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DANIELA LONGORIA

RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN BFA INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE


DANIELA LONGORIA RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN BFA INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE


1 | MUSEUM OF IDEAS | 2016

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2 | EVOKING SERENITY | 2016

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3 | DREAM STUDIOS | 2016

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4 | CMU | 2014

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5 | YCBA REMASTERED | 2016

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6 | INTERDISCIPLINARY | 2013-2017

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MUSEUM OF IDEAS | 2016 This project is born out of the Smithsonian Museum’s consideration to open a branch in London. Plagued with political history and controversial objects, and the challenge to move objects across the Atlantic, this challenge requires a specific approach as one goes about presenting America to the world. My approach was to highlight one of America’s treasures: Broadway. Inspired by the enormity of the buildings in New York and the feeling of walking within them, this pavillion recreates the experience of tall buildings and narrow a walking space. The exhibition starts from the top, accessed by elevator, and is experienced from top to bottom, the ramp walking around and within the towers. The pavillion itself is meant to be versatile, to host many different exhibitions. It is cornerned two walls, meant to be placed in the corner of an existing structure such as a big warehouse.


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Opposite page: Close up of exhibition tower. The ramp takes you inside the towers as well. This page: different vews of the pavillion and exhibition spaces.

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This page: The pavillion has two walls so it can be placed in the corner of an existing structure. Opposite: FLoor plan of pavillion.

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A’

A

A’

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This page (top): Section A-A’. (Bottom): The concept for the towers is evoking the sensation of walking in Times Square in the midst of towering buildings and the pressure to continue moving.

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This page (Top): Exhibition detail. (Bottom): Visualization for what entrance could look like for Broadway exhibition. Mimicks the experience of standing outside the theatre on the sidewalk waiting.

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EVOKING SERENITY | 2016 C u ra t e d by A n n e H u a n g

The project focuses around designing an exhibition space for a collection of objects curated by a classmate. The collection consisted of objects from the RISD Museum and the MFA in Boston and the site for the exhibition was the Beneift St. gallery of the RISD Museum. My approach to Anne’s theme ‘Evoking Serenity’ was creating an atmosphere of stillness and eternity. I designed a corten steel container with a reflective pool surface, created by a layer of oil. As the visitor approaches the objects, they walk down the stairs, descending into the exhibit, encountering the objects at eye level. The objects are in a single line, creating a steady rhythm and the visitor can engage with one object at a time, without anything else competing for attention.


This page: Selection of objects to be included in exhibition. Opposite: Existing entrance conditions include only ramp access. Change in level of garden impedes direct access.

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Existing Conditions

The exterior conditions consist of a ramp as the single access point from Benefit street into the Museum, and a sunken front garden that is underused. The rail and change in level on the garden

impede direct access from sidewalk. The gallery upon entrance of

the building is our site. It is a gallery with stairs that descend into

the middle of a white walled, high ceiling room with wooden floors.

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Opposite: View of exhibition and lobby entrance. This page: Construction Detail. A thin layer of oil sits in the contaiiner, creating a seamlessly reflective surface, evoking a still body of water.

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Opposite: View of gallery entrance and museum lobby. This page: Process sketches of reflective surface.

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Opposite (Top): Proposal for street entrance, creating access from the sidewalk. (Bottom): Process sketch iteration. This page: Reflective pool and new stairs descending to Museum entrance.

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This page: Floor plan of proposed exterior and interior. Opposite page: Section A-A’. The descending reflection pool is repeated outside and inside.

A

EVOKING SERENITY

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DREAM STUDIOS | 2016 Fall River, MA Dream Studios is a mill building that is occupied by sewn goods production. The clients’ intention is to turn an underutilized area of 15,000 sq ft. into a business incubator for sewn products. The task was to design private work spaces to rent, which are flexible in size, and lockable, considering common space and equipment as well. Inspired by the idea of thread through fabric and the existing old rack system, my approach was to create a system of rods that span the width of the space. For common areas, I created a sculptural structure made from thick felt, suspended from the rods and can slide and adjust. This creates a sturdy, but ephimeral structure that can be left in place, or redesigned by selected occupants to better suit the needs of the space, also providing the option to adjust the space for events or fashion shows.


This page: Site plan. The site is the 6th floor of a mill building located in Fall River, currently used to manufacture athletic wear and baby positioners. Opposite: Existing conditions of space and facade

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This page: Model of felt structure. Opposite: Exploded axon of model.

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Opposite: Close up of model. Diagram of panel divisor. This page: image of 500 sq.ft. individual work space.

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This page: Floor plan with furniture. Opposite: Program distribution and image of 500 sq. ft. unit with panel storage and furniture.

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Private Working Spaces Meeting Room Kitchen Common Work Area Bathroom Common Lounges/ Tables Resource Area

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Opposite: Common work area including machines, dyeing station, tables, iron board. This page first: Lounge area and kitchen. Second: View of meeting room in model. Bottom: Meeting room.

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Section A-A’

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This page: Concept model iterations. Opposite page: Samples of felt manipulation to create volume and texture.

Process Concept models are inspired by the behavior of fabric and its structural capacity, taking thread as infrastructure. The thread woven together becomes fabric, and fabric, when manipulated becomes volume; such is the behavior of pleats.

