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READERS POLL RESULTS: 2015 WINNERS & LOSERS! GUITAR & BASS TRANSCRIPTIONS

IRON MAIDEN

OTOS

TAGE PH S K C A B ING T T E S ! L A D E P EVERY EW INTERVIEW MORE N

“Speed of Light”

ED SHEERAN

“Photograph”

GARY CLARK JR.

“Bright Lights”

CLUTCH

“X-Ray Visions"

S EVERY PEDALW NE

OTOS H P E G A T S K C TING BA MORE! T E S L A D E P Y EVER IEW NEW INTERV

PHOTOS ACKSTAGE B G IN MORE! AL SETT EVERY PEDNEW INTERVIEW

TOS O H P E G A T S BACK G N I T T E S ! EVERY PEDAELW INTERVIEW MOSRTAEGE PHOTOS K N ING BAC PLUS

SETT ORE! M EVERY PEDAL W E I V R E NEW INT

S STAGE PHOTO K C A B G SETTIN AUERBACH'S CUSTOM “FLYING ORE! EVERY PEDAL M W IE NEW INTERV

DAN CLUTCH

B SETTING EVERY PEDAL INTERVIEW W E N HOTOS

EP BACKSTAG G IN T T E S AL ORE! EVERY PED RVIEW M NEW INTE

WEDGE” LESLIE WEST JOHN McLAUGHLIN


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倀栀漀琀漀㨀 刀漀戀攀爀琀 䴀⸀ 䬀渀椀最栀琀

䨀䤀䴀䴀夀 倀䄀䜀䔀 䘀䄀䴀伀唀匀䰀夀 匀䰀䤀一䬀夀 匀䤀一䌀䔀 ㄀㤀㘀㔀⸀

䨀漀椀渀 琀栀攀 氀攀最愀挀礀 簀 攀爀渀椀攀戀愀氀氀⸀挀漀洀 簀 ⌀椀瀀氀愀礀猀氀椀渀欀礀


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Here are the target frequencies for each string (6 string guitar): Low E. . . . . . . . . . . 82.4 Hz A . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110.0 Hz

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䌀甀琀氀愀猀猀 䤀瘀漀爀礀 圀栀椀琀攀

匀琀椀渀最刀愀礀 嘀椀渀琀愀最攀 吀漀戀愀挀挀漀 䈀甀爀猀琀

䌀䰀䄀匀匀䤀䌀 䐀䔀匀䤀䜀一⸀ 䴀伀䐀䔀刀一 倀䔀刀䘀伀刀䴀䄀一䌀䔀⸀ 䌀爀愀昀琀攀搀 昀爀漀洀 漀爀椀最椀渀愀氀 䴀甀猀椀挀 䴀愀渀 ㄀㤀㜀 ᤠ猀 搀攀猀椀最渀猀Ⰰ 琀栀攀 匀琀椀渀最刀愀礀 愀渀搀 䌀甀琀氀愀猀猀 栀愀瘀攀 戀攀攀渀 爀攀ⴀ椀洀愀最椀渀攀搀 眀椀琀栀 䔀爀渀椀攀 䈀愀氀氀ᤠ猀 最爀漀甀渀搀戀爀攀愀欀椀渀最 攀渀最椀渀攀攀爀椀渀最Ⰰ 搀攀氀椀瘀攀爀椀渀最 甀渀洀愀琀挀栀攀搀 瀀氀愀礀愀戀椀氀椀琀礀Ⰰ 昀攀攀氀 愀渀搀 琀漀渀攀⸀ 䈀漀琀栀 洀漀搀攀氀猀 昀攀愀琀甀爀攀 甀瀀搀愀琀攀搀 瘀椀渀琀愀最攀 猀瀀攀挀 攀氀攀挀琀爀漀渀椀挀猀Ⰰ 猀甀瀀攀爀 猀洀漀漀琀栀 洀漀搀攀爀渀 琀爀攀洀漀氀漀 猀礀猀琀攀洀猀Ⰰ 挀漀瘀攀爀攀搀 戀爀椀搀最攀猀Ⰰ 猀琀愀椀渀氀攀猀猀 猀琀攀攀氀 昀爀攀琀猀Ⰰ 匀挀栀愀氀氀攀爀 氀漀挀欀椀渀最 琀甀渀攀爀猀Ⰰ 挀漀洀瀀攀渀猀愀琀攀搀 渀甀琀Ⰰ 椀渀渀漀瘀愀琀椀瘀攀 琀漀渀愀氀 瘀漀氀甀洀攀 挀漀渀琀爀漀氀 愀渀搀 漀瘀攀爀猀椀稀攀搀 㐀 漀瘀攀爀 ㈀ 栀攀愀搀猀琀漀挀欀猀Ⰰ 搀攀氀椀瘀攀爀椀渀最 猀琀爀愀椀最栀琀 猀琀爀椀渀最 瀀甀氀氀 昀漀爀 猀甀瀀攀爀椀漀爀 琀甀渀椀渀最 猀琀愀戀椀氀椀琀礀⸀ 䄀瘀愀椀氀愀戀氀攀  ㈀⸀ ㄀⸀㄀㘀 簀 䴀唀匀䤀䌀ⴀ䴀䄀一⸀䌀伀䴀 䔀爀渀椀攀 䈀愀氀氀 䴀甀猀椀挀 䴀愀渀 洀漀搀攀氀猀 猀琀愀爀琀椀渀最 愀琀㨀 ␀㄀㐀㤀㤀 簀

洀漀搀攀氀猀 猀琀愀爀琀椀渀最 愀琀㨀 ␀㐀㤀㤀


A musical icon turns 100: Celebrating the Martin Dreadnought Guitar.


MartinGuitar.com


JOHNCAMPBEll Lamb Of God

JaredMacEachern Machine Head

JOEYVERA

Armored Saint

FRANKBELLO Anthrax

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espguitars.com

TOMARAYA Slayer


CON T EN TS VOL. 37 |

NO. 2 |

FEBRUARY 2016

FEATURES 46 2015 READERS POLL B.B. King achieves posthumous Hall of Fame glory, Iron Maiden trounces the metal competition and Keith Richards shows the young’uns how it’s done. You voted, we counted. Here are the results.

52 EDWARD VAN HALEN In this world exclusive, Edward Van Halen reveals all the intricacies, details and secrets behind his live rig that powered Van Halen’s monumental 2015 U.S. tour.

68

JOHN McLAUGHLIN He’s considered a true pioneer and has earned the admiration of the world’s most respected ax-slingers for decades. Here we celebrate the accomplished career of jazz-fusion legend John McLaughlin and his innovative new album, Black Light.

80 DAN AUERBACH Join us for this exclusive, inside look at the making of Dan Auerbach’s custom Kingston “Flying Wedge” copy guitar.

COVER PHOTOGRAPH C. FLANIGAN

14

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016


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CON T EN TS VOL. 37 |

NO. 2 |

FEBRUARY 2016

DEPARTM ENT S

Mike Kennedy at Guitar World HQ, NYC

18 WOODSHED 20 SOUNDING BOARD

Letters, reader art and Defenders of the Faith

23 TUNE-UPS

Vision of Disorder, James Williamson, Dear Guitar Hero with Clutch, Girlschool, Leslie West, J.D. Simo, Mark Tremonti and more!

87 SOUNDCHECK

87. Ernie Ball Music Man Modern Classic Stingray and Cutlass electrics 89. MXR EVH 5150 Overdrive pedal 90. Strymon Dig Dual Digital Delay pedal 92. Epiphone LTD ED Tamio Okuda Elitist Coronet electric 94. JHS Pedals Unicorn pedal 96. Fulltone 2B Boost pedal 96. Band Industries Roadie Automatic Guitar tuner

98 COLUMNS

98. Emmanuel Dexterity by Tommy Emmanuel 100. Holcomb Mania by Periphery’s Mark Holcomb 102. String Theory by Jimmy Brown 104. School of Rock by Joel Hoekstra 106. Acoustic Nation by Dale Turner 108. In Deep by Andy Aledort

26

Vision of Disorder

146 IT MIGHT GET WEIRD Thorsten Wolf’s The Pacific guitar

TRANSCRIBED “Speed of Light”

“Photograph”

“Bright Lights”

“X-Ray Visions”

by Iron Maiden

by Ed Sheeran

by Gary Clark Jr.

by Clutch

PAGE

PAGE

PAGE

114

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

124

130

PAGE

142

PHOTO BY JUSTIN BORUCKI


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World Music Nashville worldmusicnashville.com

• For a complete list of dealers see johnpageclassic.com


WOODSHED VOL. 37 |

NO. 2 |

FEBRUARY 2016 EDITORIAL

BACKSTAGE CLASS AS GUITAR WORLD enters its 36th year in publication, it’s easy to look back on the long list of guitarists with whom we’ve had special relationships—those we consider family—and realize that we must have been doing something right for all these years. From Jimmy Page, Billy Gibbons, Kirk Hammett and Dimebag Darrell to Joe Satriani, Zakk Wylde, Tony Iommi and John Petrucci—we’ve always taken great pride in the access we’ve been granted to some of the world’s most iconic rockers. But perhaps the best example of Guitar World maintaining a close, personal relationship with a legendary figure for decades is the man you see on this month’s cover: Eddie Van Halen. Our history with EVH is extensive, beginning with his first appearance in Guitar World—a cover story in the January 1981 issue, the fourth issue in our existence—and continuing with more interviews, lessons and cover stories over the past quarter century than we could possibly count. And with each new occasion, Guitar World was always given unparalleled access to the inner workings of the Van Halen machine. In the early Nineties, GW editors were routinely invited to 5150, the legendary studio on the Van Halen family property in Los Angeles, and given early previews of new music and shown whatever gear innovations Eddie happened to be working on at the time. Few media outlets were ever given such privileges, and as we move into another new year, it makes me proud to see that tradition continue. Back in September, Guitar World’s Chris Gill received an invitation from the VH camp to attend a concert in Bethel Woods, New York—but not as a mere VIPsection spectator. No, this visit would be far more special, and so Chris headed upstate to meet up with the VH crew, and what he came back with was nothing short of unprecedented. Over the course of six hours leading up to the opening strains of “Light Up the Sky,” Chris was given complete access to Eddie’s entire touring rig—every guitar, amp, pedal and setting he could document in words and pictures in an effort to fully analyze how the master creates his signature sound onstage. The entire backstage crew—particularly EVH Operations Manager Matt Bruck, who was instrumental in facilitating this story—were welcoming and forthcoming with information, and Ed himself answered every question Chris threw his way. Listen, not everyone gets to fiddle with Eddie’s main white Wolfgang guitar for a few minutes before a show, but Chris certainly seized that opportunity. Did the Van Halen camp have to open their doors—and truckloads of road cases—for us? Certainly not. But they always have, and for that, we thank them.

EXECUTIVE CONTENT DIRECTOR Jeff Kitts EXECUTIVE EDITOR Brad Angle TECH EDITOR Paul Riario ASSOCIATE EDITORS Andy Aledort, Richard Bienstock, Alan di Perna, Chris Gill CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Joe Bosso, Ted Drozdowski, Dan Epstein, Greg Evans, Randy Har ward, Peter Hodgson, Mark Holcomb, Joe Satriani, Dale Turner, Jon Wiederhorn SENIOR VIDEO PRODUCER Mark Nuñez

MUSIC SENIOR MUSIC EDITOR Jimmy Brown MUSIC TRANSCRIPTIONIST Jeff Perrin MUSIC ENGRAVER Patricia Corcoran

ART CONTRIBUTING ART DIRECTORS Andrea von Bujdoss, Sandie Burke, Tony Mikolajczyk ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Natalie Skopelja

ONLINE MANAGING EDITOR Damian Fanelli EDITORS Brad Angle, Jeff Kitts

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION MANAGER Nicole Schilling

BUSINESS VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL MANAGER Bill Amstutz bamstutz@nbmedia.com GROUP PUBLISHER Bob Ziltz bziltz@nbmedia.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR - WEST Jason Perl 646-723-5419, jason@guitar world.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR - EAST Scott Sciacca 646-723-5478, scott@guitar world.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Anna Blumenthal 646-723-5404, anna@guitar world.com GROUP MARKETING DIRECTOR Christopher Campana 646-723-5423, ccampana@nbmedia.com SR. MARKETING MANAGER Stacy Thomas 646-723-5416, sthomas@nbmedia.com

CONSUMER MARKETING CONSUMER MARKETING DIRECTOR Cr ystal Hudson AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Kara Tzinivis FULFILLMENT COORDINATOR Ulises Cabrera MARKETING COORDINATOR Dominique Rennell

NEWBAY MEDIA CORPORATE PRESIDENT & CEO Steve Palm CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Paul Mastronardi CONTROLLER Jack Liedke VICE PRESIDENT OF PRODUCTION & MANUFACTURING Bill Amstutz VICE PRESIDENT OF DIGITAL STRATEGY & OPERATIONS Robert Ames VICE PRESIDENT OF AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT Denise Robbins VICE PRESIDENT OF CONTENT & MARKETING Anthony Savona VICE PRESIDENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES Ray Vollmer SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: Guitar World Magazine Customer Care, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039 ONLINE: w w w.guitar world.com/customerser vice PHONE: 1-800-456-6441 EMAIL: guitar world@pcspublink.com BACK ISSUES: Please visit our store, www.guitarworld.com/store, or email onlinestore@nbmedia.com

—Jeff Kitts Executive Content Director

GUITAR WORLD (ISSN 1045-6295) is published 13 times a year, monthly plus Holiday issue following December issue, by NewBay Media, LLC, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Phone: 212.378.0400. Fax: 917.281.4704. Web Site: www.nbmedia.com. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. Newsstand distribution is handled by Time Warner Retail. Subscriptions: One-year basic rate (12 issues) US: $14.95. Canada: US$29.95. Foreign: US$49.95. Canadian and foreign orders must be prepaid. Canadian price includes postage and GST #R128220688. PMA #40612608. Subscriptions do not include newstand specials. POSTMASTER: Send change of address to Guitar World, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039. Ride-along enclosure in the following edition(s): none. Standard enclosure: None. Returns: Pitney Bowes, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2, Canada. Entire contents copyright 2012, NewBay Media L.L.C. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited. NewBay Media L.L.C. is not affiliated with the companies or products covered in Guitar World. Reproduction on the Internet of the articles and pictures in this magazine is illegal without the prior written consent of Guitar World. Products named in the pages of Guitar World are trademarks of their respective companies. PRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. SUBSCRIBER CUSTOMER SERVICE: Guitar World Magazine Customer Care, P.O. Box 469039, Escondido, CA 92046-9039. Online: www.guitarworld.com/customerservice. Phone: 1-800-456-6441. Email guitarworld@ pcspublink.com. BACK ISSUES: www.guitarworld.com/store REPRINTS: NewBay Media, LLC, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Phone: 212.378.0414

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

REPRINTS AND PERMISSIONS: For article reprints and or e-prints, please contact our Reprint Coordinator at Wright’s Reprints, 877652-5295, or NewBay@wrightsmedia.com EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING OFFICES 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016 (212) 768-2966; FA X: (212) 944-9279 NEWBAY MEDIA, LLC 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016 www.nbmedia.com

©2015 NewBay Media, LLC. All rights reser ved. No par t of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of NewBay Media, LLC.

I L L U S T R AT I O N BY J O E L K I M M E L

LIST RENTAL: 914-925-2449, danny.grubert@lakegroupmedia.com


Classic

Balanced

Consistent

Authentic

Original

True


SOUNDI NG BOARD Got something you want to say? EMAIL US AT: Soundingboard@GuitarWorld.com in my early forties and subscribed to Guitar World in my teens, and this past year I decided to get back to playing a little more and subscribed again, and I have enjoyed it so far. Would love to see tabs from some great newer groups like Rival Sons, Vintage Trouble and Gary Clark Jr., as well as new songs by veteran groups like AC/ DC. Thanks again!  —Steve Bruno

Holiday Cheer It’s about time Keef made the cover of yer damn rag. Seriously though, this was way long overdue. Personally, I am tired of seeing the same heavy metal idiots and it was refreshing to see a true rock and roll icon on the cover. Thanks for making my day! Now I have to go and play some open chord Keef riffs. —Jeffrey Osgood I just wanted to comment on how outstanding the Holiday issue was—especially the transcriptions of REO Speedwagon’s “Roll with the Changes” and “Catch Your Train” by the Scorpions, which was a real shocker—but a welcome one! I also enjoyed the interview with the Iron Maiden guitarists.  Best issue this year! I’m

GU I TA R WOR L D • HOL I DAY 2015

Richard Bienstock ILLUSTRATION BY PHILLIP BANKEN

Pieces of Eight I’ve been a devoted fan of Guitar World for almost 15 years now, collecting as many issues as I can, and I’m almost always blown away by the quality of the transcriptions, and the fact that you have lesson columns from modern day extended-range guitar heroes like Tosin Abasi, Misha Mansoor and now Periphery’s Mark Holcomb! It’s because of Guitar World that I discovered seven- and eight-string guitars and have put them to use in my own music. But I’d also love to see some eight-string transcriptions in future issues of your magazine. I feel like eight-string players have started to grow in numbers, and it might be time to give them some fair recognition by including a transcrip-

S U R V I V O R S

It’s been 35 years since the release of their debut album and IRON MAIDEN show no signs of slowing down. In this interview with the triple-ax-attack of DAVE MURRAY, ADRIAN SMITH and JANICK GERS, the men of Maiden discuss the making of the new Book of Souls double album and the resilience of singer Bruce Dickinson after a recent cancer scare.

60

guitarworld.com

61

tion of one of the many growing numbers of songs that use eightstring guitars, even if only to prove to the naysayers that eightstring players don’t always ride that low string!   —Travis Lausch

Bottoms Up! Lately I have seen other subscribers send in pics of their Van Halen-themed items. In May my daughter gave birth to my first grandchild, and she’s been making his own diapers and is very talented at it.  So I recently challenged her to make one resembling Eddie’s Frankenstrat guitar.  Hope you all enjoy it.  —Pat Rhyner

Scholz. I think it would be cool to profile these guys in your magazine more. —Norm Halverson Thanks Norm! And FYI, we transcribed “I’d Love to Change the World” by Ten Years After in the December 2004 issue.—Ed.

Ink Spot Nobody ever gives Thin Lizzy any freakin’ cred, and this is my tribute to the best band that ever existed. Phil Lynott was a real troubadour,  a real poet. No other band had the ability to write a beautiful, meaningful song and then also be able to rock our asses off like Thin Lizzy did. David Lee Roth wished he had Phil’s swagger. —John Slaughter

Power of Ten When I was young my all-time favorite guitarist was Alvin Lee. Since his passing a couple of years ago I’ve been trying to find information about what he did after Ten Years After, and trying to find any Ten Years After transcriptions. Personally I consider Alvin Lee to be the grandfather of modern blues shred—he was great! What would it take to get you guys to do a tribute story and a couple of tabs? Or point me in a direction where I can get this information. There must be a hundred forgotten heroes out there such as Rick Derringer or Mark Farner or Tom

GOT A TATTOO of your favorite band or guitarist you want to share with us? Send a photo of your ink to soundingboard@guitarworld.com and maybe we’ll print it or post it on our Facebook page!

SEND LETTERS TO: The Sounding Board, Guitar World, 28 East 28th Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10016, or email us at Soundingboard@guitarworld.com. All subscription queries must be emailed to guitarworld@pcspublink.com. Please do not email the Sounding Board with subscription matters.

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016


&

STAY CONNECTED WITH GUITAR WORLD ON

AND GET THE LATEST GUITAR NEWS, INSIDER UPDATES, STAFF REPORTS AND MORE!

READER ART

OF THE MONTH

If you created a drawing, painting or sketch of your favorite guitarist and would like to see it in an upcoming issue of Guitar World, email soundingboard@ guitarworld.com with a scan of the image!

JA M ES HETFI EL D B Y D A R R E N C O M P TO N

DEFENDERS

E RIC JOHNSON B Y D AV I D O ’ D O N O VA N

of the Faith

Jose Antonio Barr

John Di Filippo

Zach Fischer

AGE 48 HOMETOWN Lima, Peru GUITARS Gibson Les Paul Custom, Fender American Stratocaster SONGS I’VE BEEN PLAYING Yngwie Malmsteen “Far Beyond the Sun,” Helloween “Keeper of the Seven Keys,” Fates Warning “Wish” GEAR I MOST WANT Fender Yngwie Malmsteen Stratocaster, Marshall JVM410H

AGE 66 HOMETOWN San Diego, CA GUITARS Carvin Custom Bolt, Fender American Vintage Reissue ’69 Tele Thinline and ’72 Reissuse Tele Thinline, Ibanez Artcore AS93, Gibson Blues King SONGS I’VE BEEN PLAYING Commander Cody “Hot Rod Lincoln,” the Black Keys “Little Black Submarines,” B.B. King “Confessin’ the Blues” GEAR I MOST WANT DW four-piece drum kit with hardware and cymbals

AGE 16 HOMETOWN Fort Washington, PA GUITARS Carvin H2T Allan Holdsworth, Gibson Firebird, Hanika 54PC, Gibson B45-12N SONGS I’VE BEEN PLAYING Leo Brouwer “Études Simples,” John Coltrane “26-2,” Frank Zappa “Echidna’s Arf (Of You),” Allan Holdsworth “Fred” GEAR I MOST WANT Strandberg Madeto-Measure Boden 7, Vigier Excalibur Shawn Lane

Are you a Defender of the Faith? Send a photo, along with your answers to the questions above, to defendersofthefaith@guitarworld.com. And pray! guitarworld.com

21


TRANS BLACK

TRANS RED

BLACK

I’d Tap THat YOU WON’T BE ABLE TO KEEP YOUR HANDS OFF THE NEW WOLFGANG STANDARD. WITH A COMFORT-CUT FOREARM CONTOUR, EVH-BRANDED FLOYD ROSE SPECIAL AND OTHER EVHAPPROVED APPOINTMENTS, IT’S NEVER BEEN EASIER TO GET YOUR EVH ON. ®

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© 2015 Fender Musical Instruments Corporation. EVH®, the EVH® logo, Wolfgang® and 5150 ® are trademarks of ELVH, Inc. All rights reserved.


TUNE-UPS VISION OF DISORDER

JAMES WILLIAMSON

26

28

CLUTCH

GIRLSCHOOL

LESLIE WEST

SIMO

30

34

36

42

MARK TREMONTI

44

tktktktkt

Fresh Paint AFTER MORE THAN TWO DECADES FRONTING NORWEGIAN BLACK METAL PIONEERS IMMORTAL, ABBATH RETURNS WITH HIS CORPSEPAINTED FACE AND A NEW SOUND.

JUSTIN BORUCKI

By Richard Bienstock

King Ov Hell (left) and Abbath

PHOTO BY FRANCISCO MUNOZ

“YOU KNOW, I never planned to go solo,” says Abbath about his split from Norwegian black metal legends Immortal last year, which led to his forming a new, eponymously titled outfit. “It was never my intention to have my own band. Like, Abbath? That’s not a band name.” But, he adds, “then we had a guy who came up with an awesome logo for us, and now it feels more right.” Beyond having an awesome logo, Abbath also have a pretty great debut album on their hands. The self-titled effort finds the frontman backed by ex-Gorgoroth bassist King Ov Hell (“the John Paul Jones of extreme metal,” Abbath says) and drummer Creature, and turning in a seriously brutal collection of songs. From the opening battle cry of “To War,” to the blitzkrieg assault of “Fenrir Hunts,” to the mammoth mid-tempo stomp of “Root of the Mountain,” Abbath shows the singer and guitarist further exploring his trailblazing combination of frostbitten Norwegian guitarworld.com

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NEWS + NOTES

What's on My iPod?

