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contact: daniel.p.baciuska@gmail.com 1.609.213.1387

Volume 03

issue:

architect + designer

dpb design portfolio

title:

Daniel P Baciuska 2001 - 2011

date:

rev:

3

scale:

-


background image :: w. 125th st, manhattan, new york photo credit, daniel baciuska :: fall 2008

02


dpb CV :: 04 Introduction :: 06

STUDIO PROJECTS :: COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY :: 2008 - 2011 GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING AND PRESERVATION (GSAPP) NEW YORK, NY

01 Core I Studio :: Galia Solomonoff :: Fall 2008 ::

Climatologist Monitoring Pod :: 08 - 09

02 Core I Studio :: Galia Solomonoff :: Fall 2008 ::

Atmospheric Study Lab :: 10 - 13

03 Core II Studio :: Charles Eldred :: Spring 2009 ::

Museum of Delineation :: 14 - 19

04 Core III Studio :: Robert Marino :: Fall 2009 ::

Urban Housing :: 20 - 33

05 Adv. Studio V :: Benard Tschumi :: Fall 2010 ::

Architectural Metaphors :: 34 - 39

06 Adv. Studio VI :: Soo-in Yang :: Spring 2011 ::

New Town for the “New Old” :: 40 - 47

UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA :: 2002 - 2006 SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA

07 Arch 405 :: Michael Bednar :: Fall 2005 ::

Library on the Potomac :: 48 - 51

08 Arch 406 :: Edward Ford :: Spring 2006 ::

Boat Building Workshop :: 52 - 55

SELECTED WORK ::

Architectural Technology V :: Spring 2010 :: GSAPP :: Bronx Industrial Loft :: 56 - 61

Photography :: Fall 2008 :: New Jersey Meadowlands :: 64 - 65

(RE)Power: A redevelopment proposal for yonkers :: competition :: 68

Burnham Place :: Washington, D.C. :: Shalom Baranes Assoicates :: 70

Statue of Liberty Pedestal Renovation :: Farewell Mills and Gatsch :: 71

Ambition Statement :: 72 - 73

Education Profiles :: UVa , 74 :: Columbia, 75

Advanced Studio V :: Spring 2010 :: GSAPP :: Lunar Habitat // Space Lab:: 62- 63

Project Snapshots :: Digital Modeling 66, Construction Detailing 66, Bryant Park Pavilion 67

Contact Information :: 76

_03


    

:: conceptual sketch, fall 2005

04


     


During my studies, first during my undergraduate program at the University of Virginia School of Architecture, and later at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, I was continuously challenged and pushed by my professors, classmates and curriculum. Every project presented me with a set of problems spanning creative to technical. The scope of my projects required examining, analyzing, understanding and innovating upon contemporary notions of design. Throughout my endeavors I created new strategies for addressing problems, and examined them against baseline standards. It was through this process that I discovered and developed a new jumping off point for design. By placing a heavy emphasis on the environmental quantitative analysis (the final spreadsheet results) as well as its qualitative possibilities (the experience of the user), progressive solutions to problems common in the built environment emerged. As a result, my education has instilled in me a responsibility to synthesize these two lenses into a new comprehension of “design.”

INTRODUCTION

Between my undergraduate and graduate studies, I spent a year with a general contractor in Washington, D.C. There, I led operations in the field that I had only previously seen as renderings on paper or viewed on a computer screen. Gaining a firsthand understanding of the technicalities of construction (how concrete is poured, how steel is erected, how stone and glass are incorporated) broadened my perspective of the built world. Before starting graduate school, I returned to design. There, my work ranged from the renovation of the Department of Treasury building to planning the creation of a platform over the city’s main railyard for future development. Due to these distinctly different types of exposure in work experience, in construction and design, I have a perspective of both sides of the project table and a distinct appreciation for the commitment that the practice of architecture demands. Just as importantly, these experiences have taught me how to work, and be a successful leader, as a contributing member in an organization. It is from this perspective that I think and design. The work in this portfolio marks the beginning steps in my career as I continue to develop my interests and explore possibilities. -dpb

LEFT TO RIGHT, TOP TO BOTTOM study model :: uva :: 2003 // museum render :: gsapp :: 2009 // library model :: uva :: 2005 // urban housing model :: gsapp :: 2008 // manhattan infill model :: uva :: 2005 // dc office building model :: uva :: 2004 // schematic diagram :: gsapp :: 2009 // the academical village :: thomas jefferson :: bs arch ‘02 - ‘06 // renault center render :: gsapp :: 2008 // boat building school model :: uva :: 2006 // madison bowl proposed residential college model :: uva :: 2004 // s.korea housing model :: gsapp :: 2011 // rendering, queens housing :: gsapp :: 2009 // site model, s.korea :: gsapp :: 2011 // material study :: gsapp :: 2009 // light model :: uva :: 2005 // concrete column :: clark construction, dc :: 2007 // housing model :: gsapp :: 2009 // avery hall, columbia university :: m.arch ‘08 - ‘11 // foggy bottom metro station, dc :: uva :: 2004 // boat building school rendering :: uva :: 2006 // drawing center, soho :: uva :: 2005 // lunar habitation project :: gsapp :: 2010 // boat building school :: uva :: 2006 // lunar habitation module persepctive :: gsapp :: 2010 // rendering, microstation :: uva :: 2005 // air lab :: gsapp :: 2008 // museum :: gsapp :: 2009 // conceptual drawing, urban housing :: gsapp :: 2009 // facade study :: gsapp :: 2009 // gis nyc map :: gsapp :: 2008 // boat building school site model :: uva :: 2006 // town planning persepctive :: gsapp :: 2010 // yonkers power plant compeition :: gsapp/nyu :: 2011 // boat building school model detail :: uva :: 2006acade study

:: gsapp :: 2010

06


climatologist monitoring pod iles

GW Bridge

Fall 2008 :: Columbia University Galia Solomonoff :: 3 weeks

10 m

C

limatologists track specific conditons that include storm development, tropical temperatures, polar ice melting, rain fall quantities, pollution, pollen density, etc. Because of the nature of their work and the need for systematic monitoring, work shifts are long and require attentive and intense observation. Measurement allows us to understand relations: our body in relation to the enviornment around us, the proximity to objects, the reactions to threatening actions, the thickness of walls, the vulnerbility of weather, etc. This project explores the volumetric differential between claustrophobic and efficient work environments. A workspace is designed of minimal size for a Hudson River Climatologist whose job is to monitor and measure riverbed data. The very humane relationship between the occupant and the pod is considered through degrees of interiority-exteriority, material, and structure through sectional analysis.

Statue of Liberty

In his 2004 “State of the State” Address, NY Governor Pataki set the ambitious goal of making the Hudson River suitable for swimming from its source in the Adirondacks down to Manhattan by 2009 - the 400th anniversary of Henry Hudson’s voyage up the River. To ensure that the river is reaching safe swimming levels at it’s terminus, New York Harbor, the Hudson Climatologist spends 12 hour shifts out on the river, monitoring and measuring the PCB levels found in the soil he dredges up from the riverbed and from fish that he catches in the waterway. Meticulously charting the Hudson, from the George Washington Bridge to the Statue of Liberty, the climatologist eats, sleeps and works within the cell.

hours_ outside_ sitting_ work_ input_ analysis_ eat_ rest_

HUDSON RIVER, NY

personal_

18”

35”

190”

24”

42”

182”

180”

72”

175”

30”

80”

30”

30”

36”

36”

72” 36”

90” 42” 40”

42”

50”

80”

72”

72”

72”

36”

42”

18”

182”

182”

30”

80”

36”

48”

xx”

xx”

32”

30”

160”

150”

30”

30”

30”

26”

08


:: hudson river swimming holes

Currently, no formal swimming areas are located in Manhattan.As the city rediscovers its waterfront, the climatologist’s data will provide essential information for this Hudson River tradi:: circa 1925 :: 2008 tion to be reestablished. The working environment of the Hudson Climatologist is directly related to his daily routine on the river. The monitor cell becomes an extension of the climatologist and the river itself as data is collected and recorded.

1’ 2’

:: c

:: b

:: a

5’

8’ 3’

section :: b

section :: a

_threshold

_counter space

_preparation

_multi use

_sleep

section :: c

_narrow space

_lavatory

_work space


atmospheric study laBoratory The

client, Columbia University’s Earth Instutute is building a center to further the influence and impact of the Climate Change Team. The design of the Atmosphere Lab is a scientific, research and policy laboratory intended to expand knowledge of global warming while addressing the political and technological implications.

spring st

way

reet

de high

TUNNEL EXHAUST TOWERS

CANAL ST ENTRANCE

AIR LAB

HUDSON RIVER

NJ / JERSEY CITY

HOLLAND TUNNEL RIVERBED

ca

na

ls

NY / MANHATTAN

tre

et

:: the site BEDROCK

Fall 2008 :: Columbia University Galia Solomonoff :: 6 weeks

Ca

na

lS

tre

et

Washington Street

West Side Highway

Spring Street

Hudson River

JERSEY CITY ENTRANCE

west si

Line, plane, surface and volume are mathematically bonded and interrelated. In architecture, the geometrical properties of the line are associated with columns and beams, the plane with walls and floors, and surface and volume with resultant space. Architecture allows us to understand the mathematical relations of these elements in new and unexpected ways. This project explores these relationships while tackling the issues of a changing climate and its potential impact to the island of Manhattan:

:: manahttan (catergory 3) flood zone map

:: plan / section a

CANAL STREET/HUDSON RIVER, NY

10


New York City has close to 600 miles of coastline, and four of its five boroughs are on islands. All this makes New York especially prone to global warming’s most dramatic effects. Sea levels have been rising along the East Coast for thousands of years, in part because of the natural sinking of the land. However, in the last several decades, scientists have concluded that part of the rise can be attributed to global warming. Water at the Battery has risen more than a foot during the last century. Although sea levels in the New York area are projected to edge up several inches more by 2050, that’s not what most worries experts. Coastal storms, including northeasters, tropical storms and hurricanes, greatly affects New York City. In fact, New York’s densely populated and highly developed coastline makes the city among the most vulnerable to hurricane-related damage. The site sits in the flood plain and is adjacent to the Holland Tunnel Exhaust Tower on Canal Street and the West Side Highway.

