Page 1

. EDGE

ROAD TRIP! A TOUR OF AMERICA’S COOLEST GUITAR STORES

GUITAR & BASS TRANSCRIPTIONS

J O E WAL SH TURN TO STONE

WARRANT

UNCLE TOM’S CABIN

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CON T EN TS VOL. 38 |

NO.10 |

OCTOBER 2016

FEATURES

36

VOLBEAT

On their sixth album, Seal the Deal & Let’s Boogie, Michael Poulsen and Volbeat refine their trademark blend of musical styles while showcasing the wicked fretboard talents of new addition Rob Caggiano.

42 MARTIN GUITAR: 100th

ANNIVERSARY OF THE DREADNOUGHT

For more than a century the Martin dreadnought has been one of the most formidable weapons in any guitarist’s arsenal. Here is the story behind that mighty acoustic.

50 THE EDGE The U2 guitarist talks about the evolution of his axes during his career and what makes his first-ever signature guitar and amp so special.

58 COOLEST GUITAR SHOPS Guitar World travels the country in search of the best brick-and-mortar guitar stores every player should visit.

“Uncle Tom’s Cabin” by Warrant

PAGE

98

“Monster” by Skillet

PAGE

110 “Turn to Stone” by Joe Walsh

PAGE

114 14

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

DEPARTMENTS 16 WOODSHED 20 SOUNDING BOARD

Letters, reader art and Defenders of the Faith

23 TUNE-UPS

Opeth, Katatonia, Skillet, Boris, Wolf Hoffmann and Dear Guitar Hero with Periphery

73 SOUNDCHECK

73. Boss Waza Amp Head and Waza Amp Cabinet 212 76. John Page Classic AJ electric 78. Seymour Duncan Palladium Gain Stage pedal 80. Reverend Billy Corgan Signature electric

82. Dunlop Cry Baby CBM105Q Mini Bass Wah pedal 82. Fender FXA6 Pro In-Ear Monitors

84 COLUMNS

84. Wood Vibrations by Mike Dawes 86. String Theory by Jimmy Brown 88. School of Rock by Joel Hoekstra 90. Acoustic Nation by Dale Turner 92. In Deep by Andy Aledort 94. Thrash Course by Dave Davidson

130 IT MIGHT GET WEIRD Phat Guitars Remington Tele

ROSS HALFIN

TRANSCRIBED

Michael Poulsen


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WOODSHED VOL. 38 |

NO. 10 |

OCTOBER 2016 EDITORIAL

IT’S THE MIDDLE of summer here in New York City as I type this, and there’s a bit of a lull in the music world in terms of things to celebrate. The first half of the year showcased some terrific albums—Megadeth, Death Angel and Volbeat among them—and the second half promises to bring us new Metallica, Testament, Opeth and more. So here we find ourselves without a hot new album to rally behind or a reunion announcement to get our nostalgia juices flowing, which means we are focusing this month’s issue on the one thing that unites all of us month after month: the guitar. First up, our cover subject: The Edge, who actually hasn’t been on the front page of Guitar World since the September 2005 issue. While there may not be a new U2 record on the immediate horizon, the Edge has been plenty busy within the confines of the Fender factory in Corona, California, tweaking, testing and perfecting his first-ever signature products: the new Edge Stratocaster and Deluxe amp. Longtime Guitar World contributor Joe Bosso did a great job with his interview, tracing the Edge’s guitar history and getting to the heart of what makes a guitar and amp special. You can tell from the conversation that the Edge has true passion for his gear—he appreciates all the indefinable nuances that make a guitar right for him, and he has certainly nailed it with his new Strat. When it comes to passion for the guitar, you may not find a better environment than an old-school brick-and-mortar guitar store. Not the big conglomerates, discount chains or the online sites—we’re talking about the family owned stores that often serve as a constant heartbeat for a local guitar community. If anyone truly understands this, it’s Eric Feldman, the founder of the monthly guitar store T-shirt subscription service Guitar Shop Tees. Eric has traveled America in search of worthy guitar stores, which made him the perfect choice to bring us this month’s exhaustive, enlightening and amusing survey of the country’s coolest shops. You can tell by the way these store owners speak—guitars are in their blood. Do yourself a favor and pay them a visit next time you’re in one of their towns. Then, of course, we have Chris Gill’s authoritative history of the Martin dreadnought guitar, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. The dreadnought is one of the most imitated acoustic guitar designs in history. It’s big, bold and makes a statement like no other—so it’s no wonder that a century later it’s still as popular as ever. So yes, this month, it’s all about the guitar. After all, that’s why we’re all here, right?

—Jeff Kitts

Executive Content Director

MUSIC

SENIOR MUSIC EDITOR Jimmy Brown MUSIC TRANSCRIPTIONIST Jeff Perrin MUSIC ENGRAVER Patricia Corcoran

ART

ART DIRECTOR Mixie von Bormann ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Tamara Lee ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Natalie Skopelja

ONLINE

MANAGING EDITOR Damian Fanelli EDITORS Brad Angle, Jeff Kitts

PRODUCTION

PRODUCTION MANAGER Nicole Schilling

BUSINESS

VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL MANAGER Bill Amstutz bamstutz@nbmedia.com GROUP PUBLISHER Bob Ziltz bziltz@nbmedia.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR - WEST Jason Perl 646-723-5419, jason@guitar world.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR - EAST Scott Sciacca 646-723-5478, scott@guitar world.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Anna Blumenthal 646-723-5404, anna@guitar world.com GROUP MARKETING DIRECTOR Stacy Thomas 646-723-5416, sthomas@nbmedia.com

CONSUMER MARKETING

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Sheri Taubes FULFILLMENT COORDINATOR Ulises Cabrera

NEWBAY MEDIA CORPORATE

PRESIDENT & CEO Steve Palm CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Paul Mastronardi CONTROLLER Rick Ng VICE PRESIDENT OF PRODUCTION & MANUFACTURING Bill Amstutz VICE PRESIDENT OF DIGITAL STRATEGY & OPERATIONS Robert Ames VICE PRESIDENT OF CONTENT & MARKETING Anthony Savona VICE PRESIDENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES Ray Vollmer CORPORATE DIRECTOR OF AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Meg Estevez SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: Guitar World Magazine Customer Care, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039 ONLINE: w w w.guitar world.com/customerser vice PHONE: 1-800-456-6441 EMAIL: guitar world@pcspublink.com BACK ISSUES: Please visit our store, www.guitarworld.com/store, or email onlinestore@nbmedia.com LIST RENTAL: 914-925-2449, danny.grubert@lakegroupmedia.com REPRINTS AND PERMISSIONS: For article reprints and or e-prints, please contact our Reprint Coordinator at Wright’s Reprints, 877652-5295, or NewBay@wrightsmedia.com EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING OFFICES 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016 (212) 768-2966; FA X: (212) 944-9279

GUITAR WORLD (ISSN 1045-6295) is published 13 times a year, monthly plus Holiday issue following December issue, by NewBay Media, LLC, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Phone: 212.378.0400. Fax: 917.281.4704. Web Site: www.nbmedia.com. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. Newsstand distribution is handled by Time Warner Retail. Subscriptions: One-year basic rate (12 issues) US: $14.95. Canada: US$29.95. Foreign: US$49.95. Canadian and foreign orders must be prepaid. Canadian price includes postage and GST #R128220688. PMA #40612608. Subscriptions do not include newstand specials. POSTMASTER: Send change of address to Guitar World, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039. Ride-along enclosure in the following edition(s): None. Standard enclosure: None. Returns: Pitney Bowes, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2, Canada. Entire contents copyright 2012, NewBay Media L.L.C. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited. NewBay Media L.L.C. is not affiliated with the companies or products covered in Guitar World. Reproduction on the Internet of the articles and pictures in this magazine is illegal without the prior written consent of Guitar World. Products named in the pages of Guitar World are trademarks of their respective companies. PRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: Guitar World Magazine Customer Care, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039. Online: www.guitarworld.com/customerservice. Phone: 1-800-456-6441. Email guitarworld@pcspublink.com. BACK ISSUES: www.guitarworld.com/store REPRINTS: NewBay Media, LLC, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Phone: 212.378.0414

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GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

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©2016 NewBay Media, LLC. All rights reser ved. No par t of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of NewBay Media, LLC.

I L L U S T R AT I O N BY J O E L K I M M E L

PASSION PLAY

EXECUTIVE CONTENT DIRECTOR Jeff Kitts EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brad Angle TECH EDITOR Paul Riario ASSOCIATE EDITORS Andy Aledort, Richard Bienstock, Alan di Perna, Chris Gill CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Joe Bosso, Mike Dawes, Dan Epstein, Randy Har ward, Eric Feldman, Joel Hoekstra, Joshua Rothkopf, Dale Turner, Jon Wiederhorn, Dave Davidson SENIOR VIDEO PRODUCER Mark Nuñez


Gibson Explorer 2016 Traditional BOSS DD-500 Fender The Edge Deluxe

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SOUNDI NG BOARD Got something you want to say? EMAIL US AT: Soundingboard@GuitarWorld.com

but were never given the proper clearance from his estate—so, rather than risk a lawsuit, we had no choice but to move forward without it. —Jeff Kitts, Executive Content Director

A True Prince I just wanted to say thank you for putting Prince on the cover of your August issue. I know he’s not the typical Guitar World artist, but he was an awesome musician and just so criminally underrated as a player. He’s one of my all-time greatest influences and will be missed. —Peter Joseph I’ve been a reader of Guitar World for a very long time and was absolutely thrilled when I opened my mailbox and saw Prince on the cover—however, I was disappointed that there was no Prince transcription in the issue. Prince, the seasoned guitarist that he was, deserves some love in the transcription department—so please consider it for a future issue. —David Sisti David, yours wasn’t the only letter we received about the lack of a Prince transcription in the August issue, so allow me to explain why that was. Every transcription we print in Guitar World has to be legally cleared, with permission granted from whichever organization holds the print publishing rights to that artist’s music, before we can print it. We made every effort to obtain the rights to run a Prince transcription in the August issue,

I really enjoyed the Prince issue, but it would have been great if you could have gone more into his playing technique, style and licks. I shouldn’t complain, though, because I am happy that you at least recognized his genius. Some of us want as much Prince as we can get because we are devastated by the loss of a true force of nature. —Lawrence Bowman

this will hit a nerve for many—but I am also sure that some will agree with me. —Joe Terranova

Mean Street Hi Guitar World, I’ve been a subscriber since the beginning, and I just wanted to share my Van Halen mail box with everyone. Hope you like it! —Alex Monroy

Are You Funking Kidding? I’ve read your mag from the very first issue—yet I hardly ever see a mention of Eddie Hazel from Funkadelic. “Maggot Brain” is as great a guitar track as any I’ve heard. Please pay tribute to one of the greats in an upcoming issue. —fdtkftyseven

Not Hymn I have been a Guitar World subscriber since the Eighties but have never written in until now—and frankly, I have had all I can stand of this “Clapton Is God” crap. Talk about way overrated! Yes, he wrote some tasty licks, but that was 40 years ago—and has not done a thing on guitar since. Plus, there are plenty of guitarists from that era that blow Clapton away—like Jeff Beck and Steve Morse. Not only are they more technically proficient, they can also play different styles of music equally well. And they have both grown as guitarists. So call Clapton a great guitarist if you want, but he is not god. I’m sure

Faith No More I’ve been reading Guitar World for 23 years now, and it seems to me not a year has gone by without you printing a letter from some uptight Christian complaining about your coverage of “Satanic” bands. I remember an issue with Twiggy Ramirez and Daisy Berkowitz from Marilyn Manson on the cover [December 1996] caused one guy to write in quoting scripture as his reason for unsubscribing. Then, lo and behold, in the last six months or so, you’ve printed two letters like that. These letters make me feel bad for those people. It must be sad to have so little faith in your god that you think he gets offended by a rock band. —Kurt Moore

Ink Spot The Beast Goes On Hi y’all, this is Biff “The Beast” Bingham and I love your mag! Last year you guys did a big thing on Shawn Lane [August 2015 issue] and it was great. When I joined Black Oak Arkansas years ago, the day I arrived in Memphis, Shawn was at the motel I was staying in. He sat with me for hours, showing me his licks and teaching me stuff. He was the most incredible guitarist I had ever seen—he had an eight-fret stretch! Take it from me: if you want this, don’t be lazy! You play until it hurts, then you play some more. Our gifts as guitarists are a blessing, and at 55 years old I’m still at it even though I have severe health problems now. Bless you all and don’t ever give up! —Robert Bingham

Jimi Hendrix is the god of all guitar gods, and the one who inspired me to play guitar. —Adam Crecca

GOT A TATTOO of your favorite band or guitarist you want to share with us? Send a photo of your ink to soundingboard@guitarworld. com and maybe we’ll print it or post it on our Facebook page!

SEND LETTERS TO: The Sounding Board, Guitar World, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016, or email us at Soundingboard@guitarworld.com. All subscription queries must be emailed to guitarworld@pcspublink.com. Please do not email the Sounding Board with subscription matters.

20

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016


&

STAY CONNECTED WITH GUITAR WORLD ON

AND GET THE LATEST GUITAR NEWS, INSIDER UPDATES, STAFF REPORTS AND MORE!

READER ART

OF THE MONTH

If you created a drawing, painting or sketch of your favorite guitarist and would like to see it in an upcoming issue of Guitar World, email soundingboard@ guitarworld.com with a scan of the image!

JI M M Y PAGE B Y C A R R I E R U T TA

DEFENDERS

ZAKK WYLDE B Y C R A I G H O W E L L

of the Faith

Tanner Baska AGE 14 HOMETOWN Scappoose, OR GUITARS Gibson SG, ESP LTD MH-103QM SONGS I HAVE BEEN PLAYING Ozzy Osbourne “Mr. Crowley,” Guns N’ Roses “Paradise City” and “Buick Makane (Big Dumb Sex),” Van Halen “You Really Got Me” GEAR I MOST WANT Gibson Les Paul, EVH Wolfgang Stealth USA, Fender Telecaster

Brothers Clay and Jerry Evins AGES 53 and 56 HOMETOWN Lake Jackson, TX GUITARS Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster and Jeff Beck Stratocaster, Ibanez RG550, Gibson Les Paul Standard, Traditional and RD Standard Reissue SONGS WE HAVE BEEN PLAYING Bad Company “Shooting Star,” Robin Trower “Day of the Eagle” GEAR WE MOST WANT Gibson SG ’61 Reissue, Les Paul Custom

Reed Gizinski AGE 11 HOMETOWN Victoria, MN GUITARS Left-handed Fender Stratocaster, Ibanez acoustic SONGS I HAVE BEEN PLAYING Black Sabbath “Iron Man” and “Paranoid,” Mötley Crüe “Shout at the Devil,” Iron Maiden “Run to the Hills” and anything by Metallica or AC/DC GEAR I MOST WANT ESP LTD James Hetfield Snakebyte, B.C. Rich Warbeast, Dunlop Kirk Hammett Signature Cry Baby Wah

guitarworld.com

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TUNE-UPS WOLF HOFFMANN

26

“I’ve always liked to use classical melodies, and bring them into the metal world”

SKILLET

28

BORIS

30

DEAR GUITAR HERO: PERIPHERY

32

Mikael Åkerfeldt and Opeth, 2016

The Conjuring WITH A NEW ALBUM, SORCERESS, DUE IN SEPTEMBER, OPETH FRONTMAN MIKAEL ÅKERFELDT EXPLAINS HOW THE SWEDISH PROG-METAL MASTERS ARE CONTINUING TO EVOLVE THEIR MULTI-GENRE CRAFT.

OPETH: STUART WOOD; WOLF HOFFMANN: FRANK DUENNHAUPT

By Richard Bienstock

“EVERY TIME WE have a new record deal it’s always an exciting period for us,” says Opeth singer and guitarist Mikael Åkerfeldt, discussing his band’s recent signing to metal powerhouse Nuclear Blast. It also looks to be an exciting time for fans of the long-running Swedish progressive metal act. In addition to hooking up with the new label after roughly a decade with Roadrunner, Opeth have also announced the formation of their own Nuclear Blast– distributed imprint, Moderbolaget Records (“It means ‘mother label’ or ‘parent company’ in Swedish,” Åkerfeldt says), through which they will issue their highly anticipated 12th studio album, Sorceress. The new record, which Åkerfeldt reports is completely recorded and mixed, is scheduled for release in September. It’s the follow up to 2014’s Pale Communion, which saw Opeth continuing down a musical path more heavily indebted to Seventies prog-rock than the sort of corrosive death metal attack that was their stock-in-trade in their guitarworld.com

23


NEWS + NOTES

What's on My iPod?

PLAYLIST

ANDERS NYSTRÖM OF KATATONIA 1 “Pleiades Dust” Gorguts “A 33-minute–long rollercoaster ride that bends and twists so much it’ll leave anyone sick with fever.”

formative days. As for the direction the band opted to take on Sorceress, Åkerfeldt says that the album “could be compared to Pale Communion, but it doesn’t really sound like that record to me. It’s very diverse. And it’s also a bit heavier. Though not death metal heavy—it doesn’t have any screams or anything like that. But I am pushing my vocals a little more. I’d also say it’s a bit more catchy. That almost sounds like a negative thing coming from the Opeth camp, but I don’t think it is!” Expanding on the new album’s diversity, Åkerfeldt says that within the 12 tracks there are “some progressive moments, some jazz moments, some acoustic things…a little bit of everything. I don’t think there are any two songs that sound the same.” He describes the first track, an intro piece titled “Persephone,” as sounding “like Mexican prairie-type music,” and another one, “Will of the Wisps,” as a “catchy, ballad-y, acoustic folk tune.” Then there’s a song that features an electric harpsichord (“which has the working title ‘Queen,’ because it’s very Queen-sounding,” Åkerfeldt says with a laugh), another that’s “almost like a lateEighties hair-metal pastiche, which we’ve never done before,” and one called “Strange Brew,” named “after the Cream song, basically, because it has a blues thing in it.” Åkerfeldt also points to the title track, “Sorceress,” as another one that contains some surprises. “I wrote a little fusionesque type of part for it,” he says, “but then I

24

GU I TA R WOR L D •OC TOBER 2016

thought, This is going to be the first full song on the record, and people who are hoping we would go in a heavier direction this time are going to hear it and say, ‘Fuck this shit! Again?’ So I wrote some heavier parts for it. And if they stick with the song for about a minute-and-a-half they’ll hear it’s the heaviest thing on the record.” This question of “heaviness” brings Åkerfeldt’s attention to a recurring discussion point regarding his band these days: As they have brought in more varied and often acoustic instrumentation over the last few albums, and Åkerfeldt has done away with deathmetal–style growls in favor of using exclusively clean vocals, many fans have questioned whether Opeth, who will now be partnered with perhaps the most prominent heavy metal label around, are even a heavy metal band anymore. To which Åkerfeldt replies, “Well, I see us as a metal band. I see us sometimes as an extreme metal band. But it’s kind of been made clear to me that my opinion about what is metal and what is not metal is simply the opinion of an old graying dude who doesn’t know shit!” He laughs. “So, yeah, Opeth is still a metal band. But we’re also so much more. And I think that some people get confused by the ‘so much more’ part. It’s just that sometimes we choose to not just sound like we did in the past. We’re always moving forward, you know?”

2 “Broken Horses” Krister Linder “From the only true urban Jedi out there comes such a beautiful soundtrack that it will pierce the night itself. Stockholm has Krister Linder in its heart, and so do I.”

3 “Bringer of Doom” Slug Comparison “A clever genre-defying song that is so ridiculously catchy it will leave you humming for days.”

4 “Night Comes Down” Judas Priest “A forgotten ballad hiding in the shadow of their heavy metal peak. Recently covered by us and forever cherished as one of Priest’s greatest songs ever.”

5 “Cornerstone” Petter Carlsen “A little addictive instrumental tune where a melody slowly builds up until it reaches epic proportions and turns into a musical tsunami. Totally fatal.” KATATONIA’S LATEST ALBUM, THE FALL OF HEARTS, IS AVAILABLE NOW.

O P E T H : S T U A R T W O O D ; A N D E R S N Y S T R O M : T H E R É S S T E P H A N S D OT T E R B J Ö R K

Opeth (from left) Martín Méndez, Joakim Svalberg, Fredrik Åkesson, Åkerfeldt and Martin Axenrot


NEWS + NOTES

Wolf Hoffmann

IT’S A CLASSICAL GAS AS ACCEPT’S WOLF HOFFMANN PUTS A HARD METAL SPIN ON OLD FAVORITES BY BEETHOVEN, TCHIKOVSKY AND PUCCINI. By Richard Bienstock

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less all “big moments.” “I’m not playing the music as it was composed, by any means,” he says. “I would say to myself, ‘If I had had that awesome idea that Mr. Tchaikovsky or Mr. Beethoven had, what would I have done with it?’ And the answer is I’d leave all that other stuff out and invent some riffs and solos to go with the theme. So that’s what I did.” While Hoffmann is excited to have Headbangers Symphony completed, he is also currently turning his attention back to Accept, who are in the midst of writing sessions for their 15th studio album, due for release in 2017. As for whether his time spent doing Headbangers Symphony will result in a greater classical influ-

ence on the new Accept material, he says, “Probably not. Because it doesn’t always fit. I mean, it wouldn’t make sense to have the melody of ‘Madame Butterfly’ with a song about death and violence, you know? It all has to work together.”

AXOLOGY • GUITARS Framus Wolf Hoffmann Signature, various vintage Fender Stratocasters, PRS Singlecut • AMP Kemper Profiler • STRINGS Salvation Audio Vivider, Dallas Rangemaster Treble Booster

A N D R É H AV E R G O

“I’VE ALWAYS LIKED to use classical melodies, especially well-known pieces, and bring them into the metal world,” says guitarist Wolf Hoffmann, who with long-running German outfit Accept created some of the most enduring metal anthems of the early Eighties, like “Balls to the Wall” and “Fast As a Shark.” But, he continues, “that always left me unsatisfied because in Accept it’s always been just a snippet here and there. So I thought, Wouldn’t it be cool to make a whole project dedicated to this classical stuff?” That project was 1997’s Classical, on which Hoffmann “metal-ized” famous pieces from the likes of Edvard Grieg, George Bizet and Maurice Ravel. Now, almost 20 years later, the 56-year-old guitarist has released a follow-up, Headbangers Symphony. This time around, Hoffmann tackles everything from Beethoven’s “Scherzo” to Puccini’s “Madame Butterfly” to Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake.” But, he cautions, Headbangers Symphony is hardly a traditional classical album. “I look at it as a ‘tribute’ to classical music,” he explains. “Because I love classical music and I think it’s beautiful, but truthfully when I do listen to it there’s always only a few sections that I’m really digging. In every symphony there’s the main theme and the one movement where everybody goes, ‘Wow!’ And the rest of it, it’s fine, but to use a harsh word, it’s fluff. There’s a lot of stuff you have to sit through while you’re waiting for the big moment.” As a result, Hoffmann constructed Headbangers Symphony to be more or


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NEWS + NOTES

Seth Morrison (left) with Korey Cooper

Skillet

AXOLOGY

By Dan Epstein

“THERE’S SOMETHING REALLY special about taking two amps that sound really good by themselves and blending them together,” says Seth Morrison, describing how he and producer Brian Howes built the impressively meaty guitar sound on Skillet’s new album, Unleashed. “With a lot of the tracks, I laid down one or two rhythm passes with a Mesa/Boogie Dual or Triple Rectifier, then went back over it with something EL34 based, like a Marshall, and filled in the frequencies. It created this ‘wall of guitars’ that we were all really happy with.” Unleashed is the veteran Christian hard rock band’s second album with Morrison in the lead spot (after 2013’s Rise), and longtime guitarist and keyboardist Korey Cooper says the two really refined their

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guitar partnership this time out. “I’m a little more feely, moody, with a little more swagger,” she explains. “Deftones, the Cure and the Edge—those are my main influences, while Seth brings the shredding and the harmony leads. I think we complement each other pretty well!” “I get a lot of my shred and sweeppicking techniques from Mark Tremonti and John Petrucci,” says Morrison, “but I also love ‘feel’ guys like Stevie Ray Vaughan and Joe Bonamassa—and I also love Brent Mason, who’s a Nashville session guitarist. I’m obviously a rock guy, but my dad’s a steel guitar player, so there’s a little country in there, as well!” Both Morrison and Cooper are diehard PRS devotees, with Cooper favoring Custom 22 models, and Morrison mainly

• GUITARS (Morrison) PRS SC250, PRS Mark Tremonti signature model, PRS Starla; (Cooper) PRS Custom 22 • AMP (Morrison) Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, PRS Archon, Vox AC30H2; (Cooper) Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier, Marshall Plexi 1959SLP, Fender Twin • EFFECTS (Morrison) Cusack Twirl, Cusack Scream, Cusack Scruzz, TC Electronics ND-1 Nova Delay, TC Electronics Hall of Fame Reverb, DigiTech Whammy DT, Wampler Tape Echo, Dunlop John Petrucci Cry Baby Wah; (Cooper) Nemesis Delay, Ibanez Tube Screamer

playing SC250s. “I’m so passionate about that company,” Morrison says. “I remember flipping through Guitar World back when Mark Tremonti’s signature model first came out, and thinking, Argh, I’ll never be able to afford one of those! So to actually get to the point where I have a great working relationship with them, it’s definitely a ‘bucket list’ check mark for me as a professional guitar player.”