PLAYLIST

JUSTIN deBLIECK OF ICE NINE KILLS 1 “Kings and Queens” Thirty Seconds to Mars “I've heard people ask, ‘How does he [Jared Leto] do that with his voice?’ I’ve always said it's just good old fashion singin’.”

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

2 “Under a Glass Moon” Dream Theater “The solo in this song covers the entire fretboard. It's such a perfect example of John Petrucci's creative versatility.”

3 “The Great Dividers” Unearth “For me, it all started here. Best riffs. Best breakdowns. To this day, no one does it better.”

4 “Fallen Star” Kamelot “The theatrical elements and orchestral layers of this song are so seamless. They’ve always been an inspiration for me when composing additional sound design in my music.”

5 “Pathfinder” Fleshgod Apocalypse “There's such brilliance to this symphonic mayhem. After hearing this record [Labyrinth] I decided I was going to pursue the world of orchestral composition to accompany my writing.” Ice Nine Kills' new record, Every Trick in the Book, is out now.

P H OTO O F A B B AT H : F R A N C I S C O M U N O Z

be on tour right now. So black metal and more classic metal elements. "This album came it’s a lot of bullshit.” To add insult to inTo denote each of these out better than if jury, it has since been ansides, he points to two Abbath tracks: “Winter I had done it with nounced that, rather than disbanding, Demonaz Bane,” which, he says, Immortal." and drummer Horgh will features “a riff like continue on under the something off [Immor—ABBATH Immortal banner, and tal’s 1997 effort] Blizzard are currently preparing Beasts,” and “Count the a new album. How does Abbath feel about Dead,” which has “kind of an Ozzy Osthis turn of events? “Fired!” he says with a bourne, ‘Over the Mountain’ feel to it.” laugh. “But really, life goes on. And if they Abbath says that much of the material can do something worthy of the name of on the new album was actually written for Immortal and continue it in a great way, a new Immortal effort, which would have then good luck to them. But I’m moving been the follow-up to 2009’s All Shall Fall. on. And I think this album came out better “But you know that story there,” he says. than it would have if I had done it with ImFor those who do not, the short version is mortal. Because the most important thing this: After more than two decades together, for me is to have the band’s spirit be good. Abbath and Immortal co-founder Demonaz So now I’m doing what I believe in and publicly split roughly a year ago, and it what I love, and I’m playing with guys who looked as if the band was done for good. believe in the same thing. So it’s already a And then things got ugly—a fight erupted success for me.” over the rights to the name, and Abbath’s And in fact, things are only going to ex–bandmates claimed that they felt he get better. Abbath will be hitting the U.S. needed to go to rehab. this winter for a headlining tour alongside To the latter point, Abbath replies, High on Fire and Skeletonwitch, and the “That’s their argument. I never bothered frontman also reveals that they’re already them with it, and I’m not an alcoholic or a working on a follow-up to their debut. drug addict or anything like that. But the “After everything that happened with Imbest thing for me is to be on tour, to be acmortal, it was either fucking retire or go tive. And that’s what I wanted for Immorfull sails,” he reasons. “But I decided that tal. But everything had to be on their terms this is what I want to do. So we said, ‘Let’s all the time, and there was a lot of waiting give it a real shot.’ ” around. If it was up to me Immortal would


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NEWS + NOTES

Vision of Disorder NEW YORK HARDCORE VETERANS INFUSE THEIR SOUND WITH A METALLIC EDGE WHILE TACKLING HEAVY SUBJECTS ON RAZED TO THE GROUND. By Dan Epstein

“RIFFS HAVE TO have personalities,” says Vision of Disorder guitarist Mike Kennedy. “They have to have something signature and memorable; they can’t just be nonsense, they can’t just be a rhythm.” There are riffs aplenty on Razed to the Ground, the sixth studio album from the veteran New York hardcore band, and their personalities lean primarily toward the nasty and explosive. Produced by Chris “Zeuss” Harris (Hatebreed, Shadows Fall, Bleeding Through), Razed to the Ground features 10 uncompromising blasts of politically charged hardcore punk with a decidedly metallic edge. “It’s the right album at the right time,” says Kennedy. “There’s a lot of tumult in the world right now, and songs about that work well with aggressive music.” Due to the amicable departure of co-founding guitarist Matt Baumbach in 2013, Kennedy handled all the guitar duties on Razed to the Ground. (Josh DeMarco currently fills in the second guitar spot on tour.) “From a guitar tone standpoint, doing it myself was definitely a positive,” he says. “It allowed me to do both the rhythms, make them super-tight, and focus on what I felt was the most brutal tone I could get. In the past, Matt always wanted guitars that sounded like Soundgarden, and I always wanted to sound like Dimebag Darrell,” he says with a laugh. “So this time, I was able to focus on my inner Dime!” In order to do that, Kennedy relied primarily upon his new Esoterik DR1 guitar (customized with EMG 81 and 85 pickups) and a white EVH 5150III 50-watt head. “We went in, I plugged my guitar into the head and cranked the gain, we moved a mic, and that was it,” he laughs.  “I’m not kidding, that was the whole freaking guitar sound—the exact same setup I use live, no effects or anything. It took us 10 to 15 minutes of finagling, tops. Zeuss just looks at me, and he goes, ‘I think we got it!’ ”

AXOLOGY • GUITARS Esoterik DR1 Custom, Gibson Les Paul • AMPS EVH 5150III 50-watt • STRINGS Dean Markley .010–.052

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

PHOTO BY JUSTIN BORUCKI


Model Shown: Bassbreaker 007 Head and 112 Cabinet


NEWS + NOTES

INQUIRER

remember having a frequently recurring fear that I couldn’t remember where all the changes were in the song. But I did fine.

What influenced you to pick up a guitar? My sister started bringing home Elvis Presley records and I was listening to “Love Me Tender” and “Hound Dog” and I noticed the girls were all goin’ crazy. He had that guitar slung around him and I figured, Hey, I want some of that. So I got a guitar. What was your first guitar? I got my uncle, who worked at

Sears, to give me a discount on a Sears Silvertone f-hole acoustic guitar. The action was about half an inch above the fretboard. It was really hard to play and probably sounded like shit. I took a couple of lessons, just to learn some basic chords. The person I took lessons from—this was in Lawton, Oklahoma—his name was Rusty McDonald, and he usually played with the Bob Wills band; he sang with them for a while. I didn’t know who

Bob Wills was, but he had a little TV show, a local one, and once I learned some songs, he had me on to play [Appalachian folk song] “Good Old Mountain Dew.” The girls started calling me right after that. What do you recall about playing your first gig? I recall being alone and nervous, but getting a good reaction from the audience. We were playing all covers, mostly Rolling Stones. But I

Have you ever had an embarrassing moment onstage, or a nightmare gig? When I first started playing with the Stooges, we were in either St. Louis or Chicago, in a larger room than I was used to playing in. I drank a few beers before I went onstage, and I couldn’t hear what was going on. I learned that night that alcohol is not a good idea when you’re trying to play live, because it messes up your hearing, your perception of sound. So I never had any alcohol before a show from that time on. It was embarrassing because if you can’t hear, you can’t stay in sync with people. It was a terrible, terrible experience. What is your proudest moment as a player on your most recent album, Re-Licked? It did my heart good to get a chance to re-play those things and play ’em with people that were excited to play ’em, like [Dead Kennedys lead singer] Jello Biafra, [Screaming Trees frontman] Mark Lanegan and [blues singer/songwriter] Carolyn Wonderland. Wow. Those versions of the songs that I recorded for the album were smokin’. What is your favorite guitar or piece of gear? The sound that people like to hear from me is the original Les Paul Custom from ’68 or ’69 that I played on [the Stooges’] Raw Power. I play that guitar on every album through a Vox AC30, and I have an old 1965 Super Twin, the one with the head. That combination is just killer. It’s got that sound—you heard it on this record and you probably recognize it. —RANDY HARWARD

H E AT H E R H A R R I S

JAMES WILLIAMSON


Tim Sult (left) and Neil Fallon

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G U I T A R WO R L D •F E B R UA R Y 2 0 1 6

K E V I N N I XO N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

DEAR GUITAR HERO


NEIL FALLON & TIM SULT OF CLUTCH

They came up on the heels of the Eighties D.C. hardcore scene and have become one of the most popular hard-rock acts on the charts, but what Guitar World readers really want to know is… Interview by Brad Angle

LOVE PSYCHIC WARFARE, AND “X-RAY VISIONS” IS AN EPIC SINGLE! YOUR SONGS HAVE SUCH A GREAT STORY-TELLING QUALITY TO THEM. WHERE DID YOU DRAW INSPIRATION FROM THIS TIME AROUND? —JOHNNY

NEIL FALLON This time I was paying particular attention to Philip K. Dick’s writing, as far as his preoccupation with the intersection of reality and un-reality. I also tried hard to make each song its own short story or chapter in a longer story. Having a plot arc can be helpful, but also maddening at the same time. I always enjoy songs that, even if it’s abstract, seem to take you from point A to point B. TIM SULT And musically, we all bring in the riffs. With “X-Ray Visions,” originally there were the verse riffs and then we jammed together and came up with that chorus. With this album we worked on the songs together more than any other album.

Tim, I heard that you used to be really hard on yourself when it came to self-critiquing your performances. Is this still a problem?  —Paul Aponte SULT [laughs] Oh, no no. It’s fine. [laughs] I wouldn’t say I’m that hard on myself. Maybe once in a while I’ve let the smallest thing ruin my day. [laughs] But now I just try and have a good time and not do that anymore. Really it’s probably a byproduct of having slightly less caffeine during the day. [laughs] And maybe a more balanced diet, like salads instead of McDonald’s every day. Last time I saw Clutch you were all playing SGs.

Are those still your main guitars?  —Will Keyes FALLON You must be from Europe. That’s one of my SG Standards, a 2011, that I keep in storage over there. Because every time we fly it costs us two or three hundred extra each in baggage fees. You do a couple tours and there’s an SG for you. Nowadays I’ve been playing a G&L quite a bit. And, of course also Les Pauls, and a D’Angelico hollowbody. SULT I’ve always played shows with Gibsons. My first show was with my old Gibson SG. But early on when I was 14 or 15 I had a B.C. Rich, 200-dollar guitar. By the time I was 17 or 18 I had a cheap Fender Strat. Then by the time I was playing shows at 21 I had the SG. And as far as Clutch

goes I’ve always played SGs or Les Pauls. But you know what? I’m totally open to going to a shredder guitar at any moment. I’ve always wondered about the blues influence in Clutch’s music. Is there a moment you can point to when you got turned on to the blues in a serious way? —Kirkland FALLON I think it was always in the background even when we didn’t know it. Whether it was listening to classic rock or obvious examples like ZZ Top or George Thorogood. In the early Nineties I remember very distinctly buying a compilation CD, when we were driving the van, called [Back to the Crossroads] The Roots of Robert Johnson. In particular

the Skip James track, “Devil Got My Woman,” really split my wig. From that point on I realized there was a whole lot more to it than just the 12-bar blues you hear in classic rock. I keep falling into the same pentatonic blues clichés when I solo. Tim, your solos always seem to tell a story within the song. Any suggestions on how to break out of tired patterns? —Billy SULT If you’re in an A minor blues scale it’s always fun to go to the notes of a C major scale. It’s very simple. It makes the solo float a little more when you throw in notes out of the [relative] major scale over top of the minor blues scale. What is that when the C is the third of the A minor but you switch it to the [relative] major? Aeolian? Using the root of the minor scale but playing the notes out of the [relative] major scale. That’s the way I look at it…sometimes. For me that spices up solos quite a bit. How was it working with [producer] Machine? I heard he can be really in your face. Was that your experience with him? —Adam Povic FALLON Yes. But that’s for the best. I’d rather someone be brutally honest and piss me off for a couple hours than to glad-hand me and then listen to it for years later and think, Oh that could have been better. [laughs] It’s a bit of a learning curve with his style. He’s kind of aggressive, and he’s very gre-

guitarworld.com

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DEAR GUITAR HERO

Sult (left) and Fallon at the Hollywood Palladium on April 29, 2015

I’m 21, and I work part-time painting jobs so I can gig with my band at nights. Did you have any lame jobs you had to endure before Clutch took off? —Paulie SULT I worked as a [UPS] mail sorter. It was definitely a good job for a musician because it wasn’t a full-time job. I was on my way to being a full-time driver. I’d done all the training, and I was on a waiting list to be called to do it. At the time I thought it was a great job for sure. FALLON There’s been periods of time that I’ve had to do jobs in between tours because the well was running dry. I did a stint as a bike courier, and quickly got fired because I’m a terrible bicyclist. [laughs] But I got in great shape. Then I decided I

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was going to sit down, so I did data entry for one day. And I thought my eyes were going to bleed. [laughs] At least with the bicycle, you’re outside. I think being in a cubicle is a slow death for the creative type. So you can paint walls on automatic pilot and think of other things. But you can’t do that with data entry, that’s for damn sure. I’ve seen you guys a bunch over the years, including once when you opened for Slayer. Was it brutal? Do you have any tricks in terms of winning over fans?  —Katz FALLON I braced myself for the worst on that tour. But it was actually a lot easier than I expected. When you’re opening up for a band with a rabid fan base like that, it’s more like a psych game. The front row is there for the opening act and they’re giving you middle fingers. You have to be able to remind yourself that behind them, standing stock still at the bar, is your new fan. You just can’t see them at that time. There’s this sweet spot. If you look like you’re getting flustered onstage it’s like sharks smelling blood in the water.

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

But if you get confrontational it’s no longer about the music, it’s about chest beating. I’m still figuring it out. What was the first show you ever saw that made you want to play music for a living? —Barker SULT I moved to the D.C. area when I was 14, so that would have been 1984. So I missed the early, glory days of stuff like Bad Brains and Minor Threat. Even though I listened to that music in high school, I missed going to those shows. My first show was at the 9:30 Club and it was the Dead Milkmen. You remember that punk band from Philadelphia, and stuff like “Big Lizard in My Back Yard,” and “Bitchin’ Camero”? FALLON I can’t pin it down to one show. When I turned 16 and could get on public transportation, or have friends with cars, I saw Fugazi countless times. They always brought down the house, even in the most bizarre locations like a VFW hall that was only lit with fluorescent lights. That really was a great place to be introduced to live music. It was just them onstage, there was no smoke and mirrors involved.

—TANKER

SULT We really didn’t hang out with the Pantera guys too much. We hung out in Phil’s dressing room more so than the other guys. FALLON That was a whirlwind for us, and I’m sure even more so for them. Dimebag was always totally cool, and super down to earth. We’re a much more reclusive band, and I think maybe it was a bit intimidating watching that giant mosh pit. SULT Later we played with Damageplan a few times and Dimebag definitely came up to me and said a lot of positive things about Clutch. He was very, very cool to us.

PA U L A R C H U L E TA / G E T T Y I M A G E S

garious. Jesus it sounds like I’m talking about a toddler. [laughs] He has a license to speak to us in a frank and honest manner that no other person can. And that’s half the battle, being able to accept criticism positively and establish a relationship. By all means I’d suggest working with him. He’s taught me a lot of things, and I’ve become a better singer working with him.

YOU GUYS TOURED WITH PANTERA BACK IN THE DAY. DID YOU GET TO HANG WITH DIME AT ALL?


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NEWS + NOTES

Girlschool

AS EVIDENCED BY THE NEW GUILTY AS SIN, THE CLASSIC ALL-GIRL BRITISH METAL OUTFIT SHOWS NO SIGNS OF SLOWING DOWN EVEN AFTER 35 YEARS. By Adam St. James

Girlschool (from left) Enid Williams, Jackie Chambers, Denise Dufort, Kim McAuliffe

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GIRLSCHOOL ENJOYED A celebrated and highly promoted run as the first all-female metal band during the New Wave of British Heavy Metal era in the late Seventies and early Eighties. The London-based quartet made a name for itself by kicking out seven punkish metal albums and touring with the likes of Motörhead, Def Leppard, Black Sabbath and Rush, among others. Throughout personal ups and downs, and the shifting popular musical trends of the last 35-plus years, Girlschool never gave up touring or recording. Even today they're still proudly flying the NWOBHM flag on the road again with old friends Motörhead and Saxon. Their 13th album, Guilty As Sin, produced by Chris Tsangarides (Judas Priest, Thin Lizzy, Ozzy), provides an updated, yet still raucous take on Girlschool’s musical mindset. “We just went in and didn’t really think about it,” explains founding guitarist and singer Kim McAuliffe. “We had worked with Chris Tsangarides before—30 years or so ago—so to us it was very much like going back to the old days.” Noticeable among the 10 tracks is the clear tribute to Motörhead in “Take It Like a Band,” that McAuliffe says is “a bit of fun,” and an unlikely but cool cover of the Bee Gees’ disco mega-hit “Stayin’ Alive.” “Our manager came up with the idea,” says the 56-year-old McAuliffe, “and we thought he was mad! I must admit I’d always liked the song and could not hear it but we tried it and now love it!” As for the band’s current European jaunt with Motörhead, McAuliffe says they’re playing to packed houses and having a blast. And the adult beverages are still flowing backstage, though McAuliffe says Motörhead set them straight long ago. “You will still find a bottle of Jack Daniel’s,” she admits. “Lemmy insisted on that years ago as he was fed up with us drinking his! But now we’re mostly giving it to the crew. We don’t seem to bounce back like we used to!”


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 洀愀琀挀栀椀渀最 栀攀愀搀猀琀漀挀欀 最爀愀瀀栀椀挀猀


NEWS + NOTES

Sound Theories

JOINED BY PETER FRAMPTON, BRIAN MAY, JACK BRUCE AND OTHER ROCK NOTABLES, LESLIE WEST CRAFTS A WIDE-RANGING COLLECTION OF COVER SONGS, TRIBUTES AND ORIGINALS ON HIS LATEST RELEASE, SOUNDCHECK. HERE, THE LEGENDARY MOUNTAIN MAN EXPLAINS THE INSPIRATION BEHIND EACH TRACK. By Joe Bosso

L

ESLIE WEST LETS out a raspy laugh at the notion that his songwriting partnership with his wife, Jennifer, is anything close to a democracy. “Believe me, this is a dictatorship,” he chortles. “I wake up in the morning, and I see that these song lyrics have mysteriously appeared on my computer. But Jenny’s a great writer, so she inspires me. We’ve got a good give-and-take—for a dictatorship.”

again.’ I thought, The hell with that, so I did this one. “The words are great, so I was halfway there. I saw a live video where some guy was playing solos, but I went my own way when I did my solos. Like the Jewish boy I am, I played some Jewish blues. Tracy reminds me of Janis Joplin a little bit. Not her looks, but her aura, her attitude. When I got that visual in my head, it made me play a little differently.”

The just-released Soundcheck features a number of standout husband-and-wife originals, along with head-turning covers of songs by Tracy Chapman, Curtis Mayfield and Willie Dixon, among others. On a couple of cuts, the venerable guitar great mixes it up with British six-string gods Brian May and Peter Frampton, and a nearly 30-year-old live version of the Cream classic “Spoonful” sees him spitting out fiery licks alongside that band’s late bassist-singer, Jack Bruce. “I’m surrounded by friends on this record,” West says. “Jack and I had our band West, Bruce and Laing in the Seventies, and Peter and Brian are terrific pals. Everybody plays their asses off.” He pauses, then tosses humility aside to add, “I don’t think I’m too bad, either. Some things get better with age.” We recently caught up with West to get the stories behind each of Soundcheck’s 11 tracks.

“Here for the Party”

could duplicate it on the synth. I get excited anytime I hear any keyboard, and I love the way this one sounds. People might expect me to open one of my records with some heavy guitars, so this throws them a curve. “I play slide on the song. I’m not a natural slide player, but I have a good time trying. Funnily enough, I learned how to play slide from Jay Traynor from Jay and the Americans—the original Jay, not the guy who’s out with them now.”

“Left By the Roadside to Die”

“Give Me One Reason”

“I came up with the title because that’s the way I felt when I lost my leg [in 2011 as a result of complications from diabetes]. Jenny wrote some great lyrics that really captured my mood, and I put the words to music. “I played a guitar part to my keyboard player, Dave Biglin, and I asked him if he

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

“I get tears in my eyes listening to it. Playing with Jack Bruce was a real thrill. At least I got a last goodbye.”

“It’s a blues song, isn’t it? I didn’t want to write another blues song myself, and here was a perfectly good one by Tracy Chapman. Let’s face it: Anybody can write a blues song—‘I woke up, and the cat peed on the rug.’ Or else it’s ‘I gotta take the garbage out, so I got the garbage blues

“Jenny is from Tennessee, and she loves country music. Gretchen Wilson did this song a while back, but I don’t think of her as country. She’s a rock chick. “I thought, If I can come up with a riff that sounds like me, I’ll record this one. And that’s what I did—it was the first song that went down. I just had to change the gender in the words. Gretchen originally sings, ‘The boys say I clean up good,’ so I made that ‘girls.’ “For the solos, I’d play four bars and stop, do another four bars and stop, and so on. I did a bunch of takes. My co-producer, Mike Goldberg, picked out bits and we put them together. In all the Mountain stuff I did, I only played one solo in one take— ‘Theme for an Imaginary Western.’ ” “You Are My Sunshine”

“I was watching Sons of Anarchy, and I heard a group in the background during one of the scenes doing ‘You Are My Sunshine’ in a minor key. I thought, What a great idea. That's where I’m taking this. It sounds like a fucking funeral dirge. “After I recorded it, I knew I wanted Peter Frampton on it. I’ve known Peter for well over 40 years, and I’ve always played with him onstage, but we’ve never recorded anything together. It was time to change that."

PHOTO BY JUSTIN BORUCKI


NEWS + NOTES “Peter loved the way I did the song, and he plays his ass off on it. I’m doing the slide stuff, and Pete plays the regular guitar parts. At the end we do harmony leads together. I sent him the track, not knowing what he’d do, and when I got it back from him, I said, ‘Peter, you nailed it on the head. I don’t want to change anything.’ ” “Empty Promises/Nothin’ Sacred”

“Jenny and I wrote this as my tribute to AC/DC. I tried to sing like Brian Johnson— I think I get sort of close. It’s a bitch, though. The only reason why I’m anywhere near as good as I am is because I stopped smoking six or seven years ago when I got cancer. I actually got bladder cancer from smoking—I didn’t think that was possible. But I got it cleared up, and now my voice is stronger than ever. “On this song, I use an open tuning on my guitar that omits the thirds. One of my guitars fell off its rack and knocked it out of tune. I picked it up and liked the way it sounded. I play most of my songs in E flat, and then I drop the E string down another whole step. I play regular chords, but they

“I’ve known Peter Frampton for well over 40 years, but we’ve never recorded anything together. It was time to change that.” sound crazy. If somebody tried to figure out what I’m doing, they’d be lost.” “A Stern Warning”

“It’s a solo acoustic piece and a tribute to my good friend Howard Stern. Howard was listening to a song I did a while ago, ‘To My Friend,’ and he asked me about it. I told him that [Mountain bassist and singer] Felix Pappalardi was playing a beautiful Guild 12-string acoustic, and one day he handed it to me and said, ‘Write a song with this and it’s yours.’ So I did. “I wrote this song in a similar man-

ner—it’s kind of bluesy and classical—and I decided to call it ‘A Stern Warning’ for Howard. When you use an open tuning, you can do magical things. This song reminds me of ‘Riverdance’ or some kind of Celtic stuff. I’m pretty proud of it.” “People Get Ready”

“A Curtis Mayfield great. I usually open the show with it. The words are brilliant. I lost a good friend last summer—[road manager] Bobby Pace—and so I dedicated the song to him. I’ve been losing a lot of friends lately. That’s what happens with age. “There have been some amazing covers of this song already. Jeff Beck’s solos on the Rod Stewart version are tremendous, but I had to tune them out when I did my thing. I tried a few different melody ideas, though I did sneak a little bit of the main melody in there on the slide. “But come on, it’s all about the words: ‘People get ready, there’s a train a-comin’/ you don’t need no ticket, you just thank the Lord.’ How great is that? I never used to think about lyrics at all, but those ones really say it all.”