The air lab is able to meet the inevitable rising tides by creating series of NGP’s (New Ground Planes) that are able to keep the building functional and accessible in a variety of extreme weather conditions.

10’

20’

5’

10’

20’

a d b e

There is an ability to create a new, and needed public space on the west side by “lifting” the lab and combining three currently unoccupied blocks into new public space.

existing major public parks (23rd St. - Canal St.)

5’

c

f

a. madison square b. union square

c. washington sq. park d. gramcery park

e. stuyvesant sq. f. tompkins sq. park

section a :: east-west section


:: DAILY LAB FUNCTIONS

:: b

5’

Holland Tunnel North Tube

10’

20’

Holland Tunnel South Tube

:: section b For New York, a big problem is the combination of rising seas and stronger storms. Scientists predict that over the next century as the earth warms, weather extremes will become more frequent and storms more violent. What is considered a If100-year flood today hit NYC, the U.S. Army Corps of a category-3 hurricane that nearly 30% of the south side of could become twice or even four times moreEngineers frequent.estimates The city’s Manhattan by would be 80 flooded. Storm surge flooding could boroughs are linked to each other and the mainland about threaten billions of dollars of property and have a grave bridges and tunnels. Most subway and tunnel entrances are only impact on the lives of the millions of people who live in NYC. slightly above sea level, as are the three major airports. They are The from Headquarters, built to withstand all types of natural particularly vulnerable to rising seas and flooding Northeasters disasters, serves as a beacon for the region that the city is and hurricanes. The Lab has the capacity to respond to the rising operational during storms that could potentially cripple city tides and becomes an emergency management center for the City. management. 5’

JERSEY CITY ENTRANCE NJ / JERSEY CITY

TUNNEL EXHAUST TOWERS

10’

20’

CANAL ST ENTRANCE

AIR LAB

HUDSON RIVER

NY / MANHATTAN

HOLLAND TUNNEL RIVERBED

:: section, holland tunnel system

BEDROCK

:: program distribution diagram

_12

n Street

Spring Street

:: massing model


:: BUILDING RESPONSE TO CLIMATE EMERGENCY

:: c

5’

Holland Tunnel North Tube

10’

20’

Holland Tunnel South Tube

:: section c

:: d

5’

10’

20’

:: section d

_13


museum (of delineation) The Museum of Delineation / MOD, is a museum for

both the arts, production and tools of deliniation. MOD collects, exhibits and educates the public on all manner of linear representations both analog and digital. MOD contains both flexible and permanent galleries for works ranging in scale and content. Working within the multi-scalar framework of Micro/Meso/ Macro Delineation the focus is on the Meso (the scale inbetween where micro and macro meet). Although it is the interface between micro and macro, the Meso scale is in itself measurable. It is a framework that the foundation of (bio)diversity scales time and structures and links structures to performances. Like drawing, digital technology is transforming the arts of design and construction. Museums reflect the integration of design, construction, environmental controls (light and temperature) and multi-scalar structuring. At the scale of the objects, this includes technologies of display, storage and archiving. This project explores what a modern museum must address:

The access to the site is at the confluence of two axis. In a rare New York moment, Prince Street ends abruptly at a dead end. As a visitor approaches from the west, more of the MOD is revealed as one nears the Bowery. Taking advantage of this view corridor, the building allows the street to “continue� through the site. The museum is comprised from the concepts consisting of structural, programmatic, and perspectival experiences of the space attenuated and extended within the space tubes. The reading of this is further linked into the idea of the project site as an extension of Prince Street.

Spring 2009 :: Columbia University Charles Eldred :: 12 weeks

:: early program/circulation study diagrams

BOWERY, LOWER EAST SIDE, NY

14


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0’

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300’

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new museum erratic

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mutliple faces

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The site, 231 Bowery, is bordered by two New York instiutions. On the North is the recently constructed New Museum of Contemporary Design. To the south is the Bowery Mission. A fixture on the street for over 100 years. The 47,000 SF lot sits at the dead end of Prince Street. Using this condition, the steet continues into the site and the museum acts becomes a new streetscape experience.


OBJECT TO SYSTEM: VOLUME

1 ::

2 ::

3 ::

4 ::

5 ::

2 ::

3 ::

4 ::

5 ::

:: creating “streets” on the site OBJECT TO SYSTEM: ENVELOPE

OBJECT TO SYSTEM: ENVELOPE

:: “street” gallery, various conditions OBJECT TO SYSTEM: VOLUME

OBJECT TO SYSTEM: VOLUME

1 :: 1 :: :: structural diagrams

_16

2 ::

3 ::

4 ::

5 ::


0 sf

_connectivity _flexibility _exterior views

_4

ws

_private

0 sf

_public _natural light _connectivity _flexibility _exterior views

_3

ws

_private _public

0 sf

_natural light _connectivity _flexibility _exterior views

_4

ws

00 sf

:: conceptual study models

_natural light _connectivity _flexibility _exterior views

_private

0 sf

_public _natural light _connectivity _flexibility _exterior views

_private _public _natural light _connectivity _flexibility _exterior views

_10

_private

0 sf

_public _natural light _connectivity

_private

_flexibility

_public _natural light

The extruded tubes, both their interior gallery spaces and the voids that they form are linked together to create a variety of gallery and exhibition spaces. By stacking these “streets,” a relationship between perspectival views and connections are made both within and outside the museum. The path through the museum is linked together by an interwoven structure that emerges and disappears as the visitor progresses through the galleries. By being able to stand in, on top of and next to these volumetric spaces, a variety of space becomes available to museum, enabling many different types of applications and uses. The journey of the visitor, through the museum is comprised of with moments of pause and movement, the mundane and the memorable.

_exterior views

_connectivity

_10

_flexibility

NEW MUSEUM 175’ - 0”

_exterior views

_private

0 sf

ws

_public

_25

ws

ws

_private

_public _natural light _connectivity _flexibility _exterior views

_10

FLOOR 6

ws

FLOOR 5

FLOOR 4 ADMINISTRATION

FLOOR 3 EDUCATION

FLOOR 2 GALLERY

STREET LEVEL CAFE

B-1 LOBBY

B-2 COMMUNITY SPACE

_17


19

18

i

17

F I F T H L E V E L_ 17 5TH FL GALLERY 18 OUTDOOR GALLERY 19 CLOSED EXHIBITIONS

15

16

14

F O U R T H L E V E L_ 14 EDUCATION ZONE 15 LIBRARY 16 4TH FL GALLERY

g

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13 12

e

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T H I R D L E V E L_ 12 ADMINISTRATION 13 3RD FL GALLERY

11 10

10

S E C O N D L E V E L_

a

10 2ND FL GALLERY 11 DIGITAL GALLERY

b

d

5

BOWERY

5

6 6

8

7

S T R E E T L E V E L_ 5 PUBLIC PASSAGE 6 CAFE SEATING 7 CAFE BAR / COUNTER

8 KITCHEN 9 OUTDOOR PUBLIC SEATING

2

3 1 4

A L O B B Y L E V E L_ 1 2 3 4

_18

ENTRY PUBLIC PASSAGE RECEPTION / TICKETING COAT ROOM

B

c


RADIAL

ACCUMULATION

DIFFUSED

SINGLE FACE

a

b

c

d

e

f

h

i

ORIENTED

ERRATIC

SHIFTING ORIENTATION

CONCEALED

g

PATTERNED

MULTIPLE FACES

DEPENDENT

SCREENED

:: visitor experience perspectives

(refer to page 18 for location of views)

:: gallery perspective studies

_19


URBAN HOUSING

(BROWNFIELD, GREENFIELD, QUEENSFIELD)

The studio explored the design of urban housing in

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Fall 2009 :: Columbia University Robert Marino :: 12 weeks :: In collaboration with Andy Vann (gsapp ‘11)

MANHATTAN QUEENS MURRAY HILL

LONG ISLAND CITY

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relation to density and connectivity to transportation infrastructure and the East River waterfront. The site is Hunters Point, in Queens, New York. With a focus on issues central to post-war housing in the U.S. including the rise of the suburban model, mass production, commuting, and relationships of housing to economic markets as well as government intervention, the studio proposes new forms of housing that are simultaneously local in scale, but also designed with a deep awareness of New York City, national and global issues.

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NEWTOWN CREEK

GREENPOINT

BROOKLYN

LONG ISLAND CITY, QUEENS, NY

site conditions :: view west,w across site to East River (midtown Manhattan beyond) :: fall 2009

20

ness

HUNTERS POINT

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EAST RIVER

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from

BROWNFIELD to

GREENFIELD to

QUEENS-FIELD

Architecture is “a plunge into social relations.” Nowhere within architecture is the materialization of social relations more prevalent than in the planning, design, and construction of housing. Analyzing our society’s social relations backwards through its housing stock, and here we speak mainly of single-family tract housing, produces a reading that is wasteful, environmentally destructive, socially alienating, and aggressively protective.