CHUCK BRUECKMANN

KOREY COOPER AND SETH MORRISON SERVE UP A HEARTY GUITAR ASSAULT ON MODERN ROCK FAVORITES SKILLET’S LATEST DISC, UNLEASHED.


NEWS + NOTES

INQUIRER WATA OF BORIS

What inspired you to first pick up a guitar? When I was in junior high school I saw lots of videos from various bands. It was very exciting to watch those guitar players and that was the beginning. My parents were not so interested in music at all, but my elder brother was very into the Beatles. He played both guitar and drums, and practiced so hard with his own handmade cardboard drum kit, which annoyed our neighbors every day. What was your first guitar? A Burny Les Paul [replica] model [by Fernandes] in black. I steadily saved money for three years to buy it. She has been with me ever since. What was the first song you ever learned? The intro of Led Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven.” What do you remember about the first gig you ever played? My first-ever gig was when I was in high school. My friend and I organized our own party. I printed tickets by myself, and we sold them to friends. I played cover songs and enjoyed it very much. A good memory.

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Ever have an embarrassing moment onstage or a nightmare show? One day two amplifiers were blown at the very beginning of the show. I couldn’t fix them at all, so the show was called off. That made me realize I should always have a backup amplifier whenever I play. What’s your favorite piece of gear? Roland Space Echo RE-150 and ELK Big Muff. I will never be able to play guitar without those. ELK Big Muff is a fuzz pedal made in Japan that has a very rich mid and low range. The RE-150 is very unstable, and easily affected by temperature

and humidity every time I use it. However, it makes me excited and freaks me out. It is the best and I love it! What advice would you give to young guitar players? I think you should experience and try whatever you can: huge sound and loud volume, terrible fuzz pedals, unstable Space Echo, blowing lots of amplifiers and breaking many backlines. Nothing is wasted with that experience. You will find your favorite guitar, pedal and backline, which will make you excited for a long time. —BRAD ANGLE

Japanese avant-garde metallers Boris have just released a 10th-anniversary deluxe edition of their Pink album via Sargent House.

M I K I M AT S U S H I M A

What was it like being a female guitarist growing up in Japan? Was the scene inclusive or did you experience difficulties? As far as playing guitar I have not felt difficulties so frequently. As the sole female member in a rock band, sometimes it is hard physically. I can’t bring lots of backline and heavier stuff by myself, and I need to ask other members to take care of it. Luckily enough I have been in the same band and played with the same members [drummer/vocalist Atsuo Mizuno and guitarist/bassist/vocalist Takeshi Ohtani] for more than 20 years, and we have our own roles internally. They help me a lot, and Boris have a reliable crew. I can’t thank them enough and really appreciate it. Maybe a different case would arise in a band that consists of female members only.


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(from left) Mark Holcomb, Jake Bowen and Misha Mansoor

ALEX WOHLEBER

DEAR GUITAR HERO

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MISHA MANSOOR, MARK HOLCOMB AND JAKE BOWEN OF PERIPHERY They pioneered the term “djent,” wield a triple-ax attack better than most and feature John Petrucci’s nephew in the lineup. But what Guitar World readers really want to know is… Interview by Richard Bienstock

SAY SOMETHING NICE ABOUT YOUR —ALVIN SINGH FELLOW GUITARISTS. 

MARK HOLCOMB Wow. Okay, let’s see. Jake is handsome… [laughs] Seriously, both of those guys motivate me to be better, and I learn so much from them. Also, when they’re on a creative hot streak it sort of lights a fire under me. After we got off tour for Juggernaut I was just creatively shot. But that all changed when I got to D.C. to write with the guys. We got in a room together and before I knew it, 24 hours into the sessions we had already written a song. And it just kept going from there. I was reminded in that instant why we do things the way we do in this band.

JAKE BOWEN Besides them being my best friends, Mark has a unique style and it’s so cool to watch people flip out over his crazy riffing. It’s funny, because there’s these Mark memes online where people take pictures of their fingers on the fretboard in these weird contorted shapes, because Mark has these really long lanky fingers and he’s able to get these really gnarly chord voicings. So it’s an admiration thing. And as far as Misha goes, there are few people that have the musical, melodic, rhythmic, compositional sensibilities that he has. He can take an awful, awful riff written by anybody and turn it into something amazing and fit it into a song. He’s a compositional madman! MISHA MANSOOR I’m at a blank. Pass! [laughs] Honestly, I feel like the luckiest guy ever. I started this band by myself and the goal was always to get a band to be a collaborative entity. And the more collaborative the band has become, the better it is. To be able to rely on Jake and Mark and their creativity is one of the greatest gifts that’s ever been given to me. And the thing that’s great is both of them have very identifiable and unique styles that also manage to ride that line of being on the same wavelength as the stuff I like. They’ve both become huge influences on me and the way I write and play.

Your last album, Juggernaut, was such an ambitious project—a double CD concept effort. What were you going for with Periphery III: Select Difficulty?  —William Abbot MANSOOR Juggernaut definitely was a huge undertaking. There were so many criteria that we had to be aware of at all times—the concept, the motifs, the mood, everything had to fit. The stress of having that in the back of your mind all

the time was very apparent. So I think when we were done with that we were like, “All right. The next album is going to go back to whatever we want.” We returned to our mantra, which is basically, Does it sound cool? There’s a lot of freedom in that, and so I’d say this was the easiest album we’ve put together. It was just good vibes the whole time and it’s the first release we’ve ever felt that way about. It’s definitely my personal favorite.

By my calculation the new album is your fifth full length. So why is it called Periphery III?—Zachary Jenkins HOLCOMB Because we like confusing our fans! [laughs] But I can break it down: Periphery is easy because it was our debut. Periphery II: This Time It’s Personal is also easy because that was our second album. Our next release was Juggernaut, and that was two albums. And the point of Juggernaut was to have this “aside,” to sort of say, “We’re

going to take a left turn right now and do this huge concept record that doesn’t have anything to do with the other albums. And there were a few reasons for that. Stylistically, we wanted it to be considered different from those first two records. But also we want to leave the concept of Juggernaut open. Because who knows? Maybe we’ll do another one of those down the road. So those are the third and fourth full lengths. And now III is sort of the successor to II, which is us in the studio and writing stand-alone songs that are just us being us, instead of trying to fit into a story arc or conceptual framework. Do you guys have a favorite song from Periphery III? —Alex Ferreria HOLCOMB I’d say “Lune,” the last song on the record. We wrote it together in Misha’s living room. It was late January and there was a big blizzard that came through D.C. and so we were stuck in his apartment, with snacks and drinks and stuff. We knew we weren’t going to be leaving for 72 hours so we had our amps set up and Matt [Halpern], our drummer, was sitting on the couch hitting his hands on his knees. I started jamming on a chord progression and Jake chimed in with a lead part over it and Misha came in with another ambient part. Then we paired it with an idea we had written the day before. It was just this really uncharacteristic but organic process. And what came out of it is probably one of our most epic songs to date. BOWEN For me it’s “Flatline.” It’s broken up into two halves, and the first half is very riffy guitarworld.com

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DEAR GUITAR HERO

If you could collaborate with any musician, who would it be? —Michelle Corkery MANSOOR That’s a very tough question. Maybe Nobuo Uematsu, who composed the music for the Final Fantasy series. And there’s this Icelandic composer I’ve gotten into recently named Ólafur Arnalds. I’d love to collaborate with him sometime. BOWEN My default answer is Trent Reznor. But it’s not always who you like or respect or love

that would make the best connection musically. So I don’t know if he would be the best choice, but it’d be cool to try! Jake, what’s it like having John Petrucci for an uncle?  —Victor Araton BOWEN He’s just a great role model. I understand that people hold him in high regard as a guitar player, but I also get to see beyond that into what kind of person he is—the way he is as a husband and a father and a friend. He’s an all-around good person who has this enormous discipline and golden heart. Seeing all that, as well as seeing his ability to play the guitar, is just so inspirational. And I always get asked, “Did he ever give you lessons and teach you things?” Yeah, he did. I learned a lot from him. In the mid Nineties when I was starting out he really, really helped me get my confidence up. His instruction was very formative. He’s a great guy! What gear did you guys use on Periphery III?  —Jim Burns BOWEN Well, guitar-wise we primarily used our signature instruments. I have my Ibanez JBM10, Mark has a signature model with

PRS and Misha has his Jackson Juggernaut. And then there were some Strats and Teles of Misha’s, because he has a pretty extensive collection at his apartment where we recorded. As far as our amp sound, it all came from the [Fractal Audio] Axe-Fx II XL. That’s always been there for us. It’s always solid, it sounds great, and the amount of customization to it is just mind-blowing. It makes it so easy and so much less daunting to get a sound you’re happy with and that sits really well in the mix. MANSOOR With the Axe-FX, I can even tell you the exact patch we used for the rhythm tone. It’s deceptively simple: It was just a Friedman HBE model with the bright switch on, the gain up at six and the bass rolled down a little bit. And the cabinet was from the Fractal Cab Pack 13. It’s a mix I made called Misha Mix 8. And that’s it—that’s the rhythm tone right there! The lead tones were a variation on that with more gain or sometimes less. Mark, I love the music you’ve done with your Haunted Shores side project. Anything upcoming in the works?  —John Chaney Mansoor

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HOLCOMB Thank you! We put out an EP, Viscera, late last year, and if we have some free time around the fall and Christmas I’d like to record another EP or potentially an album. So yes, there’s always material in the works because it’s sort of my outlet on the side where I can put out all this crazy, fast, pissed-off music. A lot of that stuff doesn’t really fit in the aesthetic of Periphery.

MISHA, DO YOU EVER WISH YOU DIDN’T POPULARIZE THE WORD DJENT? —ANTHONY MARCELLO

MANSOOR [laughs] I think that at a certain point in time I probably would have said yes. But now it’s kind of become a joke and we just roll with it. We’ve always identified as a progressive band, and we’re very comfortable with how we write. So it really doesn’t matter what people call us. If they want to call us djent, that’s fine. Honestly, it’s probably done a lot of good for us. Probably more good than harm. So why not embrace it, right?

ALEX WOHLEBER

and guitar-driven and Peripherysounding, and then once it gets into the build-up at the end, it’s the more experimental side of our sound. And Spencer [Sotelo]’s vocals get stuck in my head all the time. I’m always singing it or humming the melody. I can’t get rid of it. So I think, Wow, I’m really into this song! MANSOOR Those are both really cool songs, but I’d say right now for me my favorite is probably “Remain Indoors.” I don’t really know why…but maybe that’s a good reason too! Because sometimes you don’t really know why you’re leaning toward a particular song. It just draws you in. Plus, I think it has some moments where I feel we’re really covering new ground.


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GUITAR WORLD OCTOBER 2016

Michael Poulsen


ON THEIR SIXTH ALBUM, SEAL THE DEAL & LET’S BOOGIE, MICHAEL POULSEN AND VOLBEAT REFINE THEIR TRADEMARK BLEND OF MUSICAL STYLES WHILE SHOWCASING THE WICKED FRETBOARD TALENTS OF NEW ADDITION ROB CAGGIANO. ICHAEL POULSEN SOUNDS A BIT stressed out when Guitar World reaches him at his home in Copenhagen, Denmark. Instead of celebrating the fact that Seal the Deal & Let’s Boogie, Volbeat’s sixth and latest studio album, had just gone to Number One in Denmark and several other European countries—and peaked at No. 4 on the Billboard 200, the band’s highest U.S. chart position yet—the Volbeat frontman has spent the last week dealing with the mundane hassle of cleaning out his flooded basement. “It was just crazy,” he says of the torrential spring rainstorm that caused the flooding. “It was pouring down—I’ve never seen anything like it—and I was out there for an hour trying to keep the water out of the basement, but there was nothing I could do. It was a lot of hours of work, but we finally got it cleaned up.” For many musicians, a basement flood would mean a nightmare of warped guitars and water-logged amplifiers, but Poulsen says he “didn’t lose anything important” since he

doesn’t store his axes and amps in his basement. In fact, he claims he’s not big on gear, period. “I pretty much lost interest in guitar equipment years ago,” he says, laughing. “The only important thing is that I’m playing a Gibson through a Marshall. I’ve used that setup for years, and I don’t really need anything else!” Given Poulsen’s if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it attitude, it’s no surprise that Seal the Deal & Let’s Boogie hits most of the sonic touchstones that have defined Volbeat’s previous work. The band’s unique mixture of metal, punk and rockabilly influences can once again be heard in such anthemic tracks like “The Devil’s Bleeding Crown,” “Marie Laveau” and “The Gates of Babylon”; the entire album is underpinned by the same dark rhythmic roar that’s been an intrinsic part of the band’s attack since their 2005 debut The Strength/The Sound/The Songs, and Poulsen still wails his lyrics with all the passion of an 18th century general leading his troops onto the battlefield. Perhaps the biggest difference this time out is that Seal the Deal & Let’s Boogie marks the first time Poulsen has written an album of songs with lead guitarist Rob Caggiano in mind. Caggiano, previously a member of Anthrax, officially joined Volbeat after producing (and adding some shredding solos to) their U.S. breakthrough, 2013’s Outlaw Gentlemen & Shady Ladies. While Volbeat has primarily featured a two-guitar

BY DAN EPSTEIN PHOTOS BY ROSS HALFIN

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GUITAR WORLD OCTOBER 2016

(from left) Jon Larsen, Rob Caggiano, Poulsen and Kaspar Boye Larsen

“ON PAPER, IT DOES SOUND WEIRD, MIXING METAL WITH PUNK, WITH COUNTRY, WITH GOSPEL. BUT THAT’S WHAT THE VOLBEAT STYLE HAS BEEN FOR A LONG TIME NOW.” —MICHAEL POULSEN

lineup throughout its 15-year existence, Caggiano is the first guitarist with serious lead chops to join the band. “We’d finally come to the point where we decided that Volbeat music needed a real lead guitar player,” Poulsen reflects. “In the very beginning, we didn’t think too much about solos; we thought, Volbeat should be all about rhythm and vocals! But I am a huge fan of Ritchie Blackmore, Chuck Schuldiner, Criss Oliva from Savatage, those kind of guitar play-

ers—and eventually we thought, Okay, maybe it would be good to have a lead guitar player who actually knows how to play those kind of solos! Poulsen, who lists Schuldiner, James Hetfield and Tony Iommi as his main rhythm guitar influences, insists that he was “never really interested in being a lead guitar player. The previous guitar players we’ve had were also rhythm guitar players, and we all played a little bit of solos and leads, but nothing really inter-

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esting. So now that we have a guy who knows how to do it, it’s great; and as a songwriter, I can make room for his ideas and the way he plays lead guitar.” Poulsen says that although he and Caggiano tried writing songs together, the material on Seal the Deal & Let’s Boogie was primarily written by Poulsen and then presented to the band. “I would come into the rehearsal studio and show the guys what I’d been working on at home. I would tell Rob, ‘In this chorus, I need a guitar theme on top of the vocals.’ Or there’d be a spot where I’d make some space for him to play a solo, and maybe he’d change the rhythm part so his solo was fitting a little better. That’s mostly how we worked on the songs. Except for ‘The Loa’s Crossroad’—most of that song was written by Rob. He also made the beautiful part on ‘You Will Know,’ and he did the middle section in ‘The Gates of Babylon.’ ” “The Devil’s Bleeding Crown” was one of the first songs Poulsen came up with for the album, he says. “It was a song that I wrote on the road, fairly easily from start to finish. Nothing really changed in that song when I brought it in; I already had the idea of how I wanted the drums to sound, and it was just up to Rob how he wanted to play that solo… “Musically, I’d say I write about 95 percent of Volbeat’s songs,” he continues. “Everybody helps and has a chance to come up with their own ideas, but it’s important to me as the main songwriter that it always sounds like Volbeat. But that gets easier with each record we make.” It’s also gotten progressively easier for Poulsen to dial in his guitar sound with each record, since he’s been loyal to the combination of a Gibson SG GT and a Marshall JCM 800 head for the last 10 years or so. “I love playing Gibsons, and I feel very comfortable with them,” he says. “There’s a reason why Gibson is Gibson, you know?”


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Poulsen bought his first Gibson— a Tony Iommi signature SG—in the late Nineties, during the waning days of Dominus, his pre-Volbeat death metal outfit. “There was a guitar store in Copenhagen, and they imported three Tony Iommi Gibson models,” he recalls. “They knew I would be interested, so they called me up even before they put them in the store.” He switched over to the SG GT a decade ago, when that same Copenhagen guitar store alerted him to the model’s existence. “It came out of nowhere,” he says. “They called me again and said, ‘We have this really special model, and it totally has your name on it; it looks like a fucking Cadillac with strings!’ I went to the store and totally fell in love with it immediately. It’s a guitar that is very much alive—but I really like that you kind of have to tame it a little bit. Once you get to know it, it becomes your friend. It’s kind of become my signature guitar!” Since Gibson discontinued production of the GT model after only two years, Poulsen—his previous claims of gear disinterest notwithstanding—continues to keep his eyes peeled for the striped-andchromed beauties. “They’re not that easy to find anymore, so I buy them whenever I can,” he says. “My guitar tech is very good at contacting guitar stores from around the world and tracking them down. I even got one from a Volbeat fan— he desperately needed some money, so he contacted us and we bought it from him. “I currently have two black ones with white stripes, one green with a black stripe, a custom-made white one with a black stripe, a red one with a black stripe, and a black one with a golden stripe—and those are just the ones I can remember right now!” Caggiano mostly relies upon his ESP signature models, as well as Fryette heads and cabinets, and a pedalboard so wellstocked with effects that “it makes my brain hurt just looking at it,” Poulsen says. “It looks like a fucking spaceship!” Live and in the studio, Poulsen prefers to do without stomp boxes, though his tone is modified somewhat by a Behringer Ultra-Q equalizer, and a BBE 362 Sonic Maximizer, both of which are rackmounted. “The Maximizer just gives it a little more body, more bass and more balls,” he explains. “And the equalizer is just for if you need a little more of a certain frequency or tone. Sometimes the room will sound a bit different than the one you played the day before, so it helps to have

the Maximizer or equalizer there to work around that kind of thing. I’m not really a fan of effects, so I don’t use any pedals or anything. It already sounds pretty awesome going straight into the amp!” Perhaps the unwavering consistency of Poulsen’s guitar sound is one of the reasons that Volbeat can draw from so many different genres yet still remain immediately identifiable. Despite Caggiano’s impressive fretboard wizardry, raucous covers of songs by Eighties barrockers the Georgia Satellites (“Battleship Chains”) and latter-day punks Teenage Bottlerocket (“Rebound”), and cameos from Danko Jones (“Black Rose”) and the Harlem Gospel Choir (“Goodbye Forever”), everything on Seal the Deal sounds like, well, Volbeat. “On paper, it does sound weird, mixing metal with punk, with country, with gospel. It’s like, ‘What’s the problem here?’ ” Poulsen says with a laugh. “But the magical thing is, there is no problem. For us, it’s very natural to blend all those styles together and make it work—and that’s what the Volbeat style has been for a long time now, that we can blend all those styles together. “The funny thing is, when you have that magical thing, you’re often not aware of it until people tell you. Even from the beginning, people were telling us, ‘You’ve got your own thing, your own sound!’ We were like, ‘Really?’ Because we knew exactly where we got our inspiration from. But the more albums we made, and the more people talked about it, we began to think, Maybe people are right, maybe we do have our own sound! And maybe that’s part of what makes it original— you’re not trying to convince anybody of anything, you’re just doing it.” After 15 years and six studio albums of “just doing it,” Volbeat don’t figure to change course any time soon. “We pretty much defined our sound and style on our first album, and refined it for each record after that one,” says Poulsen. “We like the idea that, when you put on a Volbeat record, you can immediately hear that it’s Volbeat. Like Motörhead, AC/DC and Iron Maiden—those are bands where you’re always totally aware of which band you’re listening to, whether you put on their first record or their last one. “If you’ve already found your sound and style, you should keep it, because that makes you who you are,” he says. “There’s people out there who don’t get that—but if you’re going to sound different each time you make an album, maybe you should change your band name, too!”

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Sound Decision

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ORIGINAL ROUNDBACK® | ORIGINAL OPTIMIZED ELECTRONICS | ORIGINAL MULTI-SOUND HOLE ©2016 Drum Workshop, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


P A G E

4 2

MASTER and

COMMANDER G U I T A R

W O R L D

O C T O B E R

2 0 1 6

L IKE THE G RE AT W WI BAT T LESHIP IT WAS NAM ED AF T ER , THE M ARTIN DRE AD NOUGHT GUI TAR HAS B EEN ONE OF THE MOS T FORMIDABLE WE APONS IN ANY GUITAR IST ’S ACOU S TIC ARS E N AL F OR M ORE T HAN A C ENT URY. HER E, W E JOIN THE FOL KS AT M ART IN GUITARS AS T HEY CE L E BR ATE THE 10 0T H ANNIVERSARY OF T HE M IGHT Y D R E AD NOUGHT. BY CHRIS GILL

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guitarworld.com

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THE STORY OF THE MARTIN DREADNOUGHT GUITAR,

which is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, is a classic American tale of success against all odds. If Hollywood were to depict this fable, it would be similar to the character arc of Rocky Balboa, starting with humble beginnings as an underdog and, after long periods of hard work, struggle and unwavering belief, eventually rising to the status of a beloved and enduring champion. Over the years, numerous contenders challenged the dreadnought’s dominance, but victories by the competition were rare, short-lived and all but forgotten as the dreadnought quickly regained its stature.

Unlike the electric guitar, where several models seem to share nearly equal popularity, the dreadnought enjoys monolithic appeal in the realm of the acoustic flattop guitar. Martin’s various dreadnought models—the D-18, D-28, HD-28, D-35, D-45 and others—have collectively remained the company’s best-selling instruments since the mid Thirties. But the dreadnought’s popularity extends well beyond the instruments manufactured by Martin. Almost every acoustic guitar manufacturer—from low-budget Asian factories to one-man master craftsman workshops in the Appalachians—has imitated the dreadnought’s design, making it unquestionably the most popular guitar design of all time.

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“The multitude of imitations is flattering,” says Martin Chairman and CEO Chris Martin IV. “The dreadnought is a great design, so it’s no wonder that everyone wants to copy it. But most people are eventually going to want the real thing, which is why the copies don’t bother me. If Martin had patented the dreadnought design and went out of our way to sue everybody who copied us, would it still be the most popular guitar shape in the world? Probably not. Instead, Martin let it become this popular instrument that anybody could copy, but you could still buy a Martin if you wanted to get the real thing. It was your choice.” While it’s difficult today to imagine a time when the guitar wasn’t the dominant

musical instrument in American culture, the guitar’s status was much more humble in 1916 when Martin built its first dreadnought guitars. The mandolin was the most popular stringed instrument during this period, and musicians played mandolins of various shapes and sizes collectively in mandolin orchestras. The banjo was also becoming increasingly popular thanks to its loud volume output, which allowed it to be heard amongst the horns in Dixieland jazz bands. Martin’s small-body guitars, which were strung with gut strings, were mostly popular with wealthy women in urban centers like New York, Boston, Chicago and Los Angeles, who played guitar and sang to entertain guests in parlors in their homes (hence the term “parlor guitar” for oldstyle, small-body acoustic guitars). However, the popularity of American-made guitars was starting to wane in favor of Spanish guitars as guitar virtuosos like Miguel Llobet toured the United States to perform classical music in packed concert halls starting in 1912. However, one event in 1915 started a phenomenon that eventually led to the guitar’s dominance. The Panama-Pacific Exhibition, a world’s fair held in San Francisco for almost the entire duration of 1915, attracted more than 18 million visitors. Music was a central focus of the exhibition, and one of the most popular attractions was the Hawaiian Pavilion, where visitors


“THE WORD DREADNOUGHT MEANS FEAR NOTHING.” —CHRIS MARTIN, CHAIRMAN AND CEO

flocked to discover the soothing sounds of Hawaiian musicians strumming ukuleles and guitars and playing melodies with a steel slide on guitars resting horizontally on the players’ laps. One of the most popular groups at the exhibition was Major (Mekia) Kealakai’s Royal Hawaiian Sextette, which stayed behind after the fair to tour the mainland in 1916. As the venues where Major Kealaki’s band played grew increasingly larger, he realized that he needed a louder steel guitar, so he reached out to Martin. While other companies offered large-body guitars at the time, such as the harp guitars built by various companies and Gibson’s Style O archtop with its 16-inch body, none were like the flattop steel-string instruments built in Hawaii that Kealakai was used to. Although Martin built mostly gut string instruments during this time, their guitars probably seemed like a good choice to him both for Martin’s superior craftsmanship and their willingness to build guitars completely to custom specs in a relatively short time. The first custom guitar that Martin built for Kealakai was similar to a Martin 00-size guitar but featured an uncharacteristic oversized bridge with three leaf-like extensions with pointed ends. When Kealakai realized that the 00-size guitar still wasn’t loud enough, he ordered another custom guitar with a body much larger than anything Martin had built up to that point.