F I N C O S T E L LO/ R E D F E R N S/ G E T T Y I M A G E S

Leslie West performing in London in 1973

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NEWS + NOTES

“Going Down”

“Written by Don Nix. My friend Jon Tiven produced this a while ago, with Brian May on guitar and Bonnie Bramlett singing. We went back to the recording and gave it a listen, and we decided that it would be a good idea for me to sing it now. So I sang on it and Mike Goldberg matched my vocals with Bonnie’s. “When I listened to the old version, I was stunned that I couldn’t hear Brian May’s guitar. So I said, ‘Hey, we’ve gotta crank that thing.’ We got the master tapes,

“People said it’s a new wrinkle to Brian May’s style, the way he’s playing here. And that’s what I like about it. ” did another mix and put Brian’s guitar way up. It’s awesome. You can hear me

Leslie West performing in Denmark in 1973

playing the lead until about 2:50, and then Brian takes it out. “Some people have said that it’s kind of a new wrinkle to Brian’s style, the way he’s playing here. I guess it is, and that’s what I like about it. It’s a real honor to have him on my record. This is a real guitar jam song. If you wanna jam away on the guitar, this is the one you need to pick.” “Stand By Me”

“That’s my 16-year-old niece, Ariela Pizza, singing with me. She loves Broadway and all that stuff, and she’s one hell of a singer. I told her I wanted to do this song, but I didn’t want to do it like everybody else. “I said, ‘I’ll play it on an acoustic. You’ll sing the verses with your pretty voice, and I’ll come in for the choruses with my dirtyass street voice.’ Sure enough, it had the effect I was looking for. “I think the fact that Ariela hasn’t heard this song a thousand times gave her a real fresh perspective on it. I played her the original, but I let her do her thing. She’s a big talent. One day we’ll be seeing her on Broadway.” “Eleanor Rigby”

“One of the Beatles’ best. I love this track, man. It’s the Rev [Jones] doing it as a bass solo. A lot of people might think that’s a strange idea, but they won’t think so once they hear him do it. There are no tricks, no overdubs, no nothing. Can you believe that? “I get so excited when he performs this song. I have trouble playing just one part, and Rev does everything all by himself. It’s masterful and just gorgeous.”

“Back in 1988 I recorded an album called Theme in upstate New York. Jack Bruce flew in to play on it. The guy who ran The Chance in Poughkeepsie found out that Jack was with me, and he asked me if we’d play an unannounced set. Jack was into it, and so we went ahead and did it. “It’s me and Jack, and on drums we’ve got Joe Franco. I really thought I was Eric Clapton playing with Jack Bruce that night. I felt like I was in Cream. Originally, I think this cut was something like 15 minutes long. We managed to cut it down to seven minutes, but the best stuff is on there. “I get tears in my eyes listening to it. Playing with Jack Bruce was a real thrill. At least I got a last goodbye.”

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J O R G E N A N G E L / R E D F E R N S/ G E T T Y I M A G E S

“Spoonful”


NEWS + NOTES

J.D. Simo THE FAST-RISING HOTSHOT FROM NASHVILLE SHOWS SOME ALLMAN JOY ON HIS BAND’S LATEST, LET LOVE SHOW THE WAY. By Alan Paul

WHEN J.D. SIMO MOVED to Nashville in 2006, he was 21 and had already been on the road for seven years, having dropped out of high school to play music full time. He scuffled for a year, then got a gig in a poplar club band, gigging six nights a week and jamming with some of the city’s finest musicians. Simo was soon playing sessions and making a nice living—until he realized he was miserable. “I was already burnt out at 25,” Simo says. “I felt grateful but not fulfilled and I was too young to feel that way. I met the guys who would be my bandmates and knew what I needed to do was play with them. A lot of great players told me I was crazy, that I should keep my head down and keep doing studio work, but I couldn’t do that. I jumped off a cliff and never

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

looked back. I watched myself get poorer and poorer and all the work go away and knew I had to go out and earn it.” The payoff is here with his band SIMO’s Let Love Show the Way, cut live and partly recorded at Macon’s The Big House Allman Brothers Museum. Simo played Duane Allman’s 1957 goldtop on the sessions at the former Allman Brothers’ group home.

“I had played the guitar a bunch of times before but during those sessions I just really bonded with it and never tried anything else,” Simo says. “It was pretty heavy standing in Duane’s former living room playing his guitar. I got into a groove with it and it lead me to beautiful places.”

AXOLOGY • GUITARS 1960 Les Paul Sunburst and 1962 ES-335  • AMPS 1969 100-watt Marshall

PHOTOGRAPH BY CHARLES DAUGHTRY


BOOTH 210C

LAKE STREET DIVE WITH

Mike “McDuck” Olsen of Lake Street Dive with the EX-DC, a double-cutaway semi-hollow with the versatility to go from soul-rock warmth to bluesy buzz. Their new album, Side Pony, comes out February 19th on Nonesuch Records.

WWW.DANGELICOGUITARS.COM


SETLIST

MARK TREMONTI VENUE: Summit Music Hall DATE: October 20, 2015 LOCATION: Denver, CO Interview by RICHARD BIENSTOCK

CAUTERIZE

YOU WASTE YOUR TIME

“I think it’s always good to have a set list that starts off with three or four heavier tracks. And ‘You Waste Your Time’ is one of those. Also it’s one of our more well-known songs. So we start out with a new track that people maybe don’t know as well, and then we hit them with something more familiar.”

“It was the first song we wrote for that album, so it has a special place in our hearts. And as far as being the first song in the set, it just kind of kicks everybody in the teeth with that opening riff. It’s just a good, high-energy way to start things off. Plus, it doesn’t shred my voice right off the bat.”

FLYING MONKEYS

“It has a different mood than a lot of the other tunes. It’s not a super high-energy live song; it’s got more of a heavy groove to it. So it’s not a tune where people go crazy. But they still really get into it. Even when I’ve done a show and I’ve felt like, Ah, the crowd didn’t really get that tune, I’ll have so many people come up to me afterward and say it was their favorite.”

RADICAL CHANGE

“It’s where the set jumps up a notch. It’s our current single, and if there haven’t been any mosh pits going on by this point, this is usually where they start. I’ll ask the crowd to show us what they have when we start playing this song, and they usually get amped up and do just that.”

“It changes the pace drastically. We go from ‘Radical Change,’ which is probably the second-highest energy song, to this, which really sets a different mood. And I really have to sing on this one. Up until this point, I’ve been singing pretty aggressively. With ‘Dark Trip’ I have to pull it back. But I love performing it live and it has probably my favorite guitar solo of the set.”

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

“It’s always a highlight for us, and it’s a favorite from the first album [2012’s All I Was] for all the old-school fans. When we did the first record, we came out with a different T-shirt for every song so you could look out into the crowd and see what people liked. And still to this day, we see a lot of people showing up with ‘Brains’ T-shirts on.”

WISH YOU WELL

“I think it’s everyone in the band’s favorite song to play. It’s not a super-complicated song; it’s just a fun, thrashy kind of old-school tune that always goes over well live. It’s kind of the peak of the set, so it would be a shame to put it in the middle and have the energy go down from there. Instead, we put it at the end so that everybody will leave wanting more and will come see us again.”

FRET12/ CHUCK BRUECKMANN

DARK TRIP

BRAINS


MEET YOUR OTHER HALF AT WINTER NAMM 2016 yamahaguitars.com


2015

B.B. KING achieves posthumous Hall of Fame glory, IRON MAIDEN trounces the metal competition and KEITH RICHARDS

shows the young’uns how it’s done. You voted, we counted. Here are the results.

BEST METAL ALBUM

IRON MAIDEN The Book of Souls

38.88% LAMB OF GOD

VII: Sturm Und Drang CHILDREN OF BODOM

I Worship Chaos SLAYER

Repentless GHOST

Meliora METAL ALLEGIANCE

Metal Allegiance ACT OF DEFIANCE

Birth and the Burial DEAFHEAVEN

New Bermuda VENOM

From the Very Depths HIGH ON FIRE

Luminiferous

46

16.96% 9.95% 9.34% 8.11%

BEST METAL GUITARIST

DAVE MURRAY, ADRIAN SMITH, JANICK GERS Iron Maiden

39.48%

5.84%

CHRIS BRODERICK

4.86%

ALEXI LAIHO

3.24%

MARK MORTON & WILLIE ADLER

1.75% 1.07%

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

Act of Defiance Children of Bodom

Lamb of God KERRY KING

Slayer

19.33% 16.66% 15.96% 8.57%


GUITAR WORLD HALL OF FAME

B.B. KING

31.77% DAVID GILMOUR ANGUS YOUNG RITCHIE BLACKMORE GARY ROSSINGTON

27.89% 25.33% 13.96% 1.05%

( P REV I OUS WI N NER S : J OH N PETRUC C I, ERIC C LAPTON, PET E T OWN S HEND, S L A S H , TONY IOMMI, RAND Y RH OAD S, J OE SA TR I A N I , DI M EB A G DARRELL, J IMI H END RIX, KIRK H AMMET T , E DDI E V A N HA L EN, S T EVIE RAY VAU GH AN, J IMMY PAGE)

BEST METALCORE ALBUM

PERIPHERY Juggernaut: Alpha and Omega

33.73%

MOST ANTICIPATED RELEASE OF 2016 TRIVIUM

DREAM THEATER

24.22%

CHARLIE GILLETT COLLECTION/GETTY IMAGES

METALLICA

TOOL

MEGADETH

ZAKK WYLDE

ANTHRAX

ESCAPE THE FATE

17.32% 17.31% 12.10% 11.33% 10.61% 7.11%

Silence in the Snow BULLET FOR MY VALENTINE

Venom BETWEEN THE BURIED AND ME

Coma Ecliptic COHEED AND CAMBRIA

The Color Before the Sun AUGUST BURNS RED

Found In Far Away Places BRING ME THE HORIZON

That’s the Spirit THY ART IS MURDER

Holy War WE CAME AS ROMANS

We Came As Romans MISS MAY I

Deathless

31.48% 16.83% 5.7% 3.82% 3.04% 2.74% 1.42% 0.74% 0.50% guitarworld.com

47


VAN HALEN

21.75%

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AC/DC SLIPKNOT FOO FIGHTERS

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

20.23% 19.2% 11.35%

JUDAS PRIEST GHOST PAUL MCCARTNEY

9.41% 6.59% 4.42%

THE WHO KORN JOHN FOGERTY

3.02% 2.7% 1.33%

F I N C O S T E L LO/ G E T T Y I M A G E S

BEST LIVE ACT


BEST ROCK ALBUM

MUSE Drones

19.57% FIVE FINGER DEATH PUNCH

Got Your Six SCORPIONS

Return to Forever FAITH NO MORE

Sol Invictus KEITH RICHARDS

Crosseyed Heart CLUTCH

Psychic Warfare MARILYN MANSON

The Pale Emperor SEVENDUST

Kill the Flaw SHINEDOWN

Threat to Survival POP EVIL

Up

15.33% 14.6% 13.91%

BEST ROCK GUITARIST

10.39%

KEITH RICHARDS

7.52% 6.31% 5.76% 5.72%

Rolling Stones

JASON HOOK

35.43% 24.04% 17.8% 14.1% 8.63%

Five Finger Death Punch

CHRIS CORNELL JON HUDSON

Faith No More

ZACH MYERS

Shinedown

0.89% BEST SHRED ALBUM

BEST SHREDDER

JOE SATRIANI

JOE SATRIANI

44.58%

S AT R I A N I : L A R RY D I M A R Z I O

GUTHRIE GOVAN TOSIN ABASI TONY MACALPINE GUS G.

Shockwave Supernova

48.69%

THE ARISTOCRATS

24.13% 13.02% 9.53% 8.74%

Tres Caballeros MARK TREMONTI

Cauterize TONY MACALPINE

Concrete Gardens GUS G.

Brand New Revolution

21.04% 10.98% 10.73% 8.56% guitarworld.com

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KieselGuitars 858 GUITARS

www.

MARCH

FEBRUARY

SEPTEMBER

DECEMBER

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

HOLIDAY

JUNE

MAY

JANUARY

JULY

11.07%

ALL OUR NECKS COME STANDARD WITH DUAL HIGH STRENGTH CARBON FIBER RODS AS OF MAY 15 2015 “Every musician knows how important the neck is. Without a straight neck it doesn’t matter how good it looks or plays. We invested a lot of time and money, because we want to build the best instruments possible.” - Jeff Kiesel

AUGUST

9.98% 9.1% FAVORITE GUITAR WORLD COVER

8.98% 7.3%

APRIL

12.51%

7.22%

6.9% 6.3%

6.26% 5.33% 5.09% 3.96%

.com

JOE BONAMASSA

51.33% always made in America GU I TA R WOR L D

50

BUDDY GUY GARY CLARK JR. WARREN HAYNES BRITTANY HOWARD

25.01% 12.96% 8.24% 2.46%

RICK GOULD

BEST BLUES GUITARIST


SHAPE YOUR SOUND

Bose® F1 Model 812 Flexible Array Loudspeaker

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Introducing the first portable loudspeaker that lets you easily control the vertical coverage – so wherever you play, more music reaches more people directly. The Bose F1 Model 812 Flexible Array Loudspeaker’s revolutionary flexible array lets you manually select from four coverage patterns, allowing you to adapt your PA to the room. Plus, the loudspeaker and subwoofer provide a combined 2,000 watts of power, giving you the output and impact for almost any application. Your audience won’t believe their ears.

Bose.com/F1 ©2015 Bose Corporation. CC017045


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D A N I E L K N I G H TO N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

Onstage at Sleep Train Amphitheatre in Chula Vista, California, September 30, 2015

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Jones Beach, NY, August 13, 2015

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K E V I N M A Z U R/ G E T T Y I M A G ES

ddie van halen smiles a lot when he’s playing guitar. That smile remains there constantly, whether he’s doing soundcheck or performing onstage, and it’s a genuine expression of happiness and joy. Or perhaps it’s more accurate to describe Ed’s smile as an expression of exhilaration, as the look on his face is similar to that of a driver pushing a sports car past 190 mph or a skydiver plunging into the wild blue yonder from 18,000 feet above the earth’s surface. The source of Van Halen’s exhilaration is a rig that has constantly evolved over his entire career and that he has meticulously refined over the past nine years with the guitars, amps and other items of gear he’s developed for his own EVH brand. The sound produced by Ed’s rig is as powerful as the throaty, earth-shaking roar of a Lamborghini V12 engine at full throttle, and it demands your full, immediate attention. This point is driven home during soundcheck for Van Halen’s show at New York’s Bethel Woods Center for the Arts. As the Van Halen family—Ed on guitar, his son Wolfgang on bass, and brother Al on drums—roar into an instrumental version of “Light Up the Sky,” the entire backstage crew gathers to watch, and even the venue workers, who moments ago were hastily preparing for the evening’s events, stop in their tracks to listen. Van Halen fans who attended the band’s 2015 tour unanimously agreed that Ed’s playing is better than it’s ever been. It’s very likely that the reason for that is because his sound is also the best it’s ever been, and thanks to the iron-clad reliability of his rig all he has to think about is playing. Ed’s guitar tech Tom Weber and Wolfgang’s bass tech Jim Survis—both experienced road pros who have worked on previous Van Halen tours as well as with numerous headlining acts for decades—both humbly comment that the rigs remained trouble-free for the entire tour, something that neither can recall ever happening before on tours with other artists. While the racks of gear at stage left—Ed’s side of the stage—look intimidating and complicated to the average music fan, Ed’s rig is brilliantly straightforward and simple, with a fundamental signal path that consists of

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55


features such as Resonance controls for each channel. Those modifications were the result of Ed’s feedback after using the original 5150 III amps for Van Halen’s 2007-08 tour, and they all became stock features of the production version of the IIIS head, which is what Ed is using now. The end results of the meticulous attention to detail that goes into every EVH amp and guitar were boldly evident throughout the 2015 tour, as Ed’s tone remained massive, crisp, articulated, aggressive and, most importantly of all, consistent from the first note of the first night through the last note of the last night. Because the improvements and innovations that Ed makes to his gear become standard features of EVH products, that same sound and performance is available and accessible to any guitarist. But even better than that, thanks to the unlimited access that Van Halen gave to Guitar World, Ed has allowed us to share every detail of his rig, including the signal path, amp and effect settings, and other insights into his signature sound to help players dial in the same exact tones or use his rig as inspiration for their own signature sounds.

Ed’s guitar rack

guitar to pedals to half-stack amp. That signal path forms the core of Ed’s sound, which is subtly enhanced and given added body and dimension thanks to his wet/dry/ wet setup where delay-processed signals are routed to 4x12 cabinets on the left and right. What’s even more amazing is that the primary source of Ed’s phenomenal tone on Van Halen’s entire 2015 tour was a single amp head—an EVH 5150 IIIS. On Van Halen’s previous tour in 2012, Ed used 5150 III amps that were modified to provide enhanced gain and midrange as well as additional

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For Van Halen’s 2015 tour, Ed initially planned on using the Wolfgang USA with a Stealth black finish and ebony fretboard with dot inlays that was his main guitar during the entire 2012 tour as well as for the television appearances the band made in early 2015. However, shortly after rehearsals for the tour started Ed took delivery of a Wolfgang USA guitar built by Chip Ellis featuring a heavily relic’d white finish, block fretboard inlays, and a custom kill switch, which Ed uses to create stuttering staccato effects during “You Really Got Me” and his solo. “I wanted a white guitar that was relic’d,” says Van Halen. “Chip built that for me and did a wonderful job. I compared it to my trusty old Stealth, and the white guitar sounded better, so it immediately became my main guitar for rehearsals and the tour.” While Ed loved the white Wolfgang USA, he found the neck a little thicker than he normally likes for his neck profiles. He sanded down the back of the neck until it was slim and comfortable enough for his preferences. “It’s still a little fatter than the Stealth’s neck, but I’m happy with it, so it stuck,” he says. The white Wolfgang also features Ed’s latest innovation—a custom-made volume pot designed to provide

CHRIS GILL

GUITARS 


SETTINGS PEDAL SETTINGS 1. EVH Phase 90

UNCHAINED

Speed: 10 o’clock Script switch: On

2. EVH Flanger Manual: 11 o’clock Width: 11 o’clock Speed: 11 o’clock Regen: 5 o’clock EVH switch: Off

EXCLUSIVE: Ed’s signal path and settings revealed!

3. Boss OC-3 Super Octave Direct Level: 3 o’clock Oct. 1 Level: 5 o’clock Range: 1 o’clock Mode: Poly Guitar In Output Mono

4. Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensemble E. Level: 5 o’clock Rate: 8 o’clock Depth: 5 o’clock Filter High: 10 o’clock Filter Low: 5 o’clock Output A

3

AMP SETTINGS 5. EVH 5150 IIIS

Impedance: 16 ohms

COLEMAN AUDIO SWITCHER

SUPER Octave

Channel 1

Gain: 10 o’clock Low: 1 o’clock Mid: 10.5 o’clock High: 2 o’clock Volume: 10 o’clock Presence: 1 o’clock Resonance: 1 o’clock

1

4

Chorus Ensemble

E V H

MXR

Channel 2

Gain: 5 o’clock Low: 3 o’clock Mid: 12 o’clock High: 12.5 o’clock Volume: 10 o’clock Presence: 1.5 o’clock Resonance: 5 o’clock

EVH

2

Channel 3

Gain: 2.5 o’clock Low: 2 o’clock Mid: 12 o’clock High: 1 o’clock Volume: 11 o’clock Presence: 1.5 o’clock Resonance: 1 o’clock

LEXICON PCM 70

6 HH

V800

Front panel

LINE TAP

Delay Time: 7 o’clock (minimum) Unigain: +4dB Mixed output Remote Switch Delay On/Off

Rear panel

EVH

7. ROLAND SDE-3000 RIGHT

EVH

EVH ‡

EVH

Input: -2dB Delay Time: 798 Delay Feedback: 20 Delay Out: 31 Modulation Rate: 00 Modulation Depth: 00

Rear panel

HH

V800

Front panel

Delay Time: 7 o’clock (minimum) Unigain: +4dB Mixed output Remote Switch Delay On/Off

5

7

6. ROLAND SDE-3000 LEFT Input: -2dB Delay Time: 398 Delay Feedback: 30 Delay Out: 31 Modulation Rate: 00 Modulation Depth: 00

EVH LINE TAP

S P E AKE R O U T

‡ D R Y S IG N A L

† EFFEC TS W ET

I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y S A N D I E B U R K E

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Because “Little Guitars” returned to the band’s set for the first time since the 2007-08 tour, Ed brought along a pair of custom-made EVH Wolfgang mini guitars. His main one has a tobacco sunburst finish and Floyd Rose tremolo with D-Tuna, while the backup has an amber-yellow finish and stop tailpiece. One other guitar joined Ed’s collection late in the tour but never appeared onstage—an accurate replica of Ed’s colorful “Rasta” guitar made by Scott Smith. Ed’s original “Rasta” first started out as the black and white Circles/“Unchained” guitar, but he later modified the finish by taping the body and adding layers of red, green and yellow paint. “Scott has made replicas of every guitar I’ve ever made,” says Van Halen. “He gave that to me as a present. I gave my original one to Dweezil Zappa about 20 years ago.”