In Queens, NY (the city’s most populated borough) is it not possible to develop in a way that addresses energy and land use, a problem which is now directly accountable for over 20% of Americans annual greenhouse gas emissions? Simply consolidating a set of housing resources could considerably reduce our emissions. By clustering apartment units around a shared space consisting of kitchens, laundry, and social facilities, we propose a development that lowers its environmental impact significantly, while fostering a new sense of “community.” The global financial crisis was in part created by overwhelming optimism, irresponsible housing finance and the irresistible desire to own a bigger house to house more and bigger things. In the face of these pressures, shouldn’t we conceive of development strategies that mediate economic, personal and environmental concerns? At the Hunter’s Point South site in Queens, toxic soil would prevent us from responsibly developing the site. A sensitive approach using plants to bioremediate the site would indeed take nearly 30 years, but would provide the opportunity for the site to develop according to its needs over time rather than develop for a “projected future.” These problems are holistically linked. The housing, economic, and environmental crises of today are all tied together by an endless cycle of consuming and the desire to consume. It is our desire to pose the question: Can new organizations in housing empower us to stop consuming so much? Can we, as architects, propose an architecture that is conducive to new social arrangements, appropriate for confronting the challenges that face us?

A set of structures is proposed in this project that encourages:

:: environmental stewardship, :: community building, :: and a new reading of what it means to be a “homeowner.”

The proposal also addresses the following ::

The Financial Crisis is a Housing Crisis

Public Housing gets a Bad Rap

All Housing is Public Housing

Housing is Public Infrastructure

There Can Be a Mixture at all Scales


A :: EXISTING LAYERS OF TOXICITY

0’-5’

N

TOP SOIL LAYER

ROAD RUN OFF RECENT INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY

5’-15’

N

MIDDLE SOIL LAYER ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER PAST INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY

15’+

N

LOWER SOIL LAYER

WATERWAYS RUN-OFF PAST INDUSTRIAL ACTIVITY ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER

C :: PHASING STRATEGY BASED ON BIOREMEDIATION

PHASE 1

10 YEARS RING THE WATERFRONT & SITE EDGE _22

PHASE 2

30 YEARS BRIDGE ACROSS CONTAMINATED SITE

PHASE 3

50 YEARS INFILL / FULL SITE OCCUPATION


B :: BIOREMEDIATION OF STRATEGY EXISTING SITE CONTOURS (via phytoremediation)

MODULAR HOUSING GRID

HIGH TIDE

LOW TIDE HUMUS TOPSOIL ELUVIATION

SUBSOIL

BEDROCK

WATER TABLE

QNS-MIDTWN

LIRR

PHYTOREMEDIATION PLANTING PLAN GRID PHYTOREMEDIATION MODULAR HOUSING

EXISTING EXISTING SITECONTOURS CONTOURS

PATHWAY EXTENSION

S

7 TRAIN

Phytoremediation consists of mitigating pollutant concentrations in contaminated soils, water, or air, with plants able to contain, degrade, or eliminate metals, pesticides, solvents, explosives, crude oil and its derivatives. Phytoremediation is considered a clean, costeffective and non-environmentally disruptive technology, as opposed to mechanical cleanup methods such as soil excavation or pumping polluted groundwater.

FUNGI 1” PECHAY 4”

FERN 12”

DAYLILIES 2’

TOMATO 3’

FOUNTAIN GRASS 3’

PHYTOREMEDIATION

Index of plants to be utilized across site according to root penetration and location of toxins :: *depths listed pertain to extent that toxins are removed by root structure

BLACKEYED SUSAN PATHWAY 5-6’ EXTENSION BUFFALO GRASS 8’

SITE SPECIFIC COMPOSITE GRI COMPASS PLANT 13’

NINEBARK SHRUB 16’

POPLAR UP TO 40’

WILLOW UP TO 40’

_23


:: view of common space Each cluster comprised of 8 -10 apartment units (1BR, 2BR and 3BR) is linked to a double height common space that houses kitchen and laundry facilities. These communal spaces remove the redundancies and waste that are inherent in housing today. Through the concentration of kitchen and laundry facilities, a new way of living and social interaction is proposed and promoted. Outriggers, built during initial construction, are a proactive measure to allow for the exapansion of units in a controlled, systematic way.

_24


SOCIAL STRATEGY ::

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PRO-FORMA NEW YORK CITY APARTMENT SIZES

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600 sq.ft.

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TYPICAL PROPOSED MIXED TYPE APARTMENT CLUSTER (10 MIXED UNITS IN EA. CLUSTER

20%

REMOVING REDUNANT SPACE FROM UNIT

300 sq.ft. 500 sq.ft.

750 sq.ft.

1,200 sq.ft.

=

1,000 sq.ft.

SHARED AMENTITY SPACE (AVG OF 1,000 sq.ft. per 10 UNITS)

In Queens is it not possible to develop in a way that addresses energy and land use, a problem which is now directly accountable for over 20% of Americans annual greenhouse gas emissions? Simply consolidating a set of housing resources could considerably reduce our emissions. By clustering apartment units around a shared space consisting of kitchens, laundry, and social facilities, we propose a development that lowers its environmental impact significantly, while fostering a new sense of “community.”

3BR 1BR

SRO 2BR 2BR 10 UNITS CONNECTED TO SHARED CLUSTER SPACE:

KITCHEN DINING LAUNDRY

SRO

1BR SHARED AMENITIES

3BR 3 BEDROOM UNIT 2 BEDROOM LOFT UNIT

2BR

1BR

WORK/STUDY 1 BR LOFT UNIT 1 BEDROOM UNIT

_25


PHASE 01 :: “TOWER CLUSTER”

PHASE 02 :: “BAR CLUSTER”

COMPLETION DATE: 2015 UNITS: 2,000 // (SITE TOTAL: 2,000)

PHASE 1 PLAN (BOARWALK)

COMPLETION DATE: 2030 UNITS: 1,000 // (SITE TOTAL: 3,000)

A 12’ x 12’ concrete framework forms the structure of Phase 1 to occupy the river front and property line closet to Long Island City, leaving the interior open for remediation. The structure’s outriggers allow for future, unanticipated growth. Each cluster is 3 stories high served by a core on the north sice (preserving light and air for the douuble heighted south facing common rooms). Central to each cluster is a common room containg the kitchen and main living room space of the 8 units it serves.

SFIELD SFIELD

01

PHASE

_26

PHASE 2 PLAN (SPAN ABOVE)

PHASE

02

S, NY NS, NY

A steel truss forms the structure of Phase 2 to span the site from Phase 1 on the river to phase 1 adjacent to the city. The interior of the site is left open for remediation during Phase 2 construction and occupation. Again, each cluster is 3 stories high served by a central corridor linking the cores at each end which are extensions of the phase 1 cores built 20 years earlier. By wrapping around the corridor, each unit benefits from both northen and southern exposures.


PHASE 03 :: “INFILL CLUSTER” COMPLETION DATE: 2050 UNITS: 2,000 // (SITE TOTAL: 5,000)

Stick built, Phase 3 infills the site with density as the land is no longer toxic. Occupying both the ground and roofs of Phase 1, Phase 3 is the final installment on the site. Light and easy to build, the stick built phase takes on a different quality than the concrete and steel buildings of Phase 1 and 2. Clusters vary in height depending on need and location but employ the centralized kitchen which serve several units.

PHASE 3 PLAN (GROUND INFILL)

PHASE

03

02

E

:: 1/16” sectional scale model

:: 1/8” sectional scale model _27


PHASE 1 :: BOARDWALK 12’ x 12’ concrete grid, outrigger extentions allow for unit expansion

PHASE 2 :: SPAN SITE spanning steel truss

PHASE 1 tower clusters _28

PHASE 3 :: INFILL stick built 16” oc stud construction

PHASE 2 bar clusters


:: 1/8� and 1/16� scale model views

PHASE 3 infill clusters

:: elevation with all 3 phases complete

_29


PHASE 01 :: “TOWER CLUSTER” VIEW

CLUSTER PLANS / EXPLODED AXONOMETRICS :: (communal spaces in red)

:: phase 1 _30


PHASE 02 :: “BAR CLUSTER” VIEW ACROSS REMEDIATION FIELDS

A

B

C

A

D

C

E

B

F

E

:: phase 2

D

F

:: phase 3 _31


2

1 3

BUILT OUT PHASES DEPLOYED ON SITE :: 1::TOWER CLUSTER // BOARDWALK ALONG SITE EDGES 2 :: BAR CLUSTER // SPANNING OVER REMEDIATION FIELD 3 :: INFILL AFTER TOXINS REMOVED 1/16” SECTIONAL SCALE MODEL OF PROPOSAL

:: key of scale model from site plan

2

1

:: site conditions, 2009

N

ITE PLAN 1:50

_32

UNIT EXTENSION EXAMPLES :: 1 :: GLAZED PORCH 2 :: GARDEN DECK 3 :: ROOM EXTENIONS

3


FINAL COMPOSITE PLAN PHASES 1 - 3 BUILT OUT

OUTLINE OF 1:16 SCALE MODEL

N

SITE PLAN 1:50

_33


WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE...WHAT IT DOES

ARCHITECTURAL METAPHORS In architecture today, it seems that everything goes

and anything is possible: Buildings are inspired by bird nests, flowers, sails, etc. The semester was an investigation into the use of “extreme” nonarchitectural analogies or metaphors (starting with historical examples using elephants, ducks, etc.) The endeavor was analyzed critically. How can design benefit society, how can it accelerate change? At a time when speed is of the essence (cell phones and the Internet were not ubiquitous twenty years ago), how does architecture catch up and induce change? Architecture makes a difference. Can we contribute? How? An architecture of resistance or an architecture of acceleration?