“The second Kealakai guitar was the full dreadnought size, but it had a tight, narrow waist instead of the shallow waist typical of the Martin dreadnought design,” says Dick Boak, Martin’s Museum, Archives and Special Projects Director. “Apparently that fit the bill.” The large guitar that Martin built for Major Kealakai and shipped on March 16, 1916, also had a Hawaiian setup with a raised nut and bridge (of the same distinctive “three-point” style as Kealakai’s Martin predecessor) for slide playing, so technically it could be considered a transitional instrument rather than the first true dreadnought guitar. Martin’s shipping records identify the guitar as an “extra large” Style 17 guitar with serial number 12210. What happened next is uncertain, but apparently Frank Henry Martin was walking through the Martin factory with Harry Hunt, a store manager for the Oliver Ditson Company, when Hunt noticed factory craftsman John Deichman working on Kealakai’s large custom guitar. “The specifics of how the first dreadnought came about were lost to history,” says Chris Martin. “We know that my great grandfather, Frank Henry Martin, Harry Hunt and John Deichman were involved in the development of the dreadnought, but what each of them actually did is difficult to say as none of them are still around to tell us what actually happened.” Shortly after that meeting between Martin, Hunt and Deichman, Martin started producing guitars that Ditson sold under their own Ditson brand name. Less than five months after the Kealakai guitar shipped, Martin shipped its very first dreadnought model to Ditson on August 8, 1916, and six more dreadnought guitars shipped to Ditson on December 30, 1916. The “extra large” Ditson model 111 and 222 dreadnoughts differed only slightly from the Kealakai guitar, the main differences

(opposite page, clockwise from left) Trio of Kealakai guitars, Gene Autry with his Martin D-45, HMS Dreadnought and Major Kealakai

being a standard, Spanish-style setup, narrower waist and rectangular bridge. While specifics of the first true dreadnought model’s design are unknown, the origins of the name can positively be attributed to Frank Henry Martin. “One night I asked my grandfather [C.F. Martin III] where the dreadnought name came from,” Chris Martin recalls. “He very casually said that his grandfather [Frank Henry Martin] was a big history buff, and he named it after a battleship. As the dreadnought’s 10th anniversary approached, I personally decided to learn more about that particular ship.” The ship that Martin is referring to was the HMS Dreadnought. “The word ‘dreadnought’ means ‘fear nothing,’ ” Martin explains. “It was meant to remind people that Great Britain dominated the seas and that the British people should feel safe and secure. The HMS Dreadnought was a showcase ship that was bigger and faster than anything else out there. In 1906 when the British first presented the ship to the world, people were going ‘Oh my God!’ and were absolutely amazed and intimidated by it.

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“WHEN YOU COMPARE THE DREADNOUGHT’S TONE TO OTHER GUITARS, EVERYTHING ELSE SEEMS KIND OF WIMPY.” —DICK BOAK, MUSEUM, ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL PROJECTS DIRECTOR

“When you fast forward about eight years to the start of World War I in 1914, you realize that the British were right to develop such a powerful ship,” Martin continues. “I also realized that my great great grandfather had given this guitar a very important name in terms of its context during that time in 1916. My great great grandfather must have felt very patriotic, and he decided he was going to honor this guitar by naming it after this battleship. The dreadnought was Martin’s biggest guitar, and we were going to acknowledge that the British were our allies and they had built the biggest battleship of its time.” Perhaps because the dreadnought was a collaborative effort between Martin and Ditson, Martin initially did not produce their own dreadnought model bearing the Martin brand name. Martin had developed a similar arrangement with the Southern California Music Co. also in 1916, producing steel-string Hawaiian guitars made out of koa for them, so their exclusivity agreement with Ditson was not unique. As an interesting side note (and testimony to the popularity of Hawaiian music at the time), Martin also started building its first ukuleles in 1916. This turned out to be a fortuitous decision several years later, as ukulele sales helped keep Martin in business during the Great Depression when guitar sales plummeted. Another reason why Martin didn’t make Martin brand dreadnoughts early on is because the dreadnought wasn’t particularly successful. Between 1916 and 1921, Martin built only 14 Ditson dreadnoughts, and by 1931 when Ditson went out of business fewer than 30 dreadnought guitars were shipped. “Sales were abysmal in the beginning,” says Martin. “The guitar was pretty big, and most guitarists back then couldn’t figure out why anyone would want a guitar that big. It took a while for demand to develop.” The catalyst for the dreadnought’s eventual success was the emergence of another popular style of music. “Country music

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began to gain momentum during the Twenties,” says Boak. “The recording industry was in its infancy, and there were radio shows like the National Barn Dance on WLS in Chicago and the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville that introduced country music to millions of people. Performers started to use microphones for recording, broadcasting and performing. The sound of the dreadnought guitar lent itself really well to that environment.” Country music singers quickly discovered that the guitar’s range was a better match for the voice than the strident tones of the ukulele, banjo and mandolin. With its deep bass, the dreadnought guitar provided a rich, full-sounding rhythm foundation for

(above) Hank Williams with D-18; (below) Martin Guitar employees, circa 1920 (left to right) Herbert Keller Martin, unknown, Charles Anglemire, Nicholas, Frank Henry Martin, unknown, E. L. Miksch, unknown, C. Frederick Martin III

vocalists without getting in the way. When Ditson went out of business in 1931, Chicago Musical Instruments took their place as advocates of the dreadnought guitar. “Demand for the dreadnought was driven by the dealerships in the early Thirties,” says Boak. “The orders that Chicago Musical Instruments placed convinced Martin to keep building them at the time. Martin wouldn’t have kept making them if they didn’t think that customers wanted them.” The very first Martin-branded dreadnought models—the D-1 and D-2—were introduced in 1931. The first D-1, bearing serial number 47053, was made for the Chi-

cago Musical Instrument Company. Martin had also sold a DD-21 dreadnought to this dealer about a month before. However, like the Ditson dreadnought the D-1 and D-2 got off to a slow start. Martin built only two D-1 and four D-2 guitars during 1931 before changing the names to the D-18 and D-28, respectively, later that year. In 1933, Martin made nine D-18 guitars and 12 D-28s, but the following year production increased substantially, especially after Martin radically updated and upgraded the dreadnought’s design. The earliest D-18 and D-28 guitars built between 1931 and 1934 had necks that met the body at the 12th fret, a longer body with rounded shoulders and slotted headstocks. In 1934, the Martin dreadnought switched to a 14-fret neck, shorter body with square shoulders, and paddle headstock design. This is the modern dreadnought design that went on to become the most copied guitar design of all time, and it remains the standard for the dreadnought design today. In 1933, a regular performer on the WLS National Barn Dance who had recorded several hits contacted Martin to custom order the biggest and fanciest guitar that Martin could make. The artist was


Gene Autry and his order became the first D-45 ever produced. The following year, 12-year-old singing sensation Jackie “Kid” Moore, who took guitar lessons from Autry, ordered the second D-45. That same year Autry made his film debut as singing cowboy and earned his first starring role a short time later in 1935. Autry’s gorgeous D-45 was prominently visible in his hands in most of his early films, which inspired thousands of aspiring country and cowboy stars to get a Martin guitar. Autry also frequently played his D-45 when he appeared at the Grand Ole Opry, introducing audiences and performers alike to the allure of the Martin dreadnought. “Most people don’t realize how pervasive the whole singing cowboy phenomenon was,” says Boak. “It seems that every town during the Thirties had at least a dozen singing cowboy bands. We have collected thousands of photos of cowboy bands in our archives, and most of them were local acts. The band members all had fancy suits, boots and guitars, and the guitar that most of them wanted to have was a Martin.” In 1939, Martin built 475 D-18s, 123 D-28s and 14 D-45s, with the D-18 now enjoying status as Martin’s most popular model. While the onset of World War II was a major setback for most American musical instrument companies, Martin maintained similar annual production totals for the D-18 and D-28 during the war and the years immediately afterward, although the fancy D-45 was discontinued by 1943. What is truly amazing about the Martin dreadnought guitar is how it has remained a vital and relevant instrument ever since. During the Fifties the dreadnought achieved its own icon status in the hands of Hank Williams, Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash. It also defined the sound of bluegrass guitar thanks to players like Doc Watson, Lester Flatt, Norman Blake, Clarence White, Tony Rice and countless other pickers. When the folk boom hit during the late Fifties and early Sixties, the Martin dreadnought surged in popularity as well. “The Kingston Trio deserves a lot of credit,” says Boak. “When they became popular, college students went out and bought D-28s in droves. Back then you had to wait four years to get a new Martin dreadnought because the factory couldn’t keep up with the orders. In fact, Martin had to build a new factory in 1964 because of the increased demand that resulted from the sales driven by the Kingston Trio. We’re still in that building today. That momentum continued through the late Sixties, when Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young

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“IT’S A SIMPLE SHAPE, BUT WHEN YOU PLAY ONE IT LOOKS LIKE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU’RE DOING.” —CHRIS MARTIN played at Woodstock. It was mostly an electric guitar event, yet they made the bold move of playing an acoustic set.” Other notable mileposts for the Martin dreadnought include the D-28s that the Beatles used to record the “White Album” and that were played in the film Let It Be, and the instrument’s nearly ubiquitous presence in MTV Unplugged during the Nineties, including memorable performances by Bob Dylan, Neil Young and Kurt Cobain. Martin is celebrating the dreadnought’s 100th anniversary in numerous ways this

David Crosby

year. The D-222 100th Anniversary model is limited to only 100 guitars, and it features a design inspired by the original Ditson models, including a 12-fret neck, slotted headstock and rounded shoulders. However, while the earliest Ditson dreadnoughts have fan bracing, this model features an X-braced top and other upgrades such as a compensated saddle and Plek Pro setup. However, Chris Martin mentions that every Martin dreadnought built in 2016 will be an anniversary model in its own distinctive way as well. “We’re marking the top block of every dreadnought made in 2016 with a centennial designation,” he says. “Regardless of whether the guitar was made at our factories in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, or Navojoa, if it is a dreadnought it

will be a centennial model.” Martin also produced the 38-minute documentary The Ballad of the Dreadnought—A Musical Icon Turns 100, which has been screened at numerous film festivals and events and can be viewed online at Martin’s web site. The award-winning film, which is narrated by actor and Martin enthusiast Jeff Daniels, covers the entire history of Martin’s beloved, iconic and best-selling guitar design, from the various styles of music it helped inspire to the many guitarists who made history playing dreadnoughts. The film also features commentary from historians and interviews with artists like Roseanne Cash, David Crosby, Vince Gill, Steve Miller, Sturgill Simpson, Stephen Stills and more. The museum at Martin’s headquarters/factory in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, also has a special exhibit dedicated to the dreadnought’s 100th anniversary. The main reason for the Martin dreadnought’s prolonged popularity comes down to its tone. “When you compare the dreadnought’s tone to other guitars, even Martins with smaller bodies, everything else seems kind of wimpy,” says Boak. “A great dreadnought guitar sounds really powerful without being woofy. Rosewood dreadnoughts are great for vocal accompaniment, while mahogany dreadnoughts are clean, clear and crisp and really cut through when recording. They have an openness of tone, especially when the braces are scalloped. “The appearance of the D-18 and D-28 may be austere,” Boak continues, “but both models are really all about the tone.” “There’s something imposing about the look of a dreadnought,” adds Chris Martin. “It’s a simple shape, but when you play one it looks like you know what you’re doing. It makes singers feel more secure and confident when all they have between themselves and the audience is a microphone and a dreadnought. The dreadnought’s tone may not be as balanced as other guitars—in fact the dreadnought was initially marketed as a bass guitar because its bass frequencies are more dominant—but that powerful sound is a significant part of its allure. It’s a sound that has a place in almost every style of music and is truly timeless.”


GUITAR WORLD October 2016


RATTLE

STRUM

AS THE EDGE CREATES A RUCKUS IN THE GEAR INDUSTRY WITH HIS FIRST-EVER SIGNATURE GUITAR AND AMP, GUITAR WORLD CATCHES UP WITH THE U2 GUITARIST TO TALK ABOUT THE EVOLUTION OF HIS AXES DURING HIS CAREER AND HIS PHILOSOPHY ON WHAT MAKES A GUITAR SPECIAL. By Joe BOSSO

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ack in 2005, Guitar World asked the Edge why he never endorsed a guitar. “I’d really, really have to believe in the thing,” he said thoughtfully, then added, “I don’t want to be that guy on the posters: ‘Buy this guitar’ and all that crap. I’ve talked to a few companies over the years. Plus, I’ve had a lot of people do custom stuff for me—that’s different. Again, I don’t want to be a poster guy in music shops.” This year, however, the U2 guitarist changed his tune, and he makes no apologies for saying, ‘Buy this guitar’—or amp, for that matter. “I’m so proud of these two pieces,” he says of his recently unveiled Fender Edge Strat and its companion piece, the Edge Deluxe guitar amp. “Each design presents something very unique and updates the original item in some cool ways. Let’s put it this way: I know I’ll be using them quite a bit.” Along with Bono, the Edge joined Fender’s board of directors in 2014, but he stresses that the idea of rolling out signature products essentially grew out of personal necessity. Some of his Seventies-era Stratocasters, which he relies on for live performances of songs such as “New Year’s Day,” “Pride,” “Sunday Bloody Sunday,” “Where the Streets Have No Name” and “Bullet the Blue Sky,” were failing from the wear and tear of year-long stretches on the road. “[Longtime guitar tech] Dallas [Schoo] started to look for replacements, and things kind of grew from there,” Edge says. “Fender remade some pieces that were totally amazing. Having tried the guitar, I just realized this is a great instrument and I’d be very proud to put my name to it. When something is so good, you just have to share it.” Stratocasters—in particularly, a black ’73 model—have figured prominently in Edge’s sound since 1981. An avowed Vox AC30 devotee, he discovered the allure of the Fender Deluxe relatively late in his career, in 2003, when Schoo purchased a ’57 tweed (modified with a 15-watt Celestion Blue speaker) and brought it to sessions for what became U2’s How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb album. The amp’s punchy grit helped spark the song “Vertigo,” and from that point on, Edge was sold on its sonic properties. “There’s just something about that sound—it’s a quintessential rock and roll quality,” he says. “You can see why guitar players like Link Wray used Fenders in the early days. The amps had that classic surf guitar sound.” Edge admits that identifying the elements needed to make the ultimate Deluxe proved to be a more straightforward order of business than the trial and error (and numerous prototypes) that went into his signature Strat. “What’s so magical about guitars is hard to define sometimes,” he says, “because you’re talking about very simple electronics and very basic carpentry. These aren’t violins or cellos; they’re solid pieces of wood with pickups and strings, and they have these rudimentary controls.” He pauses, then adds, “But the Strat can be such a versatile guitar. It can be ultra-clean, ultra-pure, really crystalline in sound, but then if called upon you can put it through a distortion pedal with the right amp, and it just comes alive in its own way. You get more of that Hendrix-y, bluesy quality. It’s amazing in that regard, and with this guitar, I think we got it really right.”

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You first started using a Strat when you were a teenager, but your interest in the guitar stemmed more from Rory Gallagher than, say, somebody like Hendrix.

Yeah, I knew of Hendrix, and I loved his work, but Rory was the local hero, so it was a different kind of experience. When I was in my teens, I got to see him play, and there were some of his records around, so I kind of cut my teeth learning to play guitar by learning some of his licks and songs. He was really part of a power trio originally, and I think he inspired me to look at the guitar as something that could supply quite a lot in terms of dynamics and textures. There seemed to be so much sound that could come from a guitar, a Strat. That really impressed me. Tell me about your first Strat. It was a sunburst model, right?

That’s right. That was the first guitar I owned that you could say was kind of a professionalgrade instrument. Actually, in those days I only owned 50 percent of it. My brother, Richard, and I used to pool our meager resources to acquire equipment. We had that Strat and we also invested in an amp and a couple of


Fender The Edge Strat, the U2 guitarist’s first-ever signature instrument

“What’s so MAGICAL about GUITARS is hard to define sometimes.”

D AV I D C O R I O/ R E D F E R N S/ G E T T Y I M A G E S

The Edge playing his Gibson Explorer at the Arcadia Ballroom in Cork, Ireland, on March 1, 1980

pedals, and that took care of us for a couple of years. Then I think we might have kept a pretty rough, beat-up traditional guitar that we used if we happened to be playing at the same time. That’s how things went for a while. After a while, it felt like we really had to invest in two complete sets of equipment, so we split things up. I took the amp and he took the Strat. He still has it, actually.

The Explorer you used on the first album started to make way for the Strat.

The black ’73 Strat you bought in ’81, what impressed you about it?

When did you decide to put DiMarzio pickups in it?

It’s funny, sometimes it’s very hard to define quality when you pick up an instrument. I just call it “musicality,” where you pick it up and you’re immediately inspired by what you’re playing. I always talk about finding the songs in the guitar, the riffs and parts. So for that Strat, I just remember that it was the one. I was in New York at one of those stores on 48th Street. I tried a couple guitars—they were all used; they were in the second-hand part of the store—and this one just had it. It was an inspiring instrument and it sounded musically good, and suddenly I was playing parts and ideas. I knew this was the guitar for me.

I kept it stock for a few weeks, but I kept noticing that every time I went to the bridge pickup, it sounded too biting, too…piercing. So I went back to the same shop and told them about it, and they said, “Oh, there’s a guy next door who works on guitars.” I talked to him and he recommended changing the pickup. I think he might have modified the pickup slightly; I don’t think it was straight stock DiMarzio. Later on, we looked to see how it was modified, but we couldn’t figure it out, so it could have been a bit of a sales pitch. Whatever it was, it fit my needs perfectly.

Yeah, around that time. Like it is with most musicians, you get a new guitar and you want to really use it. So on the second album, I got the Strat and started to use it fairly heavily, particularly on something like “Gloria.” Then on subsequent records it became an important go-to guitar for me.

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The Edge testing his signature Strat and Deluxe amp at the Fender factory in Corona, California

What did you get out of that Strat that you weren’t getting from the Explorer?

The Explorer was great in so many ways, but there are just certain things the Strat can do that the Explorer can’t just by virtue of the whammy bar. Beyond that, there’s a sound difference that’s different musically. It has something to do with the single-coil pickups. When I would use the out-of-phase position between the bridge and second pickup, there was a sustain in the tone, a feeling in the attack—the transience. It just had this really great quality, and then when you add distortion and overdrive, you can really bring it out. On some of the songs you’ve played a Strat on, would you sometimes try a different guitar first?

That would happen, but 80 to 90 percent of the time the guitar I’m playing in real time with a particular sound would inspire parts and ideas. It’s very much a creative process that starts with the sound and the instrument, and the parts come from that rather than choosing to see if some other guitar suits it best. It’s rare that I would go for another guitar, unless there’s some real sonic deficiency of some kind. Occasionally you might go for something else from a production standpoint—you want to bolster the sound. But it pretty much starts with the sound and the part. Your signature Strat is a Frankenstein based on a few of the models. What were your main considerations when coming up with this design?

I’d say 90 percent sound. I wasn’t slavishly trying to recreate a Seventies instrument. I just knew the aspects that I loved and wanted to preserve, and then I wanted to see if I could improve them. I experimented a lot. We had nine or 10 prototype instruments made, because I really wanted them to hear the impact the different body weights would have on them. I tried to make one with an alder body with a rosewood neck, but we ended up with the maple neck on the alder body. Fender also

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“I’m not about the THEORY— I’m about the RESULT.” made some ash bodies, trying out both rosewood and maple necks. I was really kind of delving into the nuance of why a guitar sounds the way it does. I tried a couple of them on the road, thinking that the ash body and rosewood neck might deliver more of a classic Strat sound, but I reverted back to the heavy alder body and the maple neck. That’s what works for me as a songsmith. To put it simply, the maple neck is brighter, and the alder body is deeper and has more sustain. They kind of balance each other out. The guitar has more top end but more weight to it. Compared to the ash body and the rosewood neck, which is a little softer and not as wide in terms of frequency response. The combination of the DiMarzio FS-1 in the bridge and the Fender Custom Shop Fat ’50s pickups—how did you arrive at that?

We tried a bunch of different pickups, but something about the tone resulted from the response of the individual strings. We

addressed a lot about nuances like the pole height, because the current trend in a lot of stock Fender pickups is to have the pole height uniformly matched to the curvature of the neck—they’re staggered. What I found with those pickups was that the third string was way too loud relative to the first, second and fourth strings. In the Fifties and Sixties, you had wound third strings, but then people went to plain third strings and that trend took off. Now Fender has pickups that are way too generous in terms of the output of third strings, because it’s the thickest core relative to all strings except maybe the low E. The core size dictates the output, not the size of the string itself—the combination of core and winding. So I went to flat polepieces, which gives me a more uniform response from all the strings. So now, if I’m playing a song like “Where the Streets Have No Name” or “Pride,” the strings are all present and you hear them all in the right sort of ratio to one another.


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none that I really liked as much as that one I used for “New Year’s Day.” So one day DallasPRA cameAudio up with this amp. It 7/13/2016 was really just supposed to be a practice amp for the house. I didn’t have any particular high hopes for it, but it was fantastic. You know, whenever a piece of gear is really classic, it’s pretty obvious from the get-go. It just is. “Vertigo” probably wouldn’t have7.35” happened with4.625”x out that amp. I went into that Deluxe, and without really expecting anything I became really inspired and excited.

for Oct 2016 issue

What were some of the things you specifically wanted to update on the amp?

First of all, the speaker was selected to be the same as what’s in the Vox. That particular speaker combined with that amp is just amazing. I think the amp I originally got inspired by SAFETY also had that same speaker in it, so I think that was part of the magic. Dallas would tell me that modification was not so unheard of, but to be fair to him, I think he bought the amp and

The Edge wielding one of his Fender Strats during the War Tour at Pier 84 in New York City on June 29, 1983

How many prototypes did you try out on the road?

I M A G E S P R E S S/ I M A G E S/ G E T T Y I M A G E S

Nine. One I took out of the case and I found that it just didn’t work. It was the ash body— not even a particularly heavy ash body and a maple neck. It was made beautifully, but the tone was too light. So we didn’t try that one out live, but everything else got used. Moving on to the amp, was it a real “a-ha” moment when you used a ’57 tweed Deluxe for recording “Vertigo”?

Yes and no. Actually the solo for “New Year’s Day” was played through a Fender amp that I’d borrowed from a friend. Back in those days in Dublin, good gear was hard to come by, so a friend of mine was in a band, and his guitar player was American and he had this little amp. We borrowed it for a couple of days, and when I did the solo I was like, “Wow, this was a cool amp.” I tried to buy it, but it didn’t work out. But I always remember that Fender amp. Over the years, I owned a couple of them, but guitarworld.com

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Fender The Edge Deluxe 1x12 amp

“Whenever a piece of GEAR is really CLASSIC, it’s pretty obvious from the get-go.” wasn’t so aware of it. It was a reasonably casual purchase—he probably saw the speaker and was curious about it. But it was really only me using the amp that made me realize that it was just a great-sounding amp.

That’s right. By the way, that’s one of the things we were delving into, that mythical difference between the silver and the blue speakers. We actually went and found out that they went from blue to silver and back again because they ran out of paint. Everyone out there convinced that the blues sound different, God bless your hearing.

They were able to re-create that sound. The thing that we played around with was the volume of the curve. As you were saying, these Fifties amps sound great when you play them at a fairly low volume; they don’t need to be wound up high to kick. The curve of the volume was extremely sharp between one and three, and then from three to nine it’s almost an imperceptible difference. So we were trying to get that curve slightly more linear so you could have something subtler and more accurate in the volume control between three and five. That’s where you really need it. We ended up doing that. It’s very subtle, but because of that it gives you accurate control over volume.

In Guitar World’s review in the July 2016 issue, it was pointed out that the amp delivers a pretty tight bass response. Do you notice that?

Now that you have your own Strat model, are you going to retire some of the guitars you’ve been touring with?

What’s interesting here is how we weren’t going for the stock Fender sound. The speaker in my original amp had been kicked around for years. We assumed that it would be important to get the amp and speaker and to “run it” in, as we say. So we had Fender run the speaker for three or four days at different frequencies, just loosening it up. Then we compared it to another that was straight out of the box. The amp we had run just sounded better. There’s the tone of the amp, the weight of the punch it delivers. Weight is an interesting quality. People understand what you mean when you play a chord and you hear it. To actually analyze what frequencies create that is pretty complicated. It’s not about straightforward low end; it’s a kind of relationship between different mnemonics. Just adding low end doesn’t give you good weight—it’s some particular curve relation.

They’re retired at home. The turning point for that decision came during a show we did in Moscow. U2 has a tradition in that, if we’re outdoors and we’re not in a covered arena, if the audience is getting wet, the band is getting wet, too. That’s just the way we roll. So we were playing in Moscow and the monsoon of all rainstorms arrived, and it was so bad that it took out a lot of my guitars. My Seventies Strat took a terrible beating; Dallas was scrambling to find replacement pickups. So I just don’t want to be in a position where that happens again. In truth, there’s no compromise because my new guitar sounds better than the Seventies Strat, believe it or not. I prefer playing it. It’s great to know that it’s replaceable. If I get into a similar situation again and the guitar is destroyed by a rainstorm, I know I can go pick one right off the shelf and just plug it in. The freedom is amazing.

You’re talking about the Celestion blue speakers.

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Think you can get a special “Edge discount”?

