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DANIEL FREY DESIGN PORTFOLIO


During my architectural education at University of Oregon I have developed a great interest in Landscape Architecture and Urban Design. I seek to gain more experience that will cultivate my interests and passions. I am on a journey to discover more about myself and the world around me.


DANIEL FREY 8613 Humpert Lane Mt. Angel, Oregon 97362 (503) 931-1375 daniel.frey10@gmail.com

EDUCATION University of Oregon Bachelor of Architecture 2012 Landscape Architecture & Business Minors


portfolio CONTENTS ENVISIONING south harbor REVIVING pringle creek ANCHORING granville island EVOLVING lane community college

campus quadrangle STUDY park block PLANT DESIGN ink DRAWINGS technical DETAILS


ENVISIONING south harbor SITE:

Helsinki, Finland

PROJECT: Kirjava Satama: Helsinki South Harbor TERM:

Terminal Studio, Winter/Spring 2012

My terminal studio involved a two-term process of transforming the South Harbor area of Helsinki and designing a feature building on the harbor. The main focus of the project is connecting the people of the city back to the water by providing public access to much of the harbor. Challenges include retaining much of the functional aspects of the harbor such as the public market, private boat docks, ferry services, and cruise ship terminals. My new approach is based on the strong geometries and current activities that surround the harbor. The grid structure is extended into the water to create small “inner harbours” that provide people and activities the chance to interact on a more intimate level. My urban design set the stage for a focus building integrated into the city structure on the northeast corner of the harbor. I designed an integrated museum and community center for the people of Helsinki. This building took full advantage of the harbor and city’s interconnections.


inner harbors

harbor activities

harbor extensions


1

2

ground floor plan

3


inner museum harbor


daylit gallery wall


double-height flex space

panoramic harbor views


REVIVING pringle creek SITE:

Salem, Oregon

PROJECT: SCI Salem Waterfront Redevelopment Area TERM:

Spring 2011

As part of the Sustainable Cities Initiative, this studio was one in a series of projects in which the University collaborated with the city of Salem. We worked on a brownfield site that used to be a paper mill along Pringle Creek. The creek running through the site is highly degraded. A main focus of the project was to restore it to ecological function while at the same time creating a new densified urban area on a prime waterfront. Challenges included a railroad splitting the property in two and high traffic volumes between the site and the city. For my scheme the vision is to create a privately owned, high-density, mixed-use development on the east parcels, which allows the limited access parcels to the west to become park and open space. This development has a strong connection to the proposed “Riverwalk� along Pringle Creek. Creating underpasses through the railroad and bridges over the creek is essential for connectivity. Interacting with water, restoring the creek for ecological functions, and sculpting a topographic experience are important aspects to the new diversified park.


east vs west

severing flows

concentrated toxins


greening SALEM’S WATERFRONT

pringle creek slab

ECOLOGY manage stormwater educate the public about local flaura and fauna celebrate nature improve ecological function EXPERIENCE realize potential of confluence create outdoor spaces to foster community create a destination for salem’s downtown

east warehouse facade

railroad truss

slough parcel

retaining wall

CONNECTIVITY link site with existing city infrastructure provide options for pedestrian, bike and bus use connect the parcels for easier access


Tanner Springs Park, Portland, OR

San Antonio River Walk, San Antonio, TX

Spanish Steps, Rome, Italy


urban fabric converg providing a dense

riverfront park

open space + rock steps + earth mound + water management


ges with waterways urban district

rail + underpass

mixed use

grand steps + slab bridge

retail + residential + office + riverwalk

commercial street


create multiple and diverse park experiences allow for natural water drainage

reconn

connect city to rich natural resources

auto access

hill + sculpture

waterscape + plaza

path

open space +


necting the park experience to water

+ water management

path

pringle creek + rock steps

path

retail + office + adaptive reuse

parking


ANCHORING granville island SITE:

Granville Island, Vancouver, BC

PROJECT: Museum of Machinery and Technology TERM:

Spring 2010 [ study abroad ]

This project was part of my study abroad experience in Vancouver, British Columbia. We were hosted by Emily Carr University on Granville Island, just near our project site. We conducted an urban design charrette of the island to determine what program would anchor the eastern end of the island. We then generated building programs based on the urban design study. As the second most visited destination in Canada, Granville Island fosters a unique character recognized by everyone. This proposal provides the people of Granville Island and greater Vancouver with a museum that helps to anchor the Southeast end of the island and strengthen the regions art community. The museum is multi-faceted with a combination of supporting functions that responds to local residents and tourists alike. The design speaks to Granville’s public nature with emotional, visual, and intellectual experiences inside and out.


Display Space

Sculpture Garden

Event / Education Space Event Room Small Theater Space

Public Space

Outdoor Flexible Space

Retail/Dining Spaces CafĂŠ Restaurant

50,000 ft2 (4,645 m2)

5,000 ft2 (464.5 m2)

19,000 ft2 (1,765 m2)

11,500 (1,068 m2) 7,500 ft2 (696.7 m2)

Admin. / Support

Circulation/Storage/Mech Loading dock

Boutique Hotel Total

14,500 ft2 (1,347 m2)

Parking

2,000 ft2 (185.8 m2) 10,000 ft2 (929 m2)

40,000 ft2 (3,716 m2) 1,000 ft2 (92.9 m2)

35,000 ft2 (3,252 m2)

5,000 ft2 (464.5 m2)

2,500 ft2 (232 m2)

45,000 ft2 (4,181 m2)

Overall

168,500 ft2 (15,654 m2) 90,000 ft2 (8,361 m2)

258,500 ft2 (24,015 m2)


EVOLVING lane community college SITE:

Lane Community College, Eugene, OR

PROJECT: Northside Area Development Plan TERM:

Winter 2011

This urban design studio was a highly collaborative endeavor. The studio worked closely with the LCC Campus through a series of meetings and public charrette exercises. During this process we formed teams that each took on a parcel of land to develop. My team developed the Northside and Front Yard parcels. The team consisted of Melissa Harrison, Drew Stricker and myself. We were a highly effective group that worked well together and made the challenging process more exciting! The feedback we gathered from the campus faculty and students as well as residents from the Russell Creek Neighborhood led us to our ultimate vision. We elaborated and improved upon the existing sports complex in the Front Yard portion. Specific moves included a more defined path system and adding a large amphitheater structure on the central berm. In the Northside parcel we balanced the needs of development and preservation by setting aside a large part of the wetlands for educational purposes while also creating a dense, mixed-use community.


north side

front yard

east

campus core

south side

southeast side

WETLAND PARK URBAN FARM

I-5 HABITAT CORRIDOR

RIDGELINE TRAIL

by M.H.

MT PISGAH


O P P O R T U N I T I E S

/

C H A L L E N G E S

THE WETLAND

EXISTING NEIGHBORHOOD

The Russel Creek Wetlands occupy the West and Nor th por tions of our site. This could serve as an AMENITY for learning and habit a t re s t o r a t i o n o r c o r r i d o r. T h i s a l s o m e a n s t h a t t h e re i s O P P O S I TION to developing anything on this portion of the site.

T h e e x i s t i n g B l o o m b e r g R o a d n e i g h b o r h o o d c o u l d b e n e fi t f r o m proposed amenities and an IMPROVED sense of COMMUNITY. They have shown some OPPOSITION in the past to heavy development on the sight as seen by the NDEC vs. Rumsfeld case.

CONNECTION TO MAIN CAMPUS T h e s i t e i s S E PA R AT E D f r o m t h e m a i n c a m p u s c o r e b y 3 0 t h A v e n u e a n d t h e a t h l e t i c fi e l d s . B u t t h e l o c a t i o n c o u l d s e r v e a s t h e m a i n GATEWAY and access point into the new campus communit y.