Using the metaphor of corn, an assembly of architectural components may inform a new system for generating urban environments. Its composition, simultaneously organic and organized, is the device that provides the mechanism in which spatial and human interactions are intertwined & interchangable at the scale of the building, the block, and the town.

Fall 2010 :: Columbia University Bernard Tschumi :: 12 weeks

200’

TOWN HALL OUTER HUSK STRUCTURE

Culture is participatory and is best manifested in the activities that can only take place in the dense and interactive environment fostered by towns. From the ordinary to the VIElandscape exceptional, the urban has W2 the ability to enhance or hinder our lives, to accelerate or decelerate.

VIEW 1

STRUCTURE

TOWN HALL KERNALS

PLANNED CITY, HYPOTHETICAL

EEK

34

MODULE 4

MODULE 5

DURATION: MONTH

DURATION: EXTENDED


FACADE SUPER STRUCTURE STRUCTURE MONASTIC WALKS PROGRAM ELEMENTS MONASTIC / HOUSING CELLS

“ROOT” STRUCTURE

TRANSPORTATION NETWORK PARK


MODULE 1

MODULE 2

MODULE 3

MODULE 4

MODULE 5

DURATION: DAYS

DURATION: HOURS

DURATION: WEEK

DURATION: MONTH

DURATION: EXTENDED

:: habitation modules within structural framework

The Transportation Hub, at the foot of the town hall, produce spaces that facilitate acceleration and deceleration. The composition of experiences produces moments that are remebered and forgotten, understood and misinterpreted. The exhanges that continuously take place define the character of a particular place in time and provide identity to an urban society.

_36


1. FIVE MIN WALKING RADIUS CIRCLE DIAMTER: 2600’

2. TRANSPORTATION ARTERIES THROUGH TOWN HALL HIGH SCHOOL / LIBRARY GRADE SCHOOL / LIBRARY

TOWN HALL

RAIL CONNECTION ROAD CONNECTIONS

1. FIVE MIN WALKING RADIUS CIRCLE DIAMTER: 2600’

2. TRANSPORTATION ARTERIES THROUGH TOWN HALL

PARK INFRASTRUCTURE

3. PARK INFRASTRUCTURE BUFFER ALONG ROUTES

4. TOWN NODES ESTABLISHED IN DISTRICTS

ROOT CONNECTION

VIEW CORRIDORS

COMMERICAL CORRIDORS

SITE OF BLOCK

POLICE / FIRE / COURTHOUSE HEALTH SERVICES

3. PARK INFRASTRUCTURE BUFFER ALONG ROUTES

4. TOWN NODES ESTABLISHED IN DISTRICTS

5. TOWN PROGRAMS CONNECTED TO TOWN HALL

6. CITY CORRIDORS IMPOSED ON ORGANIC ORGANIZATION

HIGH SCHOOL / LIBRARY GRADE SCHOOL / LIBRARY PARK INFRASTRUCTURE

POLICE / FIRE / COURTHOUSE

ROOT CONNECTION

VIEW CORRIDORS

COMMERICAL CORRIDORS

SITE OF BLOCK

HEALTH SERVICES

3. PARK INFRASTRUCTURE BUFFER ALONG ROUTES

4. TOWN NODES ESTABLISHED IN DISTRICTS

ROOT CONNECTION

VIEW CORRIDORS

COMMERICAL CORRIDORS

SITE OF BLOCK

5. TOWN PROGRAMS CONNECTED TO TOWN HALL

5. TOWN PROGRAMS CONNECTED TO TOWN HALL

6. CITY CORRIDORS IMPOSED ON ORGANIC ORGANIZATION

6. CITY CORRIDORS IMPOSED ON ORGANIC ORGANIZATION

_37


TOWN HALL

transportation hub B

town hall

C

B

A. TRAIN CONNECTION PLATFORM B. RAMPS TO PEDESTRIAN LEVEL park infrastructure C. TOWN HALL MAIN FLOOR

A

road / train network

TRANSPORTATION HUB BLOCK

F

residential

D. MONASTIC CELLS E. MONASTIC COMMUNAL SPACES F. PUBLIC STEPS

district nodes I

I

H

I I

B

commercial

G. LANDSCAPE STRUCTURE H. TOWN HALL I. CONNECTION PORTALS

B

A

:: east-west section through complex

_38

The project produce spaces that facilitate acceleration and deceleration. The composition of experiences produces moments that are remebered and forgotten, understood and misinterpreted. The exhanges that continuously take place define the character of a particular place in time and provide identity to an ever changing urban society.


B

a

B

A B

C

B

A

A. TRAIN CONNECTION PLATFORM B. RAMPS TO PEDESTRIAN LEVEL C. TOWN HALL MAIN FLOOR

TRAIN CONNECTION LEVEL / -20’-0”

D

E F

b

D

D. OVERNIGHT QUATERS E. COMMUNAL SPACES F. PUBLIC STEPS

PEDESTRIAN / ROOM LEVEL +10’-0”

I

G

c

:: B

H

I

G. LANDSCAPE STRUCTURE H. TOWN HALL I. CONNECTION PORTALS

STRUCTURE LEVEL / +30’-0”

:: A

I I

:: C

_39


NEW HOUSING for the 'NEW OLD ' The studio focused on two specific aspects of a smallscale New Town development for 10,000 residents in Daejang-dong, Bundang, South Korea: 1) design of 100-150 unit residential complex in a valley; 2) “specialization” strategy for the New Town. Working closely with the developer, The Museum, to brainstorm with and against Samsung C&T Corporation’s typical development and “specialization” strategy. The studio operated within the practical constraints of the housing market, yet were specifically invited by a visionary developer to challenge the norm, imagine and innovate from within:

:: Seoul, South Korea

3

Spring 2011 :: Columbia University Soo-in Yang :: 12 weeks ::

1

DAEJANG - DONG SOUTH KOREA

22

2

:: site selection

DAEJANG-DONG, SOUTH KOREA

COMPONENTS OF STAGE:

PROGRAMS IMPLEMENTED:

40

STAGE 01 YEAR 2 (2013)

STAGE 02 YEAR 3 (2014)

STA YEA

INFRASTRUCTURE NETWORK PLATFORM CONSTSRUCTION COMMUNITY NODES

1ST PHASE LIVING UNITS PUBLIC AMENITIES

2ND 1ST P


:: developer’s vision for Daejong-Dong 3 2 1

:: project site, northern valleys

A plan for Daejang-dong, in Bundang, S. Korea can become a model for responsible economic, environmental and social development for not only the town but an entire society that must come to terms with what to do with its: aging infrastructure, aging housing and aging population.

STAGE 03 YEAR 8 (2022)

STAGE 04 YEAR 17 (2030)

STAGE 05 YEAR 33 (2050)

2ND PHASE LIVING UNITS 1ST PHASE EXPANSION

3RD PHASE LIVING UNITS 1ST / 2ND PHASE EXPANSION

CONTRACTION (PROJECTED POPULATION DECLINE)


1:100 site model

_42


:: typical unit arrangement

1

2

3

:: align services

4

With the changes, current and projected, occuring in the aging population (2 in every 5 Koreans will be over 65 by 2050), this project is a proposal on how to take into account the transformations of a society aging both in its people and infrastructure and put in place a plan that can result in a new type of development model. A model that meets the present conditions while also taking into account projected trends, and new values that will inevitably occur in a changing society.

1:100 site plan

:: respond to terrain

:: opportunity


current view ::

PHASE 3

PHASE 2

PHASE 1

0% - 30% PERMANENT

30% - 50% PERMANENT

50% - 80% PERMANENT critical path of construction

2030 ::

FACILITATING EXPANSION...AND CONTRACTION

1

2 BEDROOMS 2.5 BATHS TOTAL : 165 SQ. M.

2

4 BEDROOMS 2.5 BATHS TOTAL : 180 SQ. M.

3

3 BEDROOMS 2.5 BATHS TOTAL : 195 SQ. M.

4

4 BEDROOMS 2.5 BATHS TOTAL : 215 SQ. M.

2050 ::

2015

1:500

2030

1:500

_44

A ‘kit of parts’ allows the occupant to expand, and contract, their home to meet demands and respond to changing family needs. Each unit is designed to expand individually to the north and south elevations (2,3 in diagram above) and eventually join together (4 detailed on page 45). The unit is built initially to support such expansion and when the space is no longer neccessary or desired, the unit can easily be reverted back to any previous condition

5

2 BEDROOMS 2.5 BATHS TOTAL : 165 SQ. M.


areas designed for expansion

OUTDOOR CONNECTIONS

INDIVIDUAL EXPANSION

JOINING UNITS

PUBLIC N/S UPHILL ACCESS

BASE CASE

PUBLIC PROMONADE EXTENSION

OFFICE / LIVING SPACE

UPHILL ACCESS / PUBLIC

PLAZA ACCESS / PUBLIC

BASE CASE

ADDED OFFICE / BR

OFFICE / LIVING SPACE / 2ND LVL

LOWER LVL CONNECTIONS

1 :: allow the breakdown of structures into those parts that can change and those that cannot. This prevents buildings from being destroyed.

ADDED OFFICE / BR

OFFICE / LIVING SPACE / 2ND LVL

SHARED MIDDLE LIVING SPACE

CONTINUOUS

SEMI - PRIVATE SHARED SPACE

SEMI-PRIVATE

SHARED OUTDOOR SPACE

JOINED OUTDOOR

JOINED BR / OFFICE EXP.