[Laughs] I don’t know! Not so much for guitars, but I have been known to drop into the Guitar Center and grab a few bits. I’ve been able to get in and out before they realize it’s me. It’s interesting that the first signature items you’ve come out with are a guitar and amp. Some might assume you’d introduce your own line of effects pedals.

Right, well, let’s take this one at a time. I wouldn’t rule it out, because as you know, I actually change the sound of the guitar a lot with pedals. To me, it’s extremely simple. I’m not about the theory—I’m about the result. So if it sounds great that’s what I care about. Sometimes the pedals I use are very old vintage bits and pieces, and sometimes they’re very stateof-the-art modern pieces. At some point, if I feel like it’s something that people will enjoy, I might get into that role, but right now I’m just very happy to be getting behind this guitar and this amp. They’re two really solid pieces. I’m curious—what does your job description with Fender actually entail?

Well, like any company, it’s all about looking to the future, and that’s also the way I naturally think. Fender is one of those companies that’s grown up with rock and roll. I couldn’t imagine rock and roll without Fender. Important pieces have come from the company, so we want to see it do well and retain all of its best aspects. But we also want to embrace some new things and ideas, and we want to bring it forward to the 21st century. I feel honored to contribute to the story of Fender and do whatever we can to add our voice and our advice, and to do so in a way that enhances what they’ve always represented.


GUITAR WORLD

OCTOBER 2016

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SHOP TALK

GUITAR WORLD travels the country in search of some of the COOLEST BRICK-AND-MORTAR GUITAR STORES every player should visit at least once. Here, we pick the guitar-obsessed brains of some of the primary figures behind these landmark establishments

By Eric Feldman . Illustration by Aaron Meshon


GUITAR WORLD

OCTOBER 2016

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1. Norman’s Rare Guitars (Tarzana, CA) 2. Rudy’s Music (New York, NY) 3. Gruhn Guitars (Nashville, TN) 4. Chicago Music Exchange (Chicago, IL) 5. Elderly Instruments (Lansing, MI) 6. Willie’s American Guitars (St. Paul, MN) 7. The Guitar Store (Seattle, WA) 8. Pittsburgh Guitars (Pittsburgh, PA) 9. Walt Grace Vintage (Miami, FL) 10. Music Villa (Bozeman, MT) 11. Wildwood Guitars (Louisville, CO) 12. Fuller’s Guitar (Houston, TX)


NORMAN’S RARE GUITARS 18969 Ventura Blvd, Tarzana, CA 91356 Established: 1975 normansrareguitars.com No trip to Southern California would be complete without a visit to Norman’s. This shop is a guitar lover’s dream—if you’re looking for it, you’ll find it here. And not only does it boast an amazing guitar collection, it is also the final resting place of the 18-inch Stonehenge stage prop from Spinal Tap. Number of instruments currently in stock Norman Harris (owner) Approximately 2000, both in the shop and in our warehouse. Coolest instrument currently in the shop I’d say either a mint 1960 Les Paul Standard, a beautiful 1955 Stratocaster, a 1929 Martin 000-45 or a Stromberg Master 400. Favorite instrument you ever sold We recently sold Joe Bonamassa a 1958 Korina Flying V and that’s just one of the favorites. We have dot neck ES-335s including a blonde one, and three pre-war Gibson Rosewood J-200s. Highest price paid for a guitar in the shop All I will say is that it was well in the six figures.

Biggest pet peeve as a shop owner Not knowing whether I am happier buying a guitar or selling one. Favorite celebrity encounter I helped George Harrison get back his cherished red Les Paul known as “Lucy.” The whole story is in my new book, Confessions of a Vintage Guitar Dealer. One fact everyone should know about Norman’s That we are happy to let people play our guitars. Some stores don’t let customers try out instruments, but we do. Best advice for a customer Don’t ever buy a guitar that is just for investment—enjoying playing the instrument is 90 percent of the fun.


RUDY’S MUSIC 461 Broome Street, New York, NY 10013 Established: 1978; current location since 2009 rudysmusic.com Rudy’s Music is an iconic New York guitar institution and was part of the city’s legendary “Music Row” in the Seventies. Now located in the heart of New York’s SoHo neighborhood, Rudy’s Broome Street shop is worthy of their almost 40-year legacy. Their vast array of guitars is awe-inspiring, boasting a world-class archtop collection that is unmatched. Instruments currently in stock Rudy Pensa (owner) Around 500. Coolest instrument currently in the shop A ’54 Fender Strat. Favorite instrument you ever had in stock Perhaps the 1962 Fender Jazzmaster that we acquired as having belonged to Jimi Hendrix when he played with the Isley Brothers. We matched cigarette burns on the guitar to ones in photos of Jimi. There was no way to officially confirm the history, but after extensive research and feedback from a lot of other reputable people, I was convinced that it was, indeed, Jimi’s guitar.

Most sought-after instrument by customers It varies depending on trends, but overall it would be the Fender Stratocaster. Biggest pet peeve as a shop owner The fact that I actually have to sell these beautiful guitars! Many times I’m sad when I have to turn these instruments over to a new owner. Favorite celebrity encounter Mark Knopfler. In 1980, driving to our store, my wife and I blasted the radio when our favorite song “Sultans of Swing” was playing. We loved how amazing and different the lead guitarist was. The first person to walk into our store that day was none other than Mark Knopfler himself! A friendship was formed between us that has lasted to this day. Strangest request from a customer We received a call asking us if we would be willing to close our store in the middle of the day so that the wife of a foreign head of state could come in to buy a guitar. We obliged and shortly thereafter several limousines pulled up out front with their country’s flag flying in the wind on each of them. She emerged from her limo, flanked by bodyguards, and came in to our store to buy a guitar. Most common song people play when trying guitars We hear a lot of John Mayer on both the acoustics and the electrics. The favorites tend to be “Gravity,” “Heart of Life” and “Stop This Train.” Best advice for a customer Touch it, feel it, play it! There’s nothing like walking into a guitar store and having an instrument speak to you. It’s important to have that connection, which can only happen when you get up close and personal with the guitar.


GRUHN GUITARS 2120 8th Ave S, Nashville, TN 37204 Established: January 2, 1970 guitars.com George Gruhn’s namesake shop has set the bar as a true mustsee guitar shop. Located in the heart of Nashville’s legendary Music City, the shop is a first-class experience all around. Instruments currently in stock George Gruhn (owner) Today’s approximate count is 475 acoustic guitars, 250 electric guitars, 50 basses, 100 banjos, 100 mandolins, 35 resonator guitars, 25 ukuleles and 50 amps and miscellaneous instruments. Coolest instrument currently in the shop The instruments getting the most attention are the left-handed blackguard 1954 Fender Telecaster, 1955 Gretsch White Falcon, Lloyd Loar signed 1924 Gibson F-5 mandolin and several pre-war Martin style 45 guitars including a 1940 D-45. I continue to have a keen interest in pre-war Martin D-45 guitars and I have seen many of the 91 D-45 guitars Martin made between 1933–42. Highest price paid for a guitar in the shop Maybelle Carter’s Gibson L-5, which brought in $575,000 and is now on display at the Country Music Hall of Fame. One fact everyone should know about Gruhn Guitars Although I opened the shop in 1970 and it’s my name on the side of the building, each and every one of the 25 employees at Gruhn

CHICAGO MUSIC EXCHANGE 3316 N. Lincoln Ave, Chicago, IL 60657 Established: 1990 chicagomusicexchange.com Fitting for a city rooted in guitar history, CME is a living cathedral to all things guitar. You’ll be hard pressed to beat—or even match—the selection of new and vintage guitars found in this shop. Instruments currently in stock David Kalt (owner) Around 2000. Coolest instrument currently in the shop This 1959 hardtail Strat that recently came in. It is ridiculous! Favorite instrument you ever sold A super clean, original-owner 1957 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop…I never should have sold it. Most sought-after instrument by customers Bursts and pre-war Martins are still the most asked about/soughtafter guitars we deal in. One fact everyone should know about Chicago Music Exchange George Coutretsis (store manager) We are a vintage guitar shop

Guitars can do their jobs far better than I could—though none can do my job better than me—and each person here has knowledge and skills that are absolutely critical to the vitality of the business. Strangest request from a customer We are continually baffled by customers who seem oblivious to the importance of preserving the integrity of vintage instruments. In the past week, a visitor to the shop inquired about taking a sander to the original finish on the back of a Fifties Gretsch because it “felt too rough,” and we received a call about routing a ’59 Melody Maker for humbuckers. Why anyone would want to do some of the terrible things we’ve seen, heard about, or that have been suggested confounds each and every one of us at the shop. Best advice for a customer Collecting instruments can be incredibly fun and interesting, but if you’re seeking one to play that will inspire you, pick the guitar that feels alive and responsive and makes you feel like you’ve already known each other for years.

first and foremost: some of the coolest vintage guitars on the planet have passed through our doors. Strangest request from a customer That might be a good question for our repair shop, in which they’d probably say scalloping frets on a valuable vintage guitar. We won’t name names, but it was beyond strange! Most common song people play when trying guitars  We literally hear every riff in the book, from the good to the bad. We only ask that if you’re going to play “Stairway” or “Sweet Child O’ Mine,” just play it right.


ELDERLY INSTRUMENTS 1100 N. Washington Ave, Lansing, MI 48906 Established: July 5, 1972 elderly.com Elderly remains at the top of many touring musicians’ and guitar fanatics’ bucket lists— and for good reason. Stan Werbin’s 40-plusyear-old shop is legendary for its rare (and seemingly endless) inventory, awesome staff and great spaces to play. This family-owned and operated business prides itself on knowing everything there is to know about their instruments, making it easy to understand why many consider Elderly one of the finest shops on the planet. Instruments currently in stock Stan Werbin (owner) 4000 new, 1300 used/vintage. Coolest instrument currently in the shop Either a 1924 Gibson F-5 Lloyd Loar or a 1936 Martin 000-45. Favorite instrument you ever sold A couple of memorable ones would be a Prairie State 19” lower bout Super Jumbo circa-1938 flattop guitar that we sold in 1998 to a well known musician/collector, and a 1933 Gibson RB-Granada resonator five-string banjo, original five-string neck, flathead tone ring, one-piece flange, owned and played since 1934 by Thirties country music superstar Wade Mainer that we sold in 2010.

WILLIE’S AMERICAN GUITARS 254 Cleveland Ave S, St Paul, MN 55105 | Established: 1989 williesguitars.com No conversation about guitar shops is complete without someone mentioning Willie’s. Everything about the shop is super cool—the selection, the staff, the energy. This St. Paul shop makes the Twin Cities proud. And you never know who might stop by and plug in next to you. Instruments currently in stock Nate Westgor (owner) Willie’s tend to be picky, even with cheap stuff, but I bet we have 600 guitars including mandos and ukuleles. Coolest instrument currently in the shop My late-Twenties Martin 5K Abalone trimmed Tenor Uke, which we are using for a photo shoot. It was bought at a garage sale long ago for $4. Today it’s worth thirty grand. Favorite instrument you ever sold There have been so many, like a 1958 Flying V, a 1964 J-200 in Ember red and about a dozen Bursts including the Joe Walsh Burst. I have a 1954 Stratocaster in the store today that was used by Ronnie Wood of the Rolling Stones on tour last year.

Highest price paid for a guitar in the shop A 1959 Les Paul Standard burst for $265,000.

Favorite celebrity encounter Nicolas Sarkozy, who was the president of France at the time, called to buy a gift for his famous musician wife Carla Bruni. She wanted a Seventies Jazz Bass we had that was factory Walnut finish over a Sunburst finish, which was rare in the Seventies. And the family wanted it partly because they were fans of Tom Petersson of Cheap Trick, who had traded it in to us.

Favorite celebrity encounter Perhaps the most fun was when Lyle Lovett and much of his band stopped in, played lots of old guitars and invited everyone who worked in the shop to his concert that night.

Strangest request from a customer A customer brought in a 20-year-old Les Paul he claimed was untouched by human hands. He insisted I wear fresh white gloves to inspect his guitar before we made an offer to buy it.


THE GUITAR STORE

PITTSBURGH GUITARS

8300 Aurora Ave N., Seattle, WA 98103 | Established: 2011 seattleguitarstore.com

1305 E. Carson Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15203 | Established: 1979 pittsburghguitars.com

What can you expect from a shop whose exterior is painted in Eddie Van Halen stripes? Everything! The Guitar Store represents Seattle right with an awesome staff and a vast selection of great guitars. Instruments currently in stock James Schultz (owner) We generally have somewhere between 600–700 new pedals, 100 used pedals, 400 or so guitars, 40 basses, about 100 amps, 40 Ukes and a few banjos. We have a huge stock of instruments from great USA builders such as PRS, Fender Custom Shop, Mesa/Boogie, Breedlove, Strymon, MR Black, EHX, Earthquaker and many more. Coolest instrument currently in the shop A 1965 Red Mosrite Joe Maphis double neck with matching headstock that came from Norway. The shipping label just said “Seattle Guitar James.” After going missing for a few weeks once clearing customs it showed up here. As if I’m the only guy named James in Seattle who plays guitar. We saved the box. Favorite instrument that ever came through the shop Easy: an Asher T Deluxe Candy Apple Red with a bound body. It’s at my house and will never be sold. Giant v maple neck and as many sounds as I would ever want. It fits me perfectly. Most sought-after instrument by customers We cannot keep a Halcyon guitar in stock. Ed Bond is an amazing acoustic luthier out of Vancouver. The guitars we get from him are all custom built for the store and usually sell within a week of showing up. Biggest pet peeve as a shop owner Forums. So many people come in and think they have to look at a forum to make up their mind on the sound of a product— especially pedals. You are in a physical store; go in one of our isolation rooms and play away.

There is a reason why Pittsburgh Guitars is regularly hailed as the best that city has to offer. It’s a real shop run by real guitar players with real experience and real chops. An added bonus is that they’ve always got the best in-store soundtrack any day of the week! Instruments currently in stock John Bechtold (owner) We average around 300 instruments in stock at any given time. Coolest instrument currently in the shop A 1965 Gretsch Country Gentleman. It is a one-owner guitar with the original case and original receipt, and it is in perfect condition. Favorite instrument you ever sold We got in a 1966 Rickenbacker 360 in Fireglo that was a beauty. We posted it online and it caught the eye of a young guy who has been shopping at the store for years. Turns out he was coming up on his 18th birthday and graduating from high school, and we worked out a deal with him and his amazingly supportive parents. We still smile at the idea of him getting that guitar; it went to a good home. Most expensive instrument you ever sold One of the coolest guitars that ever passed through the shop was a left-handed 1960 Gibson Les Paul. The guitar eventually made its way into the hands of Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen and then its current owner, Paul McCartney. Most sought-after instrument by customers Fender Jazzmasters and Gibson SGs are hot. They have really been trending for a while; they sell as soon as we put them on the wall. Favorite celebrity encounter Robert and Dean DeLeo of Stone Temple Pilots have stopped in a number of times. One time, there was a kid in the back of the store playing a guitar. We were having a conversation, and Robert noticed that the kid was playing some STP riffs. His ears perked up and he was like, “Excuse me. I’ll be back in a minute.” Robert spent about 45 minutes giving that lucky kid a Stone Temple Pilots guitar lesson.


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THE SOUND OF METAL EXPANDING

The metal-to-the-core Iron Label series has always been about extremes. The new reverse headstock serves notice:

The Ibanez team has pushed the stalwart Ibanez S-Series to the edge.

As the first S-series to feature DiMarzioŽ Fusion Edge pickups, these three new models combine the player comfort and light weight of a mahogany body with a huge full-bodied sonic presence. The coil tap switch provides on-the-fly tonal options. The bound ebony fretboard assures tonal definition, and the newly added Gotoh tuners guarantee set-to-set intonation lock-down. In other words, if you’re all about the expansion of metal, Ibanez has built you the essential tool.

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WALT GRACE VINTAGE 229 NW 26th St, Miami, FL 33127 Established: 2015 waltgracevintage.com It’s rare to find a shop worthy of the buzz. Walt Grace Vintage is that shop. A relative newcomer, located in the amazingly cool Wynwood Arts District of Miami, Walt Grace displays classic drool-worthy guitars alongside top-of-the-line collectible cars. If you ever wanted to play a Les Paul while in the driver’s seat of a Lamborghini, this is the place for you! Instruments currently in stock Bill Goldstein (owner) On the vintage side, at any given time, we have between 100–150 guitars and basses in the gallery. Additionally, we have a large selection of vintage tube amplifiers from the Forties, Fifties and Sixties. Coolest instrument currently in the shop We have a near-flawless 1957 three-pickup Black Beauty (Les Paul Custom) that is as close to original as we’ve seen. We also have a 1964 Sunburst Stratocaster that is a favorite of ours and everyone else who plays it. Nothing unusual or especially unique about this one, other than it being one of the best playing and sounding Strats we’ve ever had. Favorite instrument you ever sold Probably an extremely well-loved/worn late-1956 Les Paul Jr. that we lovingly referred to as “The ’56.” In all honesty, I secretly hoped we’d never sell it, and even placed it on the highest spot of our main wall—a spot where even I (being the tallest) could only reach standing on the top rung of our tallest ladder—if for nothing else, just to make sure that I’d have a chance to screen any new potential owner to assure their worthiness. Highest price paid for a guitar in the shop We’ve sold an incredible number of vintage pieces, ranging from

lower priced Fifties and Sixties Harmony, Airline and Danelectros to more expensive Fifties and Sixties Gibson and Fender guitars and amps. To date, our sweet-spot seems to be in the $8,000– 20,000 range, but is definitely creeping upward as the word gets out about us. Most sought-after instrument by customers Definitely vintage Gibsons and Fenders, Les Pauls, Strats and Teles. But we are seeing a rise in popularity of some of the more obscure brands such as Supro and Airline. Our customers are also big fans of vintage Valco-made amps: Supro, Kay and Gretsch. We’ve also just launched our own Walt Grace Amplification line of vintage-inspired amps that are selling better than we ever could have dreamed. Biggest pet peeve as a shop owner Miami isn’t exactly a mecca for collectors of vintage anything—and because of this, the most irritating thing that we hear multiple times a day is, “So wait, these guitars/cars are all…used?” When we explain to them that they are “vintage/rare and highly collectible— some, even investments,” they’ll reply, “So, like I said, they’re used.” Favorite celebrity encounter My personal favorite was Doug Fraser from the online series The Doug and Pat Show. I’ve spent countless hours watching Doug and Pat compare and discuss the most incredible, drool-worthy vintage guitars, amps and gear on their show, so when Doug came walking into Walt Grace Vintage I could hardly contain myself. Strangest request from a customer The one that comes instantly to mind was a customer who asked us to open the control covers of a guitar he was about to purchase so he could inspect the wires that were used. Upon seeing the vintage wax coated, original pushback wire and original untouched solder joints, he asked if we could rewire the whole guitar with modern plastic coated wire and a new toggle switch. Of course we explained that the value of the guitar would be effected, as well as the sound, but he was unwavering in his request, and insisted that if he was going to buy the guitar, we would have to perform the work. Not saying if we did it or not, but let’s just say, I hate myself.


4 PEDALS, 36 SOUNDS, 100s OF HITS.

From the game changing B9 and C9 Organ Machines to the KEY9 Electric Piano Machine and MEL9 Tape Replay Machine, EHX gives you the sounds of enough legendary keyboards to fill a stage and then some!

Each polyphonic pedal provides a unique collection of classic sounds in a simple plug-in-and-play package. No modifications, special pickups or MIDI implementation is required, and tracking is impeccable.

Whether you want to cook up some hot Green Onions, lay down a cool Riders on the Storm style groove, take a trip to Strawberry Fields or spend some time at the House of the Rising Sun, EHX has the keys!


MUSIC VILLA 539 E. Main St, Bozeman, MT 59715 Established: 1970s musicvilla.com A rare guitar oasis in the middle of nowhere, Music Villa overflows with personality and specializes in one-of-a-kind, limitedrun and custom guitars. Instruments currently in stock Paul Decker (owner) We carry about 400 acoustic and electric guitars as well as banjos, mandos, Ukes and violins. Favorite instrument you ever sold I would say the Martin D-100 was probably my favorite.

Most sought-after instrument by customers Custom-built Martin, Gibson, Taylor, PRS and Collings acoustic guitars and, of course, any old Martin and Gibson guitars. Biggest pet peeve as a shop owner People dragging their fingernails on the nice new shiny pick guards. Favorite celebrity encounter John Mayer has made a couple visits. Awesome guy. One fact everyone should know about Music Villa No sales tax. Strangest request from a customer “Do you have used harmonicas?”

WILDWOOD GUITARS 804 Main St, Louisville, CO 80027 Established: 1984 wildwoodguitars.com Don’t be fooled by this seemingly small shop—Wildwood has an enormous inventory of exceptional guitars, perfectly matched with top-notch customer service. Known for their hands-on and collaborative style, Wildwood has a knack for pairing players with guitars that suit them best. Instruments currently in stock Steve Mesple (owner) It’s such a moving target from day to day but, as of this moment, we’re pushing several thousand guitars and still growing! Coolest instrument currently in the shop A vintage ’54 Stratocaster, a vintage ES-345 and a ’61 Stratocaster.

number, allowing our customers to choose the exact instrument they’re looking for.

One fact everyone should know about Wildwood Guitars Despite our massive inventory, we’re still the same family owned and operated shop that humbly opened its doors 32 years ago. Our relationship with our customers has been paramount to our success. From the moment an instrument enters our shop, it’s painstakingly inspected, weighed, photographed and set up by our fantastic techs. Every instrument we sell is photographed by serial

Strangest request from a customer One of the things we do here is label our guitars with a blue piece of tape, indicating the serial number, weight, neck dimensions, etc. We recently discovered that one of our customers in Germany actually collects these pieces of tape, almost like sentimental trophies. Well, one guitar shipped his way without this blue tape, and needless to say, we had to write up and mail him a new piece of tape!


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Dual Phase Push-pull Drivers


Your Strap. Your Style.

FULLER’S GUITAR 116 North Loop, Houston, TX 77008 Established: June 1994 fullersguitar.com Known for great deals and a killer selection, the world famous Fuller’s Guitar has been supporting Texas guitar enthusiasts for over 20 years. They’re a Les Paul lover’s dream! Instruments currently in stock Michael Fuller (owner) Over 2000 Coolest instrument currently in the shop An exact copy of Roy Rogers’ Gibson Super 400 built in the Montana Custom Shop by Ren Ferguson for the Cowboy Hall of Fame. Favorite instrument you’ve ever had in the shop A 1928 Gibson Nick Lucas which now belongs to me. Highest price paid for a guitar in the shop A pair of custom shop Martin guitars at $66,000. Favorite celebrity encounter The most wonderful gentleman Big George Foreman, who also plays guitar. Strangest request from a customer “Can I have some water for my goat?” Most common song people play when trying guitars Bon Jovi “Wanted Dead or Alive.” Best advice for a customer Play them all ’til the right one demands to go home with you.

ERIC FELDMAN is the founder of GUITAR SHOP TEES, the monthly T-shirt club that celebrates independent guitar shops worldwide (guitarshoptees.com). Eric has visited an endless number of guitar shops and has built an impressive collection of guitars, memorabilia and experiences through his extensive travels. 70

GU I TA R WOR L D


6 PACK OF

SOUND Unlock six tonal flavors within the new Pro-Mod Series guitars

Experience the new Charvel Pro-Mod guitars at an authorized dealer near you. charvel.com/guitars/pro-mod © 2016 JCMI. Charvel® and the distinctive headstock designs commonly found on Charvel® guitars are registered trademarks of Fender Musical Instruments Corporation and used herein under license to JCMI. All rights reserved.