(from left) EVH Stripe Series Star; custommade EVH Wolfgang mini; EVH Stripe Series Circles; replica of early Eighties “Rasta” guitar

AMPS  Van Halen’s onstage backline is an impressive sight consisting of 10 EVH 5150 IIIS heads and 10 5150 III 4x12 speaker cabinets, and so are his racks, which are hidden from view at stage left and contain eight EVH 5150 heads of various models. However, Ed’s massive guitar sound is generated by just a single 100-percent stock production EVH 5150 IIIS head. Ed has even used the same exact head for the entire tour. “The beauty of the production version of the IIIS is that the sound doesn’t change once you turn it on,” says Van Halen. “It sounds the same at the beginning of the set as it does at the end of the show. On this tour our front of

CHRIS GILL

absolutely noise-free performance, which EVH will offer as an accessory that can be installed in any guitar. “We’re testing it on this tour,” says Van Halen. “It’s the only volume pot I’ve found where I can play ‘Cathedral’ without any crackle or pop.” “We look at just about everything under a microscope,” says Matt Bruck, who is, for lack of an official title, EVH operations manager. “There’s a point on most pots between 0 and 1 where you can hear noise, especially at the gain levels and stage volumes that Ed plays at. We had all kinds of custom pots made for us with different tapers and designs, but we stuck with this one. It’s good for a million turns and it’s silent.” Ed brought his favorite black Stealth Wolfgang USA on the tour as a backup for the relic’d white Wolfgang, but he never used it as he was satisfied with the stellar performance the white Wolfgang delivered night after night. A similar fate befell another Wolfgang USA in his arsenal, this guitar featuring a one-of-a-kind matte red finish, block neck inlays, and no kill switch. “I occasionally used the red Wolfgang for keyboard songs during the last tour,” says Van Halen. “My main guitar is tuned down a half step, but for the keyboard songs I switch to a guitar that’s tuned to standard pitch. On this tour I’ve been using either an EVH Stripe Series Star or Stripe Series Circles or a black Wolfgang WG Standard. I prefer the Standard because it has a front pickup that I like to use for the solo in ‘I’ll Wait.’ The Standard is the most economically priced guitar that EVH offers, but it plays just as good as the Special or USA models. It has the same setup specs and similar components and sounds great.”


RG

DI

X7

MP

BS

BB

METAL TO THE CORE

RG

AIX

M 6F

TG

F

As the popularity of the Ibanez “Made for Metal” Iron Label series continues to grow, so do the models that inhabit the Iron Label universe. The RGDIX7MPBSBB features a slightly longer 26.5” scale length , perfect for 7-string down d tuning. The RGAIX6FMTGF sports an arched , contoured body that allows the guitar to become part of you like never before. The new Iron Label RGA and RGD . They’re out of this world .


EFFECTS  Although many guitarists these days place their pedals in racks and operate them via remote MIDI controllers, Ed is somewhat old school and prefers to have his pedals at his feet where he can make quick adjustments. However, he connects them to a custom-built true-bypass loop switcher, which keeps the pedals entirely out of the signal chain until he engages them with a footswitch on the loop switcher. The only pedal that isn’t connected to the loop switcher is an EVH95 Eddie Van Halen Signature Cry Baby wah, which is placed directly in front of it. Pedals connected to the switcher include Van Halen’s signature MXR EVH90 Phase 90 and EVH117 Flanger, which are meticulously designed to replicate the classic tones of his original Seventies MXR pedals. A pair of Boss pedals— an OC-3 Super Octave and CE-5 Chorus Ensemble—complete his onstage stomp box selection. “Normally I use chorus for ‘Pretty Woman,’ but we’re not playing that song this time,” says Van Halen. “On this tour I use it for ‘Drop Dead Legs,’ and I also use the octave pedal for the outro riff on that song. “I’m using in-ear monitors now,” he continues. “Because they really enhance the effects, I tend to use my effects less. In-ear monitors are great for vocals, but they suck for guitar. They make it harder to play because it

Ed’s pedalboard

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CHRIS GILL

house guy told me that the sound doesn’t change at all, so he never had to make any EQ adjustments to compensate. I blew a tube one night on my main head, but since then I’ve used the same set of tubes for the whole tour.” Ed is similarly enamored with his 4x12 cabinets, which are stocked with Celestion G12 EVH 20-watt 12-inch speakers. “They’re made in the U.K.,” he says. “The more that you use them, the better they sound. I’ve used those speakers for several tours now, and I’ve never blown a single one.” Two other 5150 IIIS heads and four 5150 III heads from the previous tour, which were modified to IIIS specs, are in the racks as backups. The prototype of the new EVH 5150 EL34 head, which features EL34 tubes instead of the 6L6 tubes used in the power amp sections of the 5150 III and IIIS, also came along on this tour. Like the 5150 IIIS, this new amp provides three fully independent channels and many other features found on the IIIS, like adjustable bias, an effects loop, direct output and rear-panel Resonance controls. “The EL34 amp is getting its first road test,” says Van Halen. “I haven’t used it for a show yet, but I plug into it every couple shows to check how well it’s holding up and how it’s maintaining its tone. The sound is very vintage Van Halen, but it’s also capable of achieving modern high gain tones while maintaining EL34 character if you want that. Right now I’m waiting on a revision to improve the adjustment range of the EQ and gain knobs. I’m still tweaking it.”


e forthcoming

EVH 5150III EL

34 amp

sounds like your ear is right up against the speaker, which can be annoying. You don’t have that distance between the guitar and the cabinet, so everything sounds more pronounced than I’m used to.” The loop switcher on the pedal board also features footswitches for engaging his Roland SDE-3000 digital delay and Lexicon PCM70 rack effects. These are effect on/off switches only, as both delay units are placed in the signal chain after the 5150 IIIS amp’s speaker output instead of going directly into the head’s input like the stomp box effects. Above the loop switcher is a standard four-switch EVH 5150 III foot controller for selecting channels and engaging the effects loop on the main EVH 5150 IIIS head. One stomp box resides in the rack instead of the pedal board—an MXR Smart Gate that is connected to the 5150 IIIS head’s effects loop. “At the volume levels and high gain settings that Ed uses, the noise floor is higher,” explains Ed’s guitar tech Tom Weber. “When you put three mics in front of the cabinets and boost that through a PA that’s loud enough to fill a 25,000-seat venue, you don’t want any noise showing up. The lowest setting on the Smart Gate makes the rig absolutely quite when Ed isn’t playing, but it gets completely out of the way once he starts playing.” Interestingly, Ed has no tuner on his pedal board, but he doesn’t need one thanks to the stability of his main Wolfgang USA guitar. “He plays that guitar for nine or 10 songs

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before the first guitar change,” says Weber. “On the 200708 tour he played his main guitar for 13 songs before making a change. If the guitar is set up properly, the tuning remains consistent, especially because the Wolfgang is a very solidly built guitar.”

POST  EFFECTS About 25 years ago Ed pioneered the wet/dry/wet setup, which utilizes a center dry speaker cabinet and delay-processed left and right speaker cabinets, and that setup still remains part of his stage rig design today. Using this setup, the primary core of Ed’s tone is always the sound coming from a half stack setup consisting of his main EVH 5150 IIIS head and a single EVH 5150 III 4x12 cabinet placed at the center. That center cabinet always remains 100 percent dry, which maintains maximum clarity and never compromises the pure, unadulterated tone

Onstage at Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, California, July 16, 2015

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and character of Ed’s half stack core. Meanwhile, delay-processed audio coming from a pair of Roland SDE-3000 digital delay units is routed to EVH 5150 III 4x12 cabinets placed to the left and right of the center 4x12 cabinet. The delays are programmed to provide big, spacious sound similar to reverb, but without losing definition and clarity the way typical reverb effects do. “I don’t want to hear the delay itself,” says Van Halen. “I just want it to fill in some holes and make my sound bigger, like reverb, although using delays this way sounds better than reverb. It gives my sound some added depth without getting in the way of the main dry signal.” The signal for the wet cabinets comes from a custom speaker-to-line level converter box made by Dave Friedman of Rack Systems that is connected to the main amp head’s speaker output jack. The speaker output-tapped line level signal goes to the input of a Lexicon PCM70, the left and right outputs of the PCM70 go to the inputs of individual Roland SDE-3000 units, and the output

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of each SDE-3000 is connected separately to left and right channel inputs of an HH V800 power amplifier. Finally, the audio signals for each channel are sent separately via the V800’s left and right speaker outputs to the left and right 4x12 cabinets onstage. The HH V800 power amps, which have remained a vital part of Ed’s live rig since the mid Eighties, are key elements in the warm, natural sound of Van Halen’s wet/ dry/wet setup. “I’ve never heard a MOSFET circuit that sounds that good,” says Bruck. “It sounds like a tube amp. We’ve kept those amps around even though they’re as old as the hills because they’re extremely reliable. The filter caps are huge. They look like a four-pack of beer cans. We’ve had them rebuilt once or twice by Stretch at Valley Sound Music Technologies, but it was just routine maintenance and replacing parts due to normal wear and tear.” Finally, the three left, center and right 4x12 EVH 5150 III cabinets onstage left are mic’d with Shure SM-57 microphones, which are the final link between Ed’s rig and

the front of house sound system. “It’s the most dependable rig I’ve ever worked with,” says Weber, who has also been a guitar tech for Nine Inch Nails, Poison, Billy Duffy of the Cult, and guitarists in Reba McEntire and Lyle Lovett’s bands. “You set it up, and it works. Ed has always insisted in getting everything right, and that has paid off. His name is on the gear after all, so it has to be right. Ed has direct input into every EVH product, and he and Matt are always providing observations and suggestions to make things better. Ed insists that anyone who buys a piece of gear with his name on it gets the same gear that he uses. You’ve gotta admire that.” “I’m very happy with my guitars and amps,” says Van Halen. “My tone on this entire tour has been very consistent from the beginning to the end and one night to the next. The 5150 IIIS is holding up very well. I don’t have to worry about the little details like I used to. That allows me to go out onstage every night and play my best. That’s the way it should be.”


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He’s considered a true pioneer and has earned the admiration of the world’s most respected guitarists for decades. Here we celebrate the accomplished career of jazzfusion legend JOHN McLAUGHLIN and his innovative new album, Black Light. ZDOWSK BY TED DRO

UARY GUITAR WORLD FEBR

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eff Beck calls his friend John McLaughlin “the best guitarist alive.” And the long list of McLaughlin’s six-string–slinging devotees include Eric Johnson, Steve Morse, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Mike Stern, Al Di Meola, Shawn Lane, Pat Metheny, Greg Ginn, Scott Henderson and Omar Rodriguez-Lopez—a who’s-who of jazz, rock, fusion and pure shred.


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FOR ME, IT’S ABOUT CREATING A DOOR TO A NEW MUSICAL LANDSCAPE.”

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While “best” might seem subjective, there is no disputing that the free-spirited 73-year-old McLaughlin is the world’s most complete guitarist. The proof is in his incendiary live performances and his sprawling catalog of over 100 albums. These encompass solo recordings, discs with his groundbreaking Mahavishnu Orchestra, pioneering fusion sessions with Miles Davis and Tony Williams, his Indian classical music inspired group Shakti, his acoustic guitar trio with Paco de Lucía and Al Di Meola, plus dozens of other bands and orchestral projects and guest appearances. All of which lay bare his unmitigated command of rock, jazz, folk, Indian, Gypsy swing, R&B, blues, psychedelic, flamenco and classical music. McLaughlin was, in fact, the first shredder—nearly a decade before the term “shred” became part of the guitar vernacular—firing off notes like a well-tuned Gatling gun since 1969 in numbers like the sweet ’n’ sour aggro-jazz improv track “It’s Funny” from his solo debut Extrapolation, and continues to do so on his inventive new album Black Light. Inspired by the Indian veena, he was the first Western guitarist to employ scalloped fretboards—nearly a decade before the emergence of Yngwie Malmsteen. And Steve Vai borrowed the “tree of life” inlay concept for his signature model guitars from the famed Rex Bogue–built doublenecked instrument that McLaughlin played in his Mahavishnu Orchestra. Even notorious curmudgeon Frank Zappa acknowledged his prowess, saying, “A person would be a moron not to appreciate McLaughlin’s technique.”

ED PERLSTEIN/GETTY IMAGES

Carlos Santana (left) and John McLaughlin during the Berkeley Jazz Festival at the Greek Theatre, May 1980


PA U L N AT K I N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

McLaughlin performing in Chicago, Illinois, on April 4, 1985

But McLaughlin’s technique involves much more than being the fastest guitarist in the West…and the East. His tone, sonic palette, melodic invention, articulation, rhythm chops, chord vocabulary, far-flung improvisations and compositional skill are simply impeccable whether applied to the screaming interstellar exploration of Mahavishnu’s epic “The Dance of Maya,” drag racing on nylon strings with Di Meola and de Lucía on “Guardian Angel,” or playing cubist bebop on “Clap Your Hands” from Black Light. So how does a kid born in a tiny village in Yorkshire and raised in the countryside of Northern England become the world’s most complete guitarist? For McLaughlin, it boils down to this: “The guitar was made for me, and I was made for the guitar.” And the rest is a matter of fascination, assimilation, education and meditation. “An acoustic guitar came into my hands when I was 11, and I stopped studying piano, which I’d begun at eight, immediately,” he recounts in his gentle

melodious voice via phone from his home in Monaco. “I was coming out of Bach and Beethoven, and suddenly, through this instrument and the records of my older brothers, who were in university, I was in the world of Robert Johnson, Fred McDowell, Son House, Lead Belly…all these great acoustic blues players. I didn’t even know what an electric guitar was at the time.” His siblings were eclectic listeners, bringing home jazz albums and early world music recordings. After digesting Delta blues, McLaughlin’s next passion was flamenco, the soundtrack of Northern Spain’s cultural melting pot of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. “That’s one of the reasons I ended up playing with Paco de Lucía,” he recounts. “But at the time it was a disaster. I was in this little town just out of Scotland. I needed a teacher and nobody else even knew what flamenco was.” Luckily he soon fell under the spell of Miles Davis, and the die was cast. “I heard Miles’ album Miles Ahead, which

he recorded with the Gil Evans orchestra,” says McLaughlin. “He showed his love of flamenco there, on ‘Blues for Pablo,’ and I was sold. By the time I was 16 I wanted to be a jazz musician, and ever since then jazz has been my true discipline. You need a discipline to master an instrument—either classical or jazz, although rock guitar players have their own discipline today. In pursuing a discipline, you learn a vocabulary of chords and concepts, and that can serve you in whatever you play. “But I think the record player was my greatest teacher,” he continues. “I drove my family completely bonkers pulling the needle off of LPs so I could hear a passage over and over. At 16 I was sneaking into pubs where they had jazz bands on weekends, and I’d ask if I could sit in. I’ll never forget the first time. The leader said, ‘Okay kid, what ya wanna play?’ I said, “ ‘Cherokee.’ They started it at 1,000-miles-an-hour and gave me my first solo. I died a thousand deaths, but learned more in 10 minutes than I had in a year. I kept coming back until I could handle it.” In the early Sixties McLaughlin moved to London and found steady work with a series of bands that helped ignite the British blues scene from which Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Peter Green—the Holy Trinity of British blues guitar—emerged, with Jimmy Page hot on their tails. After working with Georgie Fame and the Blue Flames, McLaughlin moved on to Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated and then to the Graham Bond Organisation, where he played with Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce, who would go on to form Cream with Clapton, then the hotshot young guitarist from another happening group on the scene, John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. When paychecks were scarce, McLaughlin turned to session work, recording with obscure English rocker Duffy Power and others. His logbook included a pair of demos—“Let Me Sleep Beside You” and “Karma Man”—with David Bowie and producer Tony Visconti. He also gave some guitar lessons to Page. “We were neighbors, and it was just lucky that we met,” McLaughlin says. “Jimmy’s a very nice guy, and later on we used to meet a lot on pop sessions when we were both studio sharks. I was in a soul band with John Paul Jones, and I used to teach John Paul harmony at that time, too. He also became a shark, and with Jimmy and John Paul together, Led Zeppelin was on the horizon.” Greatness was also on the horizon for McLaughlin. In January 1969 he sifted

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(back, left to right) McLaughlin, Ranjit Barot and Etienne M’Bappe; (front) Gary Husband

through the compositions he’d been stockpiling and recorded his daring solo debut Extrapolation—now considered a jazz classic—in London’s Advision Studios. Then he promptly departed for America. Soon he was in the studio with drummer Tony Williams, recording Emergency!, arguably the opening salvo of electric jazz-rock fusion. With McLaughlin and organist Larry Young pushing air hard, and Williams smacking his kit like Miguel Cabrera, Tony Williams’ Lifetime had a reputation as one of the loudest bands on the planet. “There was no goal about volume,” McLaughlin reflects. “Coming out of the racial riots of the Sixties, the bombing of the Black church in Alabama, the Panthers…there was a lot of stuff going on—not to mention the Vietnam War. It was a different world then and people seemed to be more passionate. I guess that could be translated into volume.” Williams also played drums with Miles Davis, and introduced McLaughlin to his jazz hero, who promptly enlisted the guitarist in his own electric experiments. McLaughlin played on Davis’ fusion cornerstones In a Silent Way, Bitches Brew, Live-Evil and A Tribute To Jack Johnson. During the In a Silent Way sessions, he even snuck in a night of jamming with Jim Hendrix. But recording with Davis was more challenging. “I was extremely nervous the first time in the studio with Miles,” McLaughlin recalls of the In a Silent Way sessions. “I was struggling a bit because the charts were written for piano.” At one point Davis asked McLaughlin why he was hesitant, and frowned at the explanation. “Play like you don’t know how to play guitar,” Davis advised. That wasn’t terribly helpful, but McLaughlin’s Fender Mustang is a shimmering highlight of the album. During 1971 his vision for the Mahavishnu Orchestra crystallized. Since 1968 McLaughlin—after briefly experimenting with LSD— had paralleled his study of jazz with yoga and meditation. He sought to integrate what those disciplines had taught him in Mahavishnu,

creating a group that crossed borders— musically, literally and spiritually. The band’s recruits—keyboardist Jan Hammer, violinist Jerry Goodman, bassist Rick Laird and drummer Billy Cobham— were from Prague, Illinois, Ireland and Panama, respectively. And the Mahavishnu Orchestra’s music was a blend of rock, jazz, folk, Western classical and Indian music unlike anything previously heard. “I wanted Indian music to be a big part of the band because it’s all inclusive—it integrates every aspect of the human dimension,” McLaughlin explains. The name Mahavishnu also reflected McLaughlin’s spiritual studies with guru Sri Chinmoy. It means “divine power, compassion and justice.” The twined influences of Indian classical music and flamenco initially

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motivated McLaughlin to develop his highvelocity chops. Both styles are packed with speed demons who display their knowledge and prowess in daredevil chromatic lines, fearlessly charging through compositions and improvisations alike. And those aspects of McLaughlin’s playing came to the absolute fore in the Mahavishnu Orchestra, funneled through an ear-searing 100-watt Marshall Super Lead. The original lineup’s two studio albums, 1971’s The Inner Mounting Flame and 1973’s Birds of Fire, and 1973’s live Between Nothingness and Eternity, approached the mind-blowing capacity of an acid trip. Intense unison playing, soaring arcs of melody, tagteam improvisations and skyrocket solos were de rigeur. Mahavishnu quickly became one of the most popular live acts in the world. And McLaughlin—with his crisp, white Buddhistinspired attire, era-defying short hair, Marshall stacks, double-necked guitar and flamethrower playing—became a rock star. The 21-minute track “Dream” from Between Nothingness and Eternity, which was cut live at a concert in New York’s Central Park, remains a perfect summation of the band. McLaughlin’s swift, arcing melodies lead into a series of improvisations that take the round-robin approach of bebop to fresh and daring dimensions. Silence and harmony, flaring bursts of virtuoso playing


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and passages of long, languid notes, plus a musical storyline that encapsulates the fast urban landscapes and rural eddies of the corporeal world as well as the vast peace of the spiritual realm, make the performance truly transcendent. That same year McLaughlin’s friendship with fellow Chinmoy disciple Carlos Santana blossomed into the duets album Love Devotion Surrender. The recording was inspired by the teachings of Chinmoy and was built around fire-breathing takes on jazz saxophonist John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme” and “Naima,” with the former inspired by Coltrane’s own explorations of Buddhism. Depending on your perspective, the album is either a sonic ode to nirvana— defined in Buddhism as the joyful stillness of the enlightened mind—or a fireworkspacked guitar clinic, since McLaughlin and Santana are discreetly mixed left and right. “Carlos and I started hanging out in about 1971,” says McLaughlin. “He asked me to introduce him to Sri Chinmoy and we played together and meditated together, so Love Devotion Surrender was a natural outgrowth of our bond. When you start to meditate with somebody you get close to them because you have a common vision that is blissful and loving—something that’s really missing in today’s world, unfortunately. And then you’re friends forever.” Indeed, McLaughlin and Santana have stayed connected and jammed frequently over the decades. Four years ago they observed the fortieth anniversary of the Love Devotion Surrender sessions with a passionate concert at the Montreux Jazz Festival, captured on the DVD Invitation to Illumination: Live at Montreux 2011. And next July they’re planning another reunion along with fellow fusion spelunkers saxist Wayne Shorter and keyboardist Herbie Hancock on the same Swiss festival stage. Unfortunately the serenity McLaughlin sought to establish with the Mahavishnu Orchestra’s music did not extend to the band itself. The original Mahavishnu broke up in a paroxysm of acrimony. McLaughlin put together a second version that recorded two more masterpieces, 1974’s Apocalypse and ’75’s Visions of the Emerald Beyond. A third incarnation recorded Inner Worlds in 1975, but by then McLaughlin was more interested in deepening his understanding of Indian classical music and its complex rhythms, so he formed Shakti with Indian master musicians, including violinist L. Shankar and tabla wizard Zakir Hussain.

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Nonetheless, the popularity and legacy of the Mahavishnu Orchestra continued to loom over McLaughlin—compelling him to reform the band from 1984 to 1987 with three different line-ups—and continues to do so today, despite the sustained excellence of his other work. Shakti was no exception. The acoustic ensemble was quieter than Mahavishnu, but, if anything, even more intense. The quintet’s recordings and concerts were spiked by their collective command of shifting time signatures, a flexible spider’s web of harmony and insane shredding on guitar, violin and various Indian percussion instruments. McLaughlin had a Gibson J-200 with seven tunable resonating strings across its sound hole specially built by master luthier Abe Wechter. The guitar had a scalloped fretboard and approximated the sounds of a sitar or veena. Somehow McLaughlin had found time to study veena at Wesleyan University while leading the Mahavishnu Orchestra, and later studied sitar with the instrument’s star player, Ravi Shankar.