PRIVATE GARAGE

2 :: design should allow certain structures critical to living areas to remain undisturbed when other parts become obsolete and can be dismantled. SHARED WORK SPACE

2ND STORY ACCESS

JOINED BR / OFFICE

OFFICE / BR

OFFICE / BR ADDITION

LIVING SPACE EXPANSION

3:: the structures flexible enough in their connections that it can transform, grow and eventually be removed while not impacting the integrity of the unit, the community or the region. 1m

LIVING SPACE EXPANSION / 2ND LVL

1 UNIT EXPANSION

4m

1 UNIT EXPANSION / 2ND FLR

1:100 long section

_45


4.5 m

6.5 m

9

11.0 m 6

2

6

2

6

2

12

5

1

4

LEVEL 2

11.0 m

1

10

5

5

10 1 LIVING 2 KITCHEN 3 MASTER BATH 4 MASTER BEDROOM 5 COMMUAL BATH 6 LAUNDRY 7 SPARE ROOM 8 BONUS SPACE 9 BEDROOM 3 10 BEDROOM 4 11 ENTRY / SUN ROOM

11

1 LIVING 2 KITCHEN 3 MASTER BATH 4 MASTER BEDROOM 5 COMMUAL BATH 6 LAUNDRY 7 SPARE ROOM 8 BONUS SPACE 9 DINING AREA 10 BEDROOM 3 11 SUN ROOM 12 STAIRS TO 2ND LVL

6

2 11

4

3

8.5 m

1 LIVING 2 KITCHEN 3 MASTER BATH 4 MASTER BEDROOM 5 COMMUAL BATH 6 LAUNDRY 7 SPARE ROOM 8 BONUS SPACE

4.5 m

3

8.5 m

8.5 m

3

LEVEL 2 1

3

LEVEL 2

8.5 m

4

4

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1 8

7

9

6.5 m

6.5 m

6.5 m

8

5

LEVEL 1

7

2.0 m

2.0 m

2.0 m

LEVEL 1

1

8

1 LIVING 2 KITCHEN 3 MASTER BATH 4 MASTER BEDRO 5 COMMUAL BATH 6 LAUNDRY 7 SPARE ROOM 8 BONUS SPACE

7

4.5 m PARKING LEVEL (BELOW DECK)

PARKING LEVEL (BELOW DECK) 1m

2m

PARKING LEVEL (BELOW DECK)

4m

1

5

4

2

2.0 m

3

S T STAGES

CONCRETE BOX OUT

1m

2m

4m

The inherent expansion/contraction capabilites, materiality, construction assembly and planning of the

DENSE

SINGLE BLOCK

PORUS

PRIVATE YARDS

DETACHED PUBLIC SPACE

CONVERGING GRIDS PUBLIC / PRIVATE SPACE

UNIT PLANS community, at each scale, enables every home to respond 1:100 UNIT STAGES

to both known of unforseen changes in each unit.

EVATION STAGE 1

16” O.C. STUD CONSTRUCTION

Culture is fundamentaly participatory and is EVATION usually manifested in GROWTH the activities that can only take place in the dense and interactive environment fostered by towns and cities. In the suburban typology of the valley lies an opportunity to create interaction zones, seclusion zones, indoor / outdoor, adjacent but seperate, together.

Where the units join, lies an opportunity to foster a kind of interaction - one that is dictated by the homeowner and accounted for by the initial design and construction. It’s a proactive design that enables the REGATION ON SITE 0 SITE GROWTH building and the community itself to adapt to changes in population, family GROWTH size, etc.

REAS DESIGNED FOR EXPANSION

TE

_46 OR CONNECTIONS

INDIVIDUAL EXPANSION

SOUTH ELEVATION 1:100 SITE STAGE 1

SOUTH ELEVATION 1:100 SITE GROWTH

JOINING UNITS

6.5 m

16” O.C. STUD CONSTRUCTION

Over time infrastructure and architecture inevitably LEVEL 1 erode and can become a barrier exacerbating physical 8 7 limitations, social isolation, dependency, eroding social networks and reducing the radius of activities diminishing relationships. PARKING LEVEL (BELOW DECK)


current view ::

4.5 m

6.5 m

9

6

2

LEVEL 2

12

3

LEVEL 2

5

1

4

8.5 m

3

8.5 m

4

6

2

5

1

10

2030 ::

10 1 LIVING 2 KITCHEN 3 MASTER BATH 4 MASTER BEDROOM 5 COMMUAL BATH 6 LAUNDRY 7 SPARE ROOM 8 BONUS SPACE 9 BEDROOM 3 10 BEDROOM 4 11 ENTRY / SUN ROOM

11

OOM H

1 LIVING 2 KITCHEN 3 MASTER BATH 4 MASTER BEDROOM 5 COMMUAL BATH 6 LAUNDRY 7 SPARE ROOM 8 BONUS SPACE 9 DINING AREA 10 BEDROOM 3 11 SUN ROOM 12 STAIRS TO 2ND LVL

11

2.0 m

2.0 m

2050 :: 8

9

7

PARKING LEVEL (BELOW DECK)

6.5 m

6.5 m

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 1 8

7

PARKING LEVEL (BELOW DECK)

:: exploded assembly

CONCRETE BOX OUT

*black indicates permanent construction materials.


L’nfant D.C. St. Grid

LIBRARY ON THE POTOMAC A

site on the Potomac River in the heart of Old Town Alexandria is the setting for a ‘21st century’ library. Old Town’s busy King Street, lined with shops and restaurants runs East-West before ending at the Potomac River. The site is located in between a public park to the South, the renovated Torpedo Factory Art Gallery and Waterfront Plaza to the North. From the waterfront piers that extend into the river, a view of the monument core of downtown Washington, D.C. can be seen. It is at these crossroads that a new library is proposed.

Fall 2005:: University of Virginia Michael Bednar :: 12 weeks

7 degree shift Alexandri a St. Grid

OLD TOWN ALEXANDRIA, VA

serties of study models utilizing shifting floors to manipulate light :: The 9 degree shift of the upper floor is explicitly exploited to control the natural light on all floors flooding the reading rooms with sunlight, while protecting the stacks located in the middle. The ground floor facade respects the historical context of Old Town Alexandria. A connection is made back to the river by channeling it into the site along the park to the north park and at the plaza entrance at the foot of King Street.

48


Circulation, light and existing views drove the form. The library engages the site by allowing movement through the building, connecting two public spaces along the waterfront. Light is manipulated and controlled through the geometry of the plan. The first floor follows the grid of Alexandria. The upper floors are angled to allow for the natural light to slip into the spaces below. The main reading rooms take advantage of park and river views and become transparent. The edges facing the exisiting context of Old Town respect their brick and masonry neighbors. Programmatic elements that require less natural light are placed in these areas.

1:2 scale light study model


At night, the Library becomes a lantern on the Potomac River. The reading rooms are oriented to overlook the adjacent park and frame views of the Maryland shoreline across the river. A Tower, located at the end of King Street marks the main entrance into the library. From its deck, views north to Washington D.C. engage one with the region. The existing shoreline river walk is uninterrupted by the library and allows pedestrians and library patrons to pass through the site and structure.

_50


The 9 degree shift of the upper floor is explicitly exploited to control the natural light on all floors flooding the reading rooms with sunlight, while protecting the stacks located in the middle. The ground floor facade respects the historical context of Old Town Alexandria. A connection is made back to the river by channeling it into the site along the park to the north park and at the plaza entrance at the foot of King Street.

digital media (ground floor) stacks

(c

irc

a ul triu at m io n de sk

)

main reading room

_51


BOAT BUILDING WORKSHOP A

Boat Building School is proposed to build wooden boats, provide instructional classroom space and the ability to launch them into the James River. The spaces are large enough to rig a 30’ sailboat inside. A series of work bays with sliding doors and roofs allow for numerous configurations depending on the project and weather. The school is aligned with the River Walk Boardwalk that has been extended into the the water. Numerous boats can be constructed and and launched. The light framework of the boat building bays is juxtaposed with the heavy classroom spaces. An additional elevated public pathway through the structure allows public access to observe activites while not interrupting work.

Spring 2006:: University of Virginia Edward Ford :: 12 weeks

:: site chosen on the island at the convergence of two main axis on the SE corner. The prominent location allowed for the immediate launching of boats, directly from the work space into the bay

FORT MONROE, HAMPTON ROADS,VA

:: early study models series exploring the interaction of large, open plan, work bay spaces and smaller, module classroom instruction areas

52


:: study models addressing the site

Fort Monroe is located where the James River meets the Chesapeake Bay at the southernmost tip of the eastern Virginia Peninsula. Formerly dedicated with the task of standing guard to the bay, today the Fort is the scene of tourists, bikers, runners and sailors. The site I chose on the island is at the confluence of the James River and the Atlantic Ocean. The school is strategically located at this point to maximize its visibabily and functionality.