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CMU | 2014 This projects is a Concrete Masonry Unit exploration designed to work with an aluminum piece in the prototype, but could be a piece made out of a series of materials. The units stack in the hexagonal shape, while the metal piece holds them together, also funcioning as a dynamic and aesthetic element that adds depth and texture and stability to the wall created by these CMU’s.


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This page: Different colors of aluminum piece. Bottom: Assemply of concrete and metal piece. Opposite: Wall composition with different colored metal piece.

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YCBA REMASTERED | 2016 YCBA Remastered is an exploratory project based on analysis and reinterpretation of Louis Kahn’s Yale Center for British Art. Captivated by the static rhythm of Kahn’s building, I aimed to explore a more dynamic approach to the grid, utilizing elements provided by Kahn in his design. I used the irregular windows on the facade, and through the geometric principles of extrusion and intersection, I created a completely new grid and spaces. The result I was looking for was a structure with a high density of columns, creating a disorienting sensation and a play on scale. From the initial result of intersecting the extruded windows, I created a series of travelling pavillions. The 6 pavillions are meant to be installed as a sculptural landscape that visitors can interact with.


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Image of one of the final Pavillions, meant to be placed in an open area such as a park or empty lot.

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Opposite: Existing conditions. (Left) Plan and section. (Right) Analytical diagrams of existing structure. This page: Concept drawings of intent.

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Statement of Intent My intent is to manipulate the regular, even spaced grid by amping up the volume with density and rhythm. I will do this with information provided by Kahn, creating a parasitic growth that engulfs the visitor and creates a sense of disorientation. DANIELA LONGORIA | 61


Intersecting Voids, Volumes, Beams

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Opposite (Top three): Process models. (Bottom): Frontal view of final result of system. This page: Concept model of intersecting facades.

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System of Alteration The existing facade’s window pattern was used to extrude beams accross the entirety of the building. A beam was extruded from every corner on every window of each facade. Every time facade A and B or C and D intersect, a column was placed. The beams extend from their origin on the given face, and stop once they cease to intersect the correspoding beams.

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C B

D

A

B

A

AB

C

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CD

C B

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Opposite (Top-Down): The four facades with their windows. Beams are extruded from each corner of each window. Facades A and B intersect with each other. Facades D and C intersect with each other. Columns are formned at every intersection of paired facades.

ABCD

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This page: The final structure resulting from the intersecting facades. (Bottom): Model of result. Opposite (Top): The final result is divided into 6 pavillions that will travel to different locations for months at a time. (Bottom): Section of Pavillion 6.

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Final pavillions, shown in different enironments.

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DANIELA LONGO-


MULTIDISCIPLINARY WORK 2013- 2017 A collection of individual projects in different disciplines, mostly sculptural and spatial pieces.


LUNAE CUFF | 2015 This piece is a brass cuff made by traditional metalsmithing techniques. It is inspired by the superpower of teleporting, evoking movement and speed. Originally it was meant to have a moving piece in the middle, a latch that would slide when one was ready to teleport. Unfortunately the piece was lost so the latch could not be incorporated.

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Opposite page: Point of view from ground floor. Right page: (Top) Close up of exhibition room. (Bottom): Birds eye view of tower.

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AGGREGATION | 2014 Sculptural installation based on applying the principle of aggregation to everyday inconventional objects. Objects used are gallery hooks for hanging paintings on the wall. Installation suspended in a 2x2” frame. Explores pattern, rhytm, texture and creates a collapsible armor like membrane.

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MADERA | 2014 This chair was made for my summer of Foundation studies as a

transfer at RISD. I created it using basic woodowork and joinery, and was required to build it out of 1x2 “ pine.

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PRINCIPLES | 2013-2014 A collection of architectural models conceived through the principles of manipulation and principles order. The cube was arrived at through subtraction and is then arranged in linear, radial, and grouped compositions. The models on the right page explore rhythm, movement and intersection.

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EXTRA MEDIUM | 2016 Extra medium is a response to the absurdity of clothes sizing. What a size 6 was years ago, is now the equivalent of today’s size 2. This is due to vanity sizing, resulting in skewing of sizes and our conception of them. This leads to ridiculous sizes like 00, which make no sense. I have created tags based off of sized Medium, replacing it with alternate sizes that speak to the undersirability of being medium, average, ordinary. The nonsensical sizes reflect the complete subjectivity and relativity of sizing, brands, and the idea of normal.

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SIZE

ZERO

SIZE

VANILLA

40

SIZE

pH 7

EXTRA MEDIUM

MEH :/

GREY 100 % Cotton 40

SIZE

SIZE

NORMAL

100 % Cotton 40

SIZE

100 % Cotton 40

SIZE

100 % Cotton 40

SIZE

100 % Cotton 40

50%

100 % Cotton

100 % Cotton 40

SIZE

HALF

100 % Cotton 40

100 % Cotton 40

EXTRA MEDIUM Daniela Longoria Extra medium is a response to the absurdity of clothe sizing. What a size 6 was years ago, is now the equivalent to today’s size 2. This is not because we have become skinnier, but because of vanity sizing, a strategy used by companies to flatter customers and increase sales, resulting in a measurements increase for sizes, skewing sizes and our conceptions of them, and creating the need for smaller sizes like 00. I have created tags based off of size Medium, replacing it alternate sizes that speak to the undesirability of being medium, (average, ordinary). The nonsensical sizes reflect the completely subjective and relative sizing of brands today.

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DANIELA LONGORIA danielalongoria4@gmail.com 210-529-5783 danielalongoria.myportfolio.com


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