LOCATION TO I-5 The proximity to the site provides means that there new housing and

I-5 and the McVay Hwy Exit on the East side of a MAIN ACCESS point to the campus. This also is a potential NOISE AND TRAFFIC problems for re t a i l d e ve l o p m e n t s t h a t o c c u r.

CONNECTION TO TRAIL SYSTEM The oppor tunit y to connec t the site to R idgeline Trail and the R ibbon Trail would allow for greater CONNECTIVITY and provide other transportation OPTIONS. This would require infrastructure to cross over 30th avenue and through campus.

LEARNING ENVIRONMENT The site could become a LIVING CLASSROOM for the students of LCC. There are numerous oppor tunities for Biology and other science programs to get hands on experience in a native wetland. This would require a COMPROMISE in the other uses for the sight.


BLOOMBERG ROAD

FIR COVE LANE

ROW HOUSE & SINGLE FAMILY DETACHED HOUSING

30th TO I-5 EAST SIDE

WETLAND EXPLORATION PARK

MIXED USE HOUSING, OFFICE & COMMERCIAL SAFE BIKE AND PEDESTRIAN CROSSING

30th AVE CROSS COUNTRY RUNNING TRAIL

RIDGELINE TRAIL CONNECTOR URBAN FARM BIKE ACCESS FROM TRAIL AND CAMPUS

SPORTS COMPLEX EAST SIDE

PRESERVED WETLAND

CAMPUS CORE

PRESERVED WHITE OAKS

diagrams by Melissa Harrison


sports complex amphitheater


urban wetland integration


ENVISIONING south harbor REVIVING pringle creek ANCHORING granville island EVOLVING lane community college

campus quadrangle STUDY park block PLANT DESIGN ink DRAWINGS technical DETAILS


campus quadrangle STUDY SITE:

College Campuses

PROJECT: Quadrangle Form Study TERM:

Winter 2011

This study was done as part of my studio that did the master plan for Lane Community College. We looked at over a dozen quads and studied certain aspects that were similar or dissimilar between them in order to understand what makes an ideal quad space. I then made several study models of existing quadrangles and models of my ideal quadrangle. I then decided to go for a very classical rectangular form. The edges are formed by the buildings, all of similar height. Trees line the perimeter paths and reinforce the edge and create a filter between building and green swards. The ends are anchored by the main library building on one and on the other it is open to the view. The paving is placed logically to take you the most direct route across the quad and give it asymmetry.


park block PLANT DESIGN SITE:

Eugene City Block

PROJECT: Illustrative Planting Plan & Model TERM:

Winter 2011

This small project was integrated into my Winter Plants class. We were asked to design a city block as a park space. I was assigned the task of selecting plants suitable for a hot and dry condition with a modern aesthetic. Three sides of the block are residential and one side is commercial. My design has a hardscaped grid of trees toward the commercial side. Opposite this side is a terraced hill with a green sward, small forested area, and a fountain on top. This fountain trickles across the block and hardscaped plaza.


ink DRAWINGS SIZE:

6” x 9”

MEDIA:

Ink & Watercolor Paper

TERM:

Spring 2011

These drawings were done in ink on watercolor paper. They were done in my personal time for friends and family as gifts. I filled a whole sketchbook of these simple lines. For some of them I was inspired by music I was listening to. Others were inspired by moods I was in, landscapes or patterns that I have observed. I love balancing the white and black on the page and leaving the simple lines up to each viewer’s interpretation.


technical DETAILS CLASS:

Enclosures & Revit Intro Classes

PROJECT: Detail Drawings TERM:

Fall 2010 & Spring 2011

These drawings were part of a set that I had to complete for both my Enclosures class and my Introductory Revit class. Two of the drawings were drawn largely in AutoCAD and then line weights were added to give them more depth and make them easier to read. The other two were set up in Revit and then given extra line weights later as well.



Daniel Frey's Architectural Design Portfolio