ROOF STRUCTURE

LOUVERS

FRAMING STRUCTURE

CRANE SYSTEMS

CLASSROOM // ADMINISTRATION

WOOD FLOORING

FLOOR JOISTS

JAMES RIVER PIERS

COMPLETE ASSEMBLY

_54


BAY DOORS CLOSED

FRONT BAY DOORS OPEN :: ROOF CLOSED

BAY DOORS :: ROOF OPEN FOR RIGGING

_55


d

TSAE RIATS

2 ROTAVELE

MR LACINAHCEM TSAE

SNEM MOORTSER

SNEMOW MOORTSER

SROTINAJ TESOLC

SROTINAJ TESOLC

SNEM MOORTSER

SNEMOW MOORTSER

MR LACINAHCEM TSEW

1 ROTAVELE

TSEW RIATS

c f g

b e

SUMMER :: SOUTH FACADE

industrial loft

WINTER :: SOUTH FACADE ”0 ’21

”0-’3

”81 @ 6#

”4 ’7

”0-’2

”0-’3 ”4/3

”4 @ 3# ”81 @ 6#

The

RAELC ”4/3

Spring 2010:: Columbia University 6 4 5 Technology V :: 12 weeks 10

12

”4/3

”6 @ 3#

11

12

13

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

14

25

26

27

”8

”0-’1

”0 ’1

”0-’2

AUTUMN :: SOUTH FACADE

SPRING :: SOUTH FACADE 01# ”6

”4 ”4 ”4

”8

3#

”8

”4/3 ”8

”2 ”4/3

6#

”01

”6

”4-’2

”4-’2

”4-’2

”6

”0-’8

8

7

INTERIOR OPEN FLOOR VIEWS

7

Instructor(s) :: ARCH, ENGR, MEP Consultants 11

RAELC ”4/3

”4 @ 3#

3

10

”8 @ 6#

”21 @ 6#

”4 @ 3#

primary intent of the building design was to generate a systematically integrated seamless series of spaces characterized by a sense of openness and ethereality. The particular aesthetic linked to such aspirations for this building typology, that of an industrial loft, is characterized by an open floor plan, continuous and unobstructed, achieved mainly by the articulation of building envelope and the structural system. The minimizing of content and context as well as the pre-established physical constraints in this case provides a scenario in which qualities of lightness, spaciousness, and material contrast are enhanced.

9

”81 @ 6#

28

29

30

6

7

ACCESS GRATE ELECTRICAL BOX FIRE SPRINKLER PIPE

BRONX, NEW YORK

TOPPING SLAB 6" 2" 3"

RADIANT PIPING INSULATION

3'-0"

STRUCTURAL CONCRETE

10'-0"

1 :: polystyrene 2 :: rebar 3 :: concrete slab 4 :: heated tubing

HVAC ASSEMBLY

3 HVAC SERVICES ZONE AIR EXHAUST DUCT 9

10

11

12

13

14

1

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

2 4 DOUBLE GLAZING

CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE

PRECAST CONCRETE WINDOW FRAME

RADIANT FLOORING SYSTEM

RIGID INSULATION

56

in collaboration with: ruben caldwell :: gsapp ‘11 tong hao :: gsapp ‘11 andy vann :: gsapp ‘11 sishir varghese :: gsapp’11

CAST-IN-PLACE STRUCTURAL CONCRETE WALL

AIR DISTRIBUTION DUCT


SOUTH FACADE EXPLODED AXONOMETIRC a

b

q

c

r

l d p

j

l

e l

f

u o l k

p n

r

m

j l k

v

g

h i

l

t

s

a. POLY CORRUGATED ROOFING (TYP)

i. KAWNEER 2500 PG UNITWALL (TYP)

m. 2” DEEP GRATING

r. HALFEN DETAN TENSION ROD SYSTEM

b. GLULAM BEAM (TYP)

j. UNIT ATTACHED WITH HALFEN HTS SERIES BRACKET

n. 4” X 4” TUBULAR STEELL

s. TRELLIS ANCHORING POINT

c. 24” x 10” COLUMN (TYP)

k. UNIT ATTACHED WITH HALFEN HTOS BRACKET

o. 4” X 4” TUBULAR STEEL REDIRECT

t. ANCHOR DISK

d. 3” TOPPING SLAB (TYP)

l. OPERABLE KAWNEER HOPPER WINDOWS

p. 1-1/2” STAINLESS STEEL RAILING

u. TRELLIS ARM

q. 1” STAINLESS STEEL STRUCTURAL HANGERS

v. ARM ATTACHMENT POINT

e. 6” STRUCTURAL SLAB (TYP) f. 2” POLYSTYRENE INSULATION (TYP) g. CONTINUOUS FOUNDATION WALL h. TRELLIS ANCHOR FOUNDATION

TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN

18’-0”

A WEST STAIR

ELEVATOR 1

WEST MECHANICAL RM

MENS RESTROOM

WOMENS RESTROOM

JANITORS CLOSET

CLOSET

WOMENS RESTROOM

MENS RESTROOM

EAST MECHANICAL RM

ELEVATOR 2

EAST STAIR

6” SLAB

B

52’-0”

BM 10 X 36

HVAC SHAFT, TYP

6” SLAB

0’ - 10”

5’-0”

D

2’-0”

C

10’-0”

BALCONY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

TRELLIS SUPPORTS, TYP

280’-0”

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

18’-0”

A WEST STAIR

ELEVATOR 1

WEST MECHANICAL RM

MENS RESTROOM

WOMENS RESTROOM

CLOSET

JANITORS CLOSET

WOMENS RESTROOM

MENS RESTROOM

EAST MECHANICAL RM

ELEVATOR 2

6” SLAB

EAST STAIR


SOUTH :: WALL SECTION

NORTH :: WALL SECTION

6th LEVEL +74’-9”

SEE INSET ABOVE

5th LEVEL +60’-9”

RAILING CONNECTION

CURTAINWALL SYSTEM

4th LEVEL +46’-9”

10” x 36” CONCRETE BEAM

4” ARCHITECTURAL CONCRETE 3” RIGID INSULATION 8” STRUCTURAL CONCRETE

3” PRECAST CONCRETE WINDOW FRAME

10” x 24” CONCRETE COLUMN

3”TOPPING SLAB 2” RIGID INSULATION

3”TOPPING SLAB

3rd LEVEL +32’-9”

2” RIGID INSULATION 6” STRUCTURAL CONCRETE SLAB

6” ONE WAY CONCRETE SLAB AIR DIFFUSER HVAC DISTRIBUTION DUCT HVAC EXHAUST DUCT

6” METAL STUD WALL

BALCONY RAILING

BALCONY

2nd LEVEL +18’-9”

V

BRONX I NEW

10”

_58

2’-0”

8”

14’-4”

8” 3” 4”


SOUTH ELEVATION 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30 POLYCARBONATE ROOFING MEMBRANE

ROOF 2 +132’-9”

16’-0”

10 x 40 GLULAM. TIMBER BEAMS

ROOF 1 +116’-9”

28’-0”

ALUMINUM BALCONY RAILING DOUBLE GLAZING OPERABLE WINDOWS

+88’-9”

FLOOR 6

+74’-9”

FLOOR 5

+60’-9”

FLOOR 4

+46’-9”

FLOOR 3

+32’-9”

FLOOR 2

+18’-9”

14’-0” 14’-0”

14’-0”

14’-0”

132’-9”

14’-0”

FLOOR 7

18’-0”

ALUMINIUM MULLIONS

9”

FLOOR 1

+0’-9”

SOUTH ELEVATION WITH OUTER SCREEN 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

POLYCARBONATE ROOFING MEMBRANE

ROOF 2 +132’-9”

16’-0”

10 x 40 GLULAM. TIMBER BEAMS

ROOF 1 +116’-9”

28’-0”

ALUMINUM BALCONY RAILING DOUBLE GLAZING OPERABLE WINDOWS

+88’-9”

FLOOR 6

+74’-9”

FLOOR 5

+60’-9”

14’-0”

STEEL TRELLIS NODE PLATE STEEL TRELLIS SUPPORTS

FLOOR 4

+46’-9”

FLOOR 3

+32’-9”

FLOOR 2

+18’-9”

14’-0”

14’-0”

14’-0”

CABLE TRELLIS

18’-0”

ALUMINIUM MULLIONS

9”

132’-9”

14’-0”

FLOOR 7

FLOOR 1

+0’-9”

_59


SLAB EDGE DETAILS

1 :: polystyrene 2 :: rebar 3 :: concrete slab 4 :: heated tubing 3

1 2 4

1 :: polystyrene 2 :: rebar 3 :: concrete slab 4 :: heated tubing

TYPICAL BAY / FIRE PROTECTION

3

1 2 4

8

7

7

ACCESS GRATE ELECTRICAL BOX FIRE SPRINKLER PIPE TOPPING SLAB 6" 2" 3"

RADIANT PIPING INSULATION

3'-0"

STRUCTURAL CONCRETE

10'-0"

_60


12’-0” SECTION

CORE WALL DETAILS / STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

a. 10” x 42” WOOD GLUED

b. CAST-IN-PLACE STRUCT c. 6” ONE WAY SLAB

d. CAST-IN-PLACE STRUC

e. CAST-IN-PLACE 10” x 36 f. STUD WALL g. MECHANICAL CAVITY

a b e

c

d

f g

d g

f b

STRUCTURAL CONCRETE WALL a

SERVICE CORE e

10” x 42” WOOD GLUED LAMINATED TIMBER

STRUCTURAL CONCRETE WALL

10” x 36” CONCRETE BEAMS

ONE WAY SLAB FROM STRUCTURAL WALL TO STRUCTURAL WALL 12’-0” SECTION

NORTH ELEVATION

POLYCARBONATE ROOFING MEMBRANE

ROOF 2 +132’-9”

16’-0”

CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE

ROOF 1 +116’-9” PRECAST CONCRETE WINDOW FRAME

28’-0”

DOUBLE GLAZING

CONSTRUCTION SEAM

+88’-9”

FLOOR 6

+74’-9”

14’-0”

HVAC INTAKE VENT

FLOOR 5

+60’-9”

FLOOR 4

+46’-9”

FLOOR 3

+32’-9”