“I really formed Shakti to create new, original music inspired by Indian classical music, which has much in common with jazz,” McLaughlin relates. “The improvisers are amazing and there’s so much freedom within the structure. There’s a big connection between Indian music and the modal school of jazz that was started by Miles Davis, which Thelonius Monk and John Coltrane took over. And the percussionists are masterly. The time signatures are incredible. It’s exhilarating.” McLaughlin resumed his pan-cultural electro-acoustic trekking with the One Truth Band in the early Eighties. By then he’d also formed a guitar trio with flamenco giant Paco de Lucía and Larry Coryell—who was subsequently replaced by Al Di Meola— that furthered his legend. The Trio, as they became known, was born after McLaughlin telephoned De Lucía to express his enthusiasm for his playing and to ask if they might find a way to perform together. “I could speak about Paco and his impact on me for hours,” McLaughlin offers, “but

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he was a brother to me. We had a similar sense of humor—totally wacky and irreverent. We both had the same philosophy: if you can laugh about something, then you’re saved! Musically he was the greatest of all the great flamenco players, and I’ve listened to most of them for over 60 years.” The Trio was a hell of a band. From 1981 to 1996 they burned a singular path through the acoustic guitar landscape, with de Lucía and McLaughlin’s nylon stringed instruments blending their voices with Di Meola’s steel strings in breathtaking, endlessly virtuosic forays. In his book Power, Passion & Beauty: The Story of the Legendary Mahavishnu Orchestra, jazz writer Walter Kolosky proclaims the group’s 1981 Friday Night in San Francisco “the most influential of all live acoustic guitar albums.” Through the Eighties and into the Nineties McLaughlin continued to tour with various other trios and small ensembles. He began experimenting with guitar synthesizer and used the instrument in the reincarnated Mahavishnu Orchestra. And in the quintet Remember Shakti he created a universe of sounds—flutes, strings, vocal choirs—with his acoustic guitars via the Photon MIDI controller. In 2003 McLaughlin composed and recorded his first work for classical chamber ensemble, the ballet score Thieves and Poets. Three years later he once again pushed the envelope in his quest for new sounds and ideas with Industrial Zen. The album blended the playing of ace musicians including Zakir Hussain, Eric Johnson, multi-instrumentalist Gary Husband and drummers Dennis Chambers and Vinnie Colaiuta with samples, loops and programming. Three albums later, he’s revisited that modus operandi and upped the ante by adding pre-recorded passages with the recent Black Light. “For me, it’s about creating a door to a new musical landscape,” McLaughlin explains. “It’s a new port of call—a place to travel to creatively and sonically that’s impossible for a live band, but can be visualized. It relates to my psychedelic days, when I was fascinated by the idea of being taken places by sounds.” His primary sound, of course, remains the guitar. On Black Light, that’s a new Paul Reed Smith made especially for McLaughlin that he’s entirely smitten with, and that he deploys with the searing/serene mastery that has been his signature for a half-century. “We can divide our music and our lives, but that’s just an intellectual game,” McLaughlin suggests. “In reality they are the same. Any kind of interior research, like meditation, is good, because your music has its roots in your being. When I began meditating, I found that things I’d unconsciously absorbed—from listening to records as a boy, or from the cadences of a conversation—resurfaced and helped give me musically fertile places to go. Music depends on your life for its richness. What I’m happy about is that new music keeps coming to me, and for that I’m eternally grateful.”

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JOHN McLAUGHLIN WAS BORN TO BURN—AND THESE ARE THE TOOLS OF HIS TRADE. John McLaughlin doesn’t just love guitars. He feels, to an extent, that they complete him. “I don’t like to be too far from a guitar,” says the virtuoso. “That makes me nervous.” With the wealth of exceptional instruments McLaughlin has played over the past 62 years, his jitters should be quelled. Some—including the Rex Bogue built “Double Rainbow” and the “Shakti” Gibson J-200 with resonating strings—have earned a place in history for their beauty and innovative designs. Others, like McLaughlin’s 1968 reissue Fender Stratocaster, his scalloped-neck 1976 Gibson ES-345 or the gorgeous custom-built Paul Reed Smith McCarty Violin ocean-colored flame top he’s recently been playing in concert, have either sentimental value, are adored workhorses or straddle both categories. “We all have our loves, don’t we,” he says. These are his favorite six-string heartthrobs:

REX BOGUE “DOUBLE RAINBOW” Inspired by the double-neck Gibson EDS-1275, this gorgeous guitar with a “tree of life” inlay climbing both fingerboards to symbolize McLaughlin’s spiritual and musical journey may have been his favorite. The instrument was completed in July 1973 and featured a fiddleback maple body with laminated necks composed of maple and Brazilian rosewood with Gaboon ebony fingerboards. “I got very attached to it and loved that marvelous ‘tree of life.’ ” He played the Double Rainbow on the Mahavishnu Orchestra’s Apocalypse and Visions of the Emerald Beyond albums, before tragedy struck. “I had it lying flat on a table backstage and—I don’t know what happened, perhaps it was a tremor—there was a crash and it was on the floor split in three places. I felt like I’d been in a car wreck. We were touring with Jeff Beck at the time. He loaned me a Les Paul and we finished the tour.”

D AV I D R E D F E R N / G E T T Y I M A G E S

Mahavishnu Orchestra (from left) Jerry Goodman, John McLaughlin, Billy Cobham, Rick Laird and Jan Hammer


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Onstage at the Knebworth Festival, 1974

Gibson master luthier Abe Wechter designed this unique instrument according to McLaughlin’s specifications, for playing original music inspired by the Indian classical tradition. It had a deeply scalloped fretboard and seven tunable drone strings over the sound hole that could be strummed or allowed to vibrate sympathetically. The sympathetic strings were heavy (.023 to .062) while the fretboard was adorned with lights (.009 to .038). “It was a marvelous guitar and an innovation,” says McLaughlin. “Later Abraham built me a real masterpiece—a nylon string guitar in the classical tradition. It took him seven years to build and I used it on the [2003] album Thieves & Poets.”

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1968 REISSUE WHITE FENDER STRATOCASTER

“After the 1975 tour with Jeff Beck was over, I gave him a white 1968 Stratocaster in thanks for loaning me his Les Paul, which was a great guitar. Later, I bought a white Strat for myself as a reminder of Jeff’s generosity. Every time I’ve seen Jeff since then, he’s been playing a white Strat.”

1958 GIBSON LES PAUL CUSTOM REISSUE WITH BIGSBY

“It’s very much like the black Les Paul Custom I used for recording with Lifetime,” McLaughlin says. “I’ve got a few. I really love Les Pauls. They’re excellent guitars.”

GIBSON J-200

“I’ve said many times that these are perhaps the greatest steel string acoustic guitars ever built—especially if you like that Gibson acoustic sound, which I do.”

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MARK WHITEBOOK ACOUSTIC

“James Taylor and I visited Mark Whitebook’s shop in the Bay area one day, and we both bought one of his guitars,” McLaughlin says. “They’re beautiful and have gorgeous tone, and they’re built with such care. Mark

FENDER MUSTANG

McLaughlin’s potent tone on his foundational fusion recordings with Miles Davis came from a surprisingly modest new Fender. “When I was with Miles, I played a Fender Mustang and I really loved that guitar,” says McLaughlin. “It was really nice. I used it on Bitches Brew, In a Silent Way, Jack Johnson…”

1976 GIBSON ES-345 WITH BIGSBY

For fans of semi-hollowbody guitars, this one’s a drool-fueler—and unique. McLaughlin purchased the tobacco burst instrument in 1978. Then he had it modified by scalloping the fingerboard and installing the Bigsby whammy bar, and played it on his recordings with the One Truth Band.

GODIN FREEWAY SA

McLaughlin decided he wanted to broaden his tonal palette with MIDI guitar in the Nineties, but he worked his way through a series of instruments for many years before finding the Freeway SA. “It was really a problem finding well-playing and feeling guitars that were also good for tracking MIDI,” McLaughlin says. “I used the Freeway for my instructional DVD box set This Is the Way I Do It, which explains all of my technique in detail. At the bottom of the screen, everything that I’m playing shows up in tablature, and I needed a guitar that would link effectively to the software that did the notation. Finding the Godin was really the answer for me, and it is very good in live situations as well.”

PAUL REED SMITH

Today McLaughlin endorses and plays several Paul Reed Smith models. For his new album Black Light, he used a PRS McCarty Violin and a PRS Private Stock Signature Limited Run. “Paul has made me three guitars to date, and they’re not just guitars, they’re works of art,” McLaughlin says.

—TED DROZDOWSKI

C H R I S WA LT E R / G E T T Y I M A G E S

“SHAKTI” J-200

had to quit building guitars because he developed a dreadful asthma condition and his doctor forbade him from working with wood. It’s a shame, really.”


MAXWELL


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O UST C S ’ ACH AR ERB U A UIT G N Y A D P G OF E” CO N G I D K E W MA Y I N G S GILL THE L E F “ D RI N INSI By CH STO G N KI

M

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lack Keys guitarist Dan Auerbach is well known for playing eccentric “bargain” guitars and is often seen onstage with unusual vintage Harmony, National, Silvertone, Supro and Teisco models. However, when Auerbach recently performed with his new side band the Arcs on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, he played a solidbody guitar that mystified even the most knowledgeable aficionados of bizarre Sixties Japanese guitars. The instrument in his hands looked like a very rare Kingston “Flying Wedge” (a.k.a. Rocket), which was built as an export model by Kawai during the late Sixties when the company also made Teisco guitars. Closer examination revealed features that weren’t on the Kingston guitar, such as Filter’Tron-style humbuckers, a Bigsby vibrato tailpiece, and a distinctive fingerboard inlay pattern only seen on a handful of Teisco models, perplexing guitar spotters even more.

It turns out that the guitar was actually a custom copy of that unusual Kingston model completely built from scratch by Auerbach’s guitar tech, Daniel Johnson, although the project didn’t start out that way. In early 2015, Auerbach purchased an original Kingston “Flying Wedge” on eBay

and sent it to Johnson for a few upgrades and modifications. “When Dan first got the guitar, he said it was kind of a letdown,” says Johnson. “It looked really cool, but the scale was short, the neck was very narrow, the tremolo wasn’t very good, and the body was cheap

Dan Auerbach with his custom Kingston “Flying Wedge” copy (left), and the guitar’s maker Daniel Johnson

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plywood. It wasn’t one of the better Sixties Japanese guitars, unfortunately. We talked on the phone about it, and I suggested that he could change the neck to one with a full-size scale like he was used to. Short scale guitars are too hard to keep in tune, and you can’t pound on them.” Auerbach promptly sent the Kingston to Johnson at his shop in Akron, Ohio, but soon after its arrival Auerbach sent over a laundry list of other modifications he wanted performed beyond replacing the neck. “He had a lot of different ideas about what he wanted to do and how to make the guitar work,” recalls Johnson. “He wanted to put TV Jones Filter’Tronstyle pickups in it, which meant that I needed to make a new pickguard and install new electronics that were robust enough for touring. The original tremolo also needed to go because Dan wanted to use a Bigsby and mount it on the guitar the same way that Lonnie Mack mounted a Bigsby on his Flying V. Since I was also making an entirely new neck for the guitar, it quickly looked like the only part of the original guitar that we were going to keep was the body, and it was this horrible piece of plywood.” After Johnson removed the guitar’s tremolo hardware and started to install the Bigsby, he soon realized that the original body was going to have to go as well. “There was this giant hole in the body right between the Bigsby and the bridge,” says Johnson. “I started making a new body for the guitar without telling Dan. I knew I was going to have to tell him eventually, and when I finally told him that I thought it was best to just make a whole guitar he was like, ‘What?’ He wasn’t too sure about that until I told him about the plywood and the big hole from where the tremolo was.” What started out as a few upgrades for the Kingston guitar ended up becoming a project to build an entirely new guitar based on the Kingston. Johnson made several significant upgrades to the design that increased its inherent cool factor by a few hundred percent. While the neck has the same distinctive pointed headstock shape as the original, Johnson crafted an upscale overlay from five-ply plastic. The distinctive fret marker inlays on edges of the fingerboard were inspired by a similar pattern that appeared on a handful of Teisco models (including the one famously played by Howlin’ Wolf), but Johnson used polished aluminum as the inlay material. The neck is also bound with strips of polished aluminum. “I wanted to emphasize the aluminum of the Bigsby and the mounting bar that I had to make for it,” he says. “I made an


aluminum nut as well because I love the aluminum nuts on old Danelectros. The aluminum just looks cool because it’s not too shiny and it’s somewhat subdued. The aluminum neck binding gives it a feel similar to the aluminum neck on a Travis Bean guitar.” The body is probably the most liberal deviance from the Kingston’s original design, even though it looks like an exact replica from a distance. Johnson traced the Kingston’s body so the shape would look the same, but he decided to heavily contour the body to make it much more comfortable to play. “When Dan and I were in the early stages of talking about this guitar,” Johnson says, “he mentioned that he had been playing this

“ ”

THIS GUITAR WAS A JOY FOR ME TO MAKE. IT WAS THE MOST

ARTISTICALLY FREE PROJECT THAT I’VE DONE IN YEARS.

—Guitar Tech Daniel Johnson

old Ibanez SG copy in the studio. He really loved the way the highly contoured body felt. He also has a Guild Thunderbird with a highly contoured body that is very comfortable to play. Those guitars inspired me to contour this guitar’s body as well.” While the neck appears to be attached to the body with only two bolts, it is also glued into place. Johnson says that this unusual design was more a necessity than an innovation, as he needed to reposition the neck several times while he figured out the ideal placement of the Bigsby tailpiece. The two bolts were easy to remove but stable enough for making adjustments to the scale length and pitch angle. Once he found the ideal placement, the neck was glued securely into the pocket with the

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Dan Auerbach performing in Milan, Italy in 2015

DAN IS SO

“”

COMMI T T ED

TO THIS GUITAR.

ON HIS CURRENT TOUR WITH THE ARCS.

—Daniel Johnson

screws providing added support. An extralong neck tenon that extends all the way to the top edge of the bridge pickup cavity also enhanced stability and strength. Since Johnson and Auerbach are both from Akron, Ohio, the “made in Akron” stamp on the back of the headstock is a subtle statement of pride. Johnson has previously made guitars for celebrities, including some custom guitars he made for K.K. Downing and Glenn Tipton of Judas Priest during his first-ever stint as

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a guitar tech, but this guitar is one of his favorites partly due to the unpredictable nature of the project. Auerbach is very pleased with the guitar as well. “Dan is so committed to this guitar,” says Johnson. “He has been playing it for the entire show on his current tour with the Arcs. He’s more into playing guitar than I’ve seen him for years. In the end, this guitar was a joy for me to make. It was the most artistically free project that I’ve done in years.”

R O B E R TO F I N I Z I O/ PA C I F I C P R E S S/ L I G H T R O C K E T/ G E T T Y I M A G E S

HE HAS BEEN PLAYING IT FOR THE ENTIRE SHOW


always made in America

It’s time Join the family (858) GUITARS KieselGuitars.com

www.


FE B RUARY 2016

the gear in review

89 MX R

EVH 5 1 5 0 Ov erdri v e peda l

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ST R YMON D ig D u a l D i g i t a l D el a y peda l

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E P I P H ON E L T D ED T a mi o O k u da El i t i st Co ro n et el ec t ri c

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J H S P E DA LS U n ic o rn peda l

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F U LLT ON E 2B B o o st peda l

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BAN D I N DU ST R I E S R o adi e A u t o ma t i c Gu i t a r T u n er

Future Rock ERNIE BALL MUSIC MAN MODERN CLASSIC STINGRAY AND CUTLASS By Chris Gill

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

CELLENCE

EVEN THOUGH MUSIC Man was the first company that Leo Fender collaborated with during the Seventies after he sold Fender to CBS, lightning did not strike twice, at least when it came to Music Man’s early guitar models. In fact, Music Man did not produce a successful guitar model until the mid Eighties after Ernie Ball had purchased the company. While the ever-popular StingRay bass (originally developed in the mid Seventies by Leo Fender, Forrest White, and Sterling Ball) has remained a popular mainstay of Ernie Ball Music Man’s product lineup since day one, the guitars they offered had little to nothing to do with Leo Fender’s previous Music Man designs. Ernie Ball Music Man has produced an impressive variety of original Music Man guitar models over the last three decades. The company continues to innovate with their Modern Classic Collection, which includes the StingRay (a tribute to their Seventies Stingray I and II models) and the brand new Cutlass guitar model, by delivering updated features, highquality construction, and standout performance in a classic design.

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CHEAT SHEET STREET PRICE $1,499 (each) MANUFACTURER Ernie Ball Music Man, music-man.com

FEATURES At first glance, the only major differ-

ence between the StingRay and Cutlass guitars appears to be the dual-humbucker pickup configuration of the former and the three-single-coil configuration of the latter. However, while both models have offset asymmetrical double cutaway bodies, the StingRay’s body is 1 1/8 inches longer and 1 3/32 inches wider, and the StingRay’s body is African mahogany while the Cutlass has an alder body. But beyond the electronics, body dimensions, and body materials, the StingRay and Cutlass have several features in common, including a maple neck with either a maple or rosewood fingerboard, 25 1/2-inch scale, 10-inch radius, 22 high-profile medium stainless steel frets, and compensated nut. Schaller M6-IND locking tuners are installed in Music Man’s signature 4-over-2 configuration, but the headstock is longer (6 3/8 inches) than previous Music Man guitar headstocks. The necks are attached to the bodies with five bolts to provide perfect alignment and rock-solid stability, and a sculpted neck joint provides a smooth transition between the neck and body. The Music Man Modern tremolo features vintage-style bent steel saddles for optimal tone and a smooth, chrome-plated cover for playing comfort when resting the picking hand over the bridge. The StingRay’s electronics consist of a pair of custom-wound Music Man humbuckers with chrome covers, a three-position pickup selector toggle switch, and master volume (500k ohm) and tone (.022µF capacitor) controls mounted on a chrome-plated control panel. The Cutlass features three custom Music Man mid-Sixtiesstyle staggered-pole single-coil pickups, a fivepostion blade pickup selector switch, master vol-

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ume (250k ohm) and tone (.047µF capacitor) controls, and a transparent buffered output and new wide-spectrum silent circuit powered by a single nine-volt battery. PERFORMANCE These new versions of the Sting-

Ray and Cutlass (which never made it into regular production as a guitar model the first time around) have about as much in common with their namesake predecessors as the new Mini Cooper has with its original version. The new StingRay and Cutlass are sleek, high-performance machines with classic aesthetics as their Modern Classic namesake suggests. The fit, finish, and feel of both models are phenomenal, completely living up to the standards of quality that have earned Ernie Ball Music Man guitars their esteemed reputations over the years. The StingRay has a distinctive voice that’s bigger and warmer than an SG but brighter and livelier than a Les Paul. The Cutlass delivers the full palette of familiar Strat-style tones, but they’re likely among the best you’ll ever hear, with plenty of balls, dynamics, percussive attack, and dead-quiet hum-free performance thanks to its silent circuit. The Modern tremolo system on both models would make Leo proud as it keeps the guitar perfectly in tune even when returning to pitch after dropping the strings down until they’re totally limp. This tremolo system combines the solid feel and fat tone of a vintage tremolo with the tuning stability of a double-locking system (thanks to the locking tuners and straight string pull on the headstock), although players can only drop pitch from standard and not raise it.

The StingRay features a larger African mahogany body and two humbucking pickups to provide aggressive classic rock tones. The Cutlass has an alder body, three single-coil pickups with staggered polepieces, and silent circuit to deliver classic blues and hard rock tones. The Modern tremolo system has vintage-style bentsteel saddles and a smooth bridge cover for comfortably resting the picking hand above the bridge. Schaller M6-IND locking tuners and an elongated headstock with straight string pull and Music Man’s distinctive 4-over-2 configuration provide rock-solid tuning.

THE BOTTOM LINE The Modern Classic StingRay and Cutlass provide a perfect blend of vintage looks and present-day features, resulting in timeless masterpieces for discriminating electric players.


GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

CELLENCE

You Really Got Me

MXR EVH 5150 OVERDRIVE By Paul Ria rio

FOR AS LONG as I can remember, Eddie

Van Halen’s unmistakable guitar sound is one of the most copied and revered tones that guitarists love to endlessly deliberate over. And it’s a good discussion to have, because some Van Halen aficionados are resolutely passionate about the romanticized “brown” sound of Eddie’s vintage Marshall Super Lead amplifier, while others are addicted to the hi-gain muscle of his signature EVH 5150 III 100S heads turned up to summon gloriously musical overdrive and singing feedback. Regardless of which side you’re on, the good news is Eddie Van Halen and Dunlop have teamed up to introduce the MXR EVH 5150 Overdrive, which delivers both of Eddie’s legendary classic and modern tones in a singular pedal. FEATURES Following in the same striped graphic motif as the MXR EVH Phase 90 and EVH Flanger, the stageready 5150 Overdrive is painted with black stripes over a brushed matte-black

CHEAT SHEET

STREET PRICE $199.99 MANUFACTURER Jim Dunlop, jimdunlop.com

aluminum chassis. The pedal features true-bypass switching and five controls for output, three-band EQ (bass, mid and treble) and gain. It also includes a mini gate control (based on the MXR Smart Gate Noise Gate circuit) that lights up yellow when noise reduction is engaged. There’s also a boost switch, which is key for transitioning into harmonically rich hi-gain tones with a dose of compression but without changing the overall volume. A nine-volt battery or AC adapter powers the pedal. PERFORMANCE To say the MXR

EVH 5150 Overdrive is a phenomenally dynamic, super-charged overdrive pedal is no exaggeration, because it uncannily nails both early and current EVH amp tones in convincingly enhanced detail. Word on the street is that even the man himself was unable to discern the difference between the pedal and his signature 5150 III head. The pedal’s bold overdrive is definitely on the red-hot side, with searing

The EVH 5150 Overdrive features a boost switch that doesn’t increase the volume but kicks in a shot of harmonically rich gain and warm compression.

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

crunch that teeters on the edge of distortion, even when the gain is set low and without the boost switch activated. I was quickly able to dial in the famed “brown” sound here (think Van Halen’s “Unchained”), with a cutting midrange and hot-rodded crunch that warms up as you goose the volume on your guitar. When I needed more roundness and saturated crunch (à la Van Halen’s “Tattoo”), turning on the boost switch was the way to go. And if you do decide to leave the boost switch engaged, the gate control works wonders for taming hum. The 5150 Overdrive sounds remarkable with just about any clean channel amplifier you plug into. Not to say you can’t get the same results using it in front of a hi-gain amp or as a boost, but the pedal’s superbly defined and concentrated gain sounds more tube-like and feels incredibly responsive with an amp that has a sparkly clean tone. Every so often a pedal comes around that knocks your socks off, and this is one of them.

The pedal also includes a built-in gate control, based upon MXR’s popular Smart Gate circuit, which keeps the unit dead quiet without choking the signal, especially as you ratchet up the gain.

THE BOTTOM LINE With tube-like feel and balls-to-the walls overdrive, the MXR EVH 5150 Overdrive is about the closest you’ll ever get to Eddie Van Halen’s signature amp sound in a stomp box.