OC TO B E R 2016

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD

Head of State P

the gear in review

ER

FORMANC

E

BOSS WAZA AMP HEAD AND WAZA AMP CABINET 212

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J OH N P A GE C LA SSI C A J el ec t ric

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SEY MOU R DU N C A N P a l l a diu m Ga i n St a g e peda l

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REVEREND B i l l y C o rg a n Sign a t u re el ec t ri c

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D UN LOP C R Y B A B Y CBM1 05 Q Mi n i B a ss Wa h peda l

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FE N DE R FX A 6 Pro I n -Ea r Mo n it o rs

By Chris Gill IN A RELATIVELY short period

of time, the wizards of Boss Waza Craft have done many rather remarkable things. First, Boss issued a pair of Waza Craft pedals—the BD-2w Blues Driver and SD-1w Super Over Drive—that were hot-rodded versions of popular stomp boxes. But Waza Craft also resurrected a variety of long-discontinued effects with the DM-2w Delay (analog delay), CE-2w Chorus and VB-2w Vibrato, each with a dead-accurate Standard mode that replicates the classic sounds plus a Custom mode that expands the sonic capabilities of the original effects. This was simply unheard of for a company that previously steadfastly refused to reissue products, preferring instead to move its technology forward than look back (after all, the motto of Boss’s parent company, Roland, is “we design the future”). Now Waza Craft has taken yet another left turn with the introduction of the Boss Waza Amp Head. While the handful of amps that Boss offered in the past were inexpensive practice devices like the MG-10 and JS-10 eBand Audio Player, the Boss Waza

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SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Oct2016

Amp Head is a versatile, professional-quality amp that even manages to upstage Roland’s stalwart Jazz Chorus and Blues Cube amps. FEATURES The Boss Waza Amp Head is a 150-watt, solid-state (tube purists, stay with us please—it’s worth it) guitar amp head with numerous unique and distinctive features unlike anything else out there. At its core are three “amp character” settings—the internal “legendary rock” circuit and two slots for Tone Capsule modification circuits. The Waza Amp ships with a pre-installed “Waza Brown Sound” capsule in the Amplifier A position, and an optional Steve Vai Legacy Tone Capsule is the first of many pop-in modification circuits to come. Each of the three “amp character” settings has four switchable channels: Clean, Crunch, Lead 1 and Lead 2. Each of the four channels has its own Gain and Volume controls, but the Clean/Crunch and Lead 1/Lead 2 channels each share their own sets of Bass, Middle, Treble, Presence and Reverb controls. Rotary switches on the front panel provide further tone-shaping and performance capabilities. Output can be set to 1-watt, 50-watts, 100-watts, or Max (150-watts);

CHEAT SHEET

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STREET PRICE $2,499 (amp head); $999 (Cabinet 212); $1,399 (Cabinet 412) MANUFACTURER Boss, bossus.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

cabinet resonance provides vintage, modern and deep settings; and the line-out “Air Feel” feature provides cabinet simulation ideal for recording, live performance or a blend of both. Rear panel features consist of a pair of effect loop send and return jacks that can be set to series or parallel, a 1/4inch headphone output, MIDI In, a USB recording output, balanced XLR and 1/4inch line outputs, 8- and 16-ohm speaker outputs and a 1/4-inch stereo jack for the included foot controller, which provides six footswitches for selecting channels and EFX loops plus a pair of expression pedal jacks for adjusting master and volume settings with optional expression pedals. PERFORMANCE While the Boss Waza Amp Head is priced in the same range as the Fractal Audio AxeFX and Kemper Profiler, it is really designed more as competition for the various 100-watt multi-channel tube heads in its price range. Please ignore any past conceptions you may have had of solid-state guitar amps—players who listen with their ears instead of their eyes will not be able to distinguish between the harmonically complex tones

Three “amp character” settings provide the tones and performance of three independent four-channel amp heads.

The “Waza Brown Sound” Tone Circuit module is included with the amp, and one slot is available for an additional optional Tone Circuit.

The line-out “Air Feel” settings let users choose speaker simulation that is ideal for live performance, recording or both.

and responsive feel of the Waza and a tube amp. The distortion tones are impressively aggressive, with a low-end punch that rattles walls and incredibly musical clarity and definition. The amp can dial in a variety of the most desirable classic and modern tube stack tones, as well as ballsy clean tones and lead settings with seemingly endless sustain. With an optional Tone Capsule installed, the Waza Amp performs as three separate four-channel heads. While the built-in digital reverb sounds incredible (Roland’s reverb effects still rate among the best), I do wish they included one extra footswitch for disengaging the effect when playing live. I tried the amp with several different speaker cabinets, but the Waza Amp Cabinet 212 sent for review was the best match (a Waza 4x12 is also available), providing the ideal balance of clarity and natural-sounding distortion. The 1-watt setting is perfect for low volume recording and practice, while the 50-, 100- and 150-watt settings could probably be relabeled loud, louder, and loudest. Suffice to say, the Boss Waza Amp is ready for the biggest stages.

The Waza Cabinet 212 features a pair of custom Boss Waza 12-inch speakers designed to complement the amp’s tones and massive power output.

THE BOTTOM LINE The Boss Waza Amp Head offers an attractive alternative to a tube head for its incredibly expressive tones, expandability, reliability, and enhanced versatility for the studio, stage, and beyond.


SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Oct2016

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

CELLEN

CE

Familiar Friend

JOHN PAGE CLASSIC AJ By Paul Ria rio

SINCE CO-FOUNDING the Fender Custom

Shop and eventually moving on to build his own custom guitars, preeminent luthier John Page recently partnered with HRS Unlimited to launch the John Page Classic guitar brand. Their mission was to bring a more attainable “custom production” line of his hand-built guitars to the masses. The collaboration resulted in the John Page Classic Ashburn guitar, a streamlined custom S-style guitar that Guitar World reviewed last year, and which proved to be an immediate success. The Ashburn struck a familiar chord, with its classic contours and premium components, but every part of the guitar—from its custom-designed Bloodline pickups to the contoured heel coupled with its threaded neck bolt assembly—was meticulously conceived for optimum performance in tone and comfort. The same holds true for the brand-new John Page Classic AJ. It shares many of the Ashburn’s unique elements but is redesigned as a superbly polished T-style instrument with finely tuned tweaks that will appeal to a wide variety of players, from rock and country shredders to blues hounds. FEATURES The AJ, which is named after Page’s son, is an evolution of Page’s first custom-designed P-1 single-cutaway guitar. But where the P-1 had a bulky 14-inch bout, the AJ exhibits a 13-inch lower bout that shaves some mass and displays a sleeker front and back contour on its alder body. The guitar also has a lower horn and contoured neck heel that allows for easy access to the upper frets. The neck attaches to the body via machine screws with threaded inserts that are recessed into a smooth heel. Incidentally,

CHEAT SHEET

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STREET PRICE $1,639 MANUFACTURER HRS Unlimited johnpageclassic.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

The AJ’s vintage T-style bridge has step-compensated brass saddles for accurate intonation, and its reverse-angled pickup mounting removes the icepick harshness of the high strings for a sweeter tone.

this clever design also affords seamless tone transfer between neck and body. The AJ sports a 25 1/2-inch scale length, 22 nickel-silver frets, and a medium C-shape maple neck with maple fingerboard (rosewood is also available) that comfortably fits in the pocket of your hand. Its vintage T-style bridge plate with reverse pickup angle and three step-compensated brass saddles ensure spot-on intonation, and the Gotoh staggered vintage style tuners eliminate the need for a string tree. Other premium features include John Page custom-wound Bloodline JP-3T (T-style bridge) and JP-3P (P-90 neck) pickups, short knurled chrome volume and tone knobs, a three-way switch and a sidemounted input jack.

PERFORMANCE When I picked up the AJ,

I immediately knew I was playing a professional guitar that felt custom made. The AJ hugs your body in a way that instills confidence in your playing and feels effortless once you grip the gracefully carved, satin maple neck. String tension was slinky, allowing me to bend toward the sky without worrying about fretting out, thanks to the AJ’s super flat 12-inch radius fingerboard. The Bloodline pickups are simply outstanding. The JP-3T bridge pickup is incredibly smooth, mainly because its reverseangle positioning responds with sparkle and clarity, unlike other T-style guitars. In the middle position, which engages both pickups, the tone becomes light and airy, perfect for jazzy runs. But its JP-3P neck pickup is the real magic here, with a perfect blend of firm snap and crystalline bite.

The Bloodline JP-3P P-90 pickup delivers responsive bite without the bark, and the Bloodline JP-3T T-style pickup is wound to perfection, with taut lows and clear highs.

THE BOTTOM LINE The John Page Classic AJ is a perfectly conceived T-style guitar packed with stylized refinements and stellar tone that puts it in a league above custom guitars that are nearly twice its price.


INTRODUCING THE BRAND NEW GUITARWORLD.COM EXCLUSIVE REVIEWS

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GEAR NEWS

VIRAL VIDEOS


SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Oct2016

Feel the Noise

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMA

NC

SEYMOUR DUNCAN PALLADIUM GAIN STAGE E

By Ch ris G ill

WE’RE ALL FAMILIAR with stomp boxes

designed to sound like tube circuitry, but most of these pedals really just enhance the sound of the tube amps they’re already plugged into instead of actually sounding like tubes. Seymour Duncan’s new Palladium Gain Stage pedal is one of the few rare exceptions, featuring a versatile distortion and tone-shaping circuit that not only sounds like a tube amp but feels like one too. As a result, the Palladium sounds as good driving the front end of an already overdriven tube amp as it does plugged directly into a power amp and used as a preamp. FEATURES With nine knobs on its front panel, the Palladium offers a selection of controls that rivals those found on many modern tube amps. In fact, in some ways it outdoes them, primarily thanks to the versatility of its semi-parametric midrange section, which provides a Frequency

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GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

knob for selecting any midrange frequency between 255Hz to 1.1kHz and a separate midrange Level control. There are also amp-like Bass, Treble and Presence EQ knobs plus a Resonance control that allows users to dial in the enhanced lowend thump of a 4x12 speaker cabinet. Like any good distortion pedal, the Palladium also includes the requisite Level and Gain knobs, and it has a separate knob for dialing in the gain level of the footswitchable Boost function. The footswitch on the left is a hardwired true-bypass on/off switch with a red LED that illuminates brightly when the effect is on, while the footswitch on the right engages the Boost function and a corresponding green LED. The mono input and output jacks are professional quality and are located out of the way at the back of the pedal. The Palladium operates with any nine- to 18-volt DC center negative power supply (no battery operation).

PERFORMANCE Because the Palladium’s

controls are essentially identical to those found on most amps these days, it’s very easy to dial in any desired distortion tone or texture. The EQ section is active, providing +/-15dB of boost/cut at 100Hz for Bass, +/-12dB of boost/cut for Mid, +/-13dB of boost/cut at 2.7kHz for Treble and +/-13dB of boost/cut at 5.2kHz for Presence. Most guitarists will find these EQ frequencies ideal for dialing in tones suitable for any style of music from blues and classic rock to high-gain modern metal. The EQ generally sounds the best with the knobs dialed between 9 to 3 o’clock, although more extreme boost or cut settings can compensate for an overly dark or bright sounding amp or speakers used with the pedal. Whereas many “tube” pedals actually sound stiff and compressed, the Palladium responds to the dynamics of your playing, so overdrive tones can become more distorted as you play forcefully and cleaner


The Palladium responds to the dynamics of your playing, so overdrive tones become more distorted as you play forcefully and cleaner as you play lightly.

CHEAT SHEET

as you play lightly or turn down your guitar’s volume knob. Similarly, most pedals sound harsh and one-dimensional when plugged directly into a power amp, but the Palladium turns even the most unforgiving solid-state power amp into a warm, expressive guitar amp with all of the harmonic complexity and richness of a tube amp. Guitarists can even plug the Palladium directly into a recording console and achieve impressive tones, although a speaker simulator is also needed to achieve the most ideal, lifelike results. The Boost function summons smooth, sustaining lead tones, particularly when the Gain knob is cranked up past 12 o’clock. Like many distortion/overdrive pedals offered these days, the Palladium can provide a transparent clean boost that will push an already overdriven tube amp into a sweet spot at lower volume levels, but it’s most effective when used like an additional channel added to your amp.

PRS GUITARS SE MARK HOLCOMB SIGNATURE

The PRS Guitars SE Mark Holcomb model delivers addictive playability thanks to the Periphery guitarist’s unique specifications. The guitar boasts a 24-fret, 25 1/2–inch scale length, and wide thin satin maple neck with 20-inch radius ebony fretboard. Other features include a quilted maple veneer top, black chrome hardware, Mark Holcomb Signature Seymour Duncan “Omega” treble and “Alpha” bass pickups, and a 3-way blade pickup switch with push/pull tone knob for coil splitting. The guitar is set up and tuned to drop C. STREET PRICE $899; prsguitars.com

LIST PRICE $299 MANUFACTURER Seymour Duncan, seymourduncan.com The versatile EQ controls provide varying levels of boost/cut finely tuned to frequencies ideal for most overdriven and distorted guitar tones. The Resonance control makes the bass heavier but also tighter, replicating the tonality of a closedback 4x12 speaker cabinet.

THE BOTTOM LINE The Palladium Gain Stage pedals offers impressive tonal versatility and dynamic responsiveness similar to a tube amp with a wide rainbow of tones from overdrive crunch to saturated high-gain distortion.

BOSS

WAZA CRAFT CE-2W CHORUS The Boss Waza Craft CE-2w Chorus uses premium analog components and BBD circuitry to bring the classic sounds of the company’s legendary CE-1 Chorus Ensemble and CE-2 Chorus together in one pedal with enhanced features. Standard mode completely reproduces the original CE-2 sound, which can now be further enhanced with the CE-2w’s stereo output capability. CE-1 mode includes both chorus and vibrato, authentically reproducing the original’s distinctive sounds. STREET PRICE $199; bossus.com

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SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Oct2016

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

CELLENCE

Korina Dream REVEREND BILLY CORGAN SIGNATURE By Chris Gill

I’VE BEEN REVIEWING guitars for 25 years

and collecting them for about four decades, so I can attest that it’s very rare when a new electric solidbody guitar model comes along that has its own distinctive sound and personality instead of reminding me of a slight variation of something I’ve played before. The Reverend Billy Corgan Signature is one of those rare exceptions. While it certainly shares features with other Reverend models that I know and love, the entire package— from my example’s satin purple burst finish and segmented aluminum body panels to the unique character of its Railhammer Billy Corgan Signature pickups—is truly new, exciting and perhaps even revolutionary. FEATURES At first glance, the Reverend

Billy Corgan Signature looks like a standard dual-humbucker guitar with a bolt-on maple neck and a 25 1/2–inch scale. However, several features combine to deliver a very distinctive tonal profile that truly sounds unlike any other solidbody electric I’ve ever played. The body, which has the same signature offset, asymmetrical double-cutaway shape as the earliest Reverend models, is made out of Korina and is chambered in carefully chosen sections to enhance resonance, dynamics and sustain while also reducing overall weight. The pickups may look like standard humbuckers, but closer examination reveals an

CHEAT SHEET

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LIST PRICE $1,439 MANUFACTURER Reverend Guitars, reverendguitars.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

The Bass Contour control provides much more sonic flexibility than standard guitar tone controls by boosting or rolling off crucial bass frequencies.

exposed bar polepiece for the lower three strings and three round polepieces for the upper three strings. The design provides tone similar to a P-90 but fatter and the clarity and brilliant treble of a single-coil pickup with true humbucking, noise-free performance. The Bass Contour control allows guitarists to shape their tone dramatically, offering everything from enhanced bass that makes the tone even fatter and bigger to rolled-off low end that makes the mids and treble more sparkling and clear. Other features include a string-thru-body flatmount bridge with stainless steel saddles, 22 medium jumbo frets, Reverend pinlock tuners, a graphite nut, master volume and tone controls, a three-position blade pickup selector switch and a six-bolt neck attachment that keeps the neck rock solid. PERFORMANCE Apparently Corgan’s tonal

reference point for his Railhammer signature pickups was Tony Iommi’s “cocked wah” midrange. The Reverend Corgan certainly delivers that distinctive, vocal-like midrange personality, but without sacrificing bass and treble frequencies. As a result, the guitar sounds great both when played clean or with generous layers of distortion. Best of all, every note rings out loud and clear. The tone is impressively musical, particularly for rhythm parts where note-tonote definition is crucial.

The Billy Corgan Signature Railhammer pickups combine the noise-free performance of humbuckers with the clarity and sparkle of single-coil pickups.

THE BOTTOM LINE The Reverend Billy Corgan Signature delivers truly unique tones that stand out from the sea of soundalike guitars crowding today’s market, making it a great choice for players seeking their own voice or to add new sounds to their rigs.


get into your

ELEMENT

The Element Series acoustic guitars are the most refined, well-appointed instruments Mitchell has ever created. Stunning flamed maple binding, shifted scalloped X-bracing and rubbed satin finishes provide a striking look and warm woody tone. Available with onboard Fishman® electronics, in dreadnought and auditorium style, there’s an Element guitar for every player.

ME1 • Dreadnought • Solid spruce top • Sapele back/sides

ME1CE • Dreadnought/cutaway • Solid spruce top • Sapele back/sides • Fishman electronics

MitchellGuitars.com The NEW Element Series available EXCLUSIVELY at these preferred retailers:

ME2CEC • Dreadnought/cutaway • Solid cedar top • Rosewood back/sides • Fishman electronics

ME1ACE • Auditorium/cutaway • Solid spruce top • Sapele back/sides • Fishman electronics


SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/ Oct2016

Buzz Bin

Fender Pro In-Ear Monitors FXA6

Big Baby

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMA

NC

DUNLOP CRY BABY CBM105Q MINI BASS WAH E

By Chris Gill

BASS PLAYERS WHO love funky wah effects rely on the Cry Baby 105Q Bass Wah more than any other wah on the market. The reason is simple: It’s fine-tuned to the sweet spot of most bass guitars and doesn’t kill bottom end like electric guitar wahs often do. If you’re a bass player who loves pedals and doesn’t have a wah yet, you probably don’t have room left on your pedalboard for adding one. Fortunately, Cry Baby now offers a mini version of the venerable 105Q that’s less than half the size but delivers identical performance.

FEATURES The CBM105Q is just slightly larger than a small MXR-style (Phase 90 or DynaComp) pedal, so it takes up a minimal amount of space on a pedalboard. All the features are exactly the same as those found on its big brother, including externally mounted Volume knob/Boost switch and Q controls for providing up to 20dB of boost and adjusting the width of the

CHEAT SHEET

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LIST PRICE $119.99 MANUFACTURER Dunlop Manufacturing, jimdunlop.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

effect’s frequency range, respectively. Operation is automatic and footswitch free. To engage the effect you just sweep the toe downwards. The effect is also bypassed automatically after you remove your foot from the rocker pedal. The Cry Baby Mini Bass Wah operates with a single nine-volt battery or a standard nine-volt DC center negative adapter. PERFORMANCE Whether you play four-, five- or six-string bass or baritone or downtuned guitars, the Cry Baby CBM105Q Mini Bass Wah delivers expressive, vocal-like wah effects that never sacrifice crucial bottom end frequencies. The Volume/Boost control can restore levels lost when using fuzz or distortion, or it can provide a significant boost for solos. The Q control can make the frequency range narrower, which emphasizes highs, or wider to produce a dramatic wah effect that sweeps the low end as well.

THE BOTTOM LINE Although the CBM105Q is much smaller than the standard version, it’s just as easy to use— some players may actually find the smaller profile easier and more accurate to manipulate.

Whether you’re a casual weekend warrior or grinding out a full-time gigging schedule, using in-ear monitors not only enhances your listening experience but can also boost your performance to a personal best, because you’ll be able to hear, in quiet comfort, exactly what you’re playing. Generally, in-ear monitors can be a costly option that requires a custom mold fitting done by an audiologist. However, Fender brings this concept to the consumer level by releasing five different models of pro in-ear monitors made in the USA that range in price from $99.99 to $499.99, with no custom mold required. I took a listen to the Fender FXA6 Pro In-Ear monitors, which are optimized for professional performances. The FXA6 has a frequency response of 6Hz-22kHz for detailed sound reproduction and features a HBDA tweeter (Hybrid-Dynamic tuned Balanced Armature Array) that delivers dynamic high end. Its custom rare-earth driver packs plenty of low-end punch, and the Groove-tuned bass port enhances bass response and audio transparency. The slim in-ear monitors are 3D-printed digital hybrid low-profile shells that fit 95 percent of ears and feel similar to custom-molded monitors while reducing ambient noise (up to 22dB). The FXA6 includes a deluxe carrying case, 1/8- to 1/4-inch adapter, secure-fit tips, and cleaning tool and cable. I plugged the FXA6 IEMs into my AKG IVM4500 wireless system’s receiver, which transmitted my band’s monitor mix, guitar sound and overall volume, and the FXA6 IEMs sound exceptionally clear and focused, and fit perfectly in my ears. The FXA6 captured the nuances of my guitar tone while making me feel immersed with the rest of the band thanks to its full frequency response that never fatigued my ears.  —Paul Riario

LIST PRICE $399.99 MANUFACTURER Fender, fender.com


For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Oct2016

by Mike Dawes



COLUMNS

WOOD VIBRATIONS

POLY-CENTRIC

DADGAD tuning, w/capo at 4th fret and first string un-capoed (low to high, F# C# F# B C# D). All music sounds in the key written. All tab numbers are “non-transposing.”

4

4

 

9

4

   

4

4

0 4 4

4 9 9

4 4

4

4

0 4 9

4

4 12

9

9

12  11

9

4

9 9

4 4

  

4 4

Gmaj9#11

1

5

4

4

0 4 5

4 7

4

5

4 4

0 4

4  11 4

0 0 4

4 4 9 9

4 4

4

7

4

5

 

0

4

4

4

4

4

75

4 7

0 4

4

7

9 9

Bm

1.

4 12 11 0

   9

5

  

4

4

4

  

4

0

Bm(add2) 4

7

5

 

5

7

9

9

4

4

4

 4   4 4

5

 

7

FIGURE FIG. 5 5 0

7

 

5

4

7

5

5

12  11 4

Gmaj7(9)

pick hand: p i p m i p i p m i

3

7

*All grace notes are tied (see lesson).

FIGURE FIG. 4 4

5

let ring throughout

   

4

4

 

Bm

5

7

 7

   

5

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

4

84

7

 

(play 6 times)

*

 

FIG. 3 3 FIGURE

5

4

5

2.

4 9

0 4 9

4

4

4

4

7

*k **s

4

4 12

4 9 7 7

 11 11 0 16 0

0 4 5

k 11 16

*k= “kick drum”: strike top of gtr. w/heel of right palm **s= slap strings w/r.h. finger

and fifth strings and to the fourth string’s seventh fret. I then pull off to the capoed “open” fourth string (the fourth fret), hammer onto the fifth string’s seventh fret and then end the pattern with the pull-off to the open sixth string. The second time the pattern is played, in bar 2, the second note is sounded with a grace-note pull-off from the seventh fret (tied from bar 1) to the fifth fret on the fifth string. FIGURE 2 shows the next fret-hand pattern, which is performed in a very similar manner but with a few variations: after hammering on the third note, I slide back one fret and then pull off to the open string (the fourth fret). The figure ends with a double-stop pull-off on the bottom two strings, with the “tied” ninth-fret notes pulling off to the open strings. Let’s now practice moving between these two figures, as shown in FIGURE 3. The polyrhythm now comes into play with the inclusion of the pick-hand motif, which by itself is played in 5/4 meter and is based on the repeating five-note sequence illustrated in FIGURE 4. The picking pattern for the sequence is thumb

index thumb middle index (as indicated in the music by the traditional Spanish abbreviations p i p m i). All of the notes are played “open,” with the capo “fretting” the notes at the fourth fret on the second and third strings. Practice fingerpicking the sequence repeatedly until you can play it instinctively; you will need to be able to play it nearly unconsciously when combining it with the fret-hand part. FIGURE 5 presents the two parts played together. Notice that, when the pick-hand pattern is laid over the 12/8 meter, it lines up over a downbeat every five beats, creating an unusual and seemingly random rhythmic and melodic effect. After the first four bars are played, bars 1–3 are repeated, followed by a second ending (the final bar), wherein, on beat four, I strum an Asus2 chord, and then create a “kick drum” sound by hitting the face of the guitar with my pickhand palm. I follow this with a slap on the fifth string at the 16th fret, creating a harmonic that is played in tandem with the fretted note on the fourth string. The figure ends with another “kick.”

Mike Dawes is an English guitarist and touring musician, hailed as one of the world’s most creative fingerstyle performers and renowned for his ability to seamlessly replicate a full band on a single instrument. For more information, visit mikedawes.co.uk.