FLOOR 2

+18’-9”

FLOOR 1

+0’-9”

9”

18’-0”

14’-0”

14’-0”

14’-0”

132’-9”

14’-0”

FLOOR 7

GLULAM ROOF DETAILS 5 3/8”

5 3/8”

4”

4”

4”

4” 8”

8” 4”

4”

4” 8”

3’

4” 8”

3’

4”

4”

4”

4”

8”

8” 4”

4”

4”

4”

8”

8” 4”

4”

1 1/2” 4”

1 1/2” 2”

3/4”

4”

2”

10” 2’

2’

_61


LUNAR ANGLE OF REPOSE COMPARISON

GRAVEL :: 33

RUNNING SOIL (SAND OR CLAY) 3:1 (18 )

SATURATED GRANULAR SOIL 2:1 (26 )

STONE :: 35

GRANULAR SOIL (WET) 1 1/2:1 (34 )

GRANULAR SOIL (DRY) 1:1 (45 )

SAND :: 42

FIRM CLAY W/ MIN OF 1.5 T.S.F 2/3:1 (56 )

STIFF CLAY W/ MIN 2.5 T.S.F. 1/2:1 (63 )

FRACTURED ROCK FORMATION 1/4:1 (75 )

SOLID ROCK FORMATION (90 )

REGOLITH :: 80

LUNAR HABITAT SPACE LAB

ACCESS

MINED TRENCH

A

fter 40 years, we are ready to get back into the venture of space exploration. As technology has advanced and concerns about the future of humanity on Earth increase, some argue that space colonization is an achievable and worthwhile goal. The Moon has long been seen as a candidate for possible human settlement. Inhabiting the moon for a prolonged period of time would be far different from the initial trips taken between 1969 and 1972 when men lived up to three days in cramped quarters. However, because of the extraordinary circumstances of the Cold war, the lunar missions were undertaken on an accelerated schedule and too much happened too fast for anyone to properly appreciate what had been done and where it might have led. The space industry has changed incredibly since the intial trips and future missions to the moon, undertaken through both government programs and private industry, will have multiple purposes; scientific and (eventually) touristic.

C

As mining the moon become an increasingly real A possibility, a variety of landscapes will be left behind. The landscapes left behind provideE an opportunity for D human habitiation to infillB the landscapes left after mining operations move on. Protected from meteorites and direct sun on two sides, the act of covering the I trench provides opportunites to bring indirect light, and power into the habitation zones hung from its structure. F H A. WATER TANK B. WATER PIPES C. SOLAR PANELS D. BATTERIES E. ELECTRIC CONDUIT F. EXTERIOR PANEL G. REGOLITH PROCESSING

G

I. CONNECTOR

Spring 2010:: Columbia University Yoshiko Sato :: 12 weeks

SHACKLETON CRATER, THE MOON adaptable panel

Roof structure mechanically reacts to the fluxuating lunar conditions: panels can emerge from rigid structural fram provide for the diffusion of light, block out sun radiation and provide a meteor shields to the program below.

structural grid permanent barrier

EXTERIOR

*Project presented to NASA officials at Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, March 2010 62

H. GLASS FLOOR IN HABITAT

3’-5”

INTERIOR

1’

6’

1’

6’


:: potential configurations

:: sysetm integration adaptable panel

Roof structure mechanically reacts to the fluxuating lunar conditions: panels can emerge from rigid structural fram provide for the diffusion of light, block out sun radiation and provide a meteor shields to the program below.

E

D

B ENERGY ::

I RADIATION ::

F H

VISIBILITY :: A. WATER TANK B. WATER PIPES C. SOLAR PANELS D. BATTERIES E. ELECTRIC CONDUIT F. EXTERIOR PANEL G. REGOLITH PROCESSING H. GLASS FLOOR IN HABITAT I. CONNECTOR

STRUCTURAL ::

structural grid permanent barrier


photography The New Jersey Meadowlands is a general name

for the large ecosystem of wetlands in northeast New Jersey. The Meadowlands, less than ten miles from Midtown Manhattan, are known for being the site of large landfills, sports stadiums and decades of environmental abuse. The Meadowlands consist of roughly 30 square miles of open, undeveloped space. After years of abuse, the area is making a comeback and remains an important area for birds, fish, crabs and other animals. The mixture of post industrialization, vital transportation networks and nature all competing in the shadow of New York City, first brought me to explore this area and its constant change continues to interest me. Fall 2008

NEW JERSEY MEADOWLANDS

64


PROJECT SNAPSHOTS Page 66 :: top right :: digital modeling :: UVa 2005 Page 66 :: bottom right :: building and construction detailing :: UVa 2005 Page 67 :: Bryant Park Pavilion :: Technology III :: GSAPP 2009 :: in collaboration with :: tim bell (gsapp ‘12) // andy vann :: (gsapp ‘11)

66


DETAIL:: 1

DETAIL :: 2

CONCRETE SLAB OF EXISTING BUILDING S/S GUSSET PL CABLE CONNECTION STEEL PLATE W/ ANCHOR BOLTS EMBEDDED INTO EXISTING SLAB 2” DIA CABLE

DETAIL :: 1 2” DIA CABLE

CABLE CONNECTION S/S GUSSET PL STEEL PLATE / NELSON STUDS CONCRETE FOUNDATION

DETAIL :: 2

THE SPECTACLE

DEFINING THE URBAN ENVELOPE

THE SPECTACLE

DEFINING THE URBAN ENVELOPE

CABLE TENSION SYSTEM

LIGHT NET CREATES “ENCLOSURE”

_67


(RE) powER :: A Redevelopment Proposal for the City of Yonkers COMPETITION / HOSTED BY NYU (2011) In 2010, NYU’s Schack Institute Center for the Sustainable Built Environment held a real estate & design compeition. Teams were required to select a site and develop a comprehensive proposal for a real estate development or redevelopment project that responded to a pressing environmental and/or social concern. A team of five GSAPP classmates in architecture, urban design and real estate found an abandoned power plant north of NYC on the Hudson River. In our proposal, we envision that the Glenwood Power Station Site in Southwest Yonkers can become a model for responsible economic, environmental and social development while benefitting the city of Yonkers, the county of Westchester and the greater New York region. Although the plan presented was specific to the site conditions, the goals and implementation of the project can serve as a model to be applied to similar decaying industrial waterfront sites located throughout the United States.

Thirty minutes from Grand Central Terminal, just north of the Bronx/Westchester border lies the Glenwood Power Station. Between the MTA Metro-North Glenwood Station and the Hudson River in Yonkers, the power station, built in 1906 by New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, has been abadoned and unused since the 1960’s. The power station, still with its iconic twin somkestacks seen for miles around, stand as reminders of New York City’s and Yonkers’ industrial past.

As the city debates over what to do with this complex, we developed a plan that will save the historic structure, re-program its use, and connect two critical axes along the river while simultaneously reconnecting to a long ignored and cut-off community.

Circulation Zone Retail 18,100 SF Renovated Roof Structure

Restaurant 26,500 SF

New Roof Structure

Greenhouse 26,000 SF Office 52,800 SF Production Space 37,950 SF

:: Glenwood Power Station, site visit, jan 2011 Team Members: Daniel Carr :: M.S. RED Stephanie McLean :: JD, M.S. RED Danil Nagy :: M.Arch, M.S. UP Julian Pancoast :: M.Arch, M.S. RED

*project placed 3rd

68

Incubator Space 37,950 SF Education Space 18,000 SF

Retail 14,400 SF

Water Retail 9,500 SF

Renovated Building Shell


Parcel B - Mixed-Income Housing New development site incorporating 18 story mixed-income residential tower with neighborhood amenities, parking, and bridge connection to Power Station site.

Future 20 story residential development according to Alexander Street Master Plan

Existing 18 story residential tower

Metro North Regional Train

Parcel C - Hudson Conservation Park Presently underused stretch of Hudson riverfront redeveloped into a natural wetland habitat with dock access for recreation and educational purposes.

Parcel A - Power Station Redevelopment of existing Glenwood Power Station building into mixeduse development encorporating commercial, office, recreation, and educational programs

The development will be pursued in three distinct phases, encompassing both the adaptive reuse of an existing industrial building, the development of a new site, and the restoration of a natural habitat on the waterfront.

PARCEL B

PARCEL A

PARCEL C

N

John F. Kennedy Marina Park

RESIDENTIAL TOWER

NEW OFFICE BUILDING (BUILT ATOP EXISTING STRUCTURE)

LOBBY / AMENITIES

NORTH ANCILLARY BUILDING OFFICE

GROCERY STORE

RETAIL

RETAIL METRO-NORTH CONNECTION

HUDSON RIVER

PARKING GARAGE


PROJECT SNAPSHOTS Page 68 :: BURNHAM PLACE :: Washington, D.C. :: (for Shalom Baranes Associates, 2007) “Burnham Place” at Union Station is a three-million square foot mixed-use development concept to be built above the railyard directly north of Washington, D.C.’s Union Station. Ideally located at the convergence of the City’s central business district, Capitol Hill and the up-and-coming NoMa and H Street NE neighborhoods, this project will help connect the capital city’s workers, residents and visitors with each other and with the region. The site is expected to include first-class office, residential, hotel and retail uses, and includes expansions and enhancements to Daniel Burnham’s historic Union Station. 1 :: TRUSS SPAN AMTRAK RR TRACKS

Page 69 :: STATUE OF LIBERTY :: New York Harbor :: (for US Department of the Interior, 2010) Led design team in the renovation of the Statue of Liberty for the Department of the Interior with Farewell Mills Gatsch Architects. Project called for complete redesign and reconstruction of interior statue pedestal to bring monument in line with present day safety codes. Several options for visitor circulation consisting of code-compliant stairs and new elevators were explored. All schemes ensured the preservation of original historic Eiffel steel structure. Proposals presented to Department of Interior representatives in January 2010 on Ellis Island.