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Dig It All

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMANC

E

STRYMON DIG DUAL DIGITAL DELAY By Ch ris G ill

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY has improved exponentially over the last 30 years, and as such most early digital effects are not fondly remembered. One exception is early digital delay units, particularly studio-quality rack delay units from the early and mid Eighties, which remain fixtures of numerous pro rigs today (like the Lexicon PCM70 and Roland SDE-3000 units that are still critical components of Eddie Van Halen’s wet/dry/wet setup). Strymon’s new Dig Dual Digital Delay pedal provides the best of both worlds—the rich, warm, and fat textures of early units and the state-of-the-art clarity, precision, and noise-free performance of today’s technology. In addition to its capability to function as two separate delay effects, Dig also offers versatile modulation capabilities that create mind-blowing effects that go well beyond those of the average digital delay stomp box. FEATURES Dig comes in Strymon’s same “small” format housing as their popular El Capistan and Brigadier delay pedals, but unlike those two analog-inspired products it is an unapologetic digital delay unit. While the pedal has five rotary control knobs and two 3-way switches on its front panel, sec-

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ondary knob functions are accessed by holding both the tap and bypass footswitches while turning the desired knob. As a result, Dig operates more like a sophisticated rack unit than the average delay pedal. Controls include Time (for delay 1/master or delay 1 subdivisions), Time 2 (subdivisions between

delay 1 and 2 or sync/free modes), Mix (wet/ dry ratio for delay 1 or filter functions), Mix 2 (wet/dry ratio for delay 2 or series/ping pong/parallel configurations), and Repeats (repeats for both delays or delay 2 repeats only). The Modulation switch provides off, light, and deep settings, and the Type switch allows users to select 24/96 (modern 24-bit/96kHz processing), adm (early Eighties adaptive delta modulation), or 12-bit (mid Eighties 12-bit processing). Separate footswitches control bypass and tap tempo functions. Separate left and right output jacks provide stereo effects (or enable Dig to function as two individual delay units in parallel processing settings, ideal for wet/dry/wet rigs), and an expression pedal jack allows guitarists to manually control any desired parameter, engage tap tempo with a remote switch, or use Strymon’s Favorite switch to recall desired effects. While Dig has only one input jack, it can function as a stereo input using a TRS cable and by engaging an internal switch. PERFORMANCE I’ve steadfastly kept

my old 12-bit rack digital delays in my rig


For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

PRS Guitars

SE 277 SEMI HOLLOW SOAPBAR

CHEAT SHEET

because I love how fat and warm they sound with guitar, but Dig is the first digital delay pedal I’ve tried that has tempted me to sell those bulky pieces of gear once and for all. The adm and 12-bit settings absolutely nail the elusive character of Eighties digital delay units, but without the aliasing noise and lessthan-desirable signal-to-noise ratio of many early digital effects. Dig is absolutely noise free, and it sounds equally great with clean or heavily distorted high-gain tones. Even better is the wide variety of chorus, flanging, and trippy modulation effects that this pedal offers, which all sound vibrant and lush. Dialing in these effects can take some patience and experimentation, but fortunately Strymon offers several helpful examples to familiarize guitarists with the pedal’s immense capabilities. The optional Favorite switch is highly recommended for saving any effects you want to replicate later, plus it enables Dig to function as two separate effect pedals. The only feature I miss is an LED that displays the exact delay time settings, but the tap tempo function almost always got me the setting I wanted, and usually it’s better to rely on one’s ears anyway.

The PRS Guitars SE 277 Semi Hollow Soapbar baritone guitar is named for its baritone 27.7-inch scale length neck, and offers a taut muscular low end with powerful aggressive tones. The SE 277 Semi Hollow Soapbar features a traditional mahogany chambered back, maple top, f-hole, and dual soapbar pickup configuration. The semi-hollow body provides increased acoustic resonance and clarity while the soapbars deliver a balance of transparent, uncompressed clean tones and thick growl. STREET PRICE $749 prsguitars.com

STREET PRICE $299 MANUFACTURER Strymon, strymon.net Series, parallel, and ping-pong configurations plus the ability to link or operate the two digital delay sections separately provides a wide variety of functions and effects. Delay types include modern (24/96) or classic Eighties (adm or 12-bit), and versatile modulation capabilities provide lush chorus and flanging effects.

THE BOTTOM LINE Ideal for guitarists who love the fat, warm tones of Eighties digital processors as well as the precision and clarity of modern, state-of-the-art delay effects, the Strymon Dig is an incredibly versatile digital delay pedal for delay connoisseurs.

Roland

BLUES CUBE TOUR The Roland Blues Cube Tour is a stack-style amp with a 100-watt head and 4x10 cabinet. The amp features Roland’s acclaimed Tube Logic design, which provides authentic tube tone and touch response with modern advantages like lighter weight and maintenance-free operation. The Blues Cube Tour head is equipped with two independent clean and crunch channels, and provides ample power and headroom for concert-level performing. Equipped with four custom 10-inch speakers, the Cabinet410 provides the classic 4x10 open-back configuration of sought-after vintage combos, but in a convenient stand-alone cab with reduced size and weight. STREET PRICE $1,499 (head); $1,399 (cab) rolandus.com

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For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

Green Envy

EPIPHONE LTD ED TAMIO OKUDA ELITIST CORONET By Ch ris G ill EPIPHONE SOLIDBODY GUITARS,

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMANC

E

including their USA-made models from the late Fifties through Sixties and even some Japanese models from the Seventies, are some of the greatest “sleepers” on the vintage market. One of the all-time coolest early Epiphone solidbody models was the Coronet, which essentially was the Epiphone version of a Les Paul Junior (or SG Junior), featuring a thin slab mahogany body, single P-90 pickup, stop tailpiece, and volume and tone controls. Epiphone recently resurrected the Coronet with the help of Japanese recording artist and vintage guitar connoisseur Tamio Okuda, who added a few custom touches that make this new Elitist Coronet model cooler and more versatile than ever. FEATURES While the original Sixties Cor-

onet always had just one dog-ear P-90 single-coil pickup at the bridge, Okuda modified the model into a two-pickup version with a soapbar P-90 at the neck. As a result it also adds an additional tone and volume control and three-position pickup selector toggle switch. The overall design is sort of a mashup of Sixties Coronet features, including the three-by-three “open book” headstock design of the early Sixties and the asymmetrical body shape, optional jade green “Silver Fox” finish, tremolo tailpiece, and “barrel” knobs from post-1962 Coronets. The ABR Tune-o-matic bridge is

CHEAT SHEET

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STREET PRICE $1,850 MANUFACTURER Epiphone, epiphone.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

A pair of Gibson USA P-90 single-coil pickups provides a vivid rainbow of screaming hard rock and bold blues tones.

an upgrade from the original model’s compensated stop bar bridge. The one-piece African mahogany slab body, one-piece African mahogany neck with Sixties slim taper D profile and 24.75inch scale length, and Indian rosewood fretboard with 12-inch radius are as good or possibly even better than the materials Epiphone originally used in the Sixties. The nitrocellulose lacquer finish and oiled bone nut are period-correct details, while the 22 medium jumbo frets provide the playing comfort modern players prefer. This limited edition Elitist Coronet is made in Japan and is a “Custom Outfit” model, which includes a certificate of authenticity, photo and hard case. PERFORMANCE Epiphone’s Elitist build-

ers have completely nailed the authentic feel and vibe of a vintage Epiphone with this model. The neck is rock-hard solid and stays in tune even when submitted to pounding rhythms, which is quite a feat for a solidbody design like this where the uppermost fret is about where the neck meets the body. The Gibson USA P-90 pickups scream with toothy, aggressive tone but deliver noise-free performance that allows all of the grit and growl to dominate in all its glory. If you love the Coronet’s funky vibe but want more versatile performance, the Tamio Okuda Elitist is a much better choice than a beat-up Sixties version that actually costs more.

The Trem-o-tone tailpiece delivers wonderfully wobbly tremolo and stays solidly in tune even after deep dives.

THE BOTTOM LINE The Ltd Ed Tamio Okuda Elitist Coronet is a ripping, hard-rocking solidbody that resurrects the vintage vibe of Epiphone’s beloved Wilshire and Coronet models with its screaming P-90 pickups and ultra-cool tremolo system.


Guitar gods like Slash, Michael Schenker and Mick Ronson have used the cocked wah sound to create monster riffs that have earned a permanent place in the rock lexicon. That required finding the sweet spot in their wah pedal’s sweep. The Cock Fight lets you achieve that cool cocked wah sound without the wah pedal. Tune in the tone you want. Add the built-in distortion for more grind and growl, or switch to the Talking Wah mode for a stuck voicebox sound. If you plug in an expression pedal, you can sweep the Cock Fight for jaw dropping wah and talking pedal effects, with or without distortion!

Completing the powerful trilogy forged by the B9 and C9 Organ Machines, the new KEY9 pedal emulates the world’s most coveted electric pianos and more. With 9 presets, you can transform your axe and lay down a cool “Riders on the Storm” style groove or some hot funk ala “What’d I Say!” Each preset lets you control the fundamental parameters that help define that instrument’s sound. Many include adjustable modulation like tremolo, phaser and chorus. Take it from Mike Matthews who says: “You’ll dig the way the Key9 turns you into a Rhodes Scholar!”

The smallest member of the polyphonic POG clan designed with the super space conscious in mind. Same legendary tracking and sound. Dial in an amazing 12-string guitar or turn your guitar into a convincing bass. Generates organ-like harmonic structures. Separate controls for dry, sub octave and octave up, plus silent footswitching provide the perfect formula for this compact jewel.

Are noisy effects, single coil pickups and 60 cycle hum messing with your sound? The Silencer is a sophisticated noise gate that can tame ‘em. Threshold, Reduction and Release controls guarantee precise fine-tuning. Direct I/O or a built-in effects loop for maximum flexibility. Silence the noise!

Combining a compact footprint, comprehensive feature spec and an intuitive user interface, the 22500 delivers powerful looping capabilities in an affordable, easy to use package. It records high quality, noncompressed audio direct to a removable SDHC card (4 to 32GB) and each card holds up to 100 individual loops. Includes an 8GB card for up to 12 hours of total recording time. An optional Bank Up/Down Foot Controller is available.


SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

Rockin’ Horse

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

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FORMANC

E

JHS PEDALS UNICORN By Chris Gill

THE ORIGINAL UNI-VIBE pedal developed during the late Sixties was a primitive, early attempt at creating a phase shifter, and for decades nothing else sounded like it. Then along came various reproductions and clones, which offered similar thick, chewy swirling sounds with varying degrees of success. Today, finding a good Uni-Vibe pedal isn’t as much of a challenge as it was two decades ago, but rare is the beast that offers guitarists something a little bit different in terms of features and functionality. With its all-analog circuitry and tap tempo function, the JHS Unicorn is one such device, providing genuine classic Uni-Vibe sounds as well as modern upgrades that inspire new, creative ways to use this timeless effect.

FEATURES Housed in an enclosure that’s about the same size as an MXR Flanger,

CHEAT SHEET

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STREET PRICE $299 MANUFACTURER JHS Pedals, jhspedals.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

the JHS Unicorn is larger than some recent Uni-Vibe-style pedals, but it’s still compact enough to comfortably fit on most pedal boards. Uni-Vibe enthusiasts know that photocell modulation is the key to authentic Uni-Vibe effects, and the Unicorn does not disappoint, using an all-analog signal path and photocell topology to provide authentic vibe tone. Like the original, the Unicorn provides volume, depth (intensity), and speed controls (adjustable via a front panel knob or with an optional expression pedal), as well as a switch for selecting dry (chorus) or wet (vibrato) settings. New features include the aforementioned tap tempo footswitch (a separate footswitch connected to the tap/exp jack can also be used to control tap tempo) and a ratio control for selecting 1/4-, dotted 1/8–, 1/8-, or triplet-note speed ratios.

A tap tempo footswitch and ratio control with four settings allows guitarists to perfectly time the effect’s sweep to a song’s tempo in several creative ways.

A white bypass LED let users know if the effect is engaged, while the white tap tempo LED pulsates in time with the selected speed. The pedal operates with a standard 9VDC negative power supply. PERFORMANCE The unicorn may be a

mythical beast, but the Unicorn pedal’s UniVibe tones are as real as it gets. The classic dry (chorus) setting remains thick whether it’s placed in front of a clean or distorted amp, and the effect has an expressive, voicelike character. The wet setting is more subtle but still useful for players who love lush textures. Being able to time the sweep to a song’s tempo using the tap tempo function and ratio control is very cool, and most guitarists will likely find that these features alone significantly increase the usefulness and creative potential of a vibe effect.

With its volume, speed, and depth controls and wet/dry settings, the Unicorn offers all of the same functionality as the classic Uni-Vibe effect.

THE BOTTOM LINE If you are looking for authentic, classic Uni-Vibe effects but also prefer modern performance upgrades, the JHS Unicorn is a great choice for purists and innovators alike.


SOUNDCHECK

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

Dynamic Dynamite

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD P

ER

FORMANC

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FULLTONE 2B BOOST By Chris Gill

A CLEAN BOOST pedal seems like it

should be a simple affair—you just need to pump up the signal level by a few dB and bada-bing you’re good, right? The thing is that while this is how most booster pedals

function, this isn’t always the best solution as piercing treble frequencies and harsh transient peaks can also get boosted along with the rest of your guitar tone. The Fulltone 2B pedal is a very simple-looking clean boost pedal with just two controls, but its internal circuitry is painstakingly designed to boost all the good stuff while taming the elements that you don’t want boosted. The 2B even includes a unique dynamics function that improves responsiveness without overloading an amp’s input. FEATURES The Fulltone 2B is essentially the Boost channel found in the FullDrive 3 pedal, which Michael Fuller separately installed in the smallest enclosure possible. Controls consist of a fullsize gain knob and a mini pot for dialing in the dynamics setting of a germanium diode limiter circuit. Like the Full-Drive 3, when the 2B is “off” it is a high-quality JFET unity gain buffer to drive long cable lengths and prevent tone-suck. The input and output jacks are mounted out of the way on the front panel along with a jack for a 9 to 18VDC regulated Class2 power supply, which can be used instead of an internal nine-volt battery to power the pedal. PERFORMANCE Providing up to 20dB of

gain boost, the 2B can significantly increase a guitar’s output level. More impressively, the tone stays attractively rich and warm without adding any harsh overtones. The dynamics control functions like a loudness maximizer, boosting perceived volume while eliminating transient peaks that can distort an amp’s input. Both the boost function and dynamics section make your guitar sound bigger and better without altering its inherent tonal personality.

CHEAT SHEET

96

Buzz Bin

STREET PRICE $104 MANUFACTURER Fulltone, fulltone.com

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

THE BOTTOM LINE The Fulltone 2B not only significantly boosts a guitar’s signal, it also sweetens the tone thanks to its unique germanium diode limiter circuit, which tames harsh transients while making the tone bigger.

Band Industries Roadie Automatic Guitar Tuner The concept of the self-tuning guitar has progressed significantly over the last 25 or so years. Most previous systems involve some sort of computer-controlled hardware that is installed in the instrument, which can become very costly if you own several guitars and want each to have automatic tuning capabilities. The folks over at Band Industries came up with a better solution with their Roadie Automatic Guitar Tuner, which combines a motorized peg winder with a mobile app that controls the winder via Bluetooth. While the Roadie tunes one string at a time, it performs its duties very quickly and accurately. Best of all, it is compatible with a wide variety of stringed instruments, including six-, seven-, and 12-string guitars, ukuleles, mandolins, banjos—pretty much everything but basses and instruments with wooden friction pegs. The app uses either your mobile device’s built-in mic (for acoustic instruments) or the included Roadie Jack (for electric instruments). The tuner detects notes from A1 (55Hz) to A5 (880Hz) and tunes with +/-2 cent accuracy. The app even stores alternate and custom tunings. The Roadie app is a free download, and it is compatible with a wide variety of iOS (iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch) and Android devices. —Chris Gill LIST PRICE $99 MANUFACTURER Band Industries, roadietuner.com

For video of this review, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016


Gibson Custom Shop Les Paul ‘59 True Historic Select • Southern Fade Vintage Gloss finish • 8.66 lb. • Serial #HS950305

E

very guitar is as unique as its owner. A carefully chosen combination of woodgrain, weight, feel and tone, it tells a story unlike any other. With an in-depth report on the guitars that suit you best, our Guitar Advisors will help you find more than the just best of the best. You’ll find the one guitar that truly tells your story. Call a Guitar Advisor: 866-926-1923 Monday–Friday, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. CST www.musiciansfriend.com/privatereserve


For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

by Tommy Emmanuel



COLUMNS

EMMANUEL DEXTERITY FIG. 1 1 FIGURE

Asus2

Travis picking chordmelody lines, and how to play “T.E. Ranch” IN MY PREVIOUS two columns, I dem-

onstrated how I perform the Merle Travis–style picking technique (commonly referred to as Travis picking) and associated fretting techniques on the track “El Vaquero” from my album It’s Never Too Late. This month, I’d like to focus on how I apply similar techniques to the song “T.E. Ranch” from this same disc. A significant percentage of my repertory is performed using Travis picking, wherein the bass notes of a chord are sounded on the bottom three strings and always picked in an “alternating bass” fashion with the thumb, and melodic lines are performed on the top three strings and picked with either the index finger, middle finger or both simultaneously. The trickiest part of the technique is attaining rhythmic precision. Some elements of the melody fall squarely on the downbeats, in sync with the bass notes, and some fall on the upbeats, in the spaces between the bass notes. Clearly defining the song’s melodic line, both rhythmically and in terms of precise articulation, requires close attention to detail, so be sure to work through each bar slowly and carefully. I got the idea for this tune after watching a documentary about William Cody, also known as Buffalo Bill. Apparently, he had a working ranch in Wyoming called the TE Ranch. When I heard that I thought, He’s given me the perfect song title! However, his TE stood for “trail’s end,” and I hope that’s not an omen for my career! There’s a lot going on in this tune, and it’s challenging to play and get all the details right. FIGURE 1 illustrates the fourbar intro and eight-bar verse sections. During the intro, and at the beginning of the verse, I alternate between Asus2 and Fsm7add4 chords, both of which are essentially fretted the same way; I simply add a “thumbed” low Fs bass note to get Fsm7add4. A little trick here is that I fret the E and A notes on the D and G strings with my middle and index fingers, respectively, which frees up my ring finger

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

1

0

Asus2 4

2

0

2

0

3

A

7

0

9 (9) 7 5 7 (7) 5 9 (9) 0

2 (2) 2 4 3 (3) 3 0 0 2

Fmaj7 -6/ C 3 2 3 3

02

0

0 3 2 3 3

2

2

2

0

2

(0) (3) (2) (3) (3)

4

0

0 0 1

0

X X X X

2 0

2

0

2

0

1. Esus4 0

2

4

0

0

0 2

6 6

2

0

2

0

2

2

0

4

6

1

2

0

1 2

7 9

1 2

0

0

2

2

and pinkie to add melodic notes as the song progresses. In bar 5, I pick the open A and G strings simultaneously then immediately hammer onto the A note on the G string’s second fret with my index finger, followed by a ring-finger hammer-on from the open B string to Cs at the second fret. In the next bar, the ring finger is used to pull off from Fs to E on the high E string. Remember that the alternating bass figure must be maintained throughout all of these melodic hammer-ons and pull-offs!

2

2

0 2

7 (7) 4 (4) 4

2 2

3

7

0

7

5 6

3

0

3

2

0

0 2

0

4 5 4

0

3

Asus2 0

1

2

9 (9) 7 5 7 (7) 5 9 (9)

5 (5) 3

2

0

0

2

0

2

0

3

0

E

0

2

D/ F# 2

0

2

0 2

0

0

0

F m7add4 0

2

2 0 0

0

G

4

2

Gsus2 2 0 2

0 0

0

E 0

2

0

2. Esus4

0

3 0

0

3

0

2

2 0 2

2

0

Em

2

C m7

12(12) 10 9 (9) 11 11 9 9

0 2

2 0

0

2

0

2

F m7add4

0 2

0

2

0

1

2

2 (2) 0

9

0

0

2

2

2

E 0

2

D/ F# 5 6

Asus2

2

2

2

2 0 2

Asus2 2 4

2

2

F m7

E 0

2

2

3 0

2

6

2

0 2

0

0 2

A 2

2

0

F m7add4

C m 4 5

0

A

0 2 (2) 3 2 0

0

1 7 9

7 0

2

F m7add4

0 2

0

D/ F#

FIG. 2 2 FIGURE

0

2

3 2 0 0 2

2

0

3 0 0

D/ F#

2

0

0 2

2

2

G

4 0 2

Asus2 0

F m7add4

2 0

3

0 2

G D/ F#

A

7

10

2

0

0

3 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 3

0 2

0

F m7add4

0 2

0 5

0

7

2

6

D/ F#

0 2 2

2 2

5 6 4

0 (0) 0

6 6

3

2

G D/ F#

3 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 3

3 2 0 0 2

FIGURE 2 represents the tune’s chorus, and I begin with my index finger barred across the top four strings at the seventh fret, with hammer-ons and pull-offs performed on the high E string to sound the melody. Again, it’s tricky to get all the notes sounding clean and in proper rhythm. In bars 5–7, I maintain the gist of the melody but change the chord progression, wrapping up with an unusual Fmaj7-6/C, for which the tip of the middle finger frets both the C note on the fifth string and the F on the fourth string at the third fret.

Australian-born virtuoso fingerstyle guitarist Tommy Emmanuel is world renowned for his brilliant acoustic performances, arrangements and compositions. His latest studio album, It’s Never Too Late, is available through his website, tommyemmanuel.com, and iTunes.

A D A M G A S S O N / G U I TA R I S T MAGAZINE VIA GETTY IMAGES

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HEA R MISHA MANSOOR ON PERIPHERY’S LAT EST RELE ASE ,

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jacksonguitars.com Photo: Alex Wohleber ©2015 JCMI. Jackson® and the distinctive headstock designs commonly found on Jackson guitars are registered trademarks of Jackson/Charvel Manufacturing, Inc. (JCMI). All rights reserved.

JUGGERNAUT HT6, LAGUNA BURST

JUGGERNAUT HT6, AMBER TIGER EYE

BULB HT7, MATTE BLACK

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For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

by Mark Holcomb of Periphery



COLUMNS

HOLCOMB-MANIA

THINK BIG

Working with five- and sixstring chord voicings, and how to play “Mile Zero” THIS MONTH’S COLUMN is a continua-

tion of some of the concepts I first presented a few months back, which is how to craft and utilize big five- and sixstring chord voicings that are harmonically complex and oftentimes equally ambiguous. A great example of this approach in our music is the intro/verse riff to “Mile Zero.” Before getting into the part, let me remind you of the tuning I use for this song, which is the tuning I employ most often: drop-D, down one whole step (low to high, C G C F A D). When playing in this tuning, I think of the guitar as being in a “transposing” tuning, meaning that I view and refer to all notes and chord names as if my guitar were tuned to drop-D standard, with the understanding that everything is going to sound a whole step lower. FIGURE 1 represents the entire 16-bar riff, which basically alternates between very unusual Dmaj9 and Bm9 chords. Overall, this passage was an experiment to see if I could write a riff that was jagged and angular but also musically approachable, as opposed to simply sounding unsettling. The objective was to make the part interesting by way of the voicings and the specific harmonic content of the chords. You could conceivably alternate these two chord types and end up with a folk song, as opposed to a metal song, but if you “dress them up” and make them more harmonically complex, you get a completely different result. Instead of starting with a straight D chord, I include the major seventh and ninth, with the major seventh, Cs, and high D root note voiced a half step apart, and the ninth, E, voiced a whole step above the root. Placing chord tones in such close proximity to one another is known as close voicing, and it yields a sound that has some friction and dissonance to it. Personally, I love the sound of these types of voicings, and this particular chord is one of my alltime favorites. I initially discovered it by simply building groups of intervals on the fretboard, placing my fret-hand fingers in

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GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

FIG. 1 1 FIGURE drop-D tuning, down one whole step (low to high, C G C F A D) Dmaj9 0 0 0

0 10 9 0 12 (9) 9

9

0 0

0 10 9 0 12 9

9

0 0

(0) (0) (0)

0 3 6 4 0 0

0 0

0 0 10 10 9 9 0 0 12 12 9 9

0 3 6 4 0 0

(0) (3) (6) (4) (0) (0)

0 3 6 4 0 0

0 3 6 4 0 0

0 0

9 9

F 5 Bm9 4 4 4

0 3 6 4 0 0

0 3 6 4 0 0

0

0

0

9 9

9

0 10 9 0 12 9 9

6 4

9 7

0 0 10 10 9 9 0 0 12 12 9 9

9 9

Dmaj9 (11)

0 0 0

(9)

9

0 10 9 0 12 9

0 3 6 4 (0) 0 (0) 0

9 9

Bm9

(0) (3) (6) (4) (0) (0)

0

0 0

0

0 0

0

0

0 3 6 4 0 0

0 3 6 4 0 0

9

0 3 6 4 0 0

0 (0) 10 (10) 9 (9) 7 9 11 0 (0) 7 0 12 (12) 9 (9)

Bm9

0 0

9 9

0 0

0 3 6 4 0 0

0

Dmaj9

0 10 9 0 12 9

0 10 9 0 12 (9) 9

9

0 3 6 4 0 0

9

9

0 3 6 4 0 0

0 0

Dmaj9

0 10 9 0 12 9

6 4

9

0 10 9 0 12 9

9 7

0 0

0 10 9 0 12 9

0 0

0 3 6 4 (0) 0 (0) 0

0 10 9 0 12 9

different places until I found a sound that was appealing to me. The second chord is played in ninth position, with the low B bass note fretted by wrapping the thumb over the top side of the neck. I often lean on “thumbed” low root notes for chord voicings because this technique frees up the other four fingers for fretting other, often hard-to-reach, notes. A very unusual thing about this particular voicing is that the bottom two notes are fretted with the thumb and pinkie, followed by the open fourth string and then two notes fretted with the index and middle fingers, respectively. I love the drone-y quality of the open strings in this chord, and this is another one that sounds very rich harmonically.