L A R RY D I M A R Z I O

a good polyrhythm, especially within the context of a solo guitar piece. Polyrhythms can add an interesting perspective and atmosphere to a piece of music, and I take quite a lot of liberties with the concept of polyrhythms on all of the songs on my What Just Happened album, as well as my new album, which will be released at the end of this year. The examples in this column are derived from my song “The Impossible,” about which I have received many questions during clinics. “Poly” means “more than one,” so, combined with the word “rhythm,” a polyrhythm is a musical figure in which more than one rhythmic pattern is happening simultaneously. When stacking polyrhythmic figures, an array of different and somewhat random-sounding harmonies can be created until the two different rhythms re-synchronize at a given point. In our featured example, we have a lower part performed entirely with the fret hand on the three lowest strings and a higher part on the top three strings, executed with the pick hand only. Let’s look at each part individually, then we’ll join them together. For this song, my guitar is tuned to DADGAD (low to high: D A D G A D), with a capo placed at the fourth fret but not touching the highest string, which remains un-capo-ed. The resultant tuning, at concert pitch, is Fs Cs Fs B Cs D, which yields a very unusual chord, Fssus4addf6. Due to the use of a “partial capo” here, the tab numbers in this lesson will represent the actual frets, so a “4” on the one of the capoed strings would be played “open.” Let’s begin with the fret-hand pattern, shown in FIGURE 1. The part is in 12/8 meter and may alternatively be thought of as being in 6/4, due to the use of successive quarter notes. All notes are sounded by either hammering onto a string or by pulling off from a previously fretted note, which is the case with every grace note, which is “tied” to the previous articulation of that same note. The first three notes are sounded by hammering on “from nowhere” to the fifth fret on the sixth

let ring

IN MY EXPERIENCE, everyone loves

  5  A

FIG. 2 2 FIGURE

Gmaj7(9)

  

FIG. 1 1 FIGURE

Utilizing two-handed polyrhythms for solo guitar performance


DONNY LITTLE / PAOLO NUTINI

yamaha.com/revstar


By Jimmy Brown



COLUMNS

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Oct2016

STRING THEORY

Jazz-blues comping with “chord jabs”

CONTINUING OUR EXPLORATION of

cool things to do with a jazz-blues chord progression in a rhythm section, I’d now like to demonstrate an accompaniment, or “comping,” technique favored by jazz guitarists, pianists and organists alike over a swing-style walking bass line (provided by a bassist, second guitarist or keyboardist’s left hand) that provides interesting chord movement and rhythmic “push” while remaining texturally light and unobtrusive and not crowding out a soloist or “stealing the spotlight.” The concept is to think like a big-band arranger and play like a tightly orchestrated horn section, sparsely interjecting punchy, staccato chord accents, also known as “jabs,” or “stabs,” into the groove using swing-eighth rhythms but doing so sparingly, so as to give the soloist plenty of open space in which to improvise and the bassist and/or drummer ample room to “play time.” The technique builds upon examples I presented in the previous two columns (see String Theory August and September 2016), in which I played walking bass lines with chord stabs added. Now we’ll let the bass player do the walking, which will free up our hands to play bigger, bolder chord voicings and more varied rhythms. FIGURE 1 has us comping on a 12-bar jazz-blues progression in the key of G, using four-note voicings on the top four strings exclusively, except for the final chord. Again, the concept is to emulate a group of synchronized horns. You could strum each chord with a pick, but you’ll achieve a more precise, non-staggered articulation by employing hybrid picking or straight fingerpicking, using either the pick or your bare thumb to play the notes on the D string and your middle finger, ring finger and pinkie to pluck the top three strings. One of the creative challenges with this comping style is to try and vary your rhythms enough so that they sound fresh, as it’s all too easy to fall into a repetitive, predictable phrasing pattern. Notice that many of the chord jabs fall on an eighth-note upbeat—on one of the “and” counts between beats—and half a beat “early,” relative to when the chord change “officially” occurs. These anticipations create a strong sense of forward motion, which helps propel the groove. Many of the

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GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

FIGURE FIG. 11

sparse, punchy comping on a jazz-blues progression in G   3

Medium Swing G13 1

 5

  



    =   

 

3 5 4 3

7 5 5 5

 7 4 5 4

1

  

5

/0

9

 

 5  55  3

3 3 3 2

  

Dm9

 Bm7  2 3 2 4

3 5 4 3



G13

7 4 5 4

  5 3 4 4



E7 #11 #9 6 8 7 6

E7#9#5



  13

G 9 G9

8 8 7 6

0 8 8 7 6

0 6 8 7 6

G7   C9    #5 5  6 6 6  3 5  4 4 4    4 4  33 5  4 3 3 3 3 2    A9(13) A9¨13 Am9     6 7 7 7 7 7 8 7 7 6 6  7  6 6  6 6  55 6 5 5 5 5 5     #9

/0

/0

[A¨9(13)] #9 A9(13) D7 #5

 7 7 6 5

0 6 6 5 4

 

G13   3 5 4 3

G9(13) 

0 0 2 3

3

0 0 0 2 3 3

[D¨9(13)]

G7¨9 G7 #5 C9(13)        10 12 10 10 10 12 10 12 15 11 10   10  10 10 12  15 10 10 10 10 10 12 10  10  10 10  9 9   10  10 10  14  13  11 10  9 9 9 9 8 8 15 9 8  10 10 10 15       #11 C#°7 E7 ¨9 Am11  Bm7         10 6 9 9 12 10 10 10 10  10 10 5 8 8 11 10 10 11 11 12   6  9 9 12 11  11  10 10   12 9  8 5 8 8 11 9 9 9 9 10      #9 #9 D7#5 G9 E7 #5 A9 D7#5 G13#11        10 10 10 15 12 13 13 9 11 10  13 12  11 11 10     12 12 11 10 13 12 11 11  10 10 9 12 11 10 10  998    

G9

10 10 9 8

0

FIGURE FIG. 22 variation

3 4 4 3

  F9(13) 3 3 3 3  3  32 32 2 1 1   D13¨9

10

G7¨13 C9



STICK AND MOVE

C9(13)

0

chords are separated by rests, or “holes of silence,” of varying lengths while other chords are tied over and held into the following beat. Sustained notes and chords provide a welcome contrast to short rhythms. FIGURE 2 offers another example of the same comping approach applied to a slightly different set of changes (there are many variations on the jazz-blues progression), with a few substitutions employed and featuring some new, interesting voicings and rhythmic motifs. As you play through both figures, listen to and study the voice-leading from chord to chord, meaning the way in which each individual note, or voice, moves up or down, or remains stationary, as a common tone, in relation to the voices on the other strings. Also notice that a couple of

#9

Dm9 Dm7 Dm9 G9

0

0

0 0

chords have an alternate name (indicated in brackets), which is what that chord would be called if a bassist were to play a tritonesubstitution root note beneath it, something jazz musicians love to do when walking. One of the coolest and most intriguing things about jazz is the way individual musicians, when jamming on a chord progression and improvising, will creatively interject tritone subs and other types of chord substitutions, be they diatonic (keybased) or non-diatonic (chromatic), or superimpose or melodically imply them over what others might be playing. This makes for unpredictable “outside” dissonances and a fluid musical push-pull of tension and release, which can be quite exciting and dramatic.

To download Jimmy Brown’s latest DVD, Jimmy Page Playing Secrets, Vol 1: Electric Style—as individual chapters or the complete disc—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.


For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Oct2016

by Joel Hoekstra



COLUMNS

SCHOOL OF ROCK

DISPLACED CREATIVITY

Shifting pentatonic licks to create “outside” sounds

FIG. 1 1 FIGURE

 

5

5

7

5

5

8



5

7

ALMOST EVERY ROCK guitarist knows

his minor pentatonic scales inside and out, as they are the backbone of rock and blues soloing, song structures and chord progressions. This month, I’d like to demonstrate some simple ways to twist standard pentatonic licks to create unusual “outside” sounds. In FIGURE 1, I play a sequence of 16th notes, all derived from A minor pentatonic (A C D E G) and based on a progression of thirds and fourths, moving from lower to higher strings in two-string pairs. This is a basic pattern that many of you may already know. For many of the note pairs I barre a finger across two adjacent strings at the same fret. I like to hybrid pick this pattern, using my middle finger to pluck the higher note of each pair. The phrase ends with a whole-step bend up to the A root note, which I adorn with some soulful finger vibrato. This is a cool lick as is, but let’s tweak it a bit by shifting the notes up a half step every other beat, temporarily moving out of key. As shown in FIGURE 2, beats one and three in bar 1 and beat one in bar 2 are identical to FIGURE 1. The “twist” is on beats two and four of bar 1, wherein I shift the notes up one fret and instead play them in Bf minor pentatonic (Bf Df Ef F Af). This simple alteration pulls the lick out of the familiar and into an unexpected and new harmonic territory, creating an exciting dissonance and feeling of tension and release. Let’s now apply the concept to other minor pentatonic patterns. In FIGURE 3, I descend across the strings in three-note groups, one note per string. I’m again employing hybrid picking, in this case using both my ring and middle fingers to pluck the first two notes of each triplet. As we had done with FIGURES 1 and 2, FIGURE 4 replicates FIGURE 3 with half-step shifts up to Bf minor pentatonic on beats two and four.

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GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

8

5

8 8

7

5

7

5 7

7

8

5

8

8

8

5 7

3

5

5

8

3

7

 

8

5

7

3

5

5

9

3

8

6

6

8

3

6

3

7

7

5

5

5

8

3

8

6 9

3

6

5

75

7

9

9 5

75

7975

5

7

6

8

6

6

9

8 6

5

5

 75

7

86

5 8 10 8 6

6

86

8

6

6

86

13

9 5

8 10 8 5

6

15 10 12 10

6

8

7

6

10 16 11 13 11

5

6

5

7



8

8

5

7

5

6 8

8

6

1

5 9 11 9 6

8

6

5

6

Another way to apply the half-stepshift is to move up a half step and stay there for another beat before shifting back down, as demonstrated in FIGURE 5. Again using hybrid picking, I begin in A minor, move up to Bf minor for two beats, and then return to A minor for two beats. The phrase ends with two beats in Bf minor then culminates in A minor with a G-to-A bend and some vibrato. In FIGURE 6, each bar “sits” in A minor for two beats then shifts up to Bf

7

5

5

7

8

3

5

5

6

7

9

6

7

8

 

5

3

 

7 5

7

8

8 5

6

8

6

6

8

7 6

5

7

5

FIG. 6 6 FIGURE

 

 

N.C.(Am)

8 5

7 10 7 5

8

5 8 118 6

6

10 5 8 5

15

8 5

5

8 5

7

9 6

8 6

6

8 6

8

N.C.(Am)

8

9

6

7 10 7 5

6

5 11 6 9 6

6

11 17 12 15 12

5

 3

 

FIGURE FIG. 7 7



5 7

5 8

FIGURE FIG. 5 5

1

8

7

3

3

6

14

5

3

6

1

8

7



7

3

5

3

N.C.(Am)

8

w/hybrid picking

 

N.C.(Am)

 

FIG. 4 4 FIGURE

5

8

5

FIG. 3 3 FIGURE

1

5

FIG. 2 2 FIGURE

 8  1

N.C.(Am)

16

5 8 11 8 6

6

9

8

6

6

6 12 8 10 8 8 13 9 11 9 9 10 11

6

12 18 13 16 13

7

  6

13

17

6

6

minor. In FIGURE 7, bars 1–3, I use widestretch hammer-pulls to articulate most of the notes, repeatedly shifting from Am to Bfm on each successive beat. I bar 4, the lick “shape” is different, as I move to a more Randy Rhoads–like chromatic figure that gradually climbs up the high E string in half steps. This is a challenging lick to play fast, so practice it slowly and carefully at first and be aware of any potential discomfort in your fret hand, taking breaks as needed.

New York City guitarist Joel Hoekstra plays for Whitesnake, the Trans Siberian Orchestra and his new side project, Joel Hoekstra’s 13, who recently released their debut album, Dying to Live.


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www.kysermusical.com

KYSER® MUSICAL PRODUCTS


For audio of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Oct2016

by Dale Turner



COLUMNS

ACOUSTIC NATION

WILDWOOD FLOWER

Maybelle Carter’s influential strumming techniques MAYBELLE CARTER (1909–1978) was

the musical backbone of country music’s first “superstar” vocal group, the Carter Family, an act perhaps best known for (of the 300-plus songs they recorded) “Can the Circle Be Unbroken,” “Bury Me Under the Weeping Willow Tree” and “Wildwood Flower.” In their unique brand of “mountain gospel music,” Maybelle sang harmony and played distinctly ornate guitar parts on her 1928 Gibson L-5 archtop acoustic, seamlessly weaving together walking bass lines, chord strums and fills/melody. Her sound became a group trademark, and by the late Twenties, “Carter strumming” (a.k.a. “Carter Family picking” and the “Maybelle Carter scratch”) was one of the most emulated guitar styles in the United States, influencing Merle Travis, Chet Atkins, Doc Watson, Joan Baez, Clarence White and countless others. Originally a trio (1927–1944), with Maybelle’s sister Sara, and Sara’s husband A.P. Carter, later Carter Family incarnations included “Mother” Maybelle Carter’s children (among them, June Carter, who later married Johnny Cash). Today they are collectively dubbed “The First Family of Country Music.” Let’s examine Maybelle’s guitar mastery, as displayed throughout her showcase piece, “Wildwood Flower” (The Carter Family: 1927–1934, among other collections). Maybelle Carter picked the strings with her index finger and thumb, affixed with fingerpicks, but bare fingers will suffice. She originally recorded “Wildwood Flower” with a capo at the sixth fret but in later years would move it to lower frets to suit her deepening vocal range. FIGURE 1 shows an introductory take on Carter’s technique, thumbing the “alternating” bass notes (usually the root and fifth; “slash chord” symbols above the tablature—C/G, G7/B—specify exact bass notes) and brushing higher strings with the index finger—like “scratching” an itch. Though the tablature shows “upstroke” strums sounding two strings and “downstrokes” hitting three, that type of precision is not critical; it’s merely a guideline to help

90

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

All examples performed fingerstyle, with a capo at the sixth fret. All tablature positions are relative to the capo. All music sounds in the key of F#, three whole steps higher than written.

 = downstroke strum w/thumb  

FIG. 11    = FIGURE p = thumb

C

3

  

C/G

let ring p

  

  

p

0 0 0 1 1 1 0

FIGURE FIG. 22

3

C/E

0

FIG. 33 FIGURE

C

p

C

1

2

C/G

1 1 0

3

FIG. 44 FIGURE C

p

2

3

C/E

0 0 p 0 0 0

p

1 1 1 0

0 2

  

0 0 0 1 1 1 0

p

0

2

C/G

 3    =    3

p

F etc.

1 1 1 0

3

1 1

1 1 2

3

p

1 1 1 2

p

p

0

2

3

0 0 0

F/A

1 1 1 1 1 1 2

0 2

1 1

F/C

F

C

1 1

0 2

C/E

C/G

1 1

1 1

0 2

1

1

0

2

1 1 1

3

0 2

1 1

p

1 1

 

0 0 1 0

   0 0 0 1 1 1 0

0 2 3

      C/G

0 0 0 1 1 1 0 3

0 2

p

3

p

0

3

p p p p    p p 0 0  0 0  0 p 0    1 1  0 0  0 0  1 1 1

let ring

 0  1  0

C

1 1 1 1 1 1 2

1 1

3

3

C

1 1 p

3

 3

3

G7

3

1 1 2

0 0 0 1 1 1 0

3

F/C

C

0 0 0 1 1 1 0

1 1 p 1 1 1

F/C

C/G

1 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

F p

C

1 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 p 0 0 0 1 1 0

G7/B

0 0 0 1 1 1 0

C/E

1 1 1 0

 3    =   

let ring

p

1 1 0

G7

3

0 0 p 0 0 0

let ring p

0 0 0 1 1 1 0

3

= upstroke strum w/index finger

C/G

sim.

0 0 0 1 1 1 0

3

p

C

0 0 0 1 1 1 0

C/E p

0 0 p 0  0  1 1 1   1  0 0 0 0 0 0 G7/D

1 1

0 2

1

3

1

2

G7/B

0 0 0

0

3

mimic Carter’s sound—similar to strumming with a pick, where, generally, upstrokes naturally hit fewer strings than downstrokes. FIGURE 2 focuses on the bass-line element of Carter’s approach, specifically the way she would “walk up ” or “walk down” from one chord to the next by ascending or descending through the notes of a related scale on the lower strings in a quarter-note rhythm, two beats before a chord change. This occurs at the end of bars 2 (approaching F) and 4 (approaching C), as well as the chromatic notes (notes moving in successive half steps, the distance of one fret), in the pick-up measure (the two notes leading into bar 1). Carter’s “alternating bass” technique is also involved in bar 3 (F/C).

C

0

2 0

2

C/G

1 1 1 0

3

C p

3

3

 

0 0 1 0

1 1 1 0

Now let’s add some chord ornaments to the mix. In FIGURE 3, bars 2 and 4, we’re hitting an open string then hammering on to the second-fret note of a C or F chord. This Carter “chord embellishing” technique, when combined with alternating bass notes and strums, has since become a staple in effective “strummed” acoustic country guitar accompaniments. Putting it all together, FIGURE 4 features eight bars of “Wildwood Flower”– inspired fun. Note that all “musical holes” are filled—no rests or held notes—resulting in constant eighth notes, as melody, chord strums, bass notes and other trademark Carter decorations seamlessly and beautifully interact.

To download Dale Turner’s Secrets of the Great Acoustic Songwriters DVD—as individual chapters or the complete disc—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


PITTBULL ULTRA LEAD on stage with Helmet

Steven Fryette pioneered the high gain, high definition, channel switching amp category with the release of the Pittbull series amplifiers 25 years ago.

PHOTO: JAMMIE YORK PHOTOGRAPHY

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by Andy Aledort



COLUMNS

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Oct2016

IN DEEP

ACCOMPANY MAN

Creative approaches to rhythm guitar

3 3       Triplet Feel      =   N.C.(E9) 1

FIG. 1 1 FIGURE

  



19

0405

0

1/2

5

5

75

92

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

12

10 12

10

11

10

9

10

9

1/2

1/2

8 8

7 7 0

1/4

7 530

3

5302 2

3

10

0

0

 40 0 0

9 7

 0 4 0 5  11

4 5 6 4 0 5 

9

0



5 3

4 0

 0 4 0 5 G 5 0

5

3

3

2 2 0

2

2

0

2

3202

0

2

0

20

0

2

20

2

7  9 9 9 9 10 10 10 10 9 9 9

 0

0 0

7

16

4 4  7  16

14 12

14

13

3 0

10

11

9

9

7 5 5

5 3 0

3

3

7 9 9 9 9

530

X X X 4 5 1/2

3

9 7

0

7 7

5

4 0 5 11

5 7

5

6

7

5 4 4

405 55

9

3

7 9



FIG. 22 FIGURE 1

N.C.(E9)

0

 

5 5 7

3

5

 7

6

0 5

0 5

6 7

5 7

7

5

1/2

0 0

1/2

0

9

6 6

5 7

6

6

0

0

6

4

7

7

7

6

5 6

7 7

9 7

9 7

5 7

7 7

0 0

0

7 5

5

0 !

7 6

7

5

 8

7

7

7 7 6

7

/0

0 6

0 9

7 9

8

9

0

0

0

7

9

6 6

find similar rhythmic phrases in the funk standards “Standing on Shaky Ground” and “Bending Like a Willow Tree.” In bars 1, 3 and 6, I embellish the rhythm part with single-note lines based on the E minor pentatonic scale (E G A B D). In bars 2, 4 and 9–12, I use sliding sixths (pairs of notes on non-adjacent strings that are an interval of a sixth apart, diatonic to E Mixolydian). I like to take liberties with the sixths by incorporating chromaticism, as demonstrated in bars 4 and 10. FIGURE 2 begins with an E7sus4 chord

0 5

7

5 7

6

7

7

1/2

8

1/2

10

8

9

1/2

0 7

6 7

7

9

7

1/2

5 7

9

let ring

5 56 5 5 8 5 7



reality is that, for most of us, the majority of time spent in a band setting is applied to playing rhythm guitar. While most serious guitarists have devised plenty of effective ways to practice and hone their soloing skills, the same cannot be said for the art of playing rhythm guitar. Focusing practice time on rhythm takes a different kind of discipline, which is why, unfortunately, one rarely hears someone say, “Wow, that guy’s an amazing rhythm player!” In my experience, time spent learning to improve one’s rhythm guitar chops reaps many different benefits, from solidifying your sense of time to instilling yourself as an integral part of the rhythm section. In this column, I demonstrate two approaches to playing rhythm guitar–style accompaniment over a static one-chord funk grove in E. I use the term “rhythm guitar–style” because I take liberties with the concept by including sliding sixths, singlenote melodic lines, allusions to other chords, rhythmic syncopations and more. These rhythm parts are played over a funk-style backing track with an implied tonality of E7 (or E9). I encourage you to practice playing rhythm guitar over all kinds of backing tracks (these days there are zillions on YouTube), but you should also spend time practicing rhythm guitar just to a metronome, so that you’ll be able to focus on the tempo and the time alone, without the support of bass, drums and other instruments. FIGURE 1 illustrates a 12-bar rhythm part that describes an E7 tonality by remaining rooted in the E Mixolydian mode (E Fs Gs A B Cs D), which is nearly identical to the E major scale, the only difference being that the seventh scale degree is lowered, or “flatted,” from Ds, the major seventh, to D, the minor, or “flat” seventh, so the 1-3-5-f7 chord tones are E-Gs-B-D. If you expand the chord tones to the 9, 11 and 13, the additional notes are Fs, A and Cs. In bar 1, across beats one and two, I set up a theme that’s repeated throughout the example. This theme kicks off bars 1–3, as well as bars, 6, 9 and 11. Stylistically, you’ll

12

0

3

4

AS MUCH AS guitarists love to solo, the

75

7

8

10 8

0 7

1/2

6

9

0

0

0

0

0

7

5

7

5

5

voicing, and the presence of the fourth, A, on top, inspired the move to the subsequent single-note line based on the E blues scale. In bars 2–5, I lean on the open high E string as a pedal tone while playing a melodic line on the A, D and G strings, moving in bar 8 to oblique bends (two-note figures in which one of the two strings is bent) and then a return to high-E pedal tone phrases at the end of the figure. Now that you have the idea, try devising your own inventive rhythm parts using these techniques and approaches.

To download instructional guitar DVDs by Andy Aledort— as individual chapters or complete discs—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


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by Dave Davidson of Revocation



COLUMNS

THRASH COURSE

METALURGENCY

Incorporating jazz chords into metal HELLO EVERYONE, AND WELCOME to

my latest round of Guitar World columns! It’s great to be back, and I sincerely hope these lessons will be illuminating and useful to you in your own personal musical endeavors. Though my chosen genre of music with my band Revocation is metal, I studied jazz guitar at Berklee College of Music, and I am always looking for creative ways to expand the musical palette of metal via the use of jazz-type chord voicings and harmonies. It’s great to introduce different sounds to metal that are not normally associated with the genre. For all of the examples illustrated here, my seven-string guitar is tuned down one half step (low to high: Bf Ef Af Df Gf Bf Ef). In order to make the lessons accessible to six-string players, however, I’ll avoid using the seventh string, so all of the examples presented can be performed on six-string instruments. FIGURE 1 comes from the Revocation song “Communion,” featured on our latest release, Great Is Our Sin (Metal Blade). The lick is played in 4/4 time at a very fast tempo of 240 beats per minute. Before delving into the jazz-like harmony of the chords, I should point out that the passage is rhythmically contoured with a lot of three-beat groups played back to back. So, feel-wise, each four-bar phrase may alternatively be counted as four bars of 3/4 followed by a bar of 4/4; But one can simply count straight 4/4 through the entire example, as notated here, which I prefer because it accentuates this rhythmic ambiguity. Before strumming each new chord, I alternate-pick its root note in a fast eighthnote triplet rhythm. I begin with a basic Em chord, followed by the jagged sounding F7f9 and Bfmaj7 chords. Bar 3 ends with Am, after which I play a single-note line in straight eighth notes that is based on the fifth mode of E harmonic minor (E Fs G A B C Ds) with a Gs passing tone included. This lick serves as a nod to the altered-dominant five chord of Em, B7s5, which then resolves back to the Em, the one chord. In bar 6, B7s5 replaces the Bfmaj7 and Am chords that were played

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Tune down one half step (low to high, E¨ A¨ D¨ G¨ B¨ E¨). All music sounds one half step lower than written.

FIG. 11 FIGURE 1

 5

Em

 

q = 240

7 8 9 9 7 7 7 7 3

Em

7 8 9 9 7 7 7 7

7 8 9 9 7

7 8 9 9 7

Em

7 8 9 9 7 7 7 7

5

    11 9 7 0

3

11 9 7 0

11 9 7 0

7 8 7

3 2 1 3 1

7 7 8 8 7 7

3

3 2 1 3 1

8 8 7

12 9 7 0

3

12 9 7 0

3

3 2 1 3 1 3

3 2 1 3 1

3 2 1 3 1

12 10 10 10

12 10 10 10

F 69 8 8 7 7

8 8 7 7

3

12 10 10 10

12 10 10 10

3

 

7 Dm 13

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

the first time through the pattern. The same fifth mode of E harmonic minor is used for the single-note passage in bar 8, but here I focus on the diminished seventh tones—Ds, Fs, A and C—which allude to both B7s5 and Cdim7. The entire eight-bar phrase then repeats, beginning in bar 9, and in bar 16 I simply drop down one half step from B7s5 to Bf7s5. FIGURE 2 is from a song called “Profanum Vulgus,” also from Great Is Our Sin. This riff is played in 3/4 meter and at a much slower tempo of 134 beats per minute. The entire figure is built from shifting chord voicings, starting with an Esus2 “spread” voicing

6

7

8 8 7 7

F 69 8 8 7 7

8 8 7 7

7 6 5 7 5

3

8

9

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

3

8 8 7 7

7 6 5 7 5

7

9

9

8

  

00 7 7 6

6 6 6

7 Dm 13

3

7 6 5 7 5

10 7

7 7 6

3

8 8 7 7 3

7 6 5 7 5

8

9

7 7 6

6 6 6

8 8 7 7

8 8 7 7

5

7 7 7 7 6 6

3

3

0 5 5 5 7

3

12 12 12 12 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Fmaj7

9 10

B¨7#5

 

3

3

12 9 7 0

8 8 7

7 7 7

Fmaj7

3

0 0 0

00

8 8 7

6

9 8

Am

3

7 7 7

12 9 7 0

6 7 7

3

8 8 7

3

3 2 1 3 1

6 7 7

3

12 9 7 0

3

7 8 7

B7#5

0

8 7

5 9

6 7

8 8 7

7 7 7

6 6 6

Em 11 9 7 0

8 8 7

3

11 11 11 11 12 12 12 12 12 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

7 B¨m 13

3 2 1 3 1

8 8 7

B¨maj7

3

3

8

7 8 7

q = 134 Esus2 Em

Esus2

3

7 7 7

3

7 8 9 9 7 8 8 8

3

7 8 7

0 5 5 5 7

0 0 0

3

8 8 8

F7¨9

6 7 7

B7#5

3

7 8 9 9 7 7 7 7

Am

6 7 7 6 6 6

F7¨9

FIG. 22 FIGURE 1

7 8 7

3

8 8 8

Em

3

13

B¨maj7 7 8 7

8 8 8

F7¨9

3

9

F7¨9 7 8 9 9 7

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

3

7 Dm 13

8 8 7 7

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

3

7 B¨m 13

3 2 1 3 1

3 2 1 3 1

7 6 5 7 5

7 6 5 7 5

3

3 2 1 3 1

3

3 2 1 3 1

3 2 1 3 1

3 2 1 3 1

3 2 1 3 1

3

of “stacked fifths” that spans four frets then expands to Em and a five-fret span, followed by an Fmaj7 chord in second inversion (with the fifth in the bass) and a first-inversion (third in the bass) F6/9 chord. The three-bar pattern ends with a dense, complex-sounding Dm7/13 chord. As you can see, these are not the “normal” type of chords one usually hears in metal-based music. Bars 1–3 are repeated in bars 5–7, after which the Dm7/13 voicing moves down two whole steps to Bfm7/13. Now try devising your own unusual “jazzy” chord progressions within the framework of metal music. Don’t be afraid to experiment. If it sounds good, it is good!