70

2 :: PARKING HUNG FROM TRUSS

3 :: DECK OVER TRUSS / BUILDING FOOTPRINTS

4 :: DEVELOPMENT ATOP PLATFORM


OPTION

OPTION

CENTER ELEVATOR LOCATION

OPTION

ALIMAK ELEVATOR LOCATION

EMERGENCY LIFT

OPTION

SOUTHWEST CORNER ELEVATOR

WEST SIDE ELEVATOR

EMERGENCY LIFT

EMERGENCY LIFT

6P LEVEL

6P LEVEL

6P LEVEL

121’-11”

121’-11”

121’-11”

6P LEVEL

121’-11”

5P LEVEL

ELEVATOR LOBBY

5P LEVEL

5P LEVEL

108’-6”

108’-6”

ELEVATOR LOBBY

ELEVATOR LOBBY

5P LEVEL

4P LEVEL

4P LEVEL

108’-6”

4P LEVEL

96’- 5”

96’-5”

4P LEVEL

ELEVATOR

108’-6”

96’-5” DUCT

DUCT

96’ -5” DUCT

ELEVATOR

EIFFEL STEEL

EIFFEL STEEL

DUCT

EIFFEL STEEL

ELEVATOR

STAIR A ENCLOSURE

ELEVATOR EIFFEL STEEL

STAIR A ENCLOSURE

STAIR B

STAIR A STAIR B

STAIR A ENCLOSURE STAIR A STAIR A

STAIR B

3P LEVEL

3P LEVEL

3P LEVEL

49’-4”

49’-4”

49’-4”

3P LEVEL

STAIR A

49’-4”

PINCH POINT PINCH POINT

PINCH POINT

PINCH POINT ELEVATOR LOBBY

STAIR A ENCLOSURE

2P LEVEL

2P LEVEL

2P LEVEL

21’-11”

21’-11”

2P LEVEL

1P LEVEL

1P LEVEL

21’-11”

1P LEVEL

0P LEVEL

11’-7”

0P LEVEL

11’-7”

PROJECT NORTH PROJECT NORTH

1P LEVEL

11’-7”

11’-7”

0’-0”

21’-11”

0P LEVEL

0’-0”

PROJECT NORTH

0’-0”

PROJECT NORTH

0P LEVEL

0’-0” (STATUE DIRECTION)

(STATUE DIRECTION)

(STATUE DIRECTION)

(STATUE DIRECTION)

MAIN ELEVATOR AND EMERGENCY LIFT COMPARISON

OPTION 01 CENTER ELEVATOR LOCATION

OPTION 02 ALIMAK ELEVATOR LOCATION

OPTION 03 WEST SIDE ELEVATOR

OPTION 04 SOUTHWEST CORNER ELEVATOR


There has always been a sense of mystery that surrounds

ambition statement

the profession of architecture. The architect is perceived as someone who emerges with a plan to build something, tells others how to build it, and something is built. This something out of nothing drew me into the field and it is the invention, design and translation of ideas into physical objects that continues to motivate me. I have always taken time for careful reflection before setting a course for myself that moves me forward towards an ultimate goal, and in the months preceding May 2011 I will undoubtedly reassess my plans. However I do know that to come to a conclusion about a decision takes more than just thought and planning. It requires knowledge, and knowledge is the result of education and experience. A look at my past experiences can be a ‘leading indicator.’ Having worked in both construction and design I can relate to both sides of the table. Clients talk about space and rooms. Architects talk about programming and formatting. Clients talk about image. Architects talk about design statements and historical resonance. People talk about buildings. Architects talk about architecture. Today, I feel best suited on the architecture side of the table. My time as a student, combined with my work experiences has only galvanized the fact that my passion is architecture, and perhaps just as importantly, made me aware of something that I already knew: there is so much more to learn and understand. This course and its different angle of the industry has further cemented this notion.

72


My education in architecture thus far has revealed to me how it is at once a science and an art. It demands logic, rational analysis and measurable quantifications on one hand, and intuition, willfulness, sentiment and emotion on the other. The result is one of conflict, uncertainty and confusion strung together by moments of clarity and assurances. I am constantly encouraged during this inner struggle by reminding myself that I always knew that my career in architecture would be a long journey, one that will have really just begun in May 2011. In two years the majority of my classmates will go from architectural school to the architectural office--and I see myself no different. The first few years of work in my internship years are still part of my formal training and vital to becoming an architect. As I reflect now, I see myself among the energetic, eager to produce, hungry for new knowledge, and unfortunately relatively inexpensive interns that I will be graduating with competing for jobs in what will hopefully be a much improved economic condition. Ideally, working for an internationally recognized architecture firm, I will have the opportunity to work alongside the industries most talented and motivated while also having a chance to travel and most importantly, acquire the necessary IDP credits. I hope that this experience will provide me with a better understanding of what the next step will be in my career: getting licensed, starting a firm, going back to school, etc.

Frank Lloyd Wright said that “noble life demands a noble architecture for noble uses of noble men. Lack of culture means what is has always meant, ignoble civilization and therefore imminent downfall.” I would like to believe that now, more than ever, this resonates. His statement implies that architecture is a noble pursuit. Encouraged by Mr. Wright that I have made a good choice, I feel that architecture, if utilized correctly by the right people i.e. developers, governments, etc., it can leave a positive impact in the world by creating better environments for people to live, work and gather in that have far reaching effects on the way people interact and do business with one another. For me to be fortunate enough to contribute to this I must use everything at my disposal to build off the foundation that I’ve already laid and the tools at my disposal here at Columbia. As we have seen in the last few months, architectural employment is highly dependent on the economy with the demand for new graduates fluctuating more from month to month than year to year. Economic uncertainty coupled with the propensity of architects to resist consensus on practically anything, particularly concerning their wallets and freedom of action make the relationship of individual firms to individual interns vital. I recognize that learning and growing within this field is my own responsibility. I realized long ago that I will always be a student of the world around me and I continue to seek out opportunities that will enable me to grow. My education and experience in architecture thus far has been exhilarating, frustrating, but always satisfying. I expect this to continue not just for the next two and half years, but for the duration of my career Daniel Baciuska Spring 2009

RADIAL

ACCUMULATION

DIFFUSED

SINGLE FACE

ORIENTED

CONCEALED

ERRATIC

SHIFTING ORIENTATION

PATTERNED

MULTIPLE FACES

DEPENDENT

SCREENED

:: organizational spatial strategy diagrams, 2009

_73


UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 2002 - 2006 Architectural related courses only :: SPRING 2006 Architectural Design, Studio VI Construction Management Modern Japanese Architecture FALL 2005 Architectural Design, Studio V CAAD 3D Modeling & Visualization Independent Studies, Architectural History SPRING 2005 Architectural Design, Studio IV Structural Design Building Matters FALL 2004 Architectural Design, Studio III Architectural Theory & Analysis Building & Climate SPRING 2004 Introduction to Architectural Design, Studio II 20th Century American Architecture East Asia Architecture Landscape Architecture History FALL 2003 Introduction to Architectural Design, Studio I Intro Computer Applications in Design Cities in History Intro to Community & Environmental Planning SPRING 2003 Lessons in Making Survey of Modern Architecture FALL 2002 Lessons of the Lawn History of Architecture

74

The Rotunda :: Thomas Jefferson :: The Academical Village


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY NEW YORK, NY

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING & PRESERVATION

2008 - 2011 SPRING 2011 All Development is Local (Real Estate Dev.) Traditional Japanese Architecture Advanced Arch. Studio VI FALL 2010 Constructn Technology & Management Architectural Professional Practice Exalted Structures / Arch Engineering Advanced Arch. Studio V SPRING 2010 Architecture + Development of New York Architectural Technology v Advanced Arch. Studio IV FALL 2009 The History of Architecture Theory Architectural Technology III Architectural Technology II Core Arch. Studio III SPRING 2009 From the Ground Up (Arch. Practice) Architectural Drawing & Representation II Core Arch. Studio II Renaissance Architecture History & Theory FALL 2008 Field of Play: Agency-Mapping (GIS) Architectural Photography Architecture History I Visual Studies I: Arch. Drawing & Representation I Core Arch. Studio I

Low Library :: Mckim, Mead & White :: Morninside Heights Campus

_75


dpb portfolio

Princeton, NJ Charlottesvile, VA Washington, D.C. New York, NY Oxford, UK daniel.p.baciuska@gmail.com +1.609.213.1387

DPB Portfolios Volume :: 01 Summer Architecuture Programs: University of Maryland (2000) and Cornell University (2001). issued 2002 Volume :: 02 Design portfolio of work from the University of Virginia School of Architecture (BS Arch 2002-2006). issued 2008 Volume :: 03 Comprehensive portfolio of works (2001-2011). Includes UVa, GSAPP, competitions & professional highlights. issued 2011

Dedicated to my parents, who allowed me to point myself in my own direction, and then supported me each step of the way.

_76


a

b

c

a :: fallingwater :: pa b :: glass house :: ct c :: national gallery of art :: dc d :: notre dame la grande :: france d


daniel.p.baciuska@gmail.com 1.609.213.1387

Daniel P Baciuska Design Portfolio  
Daniel P Baciuska Design Portfolio  

Architecture + Design Portfolio of Daniel P Baciuska

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