0 3 6 4 0 0

(0) (3) (6) (4) (0) (0)

0 0

9

0 0

9

0 0

0 3 6 4 0 0

0 0 9

0 3 6 4 0 0

9

0 10 9 0 12 (9) 9

9

0 3 6 4 0 0

0 0

0 10 9 0 12 9

(0) (10) (9) (0) (12) (9)

0 10 9 0 12 9 9

9

0 0

0 3 6 4 0 0

9

0 0 10 10 9 9 0 0 12 12 9 9

9

(0) (3) (6) (4) (0) (0)

0 0 10 10 9 9 0 0 12 12 9 9

Bm9 4 4 4

X X X

9

X X X

In essence, this is a four-bar figure played four times, but I do add little twists and alterations to keep things interesting on each repetition, such as the Fs5 barre chord accent in bar 6, and the single-note melodic line in bars 8 and 9. When I first presented this riff to the band, they loved it, but, unbeknownst to me, they heard it in a completely different way, syncopationwise, than how I intended it. They heard the first and second chord accents as falling on beats one and two, as opposed to on the upbeats, or, in other words, an eighth note later. So we compromised and used both approaches; when the riff reappears later in the song, we play it as they had heard it, with the figures falling an eighth note later than what is illustrated here.

Mark Holcomb plays guitar in Periphery, whose latest pair of albums Juggernaut: Alpha and Omega is out now.


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For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

By Jimmy Brown



COLUMNS

STRING THEORY

BEETHOVEN MEETS FLOYD

“Moonlight Sonata’s” melody, David Gilmour–style CONTINUING MY TWO-GUITAR

arrangement of the first movement of Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata,” I now present its sparse, haunting melody, which I play in a classic hard rock lead style inspired by David Gilmour’s lyrical wailing on such Pink Floyd songs as “Shine on You Crazy Diamond,” “Time” and “Comfortably Numb.” I call this part “Shine on You Crazy Moon: A Study in Feeling and Control” because it features lots of emotive string bends and finger vibratos that require a seasoned musical ear and a refined touch to execute well and achieve the desired voice-like quality…it’s all about making your ax sing and cry. For a guitar sound, dial in some heavy distortion to achieve a harmonics-rich, violinlike tone and give the bends plenty of sustain and “hang time.” Use your guitar’s bridge pickup, along with an equalizer to roll off the highest treble frequencies (above 4kHz) and filter out the harsh-sounding upper harmonics. Also roll off the lows below 100Hz, to suppress unwanted rumble and “pick thud.” A “reverse EQ scoop,” if you will. Top it all off with some spacious hall reverb and delay trails to enhance the part’s epic quality. FIGURE 1 shows roughly the first half of my melody arrangement, up to the point where the lead guitar drops out for about a minute and the accompaniment (which I presented in the Holiday 2015 and January 2016 issues) takes over momentarily with a chain of cascading arpeggios. The melody enters in bar 5 with what I call a “mute, rake, bend and shake,” which literally describes what’s going on. Lightly rest your fret-hand index finger across the middle strings as you drag the pick across them in a downstroke sweep to create a percussive, pitch-less grace-note rake into the first bend, which you’ll want to fret with your ring finger, supported by the middle finger one fret lower for added “push power.” Focus on precisely nailing the bend’s target pitch, which is a whole step (from Fs to Gs), pick the string twice more, as indicated, then, on the downbeat of bar 6, apply a wide, even vibrato to the already-bent note. This is done by releasing the bend by about a quarter step, then

102

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

FIG. 1 1 FIGURE

“Moonlight Sonata,” 1st movement, melody (r.h. piano part), bars 1-28 Elec. Gtr. (w/heavy dist.)

1

C#m

 E/B 1

8 7

B7



1

7

x

x

x

5

E

 T

4

 x

4

4

12



1

6 !

6

1

1



5

5 !

5

F#m

7 !

 7

 

7

Em

5

5

5

5

5



1

5

5

5

6 x x

1



!

6

6

F#

6

Bm



5

x

7 5

G7/D



let ring

N.H.

x x

x

Em6 Em6/G Bm/F#

x x x

C#m 1

 5

5

1

5 3

x

1

6

B



4 !

6 x

4

1/2

11 x x

B Em/B Em Em/G Em B G#dim7  C#7/E# F#m      11 11  11 11 11 11 ! 11 11 11 11 ! 11 ! 11 10 10 10 ! 10 ! ! x x x x x x x x x x

Em/B Em Em/G Em 1

16



 

1

x

x

7 !

F#m

x

x

5

1/2

1



Cdim7

1/2

21

1/2

1/2

G/B

25

   7 !  xx7

7

x

4

C C#dim/B C#dim/A# Bm 1

x

 7



1/2

10

G#/B#

1

1/2

F#m/C# C#sus4 C#

G5  5

1

2

D#dim7 F#m/C#

4 !

4

1

G4  4

1/2

1

1

2

 4 !

1

1/2

F#m

G#7/B#

  12 12 12 12 12 14 14 14  ! 1

1/2

C#7/E#

 12

1

12

  12  12 !

1

12

C#m F#dim7 Gdim7 G#7¨9

1

1

14 14

restoring it to pitch several times in quick succession, but not too quickly, as that can sound nervous and amateurish. You can use these same raking, fingering and vibrato techniques for most of the bends that follow. Be very mindful throughout of the indicated degree to which each note is to be bent. Some of the bends, like the first few, are a whole step (indicated by the number 1), which means you are to bend the note up to match the pitch of an unbent note two frets

   14 14 14 14 12 12 12 ! ! 1½

1

1/2

higher on the same string. Other bends are only a half step, equal to moving up just one fret without bending, and there are three big, one-and-one-half-step bends (equal to an unbent note three frets higher), in bars 7, 13 and 27. You can check the pitch of each bend by comparing it to its unbent equivalent. For more detailed instruction on playing this arrangement, watch this column’s video lesson online. Next month, the conclusion of the melody.

To download Jimmy Brown’s Mastering Arpeggios 3 DVD and others—as individual chapters or the complete disc—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.


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For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

by Joel Hoekstra



COLUMNS

SCHOOL OF ROCK

STRING SPAN

Three-notes-per-string monster pentatonic patterns HELLO EVERYONE, AND welcome to my

new Guitar World column! Over the next few months I’d like to demonstrate a variety of techniques and approaches that I use for soloing and playing rhythm guitar with Whitesnake, my own solo band and the Trans-Siberian Orchestra. Hopefully you’ll find these approaches useful in your own musical endeavors. When it comes to soloing using minor pentatonic patterns, most guitarists are well accustomed to using two-notes-perstring “box” patterns. I’d like to show you a three-notes-per-string approach to playing pentatonics and demonstrate a handful of licks that exploit the variety of expanded technical and melodic possibilities that this approach offers. FIGURE 1 illustrates a three-notes-perstring pattern for the G minor pentatonic scale (G Bf C D F): on the lowest two strings, I use my index finger, ring finger and pinkie to fret the three notes. On the D, G and B strings, I switch to index, middle and pinkie, and then on the high E string I revert back to index, ring and pinkie. When playing this way, I like to keep my fret-hand fingers “standing tall,” so to speak, positioned so that the fingertip is coming straight down onto the string from above. You’ll find that the stretch between the ring finger and pinkie will take some getting used to, as a slight rotation of the fret hand is necessary to reach all the notes comfortably. FIGURE 2 illustrates the first of five licks I’ve devised using this three-notes-per-string approach: I begin by hammering on from the low G note to Bf and C, and then, after picking D, fifth string, fifth fret, I hammer up to F and G and then pull-off back to F and D, ending the first part of the phrase on C, sixth string, eighth fret. Using hammer-ons and pull-offs in this way creates what is known as a legato (smooth and connected) sound. The nine-note pattern is played in a rhythm of 16th-note triplets. The idea is then repeated on the A string, starting with the index finger on D, fifth fret, followed by hammer-ons up to F and G and then hammers and pulls on the D string between the notes Bf, C and D. We then continue the pattern moving to each higher string, beginning each new nine-note

104

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

FIGURE FIG. 1 1 G minor pentatonic scale, three notes per string 3

6

5

8

8

8

10

10

12

10 12 15

13 15 18

15

18 20 18

15

FIGURE 2 FIGURE 2 (Gm) FIG. 2 (Gm)

full full

1518 201815 1315181513 131518 15 18 (18) 1012151210 101215 15 1518 20181515 18 (18) 1315181513 131518 8101210 8 81012 12 101215 15 1012151210 5 810 8 5 5 810 10 8101210 8 81012 12 5 810 8 5 58 810 10 8

36 8 36 8

3 FIGURE FIG. 33 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

(Gm)

3

full

17 20 17 15

18

15

17 20 17 15

6

(Gm) 8 6

8 6 3

3

6

17

17

15

18 20 18 15

6

6 3 310 8 6 8 6 6 66 3 6310 8 6 88 6 86 6 8 8

2 2

full full

17 19 17 15

15

6

FIGURE 4 FIG. 4(Gm) FIGURE 4

18 18

(15)

17

15

18 20 18 15

6

15

18

6

1310 8 10 8 8 151310 1310 10 1310 8 11 10 8 118 151310 131310 1310 11 11 13 13

181513 1513 13 201815 1815 15 181513 151513 1513 201815 1818151815 15 15 18 18

FIG. 5 5 FIGURE 5

(18) 18 15 15 18 (18) 18 15 1715 18 17

FIGURE (Gm) (Gm)

10 13 15 13 10 10 12 1510 13 15 13 10 15 12 10 15 12 10 15 13 10 13 1510 12 15 10 13 15 15 13

3 36 FIGURE

FIG. 6

10 10

(10) (10)

(play 3x)

(Gm) 10 13 15

18

10 12 15

6

10

15 12 10 12 15

15

6

“shape” by fretting with the index finger. Now let’s apply this same approach to different starting points on the fretboard. In FIGURE 3, I begin by fretting a D note on the A string’s 17th fret with my middle finger, after which I hammer-on with the pinkie to F and then pull-off back to D and C, followed by Bf on the low E string and then C on the A string. This shape is then moved up one string, starting on G, D string, 17th fret, and repeated, and then applied to each higher string. Another cool way to apply this concept is to remain on a single pair of strings while

15 12 10 12 15

6

10

15 12 10 12 15

15

6

steadily climbing the fretboard, as shown in

FIGURE 4: I begin this phrase using my in-

dex finger, ring finger and pinkie but switch immediately to index, middle and pinkie for the next two positions. FIGURES 5 and 6 offer two examples of incorporating string-skipping techniques into this approach: in both examples, the patterns fall on the A, G and high E strings only. These phrases are technically challenging and will require diligent practice and limberness to master, so take your time with each shape and strive for clarity and precise execution throughout.

New York City guitarist Joel Hoekstra plays for Whitesnake, the Trans Siberian Orchestra and his new side project, Joel Hoekstra’s 13, who recently released their debut album, Dying to Live.


For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

by Dale Turner



COLUMNS

ACOUSTIC NATION

COHEN MY WAY?

FIGURE FIG. 1 1

The fingerpicking finesse of Leonard Cohen BEFORE HE WAS an acclaimed musician,

Leonard Cohen was a successful poet and novelist in Canada; it wasn’t until his early thirties, after moving to the U.S., plunging into New York’s folk scene, that Cohen’s songcraft (cuts like “Suzanne,” covered by folk icon Judy Collins) garnered attention. Cohen’s stint at 1967’s Newport Folk Festival led to a record deal with Columbia Records’ John Hammond, and his late-Sixties albums put him on par with “literate” songsmiths like Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell and Randy Newman. His work would influence future artists like Kurt Cobain, Trent Reznor, Tori Amos, Nick Cave and Jeff Buckley (who, on 1994’s Grace, transformed Cohen’s “Hallelujah” into the mesmerizing hymn it is today). Cohen’s voice, which has dramatically lowered in pitch these past several decades (it’s now a gruff baritone) has highlighted film soundtracks since the mid Nineties, ranging from Natural Born Killers to today’s True Detective series, for which Cohen contributed “Nevermind” as its theme (from his 2014 studio release, Popular Problems). Let’s examine the many Cohen classics that showcase his polished fingerstyle guitar chops. After its appearance on Judy Collins’ 1966 album, In My Life, Cohen’s “Suzanne” served as the opening track on his 1967 debut, Songs of Leonard Cohen. FIGURE 1 similarly depicts the tune’s repeating onebar fingerpicking pattern; to shift from E to Gsm, keep the open E chord’s finger shape in place on the A and D strings and, instead of switching to a conventional Gsm barrechord shape, shift your middle and ring fingers up to the sixth fret, barre the index finger and use your pinkie to fret the note added on the G string on beat three of bar 2. This same approach is also used to fret Fsm in “The Stranger Song,” a blazing Flamencoinspired piece, also on Cohen’s debut album, which informs FIGURE 2. “Bird on the Wire,” regarded as one of Cohen’s signature songs (now a vocal standard, covered by everyone from Joe Cocker and Johnny Cash to the Neville Brothers and Willie Nelson, and even Joe Bonamas-

106

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

Esus4 E

E 0

1

2

0

2

1 2 2

2

0

FIG. 2 2 FIGURE

2 1 2 2 2 2

0

0

2

1

0

1

0

0

3

3 FIGURE FIG. 3 3

2

3

1

0

2

2

3

0

2

0

2

4

2

6

4

G sus4G m

4

6

1

0

1

0

0

2

3

1

0

2

2

2

3

2

2

2

0

2

2

2

2

4

3

2

2

2

2

2

3

2

4

3

2 4

3

2

2 0 0

4

3

0

2

3 2

4

3 2

4

FIGURE FIG. 5 5 capo 5th fret G

3

2

F m7

Em

4

0

3 0

0

2

0

2

0 0

2

Em7

0

2

0 0

2

2

C

0

3 0

0 0 0

4

2

4

3

2

2

2

2

2

3

3

1 3

2

1

0

2

1

2

1 0

G

2 2

2

D

0

2 0 0

sa), appears on Cohen’s Songs from a Room, released in 1969. Its origins date back to the early Sixties when Cohen, then living on the Greek island Hydra, dug the sight of a bird perched on the island’s newly installed telephone wires. FIGURE 3 similarly depicts the song’s signature fingerstyle pattern. 1971’s Songs of Love and Hate contains the longstanding fan favorite “Famous Blue Raincoat,” later covered by Jennifer Warnes, Joan Baez, Tori Amos and Lucinda Williams. (There’s also a musthear Danny Gatton version of the tune). Its mellow, “pianistic” fingerstyle groove

2 2

2

3

0

0 0

Em7 D 3

0

3 3 2

2 0

4

2

2

3 A

FIG. 4 4 FIGURE Tune down one whole step (low to high, D G C F A D) Bm7

4 6 6

6

E

3 2 2 2 0 0 0

2

4

F sus4 F m

D

2

4 6 4 6 6 6 6 6 6

6

4

F m

3

3

A 2

0

1 2

2

Esus4 E

E

1

G m

0

1

2

0

2 2 2 0

2

C m7

0

0 0

0

4

C 3

2

0

6

G/ B 1

3

0

3 2

0

5 4

6

5 4

6

G

0

0 3

serves up assorted chords in B minor— with a “surprise” chord, Csm (borrowed from the B Dorian mode). FIGURE 4 presents a similarly styled phrase. A perfectionist to an arguable fault, Cohen often takes years to perfect his verses before they ever see the light of day. His (now) most famous song, “Hallelujah,” purportedly had upward of 80 verses before it was whittled down to the single-digit verse version known today. We’ll close this lesson with a passage reminiscent of Jeff Buckley’s take on this timeless Cohen song, which he reshaped from John Cale’s cover version.

To download Dale Turner’s Secrets of the Great Acoustic Songwriters DVD—as individual chapters or the complete disc—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


HAVING ACOUSTIC ISSUES? DON’T FRET. There’s a capo for that. The Kyser® Quick-Change®.

Guaranteed for life. www.kysermusical.com

KYSER® MUSICAL PRODUCTS

MADE IN USA


by Andy Aledort



COLUMNS

For video of this lesson, go to GuitarWorld.com/Feb2016

IN DEEP

THE EYES HAVE IT

Jamming on the Grateful Dead’s “Eyes of The World” WITH A FAN base that spans three gen-

erations, the Grateful Dead have become an essential part of the fabric of American contemporary music. Their songs are played all around world on a nightly basis in bars, clubs, theaters and stadiums, and a great many guitarists are always glad to accept the challenge of trying to master the band’s more complex tunes. This month, I’d like to turn you onto the Grateful Dead’s 1973 classic, “Eyes of the World.” The song features a chord progression and groove similar to Marvin Gaye’s 1971 hit, “What’s Going On.” Both songs are in the key of E major and begin with a loose, funky vamp over Emaj7. In “Eyes of the World,” this vamp moves through a few chord changes while residing firmly within the E major tonality. In FIGURE 1, a seventh-position Emaj7 chord is strummed in a syncopated 16th-note rhythm, with firm downbeat accents on beats one and four and upbeat accents falling within beats two and three. Muted “dead-string” hits, strummed in steady 16th notes, reinforce the groove of the tune. Be sure to keep your pick-hand in constant motion, alternating downstrokes and upstrokes throughout. There are a few simple permutations that can be added to the underlying rhythm part to make it more interesting. In FIGURE 2, I switch between Emaj7 and Emaj9 in each bar, with the Emaj9 falling on the last 16th note of beat two. In FIGURE 3, the Emaj9 is replaced by an A major triad, the four chord in the key of E, which then resolves back to E on beat four. We can expand on this idea with the more harmonically textured approach shown in FIGURE 4, as the A chord is replaced with Amaj7 and the resolution is to Emaj9 in fourth position. Another cool approach is to move the triadic chord forms higher up the fretboard using different inversions, as shown in FIGURES 5 and 6: in FIGURE 5, both the A triad and subsequent E triad are voiced in ninth position, and in FIGURE 6, the first Emaj7 chord is voiced differently than the final one in the progression. As you can see, varying voicings in this way

108

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

FIG. 1 1 FIGURE

Emaj7 9 8 9 7

9 8 9 7

9 8 9 7

X X 9 X X 8 X X 9 7

9 8 9 7

X 9 X 8 X 9 7

FIGURE FIG. 2 2

Emaj7 9 8 9 7

Emaj9

9X X 7 8X X 8 9X X 9 7 7

7 8 9 7

7 8 9 7

7 8 9 7

9 8 9 7

7 8 9 7

X X X

9 8 9 7

(play 3x) E

A

9 8 9 7

9 X X 5 8 X X 6 9 X X 7 7

5 6 7

X 5 X 4 X 6

9 8 9 7

9 8 9 7

9 8 9 7

X X X

9X X 7 8X X 8 9X X 9 7 7

X 10 X 9 X 11

10 9 11

9 8 9 7

4 2 0

21

4 2 1

FIGURE 9 FIGURE FIG. 9 9 2

4 2 4 2

4

44

4

2

2

4 2 4 2

2

4

42

4 2 0

Emaj7 Emaj7

4 2 2 4 2 2

2

9 X X 9 8 X X 8 9 X X 9 7 7

9 8 9 7

X 9 9 X 8 8 X 9 9 7 7

X X X

FIGURE FIG. 3 3

(play 3x) Emaj7 7 8 9 7

X 7 7 X 8 8 X 9 9 7 7

Amaj7 9 8 9 7

X X X

9X X 5 8X X 6 9X X 6 7

X X X

9 8 9 7

A

9 8 9 7

E

9 XX 5 8 XX 6 9 XX 7 7

Emaj9 Emaj7 5 6 6

X 4 X 4 X 4

9 8 9 7

9 8 9 7

5 6 7

Amaj7 9 8 9 7

9X X 5 8X X 6 9X X 6 7

FIGURE FIG. 6 6 Emaj7 11 9 9 9

9 9 9

FIG. 7 7 E major scale FIGURE

4 2 0

9 8 9 7

X 5 X 4 X 6

FIGURE FIG. 4 4 Emaj7

(play 4x) E

A

9 8 9 7

Emaj9

9 8 9 7

9 8 9 7

FIGURE FIG. 5 5 Emaj7 9 8 9 7

X X X

Emaj7

Emaj7 9 8 9 7

9 8 9 7

11 9 9 9

X 4 X 4 X 4

(play 4x) Emaj7

A

11 9 9 9

Emaj9 5 6 6

11 9 X X 10 9 X X 9 9 X X 11

10 9 11

X 9 X 8 X 9

FIG. 8 8 E major scale FIGURE

5 4 2 4 2

5 4 2

4 2

0

(2) 0 0 2 0 (2) 0 0 2 0 0 0

2 4 6 2 2 4 6 4 2 0 2 4 2 0

5 4 6 5 4 6

6 4 2

6 4 2

0 0 4 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 4 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 2 2 2

5 5

7 7

7 7

4 4

4 5 4 5

7 7

5 4

2

2 1 1 2 1 4 1 4

4 4

33

creates subtly different sounds and textures, and exploring these different chord choices is easy and fun to do. When soloing over the track, guitarist Jerry Garcia would take a variety of different approaches in order to attain the musical freedom he always strived for. The simplest approach is to simply stick with the E major scale (E Fs Gs A B Cs Ds). Let’s begin with the two lowest positions of this scale, shown in FIGURES 7 and 8: the first is played in first, or “open,” position (so

named for the inclusion of open strings), and the second is played one position higher, in second position. Now let’s combine these two positions to craft an improvised solo over the rhythm part: in FIGURE 9, a four-bar solo is played that begins in open position and then moves up to second and then fourth position as the line progresses. Now that you have the idea, try forging some solo improvisations of your own within these scale positions.

To download instructional guitar DVDs by Andy Aledort— as individual chapters or complete discs—visit guitarworldlessons.com or download the official Guitar World Lessons app in iTunes.

LESSONS


Jon Foreman | Switchfoot

LIVE LOUD

ALl-new PRO center-block guitars

Photo: Jenna Garza

VISIT US AT gretschguitars.com for details

© 2015 Fender Musical Instruments Corporation. Gretsch® and Bigsby® are trademarks of Fred W. Gretsch Enterprises, Ltd. and used herein under license. All rights reserved.