To download Dave Davidson’s Heavy Metal Hybrid Picking DVD—as individual chapters or the complete disc—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


253-845-0403

MON-FRI 9AM-5PM PACIFIC TIME, USA

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TRANSCRIPTIONS

UNCLE TOM’S CABIN Warrant

As heard on CHERRY PIE Words and Music by JANI LANE • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

All guitars are tuned down one half step (low to high, Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb). Bass is in drop-D tuning, down one half step (low to high, Db Ab Db Gb). All music sounds in the key of E flat, one half step lower than written. G

E5

G5

A5

D5/A

D5

Csus2

G5

5fr 21

34

11

D

134

G#5

134

A5

13

Cadd9

13

C5

2

D5

4fr 132

A

11

21 34

144



fingerstyle 0 0 7 4

4fr

144

7fr

144

144

Cadd9

Em 96

N.C.

let ring 3

3

0

2

2

3

3

2

5

5

0

2

2



2

5

7

7

5

let ring



7

2 2 2

2

0

2

5

2

2

5

5

3

5

0

0

0 3

2

2

0

2

3



4

2

3

0 3

E5/B



0 0

2

2

2

0 2

6

2

4

5

5

3

0

3

7

7

0 3

4

4

A5

E5/B

0

0

2

4

3

3

2

  3  4 4

5

7 5

7

7

7

 7

2

4 4

2 2

2

2

5



7 !

5

5 7

5 7

7 9 7 5

7 5

7 5

0



0

7

7

7 5 7

2 0

 5

  7

5

5

 12

 

3

Em 96 3

2

5

0 0

 7

let ring 0



N.C.

3

Em11

3

 0

Bm/F#

 

3 2

2



Cadd9

4

0

X

let ring

7



0

 (string noise)

N.C.(Em)

9

18

34

Prelude (0:00) Briskly q = 175 E5

N.C.

13

2

E5

5fr

134

Gtr. 1 (acous.)

1

34

C#5

5

0

2

2

2



5

7

7

5

let ring



7

2

0

2 2 2

2

5

2

5

2

5

3

N.C. 22 2

98

0

0

0

0 3 2 0

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GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016



0

0

2

3

4

0 3

4

A5 E5/B Bm/F#

Em11

0

0

0

2

4

   3 4  4

E5

let ring

4 4

2 2 3

0 0

 

0 0 0 2 0



0

0

2 0

2 0



“UNCLE TOM’S CABIN” WORDS AND MUSIC BY JANI LANE COPYRIGHT © 1990 BMG PLATINUM SONGS AND DICK DRAGON MUSIC ALL RIGHTS ADMINISTERED BY BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT (US) LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED USED BY PERMISSION REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD CORPORATION


“ UNCLE TOM ’S CABIN ”

B

Intro (0:33) Moderately q = 128 N.C.(Am7) (Csus2)

(Dadd4)

Gtr. 2 (acous.) *Rhy. Fig. 1 let arpeggios ring 27



0

2

0 3

5

0

0

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/chorus) let arpeggios ring



Gtr. 1



7

9

2 0

10

8

7

0

4

12

 

0 0

8

(Am7)

4

5

8

11

5

5

4

11 12 12 11

12

5

3

0

12 10

7

2

9

(Csus2)

0

8

8

7

10

0

0

3

(Dadd4)

5

Gtr. 2 31

0

2

(Csus2)

0

0

0

3

5

(Am7)

0

4

4

5

5

5

4

5

3

2

0

2

G

Gtr. 3 7

9

8

8

7

10

8

11

12

11 12 12 11

12

12 10

8

9

7

10

8

7

9

8

7

Banjo (arr. for gtr. in standard tuning, half step down) P.M.

2

C

5

3

3

3

5

2

3

3

2

3

3

3

2

3

1st Verse (0:48) Just let’s get the story straight Me for the record N.C.(Am7) (Csus2) (Dadd4) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 27)

Banjo P.M. 35 2

5

3 5

Out on a (Am7)

Banjo P.M. 39 2

5

3

3

3

2

3

cypress limb above (Csus2) (Dadd4)

3

3

5

3

3

2

3

3

2

3

3

2

3 1

the wishin’ well where

3

2

3

3

2

3 1

1

3

3

5

4

3

3

 3 0 0 0 2

0 P.M.

3

end Rhy. Fig. 1

0 3 0 0 0 2 3

3

 8 7 9

0 8 7 9

 3 3 0

P.M.

3 3 0

5 3

Uncle Tom were fishin’ it was gettin’ pretty late (G/B) (Am7) (Csus2) (A5)

1

1

3

5

2

they

2

5

2

and

2

3

14

 

0

0

7

11 12 14

12

Hmm (G/B)

0

0

3

7

 

8

11

5

(Csus2)

0

4

5

(Dadd4)

 

0

4

12

*includes Gtrs. 2 and 3

(Am7)

(A5)

3

3

5

3

2

3

3

say it got no bottom say it (G/B) (Am7) (Csus2)

2

5

3 5

3

3

5 0

3 1

2

3

5

5

5

5 3

take you down to G 3 1

 3 3

hell

0 3 3

Gtr. 4 (6-string elec. w/dist.)

8 15 ! 

Gtr. 5 (6-string elec. w/dist.)

Bass

Bass Fill 1

10

guitarworld.com

99


TRANSCRIPTIONS

D

2nd Verse (1:04) Over in the bushes E5 N.C.(E5) G5 N.C.(E5)

Gtr. 4 * 43

2 0

0

5 5 3

0

0

2 2 0

Bass

7 7 5

0

0

5 5 3

and off N.C.(E5)

*doubled by acous. 12-string gtr.

Gtr. 5

A5

0

7 7 5

come

5 5 3

7 7 5

0

  

5 5 3

5 5 3

2 2 0

0

  

2

2

pale

2

2

moon

2

light

2

46

0

0

0

0

2

0

Sheriff John E5 N.C.(E5) G5

 3 2 0 0

 

2

2

2

9

3 2 0 0

0

0

5 5 3

0

2 2 0

5

7 7 5

7 7 5

2

2

5 5 3

2

2

two limp bodies down to the water’s edge N.C.(E5) G5 N.C.(E5) A5 N.C.(E5)

0

0

0

2 2 0

5 5 3

 5 5 3

0

0

7 7 5

0

0

0

0

0

0

7 7 5

7 7 5

0

0

5 5 3

 5 5 3

Brady N.C.(E5)

0

and Deputy A5 N.C.(E5)

 7 7 5

0

  D5 3 2 0

3 2 0

  3 2 0

3 2 0

0

0

2

0

0

the A5 N.C.(E5)

 7 7 5

0

7 7 5

2

2

Hedge G5 N.C.(E5) G5

A5

5 5 3

7 7 5

0

7 7 5

E 49

2

D5/A

5 5 3

0

Bass Fig. 1 2

two men talkin’ in E5 N.C.(E5) G5 N.C.(E5)

to the right G5 N.C.(E5) G5 A5

haulin’

   5 5 3

0

7 7 5

  

5 5 3

5 5 3

7 7 5

7 7 5

2

1st Chorus (1:19)

I know Csus2

a secret down in Uncle Tom’s cabin oh yeah G5 D

 3 0  3

 3 0  3

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

3

3

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

3

3

5

5

5

5

2 3 2 0

2 3 2 0

2

3 2 0

0

2

2 3 2 0

3 2 0

0

5

5

2 3 2 0

end Bass Fig. 1 Bass Fig. 2 2

100

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

2

2

2

2

9

5

0

3

3

5

5

5


“ UNCLE TOM ’S CABIN ”

53

   

2 2 0

5 5 3

7 7 5

5 5 3

E5 N.C.(E5)

0

G5 N.C.(E5)

0

1

1

14 14 12

2

F 57

0

2

0



14 12

2

0

0

0

15 12

14 12

2

2

2

6 6 4

7 7 5

6 6 4

5 5 3

  3 3 0

0

 17 !

1

15 15 12

I know a secret that I just can’t tell G5 D5/A A5 Csus2

G5 G#5 A5 G#5G5

1

15 15 12

2

A5 N.C.(E5)

17 17

  3 3

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

3

3

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

3

3

3 0

2

0 0

3

3

3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

0

3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

0

2 2 0

2 2 0

end Bass Fig. 2

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

0

0

0

0

0

3rd Verse (1:30) They didn’t E5 N.C.(E5) G5

 2 0

0

0

2 2 0

5 5 3

0

 5 5 3

me and Tom A5 N.C.(E5)

see N.C.(E5)

in the tree G5 N.C.(E5) G5 A5

 7 7 5

0

0

0

 5 5 3

0

7 7 5

 7 7 5

0

0

7 7 5

5 5 3

0

5 5 3

5 5 3

7 7 5

7 7 5

0

2 2 0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 43)

other

could

see

D5/A

 7 7 5 5

60

0

0

0

0

0

 sink

on down G5 N.C.(E5) G5 A5

62

0

0

5 5 3

the

7 7 5

7 7 5

 

0

5 5 3

 5 5 3

to

7 7 5

  5 5 3

7 7 5

7 7 5

7 7 5

   

Tossed E5

N.C.(E5)

in

0

0

2 2 0

bottom of the E5 N.C.(E5) G5

0

 2 2 0

0

0

5 5 3

 5 5 3

5 5 3

0

 7 7 5

7 7 5

Let A5

’em N.C.(E5)

7 7 5

0

 0

 7 7 5

be

found D5

  3 2 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7 7 5

0

5 5 3

5 5 3

where they’d never well N.C.(E5) A5 N.C.(E5)

7 7 5

0

bodies N.C.(E5)

5 5 3

the G5

0

 7 7 5 5

believin’ what the N.C.(E5) A5 N.C.(E5)

Neither one E5 N.C.(E5) G5

0

0

3 2 0

0

  3 2 0

3 2 0

guitarworld.com

101


TRANSCRIPTIONS

G

2nd Chorus (1:46)

 3 0  3

I

know

a G5

65

secret

Csus2

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

3

 

 3 0  3

down

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

3

in

Uncle D5 3 2 0

Tom’s

3 2 0

3 2 0

cabin

yeah

0

3 2 0

3 2 0

oh

3 2 0

3 2 0

3 2 0

12

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 (see bar 51)

E5

67

2 2 0

N.C.(E5)

0

0

G5

N.C.(E5)

A5

N.C.(E5)

5 5 3

0

7 7 5

0

0 1/4

X X

X X

12 12 12

X X

X X

0

P.H.

12 12

3

 3 0  3

I

know

69

0 0

3

3

0 0

0 0

3

3

a G5

secret

know

  

*Gtr. 4 71 3 0 3

secret

0 0

 

 3 0  3 I Csus2

a G5

 0 0

0 0

3

3

that

14

14

12

 3 0  3

Bass Bass Fig. 3 3

102

 0 0

0 0

3

3

 

5

5

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

3 2 0

0 0

3 2 0

12

0

 2 2 0

3 2 0

0

3 2 0

Uncle

2 2 0

Tom’s

cabin

5

5

5

5

D5/A

0 0

0 0

3

3

5

in

12

tell A5

3

down

10

can’t

3 2 0

3

*doubled by acous. 12-string gtr. through bar 76

Gtr. 5

3 2 0

3

E

just D5

0 0

4



12

I

5 P.H.

pitch: E/F#

Csus2

4

1

14

14

0

0 0

0 0

3

3

5

5

3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

0


“ UNCLE TOM ’S CABIN ”

73

  0 0  3

G5

I know a secret Cadd9

 3 0 2 3

  0 0  3

 3 0 2 3

3

Uncle D5 3 2 0

3

3

3 0 2 3

3 0 2 3

3 0 2 3

3

cabin

3 2 0

0

 

3 2 0

just

3 0 2 3

Tom’s

3 2 0

0 0

3 0 2 3

 5

76

I

can’t E5

3 0 2 3

that

2 2 0

7

7

5

H 79

 7 7

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

3

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

3

0

0

 

0

14

7

in

9

9

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Wow

well E5

      

2 0

down

end Bass Fig. 3

7

5

secret

 3 0  3

0

2 2 0

0

 3 0  3

3 2 0

7 7 5 5

3 2 0

12

know a G5

Know who put the bodies in the wishin’ A5 N.C.(E5)

3 2 0

0

3 2 0

I

Csus2

 0

3 2 0

9 9 7

3

3

0

tell D5/A

3 2 0

2 2 0

D5

0

2 0

0

2 0

2 0

2 0

      0

0

0

0

0

0

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

8

2

Guitar Solo (2:12)

A5 N.C.(A5) C5 N.C.(A5) D5

2 0

0

0

5 5 3

0

7 7 5

0

  8 ! G8

8

5

  

N.C.(A5)

0

0

 5

0

7 7

7

5 7

7

C#5 D5

5 5 3

6 6 4

7 7 5

8 5

7

8 7 5

7

7

7

5 6

7

A5

5 5 3

7 5

7 5

5 7

0

X X X 5 5 5

5

5

0

C5

N.C.(A5)

5 5 3

0

5 6 7

5 7

7 7 5

0

1/2

4 5 7 7 7 7 7

10 8

3

7

7 7

D5 N.C.(A5)

0

1/2

P.M.

3

0

N.C.(A5)

2 0

3

5 7

w/bar 

3

7

 

C#5 C5 6 6 4

P.H.

pitch: B

7

C5

7

5

7 7

7

7

guitarworld.com

103


TRANSCRIPTIONS

82 0

C5

C#5

5 5 3

6 6 4

0

5

8

7

5

D5

E5

7 7 5

9 9 7

P.H.

10 8

8

1

8

  

9 9 7

1

8

8

1

8

2 0

8

0

12 pitch: D

0

0

3

E

D

E

4

5

D

2 0

0

0

7

7

7

7

0

0

1/2

7 7 5

0

5

7

7

E5

5 5 3

2 0

7 7 5

6 6 4

6 6 4

5

5

7

1/4

3

3

7

7

5 5 3

7 7 5

0

P.M.



5

5

7

7

0

5 5 3

0

6 6 4

5

5

5

7

7

5

5

6 6 4

5 5 3

 7

7 !

A5 G#5 G5

E5

7 7 5

2 0

6 6 4

4

3

5 5 3

N.C.(E5)

0

0

0

5

4

3

7

6

5

0

G5

N.C.(E5)

5 5 3

0

7

0

N.C.(E5) G5

0

17 ( 17 )

2

2

A5

N.C.

7 7 5

0

0

7

7

7

7

5 5 3

0



17 17 17 20 20

10 12

10 12  14

12 12 14

12 12 14  16

12 15

12

15

7

N.C.(E5)

A5

0

2

2

2

1

17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17 17

2

7

N.C.(E5)

7 7 5

0

2

17 17

2

3

4

5

4

3

0

3

15 10 12

7 7 5

grad. 1/2 bend

1 hold bend T

C5 C#5 D5 C#5 C5

0

7

  

5 5 3

12 11 10

G5 G#5 A5 G#5 G5

6 6 4

1/4

    

D5 N.C.(A5)

0

     

    

88

3

7

  

   55

7 7

7

7 7 5

0

 7

0

   77

  89 

w/bar

5 5 3

5 5 3

0

P.M.

C5 N.C.(A5)

E

A5 N.C.(A5) C5 N.C.(A5) D5 N.C.(A5) D5 C#5 C5

85

N.C.(A5)

12

15 14 12 14 15

12 15

12

3

14

15

3

2

104

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

3

4 3

5

4

3 3

0


“ UNCLE TOM ’S CABIN ”

I

Intro Riff Recap (2:35) N.C.(Am7) (Csus2)

Gtr. 2 91

0

2

0

3

8

9

10

!

5

4

 12

11

0

0

Gtr. 3 7 0

(Dadd4)

8

7

Gtr. 4

(Am7) 0

4

5

8

! 0

5

5

4

11 12 12 11

12

5

3

12

0

2

0

10

(Csus2)

8

9

7 0

5

0

4

4

5

5

7

7

 

 12 11 !0 12 11 12  14

8

7

10

!

0

0

3

(Dadd4)

8

14

Banjo (arr. for gtr.) P.M.

Gtr. 5

3

5

2

5

3

J

2

3

3



1

2

3

3

3

w/bar

15 !

Bass

3

3

15

G7 

7 !

15

-1/2

 14 !

7

3 1

w/bar

15 !

15 15

2

15

got

3

5

2

3

3

5

2

3

3

 12 !



w/bar

14

4th Verse (2:43) Soon as they were gone me and Tom (Am7) (Dadd4) (Csus2) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 27)

2 1

12

3

5

5

5 3

2

12 !

!

14

2

3

14 12 12 12 12

( 12 )

11  14

!

Prayin’ real hard that we wouldn’t make a sound (Am7) (Csus2) (Dadd4)

down

Banjo

P.M.

95

2

5

3

3

5

3

3

2

3

3

2

3

3

2

3 1

1

2

Runnin’ through the woods back to Uncle Tom’s shack where the (Am7) (Csus2) (Dadd4)

Banjo

99

5

2

3 5

3

3

3

2

3

2

3

3

5

3

3

2

3

3

2

3

3

2

3 1

2

1

2

3

full moon shines through the roof (Am7) (Csus2) (Dadd4)

P.M.

5

3

2

5

3 5

3

3 4

3 5

3

5 0

5

5

5 3

tile cracks

1 3

Gtrs. 4 and 5

5

 0

 

Bass plays Bass Fill 1 (see bar 42)

 15

guitarworld.com

105


TRANSCRIPTIONS

K

5th Verse (2:58) who are we Oh my God Tom E5 N.C.(E5) G5 N.C.(E5) A5 N.C.(E5)

*Gtr. 4 103

2 0

5 5 3

7 7 5

0

0

0

0

0

0

gonna tell G5 N.C.(E5) G5 A5

 

5 5 3

5 5 3

7 7 5

0



5 5 3

5 5 3

2 2 0

0

0

7 7 5

The sheriff he belongs in a prison cell N.C.(E5) G5 N.C.(E5) A5 N.C.(E)

0

0

5 5 3

7 7 5

0

0

0

0

0

0

D5/A

0

*doubled by acoustic 12-string gtr.

Gtr. 5

2 2 0

5 5 3

7 7 5

Bass 2

107

2

2

2

2

2

5 5 3

2

  

2 0

5 5 3

7 7 5

5 5 3

5 5 3

0

2

0

2

2

0

0

5 5 3

2

2

0

2

0

7 7 5

2

0

2

2

2

0

7 7 5

7 7 5

  

5 5 3

5 5 3

7 7 5

7 7 5

2

0

2

2

 3 2 0

 3 2 0

3 2 0

4

5

4

3 2 0 0

5

5

in the

3 2 0

3 2 0 0

0

0

up

3 2 0

3 2 0 0

4

5

0

3 2 0 0

0

0

0

wishin’ well A5 3 2 0

0

0

  2 2 0

5

7 7 5 5

0

Oh

 2 2 0

 

0

2 2 0

2 2 0

0

14 15 16

2 2 0

16

3rd Chorus (3:13) I know a secret Csus2 G5

  

Gtr. 4 111 3 0 3

 3 0  3

Gtr. 5

 0 0

0 0

3

3

  0 0

0 0

3

3

down

in

Uncle Tom’s cabin D5/A

0 0

0 0

3

3

 0 0

0 0

3

3

Bass plays Bass Fig. 3 (see bar 71) GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

  3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

  3 2 0 0

3 2 0 0

 3 2 0 0

 3 2 0 0

 3 2 0 0

 3 2 0 0

G5

I know a secret that I Csus2

  0 0  3   0 0  3

 3 0

3 0

3

 

3

3 0

3 0

3

3

just E5

3 0

3 0

3

3

 3 0

3 0

3

3

2 2 0

2 2 0

can’t tell D5

2 2 0

2 2 0

3 2 0

3 2 0

3 2 0

3 2 0





0

2 2 0



7 7 5 5

too



7 7 5 5

7 7 5

2 2 0

106

7 7 5

Keep your mouth shut That’s what we’re gonna do Less you wanna end E5 N.C.(E5) G5 N.C.(E5) A5 N.C.(E5) G5 N.C.(E5) G5 A5 D5/A

L

2

7 7 5

7 7 5 5

3 2 0

3 2 0


“ UNCLE TOM ’S CABIN ”

I know a secret Csus2 G5

Gtr. 4 115 3 0 3

 

0 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

3

 3 0  3

Gtr. 5

0 0

0 0

3

3

Bass 0

119

0

0

0

0

  0 0  3

  0 0  3

3 0

3 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

0

3

3 0

3 0

3

3

3

3

3

5

I Csus2

know

 3 0  3

3 0

3

3

3

3

a G5

put the bodies N.C.

3

3

3 0 0

3 0 0

3

3

0

 

 

3 2 0

 15

0

3 2 0

3 2 0

E5

2 2 0

2 2 0

7

just

2 2 0

2 2 0

7

D5

 0 0

3 2 0

3 2 0

5

3 2 0

3 2 0

3 2 0

5

down

7

9

0

7

3

3

3 0 0

3 0 0

3

3

0

 3 0  3

3 2 0

0 0

3 2 0

15 12

15

12

P.H.

15 12

14

12 17 12 15 12

 0 0

0 0

 3 1  3

 3 2 0

 3 2 0

0

 3 2 0

0

0

cabin

 3 2 0

0 0

0 0

3

3

0

20

19 17

19



2 2 0

 

3 2 0

2 2 0

 

Oh

0

2

3

0

5

4

0 5

4

5

5

3 2 0

  19  19 ( 19 ) 

3

7

(Aadd4)

0

17 19

3

4

5

3

yeah

3



1/4

0

3 2 0

Know who put the bodies know who A5

3 2 0

 

3 2 0

0

3 2 0

3 2 0

0

Oh

  3 2 0



pitch: D

D5

20 20 19 17

Tom’s

15 14 12

0

D5

3 2 0

3

G5

0

3 2 0

Csus2

0

Slower wishin’ well (Em7) (Gsus2)

 

3

Uncle 3 0 0

0 0

15 ( 15 )

0

3 0 0

0 0

 3 3  

1

20 !

3 2 0

in

tell

3

can’t

0

in the

3 2 0

secret 3 0 0

 3 0  3

0

3 2 0

D5

2 2 0

 2 2 0

 7

Ha cha-cha-cha-cha Em7

0 0 0 0 0 2 0

(harmonica fill)



Gtr. 2 (acous.) 126

3

3 0 0

0

3 0

3

0

 3 0

3 0

3 2 0

0

3

 3 0  3 0

  

3 2 0

I know a secret that I Csus2 G5

5

123

0

down in Uncle Tom’s cabin ooh yeah D5 Csus2 G5

guitarworld.com

107


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®

TM


TRANSCRIPTIONS

MONSTER Skillet

As heard on AWAKE Words and Music by GAVIN BROWN and JOHN COOPER • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

All guitars are in drop-D tuning down one whole step (low to high, C G C F A D). Bass tuning (low to high): C G C F. All music sounds in the key of C minor, one whole step lower than written. G5

B¨5

D5

A5

5fr

11

A

C5

8fr

7fr

11

11

33

  

 B

B¨5

F5

D5

3fr

11

B¨5

5 5

5 5

5 5

0 0

X X

0 0

8 8

13

11134

B¨5

F5

8fr

5fr

11134

8fr

133

13fr

133

133

D5

8 8

8 8

0 0

G5

X X

0 0

5 5

D5

5 5

5 5

A5

0 0

X X

0 0

C5

7 7

F5

G5

10 10

5 5

 

3 3

Verses (0:14, 1:13) never I In the closet

1. This secret

side of me It’s scratching on the walls

hid 2. My secret side I keep G5 B¨5 D5 Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 1)

Bass Bass Fig. 1

 

D5

Intro (0:00) Moderately q = 135 G5 D5

Gtr. 1 (elec. w/dist.) Gtr. 2 (elec. w/dist.) enters on repeat Rhy. Fig. 1 1

5

F5 10fr

5

5

5

0

stay away under Hiding

(1.) So

(2.) ’cause if

Gtrs 1 and 2 9 5 5

0

8

from me the bed

5 5

In

let him out he’ll

D5

G5

5 5

I

X

0 0

under lock and key D5

8

X X

0 0

8 8

0

X

tear me

8 8

Fill 1 (0:42) (C5)

110

  

 12 12

0

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER

5

0 0

but I and I

can’t control can’t control

it it

I

keep it caged D5

but I

can’t control C5 G5 A5

it F5

0

7

3

5

3

3

0

X

X X

0 0

3

10

5

can’t hold it

Why won’t somebody come and G5

5 5

A5

D5

5 5

Bass Fill 1 (1:27) (C5)

 

5

I feel the rage and I just Why won’t somebody come and

up break me down D5

8 8

keep it caged comes awake

G5

head

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 5)

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/dist.) (doubled)

0

I It

1.

The beast is ugly my body in my

B¨5

let you see in the halls

5 5

0 0

X X

0 0

7 7

C5

G5

10 10

F5

5 5

 

3 3

Bass Fill 2 (2:34) (D5) 3 15 15 15 15

  

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

10

“MONSTER” WORDS AND MUSIC BY GAVIN BROWN AND JOHN COOPER © 2009 EMI APRIL MUSIC (CANADA) LTD., NOODLES FOR EVERYONE, WARNER-TAMERLANE PUBLISHING CORP., PHOTON MUSIC AND LANDRUM PUBLISHING ALL RIGHTS FOR NOODLES FOR EVERYONE AND EMI APRIL MUSIC (CANADA) LTD. IN THE U.S. CONTROLLED AND ADMINISTERED BY EMI APRIL MUSIC INC. ALL RIGHTS FOR PHOTON MUSIC AND LANDRUM PUBLISHING ADMINISTERED BY WARNER-TAMERLANE PUBLISHING CORP. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED USED BY PERMISSION 2016 REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD CORPORATION


“ MONSTER”

2., 3.

Save Save B¨5

me me

this this

from from

Make it end Make it end C5 Gtr. 3 plays Fill 1 first time (see previous page)

Gtrs. 1 and 2 13 8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

8 8

10 10

Bass

10 10

10 10

10 10

10 10

10 10

10 10

Substitute Bass Fill 1 on 2nd Verse (see previous page) 1

C

10 10

1

1

Chorus (0:44, 1:29, 2:18) deep within 1., 2. I feel it I hate what I’ve become deep within (2.) I feel it become 3. I hate what I’ve deep within I feel it lose control I kinda F5 D5

*Gtrs. 1 and 2 15 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1

3

3

3

3

3

3

10

3rd time on 3rd Chorus, skip ahead to G Outro (bar 39)

It’s just beneath The nightmare’s It’s just beneath The nightmare’s It’s just beneath It’s somethin’

I I I I I I

the skin just begun the skin just begun the skin radical

must confess must confess must confess must confess must confess must confess

that that that that that that

feel feel feel feel feel feel A5

I I I I I I

B¨5

like a monster like a monster like a monster like a monster like a monster like a monster C5 G5 F5 (play 3 times, 2nd and 3rd Choruses only)

 

3 0 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 0

3 0 0 0 0

0 0 0

6 5 3 3 3

6 5 3 3 3

6 5 3 3 3

6 5 3 3 3

6 5 3 3 3

6 5 3 3 3

6 5 3 3 3

6 5 3 3 3

11 10 8 8 8

11 10 8 8 8

11 10 8 8 8

11 10 8 8 8

11 10 8 8 8

11 10 8 8 8

11 10 8 8 8

11 10 8 8 8

7 7

10 10

5 5

3 3

 

*optional: Play bottom two notes only for each chord, first three bars.

*Gtr. 3 (elec. w/dist.) 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

 

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13

12

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

9

 

*doubled

Bass 3rd time on 3rd Chorus, substitute Bass Fill 2 (see previous page)

 

 

*

5 0

5 0

5 0

5 0

5 0

5 0

I5 0

8 3

8 3

8 3

8 3

8 3

10 3

10 10 3 3

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

8

7

10

5

3

*3rd time on 2nd Chorus, Substitute higher notes (shown in parentheses).

D

(0:58, 1:50)

I

D5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 19 0 0

0 0

Bass 0

0

 

G5

5 5

0

3 3

3

3 3

3

 

D5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 23 5 5

0 0

5 5

0 0

like a

feel B¨5

F5

3 3

8 8

3

8

8 8

8

B¨5

X X

0 0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 5)

8 8

 

monster G5 A5

8 8

0 0

F5

I

feel B¨5

8 8

8

8 5

7 7

5

X X

7

0 0

like a monster G5 A5

  G5

E

(repeat previous two bars)

D5

8 8

I

D5

2nd time, skip ahead to Bridge (bar 27)

5 5

D5

5 5

5 5

0 0

X X

0 0

A5

C5

7 7

10 10

Go back to B 2nd Verse (bar 5)

G5

F5

5 5

3 3

guitarworld.com

111


TRANSCRIPTIONS

E

“ MONSTER”

Bridge (1:57) It’s hiding in the dark G5

D5

5 5

Its teeth are razor sharp

Gtrs. 1 and 2 27

There’s no escape for me It

wants my soul It wants my heart C5

F5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

10 10

10 10 10 10

10 10 10 10

10 10 10 10 10 10

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

10

10 10

10 10

10 10 10

Bass 5

No one can hear me scream 31

F

Maybe it’s just a

dream

Maybe it’s inside A5

of

me

D5

G5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

5 5

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

7 7

7 7

7 7

7 7

7 7

7 7

7 7

7 7

7 7

10 10

5 5

3 3

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

10

5

3

Breakdown (2:11) I

Go back to

feel it deep within

It’s just beneath the skin

D5

7 7 5

7 7 5

G

I must confess

F5

Gtr. 1 35

7 7 5

7 7 5

7 7 5

7 7 5

Outro (2:40) I D5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 39 * 3 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

7 7 5

7 7 5

6 5 3 3 3

6 5 3 3 3

0

0

3

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8

feel B¨5

8 8

I

I

112

3

D5

0 0

0 0

0

0

 

0 0

3 3

3 3

0

3

3

 

8

feel B¨5

F5

like a

8 8

8

like a

3 3

8 8

8 8

3

8

8

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

feel

C

3rd Chorus (bar 15)

like a monster

B¨5

I

F5

that I

monster G5 A5

8 8

 

5 5

8

I

D5

I

F5

 

7 7

5

monster G5 A5

8 8

5 5

8

5

5

15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 13

feel like a monster B¨5 G5 F5

 

*optional: Play bottom two notes only.

Bass

43

Stop this monster C5 G5 F5

7

I

I D5

feel B¨5

F5

7 7

0 0

0 0

7

0

0

 

0 0

3 3

3 3

0

3

3

 

like a monster G5 F5

3 3

8 8

8 8

3

8

8

 

8 8

5 5

3 3

8

5

3


To create a reverb as immersive as BigSky required tremendous feats of sound engineering and artistic imagination. BigSky gives you twelve studio-class reverb machines, with simple and powerful controls. Hear the floating particles of the Cloud machine. Defy the laws of physics with the Nonlinear reverbs. Unleash the multi-head reverberations of the Magneto machine. BigSky. Lift your sound into the stratosphere.

strymon.net/bigsky


TRANSCRIPTIONS

TURN TO STONE Joe Walsh

As heard on BARNSTORM Words and Music by JOE WALSH and TERRY TREBANDT • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

Gtr. 4 (w/slide) is in open G tuning (low to high, D G D G B D). Dm

C

D5

A5

B¨5

F

D5

5fr

5fr

1342

A

1333

1333

13

11

1342

133

Gtr. 1 (elec. w/overdriven tone)

133

 

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

5 5 5 3

   

5

5

vib. w/bar 

1 5 5 5 3

C

Rhy. Fig. 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

Bass (w/overdriven tone and slow modulation effect)

2

34

5fr

111

*Bass plays low D root note.

1333

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

1

1

1

Bass Fig. 1 3

3

1 !

0

C5 B¨5 B¨

D5

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/overdrive)



5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

6 7 7 5

3

3

3

5 !

Dm

C

1

C

Dm

6 7 7 5

B 3

D 5fr

Intro (0:00) Moderately Slow q = 69 Dm C

* C/D

G5

B¨ 1

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

5

5

5

 

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

3

3

3

(0:17)

 1 13 13 13 ! 12 12 12

C

1

13 13 13 13 13 13

12 10

12 10

3



Gtr. 1 5 5 3

3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

Gtr. 2 (elec. w/overdrive)

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

114

1

1

1

1

3 3 2

3 3

3 2 0

Bass 3

3 3 3 1

1

1

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

3

3

3

5 !

 3 2 0

 

end Rhy. Fig. 1

6 7 7 5

7 5

6 7 7 5

7 5

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

3 3 3 1

5

5

0 3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 1

3 1

3 1

1

1

1

0 0

Rhy. Fig. 2a 5 3

5 3

3 1

end Bass Fig. 1

Rhy. Fig. 2

3

3

0

3 1

3 1



Bass Fig. 2 1 !

3 3 3 1

 

3 3 3 1

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

5 3

5 3

3

3

5

3

“TURN TO STONE” WORDS AND MUSIC BY JOE WALSH AND TERRY TREBANDT COPYRIGHT © 1972 SONGS OF UNIVERSAL, INC., BARN STORM MUSIC, INC. AND BELKIN MUSIC COMPANY COPYRIGHT RENEWED ALL RIGHTS CONTROLLED AND ADMINISTERED BY SONGS OF UNIVERSAL, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED USED BY PERMISSION REPRINTED BY PERMISSION OF HAL LEONARD CORPORATION


“TURN TO STONE” Dm

C



6

12 !

1

1

13 13 13 13 10

13

13

13

 12 10

A5 1

D5

  12

1

13 13 10

12

12 12 10

12 10



0 7 5

6 7 7 5

7 7 7 5 5 5

7 5

5 !

C

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

7 7 5 5

5

5 5

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3 3 3

3 3 3

5 5 5 3

5 3

3

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

 

 

the well’s

run

dry It’s a

now

(2.) change in

know the signs don’t the wind You people and they work all day B¨5

Hoedown backyard F

   2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Gtr. 1 9 3 3 1

3 3 1

1

Gtr. 2 Rhy. Fill 3

 

10 8

X X

1

 X X

12 8

0

  

1

Bass Bass Fig. 3 1

1

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Gtr. 3

 

3 1

1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1 0

3 3 1 1

1 1

2 2

X X

3 2 0 0

0

10 10 10 10

 

3 2 0

3 2 0

3 2 0



end Rhy. Fig. 2

3 3 2 2 0 0

3 3 2 2 0 0 0

end Rhy. Fig. 2a

2 0

3

2 2 0 0

7 7 7 7 7 5 5 5 5 5

3 3

5

7 5

0 0  10 0 0 8

7 5

end Bass Fig. 2

5

  12 12 12 12

0 0

Verses (0:31, 1:46)

1. Hey

 

3 3 3 1

2 10 10 2 10 10

3

6 7 7 5

10

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 1



3 1

3 3 1

3 1

Pages of your book on

lie Such a The day gets F

2 3 3 1

3 1

0

1

0

3 1

fire

Read the Everywhere you look we’re

strange feelin’ and I wasted It’s safe

1

10 10 8

12 8

1



1

writing fighting

don’t know why it’s to say their tastin’

   2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

2 3 3 1

10 10 8

12 12 12 8 8 8

X X

1

3 3 1

showdown

1

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 8 8 8 8

X X

X X

X X

X X

0

0

 12 8



1

1

1

1

1

1

1

 guitarworld.com

115


TRANSCRIPTIONS

taking D5

Gtr. 3 11

P.M.

7 7

5

7 7

5 5



5 5

7

5 5

to

7 7

Gtr. 4 (elec. w/overdriven tone)

w/slide

*

7 7

7 7

5 5

7

5

7

5

on Hear

the wall the call

such make

a long the words

And time rhyme

7 7

 *

7 7

5

7 7

5 5

5 5

7

5

7

5

5

5

3

 

5

3

3

5

3

X X

5 !

5

7 5

Bass 5 !

 



Gtrs. 1 and 2

5 !

5

*Tap note included on repeat only.



7 7

  5 "55  5 

*

7 7

7

7 7

you know

the They’re And you know

3

5

3

5

3

5 !

3

5

7 5

7 5

* 7

7

5

5

7 5

X X

X X

5

0

(0:58, 2:13)

it’s it’s

gettin’ stronger don’t think they can last I gettin’ stronger You can make ’em run that much longer F5 G5 F Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fill 1, second time (see below)

Gtr. 1 Rhy. Fig. 3

13

 

2 3 3 1

2 3 3 1

3 3 1

Gtr. 2 Rhy. Fig. 3a 10 10 10 8

10 10 10 8

 

3 3 1

3 3 1

3 3 1

3 3 1

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 8 8 8 8 8 8

X X

0 0 0

12 12 12 10

 

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3

3

3

3

12 12 12 10

12 12 12 10

12 12 12 10

Bass Bass Fig. 4 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

much

1

3

3

F6

C5 G5

 

12 12 12 10

12 12 12 10

12 12 12 10

12 12 12 10

longer Turn

12 12 12 10

X

 116

F5

 10 8

F6

X

12 8

F5 10 8

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

10 8

10 8

10 8

12 8

5 3

12 10

3

3

3

G6 12 10

X

14 10

X

 3

3

X

10

10

G5

G

12 10

12 12 12 10

3

3

Rhy. Fill 1 (2:13)

Gtr. 3

to

0

12 12 12 10

 

end Bass Fig. 3

*Substitute top note on repeat.

D

 

12 12 12 10

 

0 0


“TURN TO STONE”

E

Chorus (1:04, 2:19) Turn to stone stone Dm C/D

Dm

*Gtr. 1 let ring throughout 15 5 6 5 7 7 7 5

C/D

5 5

!

7

6

7 7



5

5 7 5

5

Dm

C/D

5 6 7

7 7

6

Dm

5 5 5 5 6 5 5 5 5 7 7 5 5 5 7

(play repeat simile)

C

0

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

 55 55

3 3 5 5 3 3 3 1

*Doubled simile by acous. gtr.

Gtr. 3 Rhy. Fill 2



3

5 !

5 !

5 !

5 !

0

0

0

5 !

 5 !

Gtr. 2

0 7 5

7 5

Bass

5 !

F

7 5

 

7 5

7  !

5 5

(1:19, 2:34)

C

Gtr. 3 19

D5 Dm

 

Gtr. 1 3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

D5

 3 3 3 1

5 5 5 7 5 5 7 3 3 5



0 6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

5 5 5 3

3 5 3 3 5 3 3 3 1 1



3 3 1

3 3 1

3 3 3 3 3 0 0 3 3 3 3 2 0 1 1 1 1

Dm

3 3 C

 13 13

 *Gtrs. 1 and 2  67 67 

0

1

13 13

7 5

0

2nd time, skip ahead to H (bar 27)

1

3 2 0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 simile (see bar 1)

G

7 5

5 5 5 3

13

5 5 5 3

3 3 3 1

*Gtr. 2 plays only the bottom two notes of each chord.

(1:32)

B¨ C Gtr.1 plays Rhy. Fig. 2 simile (see bar 5) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 2a simile (see bar 5)

  13

Gtr. 3 1 23 13 ( 13 )

Dm

C

1

12

13

12

12 10

 

12 10

12 !

12

10 10 10 12

  10 1

1

1

10

13 10

13

13

13

12 10

13

1

13 10

13 12

12

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 simile (see bar 5) Go back to

D5

26 12 10

 12 12 12

 22

C

2nd Verse (bar 9)

H

2. Well there’s a

10 10 10 10 10 10



1st Guitar Solo (2:47) B¨ C Dm Gtr.1 plays Rhy. Fig. 2 simile (see bar 5) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 2a simile (see bar 5)

27

  13 13 ( 13) 1

1

1

13 13 13 13 13 13

1

13 13

C 1



12 12

1

1

0 13 13 13 13 13 13 12 0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 simile (see bar 5) guitarworld.com

117


TRANSCRIPTIONS B¨

D5

Gtr. 3 1

29

13

13

 

13

13

1

13

1

13

12

13

12

12

12

1

13

12

12

13

12

1

13

12

1

13

12

12



10

(w/slide)

Gtr. 4

I

10

1

 7 7

7 7

7 7

7 7

 

(3:01)

F



   

Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fill 3 (see bar 9) Gtr. 4 w/slide 31 10 8  10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 Gtr. 1

   2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3

8

10

10

 10 10  10

10

10 10

10 10

10 10

1

1

3 3 1

1

3 3 1

X X

X X

X X

2 3 3 1

3 3 1

0 0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 3 twice simile (see bar 9)

D

Gtr. 3

 7  7  7 7

7 7 7



1

5 5

7

1

13 13 13 13 13 13  13 13 13 13 13 13

Gtrs. 1 and 2 7 7 7 5

Gtr. 4 36

7 7 7 5

7 7 7 5

7 7 7 5



 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Gtr. 3

 

10

7 7 7 5

8 8

7 7 7 5

10

fdbk.

0

7 7 7 5

1

0 0

13

10

12

10

* 10 13 13

 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10  10

0 0 0 0

1

13 10

7 7



10

10

0

13 10

8

8

10

10

810



10

10

*Gtr. 2 substitutes first two bars of Rhy. Fill 3 (see bar 9)

    2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3

end Rhy. Fig. 4

X X X 0 X X X 0

8 10

10

15 13 13

pitch: D

118

10

*2nd string “caught” under ring-finger bend.

 

10

8

10

F *Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 4 simile (see bar 31)

  7 !

5

 

8

Gtrs. 1 and 2



Gtr. 4 33  77 7

10

  Gtr. 3    13 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 X 3 1 1 1 1

Rhy. Fig. 4 2 3 3 1

10 10

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

 7  77

2



D 7 7 7

2

7 7 7



7 7 7

2 3 3 1

  7

5 5



15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 13 13

13

7

5

10 0

1

1

3 3 1 1



7 !

1

3 3 1

5 7

 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 1

X X X X X X 0 0

0 0 0 0

7

1/2

13

 

15

15


“TURN TO STONE”

J

(3:27)

F Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 3 (see bar 13) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 3a (see bar 13) Gtr. 4 39 8

10

10

8

8

G5

8

10

 

10

10

10

8 0

12

12

10

10

10

12

11



12

12

12

Bass plays Bass Fig. 4 (see bar 13)

K

Interlude (3:34) Dm C/D Gtr. 3 plays Rhy. Fill 2 (see bar 15)

Gtr. 1 41 5 6

7

7

6 7

5 5 5



5 5

5 !

C/D

6

7

7

7

6 7

5 5 5



0 5 5 5

Dm

5 5

C/D

6

7

7

7

6

5 5 5

7

w/slight fdbk.    14 14 ! !

Gtr. 4 12

7

Dm

14

5 5

5

5

5

5

5

5

Bass plays Bass Fill 1 (see bar 15) (resume original tempo)

Freely Gtr. 1 44

(grad. reduce tempo)

5 5

5

5

5 5

5

5

5 5

5

5

5 5

5

5

5 !

Bass

L

13 0 13 13

4

w/slight(tofdbk. slack)  13 13 0 X 13 13  X 13

13

6 7 7 5

X X

C 6 7 7 5

X X

5

5

  

B¨5

5 5 5 3

5 5 3

3 3 1

 12

X

3

3

0

(3:57)

B¨5 D5 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 1) Gtr. 5

47

(to slack)

5 !

w/bar

Gtr. 5 (elec. w/dist.)

Dm

w/bar    3  3 1 1

0

0 7 5

 Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 (see bar 5)

 7 5

7 5

 

B¨5

D5

    3  3 1 1 



Rhy. Fill 4 X X

X X

0

0 7 5

7 5



Gtrs. 2 and 3

7

5

7

X

X

5

7

guitarworld.com

119


TRANSCRIPTIONS

M

Outro/ 2nd Guitar Solo (4:11) Dm C Dm C Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 2 simile (see bar 5) Gtr. 5 plays Rhy. Fill 4 throughout, w/ad lib variation (see bar 49)



Gtr. 3 51

7 !

7

Gtr. 2

  5 5

7  5 

7 !



3

7

5 3

3

5 7

5

5 3

5 5

 5 G5

5

3

5

5

5 

7

D5/A

7

5 7

7 7 7 7 5 7 7 5 7

7



5 7

7 7 7

5

 

5 3

 



7 5 7

7

5 3

0 5 0 7 5

3 5 5 5

5 3

 G5  5 3 5

5

7

5 7 7

5

7 5 7

0 0 0

7

X X

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 w/ad lib variation (see bar 5)

Dm

Gtrs. 2 and 3

55



7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

Gtr. 4

Gtr. 1 Rhy. Fig. 5

Bass

5

5

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

1

1

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

1

1

3 3 3 1

5

 3 3 3 1

 

X

10

3 3 3 1

3 3 3 1

X X

Bass Fig. 5 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

3



7

Gtr. 4

7

7

7

7

 10

w/slide

7

7

7

 

10 10 10

5

8

5

10

Bass plays Bass Fig. 5 six times simile (see bar 55)

120

GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

7

7

9

10 10

X X

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

7

7

7



5

7

7

7

X

 10

 10

6 7 7 5

6 7 7 5

X X

5

5

6 7 7 5

5

5

0

Dm

  

5

7

B¨ Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 5 six times simile (see bar 55) Gtrs. 2 and 3 57

7

 



7

5

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

5



7

7



 12 

12

 12

10

*

10 12

12

*

10 12 12

*Notes in parenthesis played by Gtr. 2 only.

12 10



12


“TURN TO STONE”

Gtr. 3

59

Dm

  

1

12 12 12

12

12 12 12 12 12

13

12

13

12 12

13

12

12

 

1

Gtr. 2



12 10

0 0



12

12

12

12 12 12 12 12

X

12

12

  ( 12) 9 9 6 6 ! B¨



1

12

12 12 12

13

1

10

13 10

12 12

 12

12 10

12

Gtr.3 1 63

12

10 13

13

1

12

15 15



15 1515

0

13

13

12 12



0

12 12

13

12 12

12

9

Dm 1

0 0 0 0

12

1

13

12

12 12 12 12

15 15

13



10 10 13 13

12

13

12

15 15





12 12 10

13

13

12

1

13

13

 

12 ( 12 )

12

 1

1

12 12 12 12

12 12

12 12

1

13 12

12

1

10

13

10

12

13

12 12

13

1

12 12

10 13 15

 

15 15 15

1

13

12

15 15 15 15

1

13

 

13

15

15151515151515 15 131313

13

13

15

13

1

13 X 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 15 13 15 X

Dm





13

 15 15 1

0

15 15 15151515151515 15 1313131315

X 15 15 X

0 0

13

13

12



13

12

1

1

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 10 12 10

15 15 13



10 12

15 15 X 15 15

12 12

 

1

15

12 12

13

12 12 12

1

1

12

12

13

13

13

12

13

13 13

1

1/2

1/2

14

1

13

12

13

1

0 0 0 0

Dm 66

12 10 12 10



1

Gtr.2 13

12 12

12

Dm

1

13

13

1

  ( 12 )

1

12 12 12



1

Gtr. 4

61



1

(Fade out)



1515151515 15 1315 15

13

15 15

13

15

1515151515

1515 15

1315 15 X

131513

guitarworld.com

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HYBRIDâ„¢ GUITAR CASES

ONE CASE. TWO GUITARS.

ACOUSTIC UP FRONT

ELECTRIC IN THE BACK


IT MIGHT GET WEIRD INSIDE THE MINDS OF SOME OF THE WORLD’S MOST CREATIVE CUSTOM-GUITAR BUILDERS

ROCK AND LOAD Phat Guitars Remington Tele

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IKE MANY RED-BLOODED Americans, guitarist/luthier Van Flowers of Phat Guitars in Glen Allen, Virginia, loves his guitars and he loves his guns. “I am a gun owner and NRA member for many years now,” Flowers explains. “Spending time at the shooting range is always great fun.” So when Flowers spotted a vintage wooden ammo crate at an antiques store, he instantly knew that he needed to make a guitar from it. “I wanted to build a Tele that was like nothing I had seen before,” he says. “When I saw that Remington crate I thought, Wow! Guns and guitars. What could be cooler than that? That was the beginning of the Remington Tele.” After building his first Remington Tele, which now belongs to Blues Hall of Fame inductee Skip Frye, Flowers was so pleased with the results that he decided to make several more, and he gathered as many Remington and Winchester ammo crates as he could find. “Every guitar that Phat Guitars makes is different in some way,” he says. “Most of the bodies are swamp ash with crate tops, but we’re doing a few with mahogany bodies as

well. Each top has its own unique look that makes it one of a kind.” The gun theme doesn’t begin and end with the ammo crate tops, however. “We also make custom knobs for the volume and tone controls out of shotgun shell casings. And one of the newest features we offer is fingerboard dot inlays made from .22 shell casings.” The Phat Guitars Remington and Winchester Teles look very cool, but they’re also serious instruments built for working players. Each guitar is built entirely by hand, one at a time. The pickups are custom hand-wound by Joce Dominger to provide the characteristic “Phat” tone. No CNC machines are used—only hand tools, “a lot of sandpaper,” and nitrocellulose finishes. “When I first saw the ammo crate, I wasn’t trying to connect the guitar and the guns,” Flowers says. “I just thought that a guitar with an ammo crate top would look totally cool. It just happens that both of those things are two of my loves.” Phat Guitars currently has six Remington and Winchester Teles in production at prices ranging from $1,995 to $2,195. —By Chris Gill

Have you created a custom work of guitar art suitable for It Might Get Weird? Email us at soundingboard@guitarworld.com!

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GU I TA R WOR L D • OC TOBER 2016

For more information, visit phatguitars.com


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