TRANSCRIPTIONS TRANSCRIPTIONS

notation NOTATION guide GUIDE “tablature clef” time signature whole note (held for four beats) N.C.(E) *string 1 2 3 4 5 6

half notes (held for two beats each) D A 2 3 2 0

quarter notes (held for one beat each) E let ring

2 2 2 0

0

2

2

0

0 0 1

* String 1 is the thinnest string; 6 is the thickest. Numbers on the lines indicate frets (0 = open string). eighth notes C

count: “1

1

0

2

3

and

2

and

2

2

and

2

ee and uh

dotted quarter note G 3 3 0 0 2 3

count: “1

2

2

2

and

4

2

3

2

2

2

2 2 0

ee and uh 4

3

2 2 2 0

and

1

.. ..

2

3

4”

and

and

half rest

.. .

2 2 0

1 and

hammer-on 3 3 0 0 2 3

and

3

quarter rest

dotted quarter note

*tied rhythms 3 3 0 0 2 3

and

3

16th rest

2

.. .. ..

0

0

2

eighth eighth 16th rest note notes

count: “1

dotted half note (held for three beats) A

G/B

2

2 2 0

and

3

2 2 0

and

legato slide

2 0

3

4

and

1

2

1

ee

4

2 2 2 0

2 2 0

and uh

1

pull-off

0

3

4”

tie

1

0

2

ee

and

2

3

3

and

3

4”

* Don’t rearticulate notes in parentheses.

bend and release in time (whole-step bend) full 7

count: “1

(7)

and

(7)

15

5

2

and

3

N.H.

12

12

12

grace-note slide

*pre-bend and release (“reverse bend”) full

14

15

12

full

15

15

15

4

and

1

full 8

7 7

4”

“1

2

3

and

*pinch harmonic (note fretted)

palm muting (picking hand) E5

P.H.

P.M.

2

3

4”

trill (quick succession of hammer-ons and pull-offs)

2 0

2 0

2 0

2 0

5 5 3

2 0

X X X

7

* X X X

X X X

X X X

5 5 3

X X X

X X X

X X X

X X X

* Loosen grip on strings so that they no longer touch the fretboard.

tremolo picking

*

7 (9) 7

*Bend string before picking.

*

*Harmonic sounded by picking hand.

staccato (short) notes

7

8

fret-hand muting G5

5 2 0

*Lightly touch string directly over fret, then pick.

7

(8)

7

*natural harmonics

12

grace-note bend full

vibrato

0

2

3

5

sweep picking (“raking”)

10

7

9

8

7

3 *

= downstroke,

7

8

9

10

3 = upstroke

guitarworld.com guitarworld.com

141 113


TRANSCRIPTIONS

SPEED OF LIGHT Iron Maiden

As heard on THE BOOK OF SOULS Words and music by ADRIAN SMITH and BRUCE DICKINSON • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

G5 III

F5

C5/G

G5

B¨5

C5

D5 5fr

134

13

11

Gm7

2

A5

34

D5

13

133

13

A/C#

B5

E5 4fr

T 11

A

1

13

13

7fr

14

14

Intro (0:00) Fast q = 164 N.C.

 

light P.M.

8

8

6

7

6

5

3

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/dist.)

 5   

5

 5   

5

3

5

6

5

3

5

3

5

4

3

1

5

4

3

1

3

5

3

6

5

3

5

G5 (pick scrape)

3

1

1 !

1

3

4

3

1

3

1

1

3

4

3

1

3

1

3

1

3

1

3

4

3

1

3

1

3

3 3 1

3 3 1

3 3 1

0 0

3

4

3

1

3

1

3

1

1 !

1 !

Bass

Gtr. 3

6

5

3

3

C5/G

Riff A

G5

C5/G

P.M.

5 3

5 3

4 3

3 3

0

3 3

3 3

X

3 3

3 3

5

3 3

5

P.M.

5 3

5 3

5 3

 

X

Bass

114





Ow

G5 P.M.

5 3

4 3

3 3

5 3

0

0

3 3

3 3

3 3

3 3

5

3 3

5

5 3

*Gtrs. 1 and 2

Gtr. 2

(cont. pick scrape)

 

 1 !

5

P.M.

P.M.

3

5

F5

(Gtr. 2 plays F5 chord)



Gtrs. 1 and 2 (elec. w/dist.)

3 3 0 0

3

  12 

*Gtr. 1 plays G5 III

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016


“SPEED OF LIGHT” Ha

Gtr. 3 plays Riff A (see bar 6) Gtrs. 1 and 2 10

0

0

3 3 0 0

Bass

B

0

3 3 0 0

3

12

12

12

 10 !

1.

C5/G

G5 P.M.

5 5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

G5

P.M.

3 3 3

P.M.

3 3 3 5 3 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

0

3

5 5 5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

 

P.M.

3 3 3

3 3 5 3 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3

P.M.

3 3 3 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 0 0

 

3

N.C.(E5)

3 3 3 0

3 5

0 0

* Verses (0:30, 1:44)

Another time a trip took

I

2. I’ll

Event

a mass horizon

say

universe A hollow be blacker that will

another to see

place the sights

for

and wave in space

you Lost

0

0

0

7

7

7

5

0

0

0

0

7

0

0

0

0

0

0

7

7

7

5

0

0

0

0

7

0

0

0

0

0

than

Shooting plasma in running a (F5)

0

7

7

7

5

0

0

0

0

3 7

1

1

0

1

1

in space the

from my human



19

 

5 3

G5

5 5

1.

 

3

2.

C5/G

Bass

C

3 3 0 0

(0:19, 1:34)

Gtrs. 1-3 14

 

3

10 !

10

(q = 174)

 

3 3 0 0

3

12 !

  

0

3 3 0 0

3

12 !

ha

1

1

3

1

3

1

1

1

grave race (G5)

3

0

3

3

*(1st Verse: grad. increase tempo to q = 180)

night

1.

G5

C5/G

23

P.M.

5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

2.

C5/G P.M.

G5 P.M.

3 3 3 5 3 5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3

5 5 5 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

P.M.

3 3 3 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 0 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0

Rhy. Fill 1 (0:50) Gtr. 3



3 3

 

5 3 3 3 5 3 5 3 3 3 3 3 X

3 3 3 3 3 0 0

3



C5/G

3 3

 

G5 C5 Gtr. 3 plays Rhy. Fill 1 (see below)

3 3

5

3 3

5

10 X

guitarworld.com

115


TRANSCRIPTIONS

D

Pre-chorus (0:51, 2:05)

1.

(1.) One - way

no returns ticket on that you can see the edge don’t know where I don’t know why (2.) I that you can see I’m on the edge B¨5 C5 C5

Gtr. 3 Riff B 28 13 13 13 11 12 10 10 13

 



 10

Gtr. 1 Rhy. Fig. 1

 

P.M.

5 3

10 12 10

P.M.

P.M.

5 5 3 3 3 3 3

13

5 3

5 3

3 3

but somehow

13 10 10

3 3

2.

are

time again

back in



13 13 11 13

13

10

11 10

C5

   10  

10

5 3

5 3

P.M.

5 3 3 3

3 5 5 3 3 3 3

5 3 3 3 3

B¨5 11 10

13 11 13

P.M.

burnt

vastly

B¨5



3 3

My shooting stars

3 3

  

13 11 13

12

 

5 3

5 3

Gtr. 2 Rhy. Fig. 1a

 

P.M.

5 3

P.M.

5 5 3 3 3 3 3 3

P.M.

P.M.

P.M.

5 3

5 3

5 5 5 3 3 3 1

3 1

5 3

5 3

5 3 3 3

5 3 3 0 3

5 5 3 3 3 3 3 0

3

3

3 3 0 1

1 0 3

3

3 3 3

3 3 3 3

3 3 3 0 1 1 0 3

 

5 3

Bass Bass Fig. 1

 

3

3 3 3 3 3 3

Let’s shoot Just I’m not You won’t

the moon you and me a lonesome galaxy particular at night be tracking me by sight C5 D5

I’m

1.

you’ll

see

A single party

calling

me

   12 33  15 15 15 13 15 15 13 15 15  14 12 12 12 14 12 15 15 15 12 12 12  12       116

P.M.

7 5

7 7 5 5 5 5

P.M.

5 5

P.M.

7 5

P.M.

7 5

5

7 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

5 5 5 5 5 5 5

5 0 3

5 3

P.M.

7 5

7 5

P.M.

7 5

5

7 7 5 5 5 5 5 5

5 5 0 3 3 0 5

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

7 7 5 5 5 5

C5 13 12

P.M.

5 5

7 5

P.M.

7 5

5

7 7 5 5 5 5 5 5

5 5 5 5 5 5 5

5 3

   12  

P.M.

7 5

5 3

7 5

P.M.

7 7 7 5 5 5 0 0 5

5 5 5 0 3 3 0 5

     

3 3

7 5

5 5 5 7 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 5

3 3 3 0 1 1 0 5

2.

D5

15 13 15

3 3

P.M.

 

particular

not

D5

G5 end Riff B

13 12

 

15 13 15

2nd time, Gtrs. 2 and 3 substitute Rhy. Fill 2 end Rhy. Fig. 1 7 8 7 5 7 5

3 3 0 7 0 3

Rhy. Fill 2

P.M.

7 5

7 5 5 5 0 0

3 3 0 0 3

end Bass Fig. 1 5 5 5 5 5 5 0

3


“SPEED OF LIGHT”

E

Chorus (1:12, 2:26, 3:49)

Gtrs. 1 and 2 Rhy. Fig. 2a 38 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3

 

Shadows Shadows 3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

0

  

0 3 3 0 0

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

Humanity Humanity

3

3

3

3

3

We will We will

stars stars Gm7

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

Bass  3

the the

3 3 0 0

Gtr. 3 Rhy. Fig. 2

 

and and

let ring 

3 3

3 3

0

3

3

3

us us

3 1

3 3 3 1 1 1

3 3 1 1

3 1

3 3 3 1 1 1

5 5 5 3 3 3

3

3

3

3

at

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

0

3

3

2.

the

speed of light

3 3 5 6 5 3 5 3 0 0 5 6 5 3 5 3 0 0 3

3 1

0

P.M.

3

3

3

Go back to

B

0 0

3 3 1

3

3

(bar 14)

slip into the night D¨5 C5 B¨5 C5 B¨5 G5

D5 C5 B¨5 C5 B¨5 G5 end Rhy. Fig. 2a Rhy. Fill 3

5 5 3 3

3

0 3

We

5 3

3

3 3

42 5 X 3

3 3

 3  3

2nd time on 2nd Chorus, 1. skip ahead to F (bar 47) 2nd time on 3rd Chorus, skip ahead to J (bar 90)

won’t save won’t save C5

F5 P.M.

3 3 3

3 3

return return

let ring

3 3

not not

 

5 6 5 3 5 3 5 6 5 3 5 3

5 3

end Rhy. Fig. 2

0

 

0

3 3 1

3 3 1

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

F

P.M.

5 0 3 0

3 3 3 3 3 3 0

3

0

0 5 0 3

5 6 5 3 5 3 5 6 5 3 5 3

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 4 3 1 3 1

5 3

G

(2:46)



5 5

6 6

5 5

3 3

5 5

3 3

Gtrs. 1 and 2 5 5

6 6

5 5

3 3

5 5

3 3

 15 

3 3 0 0 3

0 3

5 6 5 3 5 3 5 6 5 3 5 3

 

3 4 3 1 3

0 5 0 3

0 0 3

  12 13 12  14 14 14

G5

*-e

15

1

12 13 13

13

15

15

4 5

1

 15 15

*Notes played slightly behind the beat.

Rhy. Fig. 3

P.M.

2 0

 

1st Guitar Solo (2:47)

the night Slip into A5 C5 D¨5 C5 B¨5 C5 B¨5

Gtr. 3 47

2 0

0

P.M.

0

0

0

0

2 0

2 0

2 0

0

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5 5

3 3 0 0 3

Bass Fig. 3

Bass 3

4

3

1

3

0

0

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

3

guitarworld.com

117


TRANSCRIPTIONS A5 1

50 15

15

13

12

13 12 13 12

14

12

13

15

13

15

5

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

15

1

1

15

15

 

3 3 0 0

15 15 13 12 13 12 13 12

14

15

13

12

13 12 13 12

4 5

4 5

5 5

5

0

15

12

P.M.

P.M.

2 0

2 0

2 0

0

0

0

2 0

0

2 0

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

0

15

5

G5 12 13 13 12 13 12

15 14 12

15

D5

1

53

1

A5

12

12 13

end Rhy. Fig. 3

0

14 15

14

12 13 12

14 14 12 14 17

14

5

2 0

2 0

0

5 5

0 0

3 2 0

3 2 0

3 2 0

3 2 0

3 3 0 0

3 2 0 0

3 3 0 0

3

3

  

2

2 0

0

5

end Bass Fig. 3 5

5

5

5

5

 

5

0

5

5

5

5

14

w/bar -1

14

-1

14 12

12

15

-1

15 14 13 12

5

0

3

3

3

3

3

3

0

G5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 3 simile (see bar 48) Gtr. 3 56

5

A5 1/2

14 16 14 12

14

13

12

14

12 13

14 14

 14 !

1/2

3

Bass plays Bass Fig. 3 (see bar 48)

60

118

1

14 12 14 12

15

12

15

 13 15 13 12 13 12 14

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

14 14

12 13 15

12 15 17

 15 15

D 17

19

 20 20 17 20 19 19 17 19 17

G5 1

20

17

20


“SPEED OF LIGHT”

H



Gtr. 3 hold bend 63 20 20

20

A/C#

Gtr. 2

 7 10 !

1

20 10

10

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

9 10

3

3

3

3

3

4 2

0

4 2

Bass

9

7

3 P.M.

D5

A5

1

Gtrs. 1 and 3 Rhy. Fig. 4

Gtrs. 1 and 2

10

7

10 9

3

7

7

9

3

2

4 2

7

7

7

2

2

4 2

7

7

7

D5

B5

7

3

10

3

P.M.

2

0

7 4

7 4

7 5

7

7

7

7

P.M.

2 0

Bass Fig. 4 3

3

3

9

3

3



66 7

9

7

3

5

9

5

0

0

2 0

5

5

5

5

 x

9

A/C#

7

6

6

6

7

6

9

0

2 0

2 0

5

5

5

E5

7

 9

9

P.M.

5

0

7 4

7 4

7 5

5

5

5

5

9

7

x

7

P.M.

9

9

7

8

6

7

5

7

7

6

7

4 2

4 2

2

2

2

4 2

7

7

7

7

7

7

8

7

10

10

0

7 4

7 4

7 5

9 7

6

2

4 2

7

7

B5

slight P.H.

10



10

5

end Rhy. Fig. 4 4 2

9

5

P.M.

1

6

9

7

P.M.

A5

slight P.H.

P.M.

7

7

3

D5

P.M.

6

7

P.M.

A/C#

7

7

9

2 0

5

7

7

P.M.

69

2nd Guitar Solo (3:08)

B5

P.M.

9 7

9 7

9 7

9 7

7

7

7

0

2 0

2 0

0

5

5

2 0

2 0

2 0

5

5

5

0 0

4 2

end Bass Fig. 4 7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

5

5

0

7

guitarworld.com

119


TRANSCRIPTIONS A/C#



Gtrs. 1 and 3 play Rhy. Fig. 4 simile (see bar 64) Gtr. 2 72

 16

17 ( 17 )

14

15

1

17 17

17

15

D5

15 14

0

A5

15

14 15

14

17

 16

A/C#

16

16

���

D5

17 15 14 15 14

3

Bass plays Bass Fig. 4 (see bar 64)

75

14

16

16

3

B5

16

A/C#

16

16

14

16

15

14

12

12

14

11

14

12

D5

11

14

12

12

14

12

15

14

C5

1

11

E5

P.M.

12

A5 Gtr. 2 78

  16

14

14

15

17

17

17

14

(gradually release bend over next two bars)

 ( 17 ) 

17 10 3

Gtrs. 3 and 4 Gtrs. 1 and 3 9 7

9 7

9 7

9 7

9 7

7

7

7

7

7

0

2 0

2 0

2 0

0

5

5

5

2 0

Gtr. 1

2 0

5 3

Bass

I

7

Interlude (3:28)

B¨5 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 simile (see bar 28) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 1a simile (see bar 28) Gtr. 3 plays Riff B (see bar 28)

1.

C5



Gtr. 4 (w/sub-octave doubling effect) 80

 

5

5

5

3

3

5

6

3

3

6

3

5

3

5 6

3

5

3

5

3



5

5

3

4

B¨5

3

5

3

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 28)

3

 



85 7 7 7 5 5

120

C5

7

8

5

5

8

5 7 5

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

D5

   5  3 



8 5 5

5



7 7 5 7

2.

C5 7

5

6 5

7 5

2.

C5

1.

  7

3

0

B¨5 D5

4

3

Go back to

5

E

5

5

Chorus (bar 38)

D5

5

3

G5

 

6

5

7

5

   7


“SPEED OF LIGHT”

J

K

(4:09)

the speed

at

of

Shadows Shadows

D¨5 C5 B¨5 C5 B¨5 G5 Gtrs. 1-3 play Rhy. Fill 3 (see bar 45) Bass 90 3

4

3

3

1

1

Out-chorus (4:10)

light

0

the the

stars stars Gm7

Gtrs. 1and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 2a (see bar 38) Gtr. 3 plays Rhy. Fig. 2 simile (see bar 38)

 

3

and and

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

(play repeat simile)

We will We will

not not

return return

won’t save won’t save C5

Humanity Humanity F5

94 5

5 5 5 5 3 3

3

3 3 3 3 3

3 3

L

2.

at the speed C5 D¨5 C5 B¨5 C5 B¨5 Gtrs. 1 and 2 99 5 5

6 6

5 5

3 3

5 5

3 3

at

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

5 5

6 6

5 5

3 3

5 5

3 3

3 4 3 1

(freely)

light

8

5

7

6

5

3

5

3

5

6

5

3

5

3

5

3

5

4

3

1

3

1

3

4

3

1

3

3 3 1

3

3

 

We slip into the night

1 !

1 !

0 3 3 1

(pick scrape)

3 3 1



X



(trem. pick)

3

103

2



5

1

G5

vib. w/bar

Bass

(4:44)

3 1

(trem. strum)

5

light

F5

1

Gtr. 3

the speed of D¨5 C5 B¨5 C5 B¨5

Outro (4:30)

of N.C. 8

3 3 3 3 3 3 0

3

1.

us us

4

3

3

3

3

3

5

5

3

5

4

1

-1/2 -1/2 -1/2 -1/2

(trem. strum) 3 3 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0



3

3 3 0 0



3

3

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 3 3

3

3

3 3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3 3 0 0

P.H.

3

5 3

6

3

3

1

3

1

0

3 3 0 0

3

3

5

1

P.H. 1

5

5

1 ! 

1 !

1

00 3 3 0 0

1

5 !



5 3

-1/2 -1/2 -1/2 -1/2

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

5

4

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

3 5 5

3

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0

5 5 5 5 3

1

3 3 0 0

3 3 0 0



3

   

w/bar

G5

3 3

3

(pick scrape)

X  ! 



0 3 3 0 0 3

!

5 3 3

5 pitch: E

1 0 1 1 2 3



3

E

3 0 3

5 5



0 3

3 ! 



3

3

3

   

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121


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TRANSCRIPTIONS

PHOTOGRAPH Ed Sheeran

As heard on x Words and music by ED SHEERAN and JOHNNY McDAID • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

Tune G string down to E (low to high, E A D E B E). Tune G string down to E (low to high, E E A D E B E). C#m7 E C#m7 9fr 6fr 6fr

A Intro (0:00) A Intro (0:00) Moderately

9fr

21

21 q = 128 Moderately q = 128 E EGtr. 2 plays Fill 1 (see below) Gtr. 1Gtr. (acous.) 2 plays Fill 1 (see below)

Bsus4 Bsus4 7fr 7fr

134

134

134

134

            1         0 0 0  67  67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 67 11 11 11 0 0 0 11 11 11 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 11 11 11     700 700700 700 700 700 700700 700 700 1199 99 99 1199 99 99 1199 *Palm muting performed w/light touch throughout, primarilly the w/light bottom touch three strings only. *Palm mutingaffecting performed throughout, primarilly affecting the bottom three strings only.

7

7

12 12

 

 

Loving can hurt Loving can hurt E E P.M.

 

 

P.M. P.M.

0 011 11 11 9 119 9 9

 

 0   07  77  5 7 

P.M.

0 0 0 07 07 07 7 7 75 5 5 75 5 5 77 7 7 75 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

00

6 67 70 0

5

but it’s the only thing but thing It it’s is the theonly only thing It is the onlyBsus4thing Bsus4

    0 0

0 011 011 11 11 11 11 9 9 9 11 119 9 9 9 9

 0

09 99 97 7

 

6 67 70 0

6 67 70 0

B B

 

1st Verse (0:18) 1st Verse (0:18) E ERhy. Fig. 1 Rhy. Fig. 1

   6  6770 0

 

  00

6 6 7 7 6 0 6 0 0 7 7 0 0 0

0 6 0 7 6 7

09 9 7 9 97 7 7 7 7 7 7

We keep this love in a photograph C#m7 Asus2 Rhy. Fig. 2 C#m7 Asus2 Rhy. P.M.Fig. 2

 

P.M.

0 011 11 119 11 9

 

0 011 11 9 11 119 9 9 9 9

 

  0 07  77 75

0 011 11 9 11 119 9 9

5

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

6 76 07 0

  0 07 77 75 5

0 07 77 75 5

, , 

6 7 6 0 7 0

X 0 X 0

5 5

4 4

  

    0

0 9 90 0 90 9 99 0 0 90 99 99 79 79 7 7 7 7 7 79 9 9 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7

Loving can hurt sometimes canhard hurt sometimes You knowitLoving can get sometimes You knowit can get hard C#m7sometimes C#m7

 

6 7 0 6 7 0

Asus2 Asus2

  0 70 77 57 5

 

0 07 77 75 5

0 0

90 99 79 7 7 7 7 7

  0 0  0 00 0

 

0 0

0 0

6 76 7 7 7

 

 

0 110 11 911 11 9 9 9

 

0 110 11 11 11 911 9 9 911 11 11 9 9 9 9

 

0 70 7 5 57 7 5 5 5 5 5 5

 0 0 70 77 57 5

00 70 77 7

0 00 70 77 7

  0 70 77 57 5

 

0 0 110 110 11 1111 911 11 911 9 9

 

0 0

6 76 07 0

6 76 07 0

 

0 0

(play 6 times) (play 6 times)

 

0 0

 !0  !0 

0 90 99 79 7

7 7

end Rhy. Fig. 1 end Rhy. Fig. 1

 *  * 0 70  77  57 5

0 70 7 5 57 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

We made these memories for ourselves ourselves E We made these memories forBsus4 Bsus4 E

  5 5

P.M.

When it gets hard When it gets hard

 

09 99 97 7

0 throughout 0 let ring 4 0 0 0 4 0

124

 

(repeat previous bar) (repeat previous bar)

Fill 1 (0:00, 1:29) Fill (0:00, 1:29) Gtr.12 (acous.) (fingerstyle) Gtr. 2 (acous.) Riff A(fingerstyle) Riff A throughout let ring

  00  

0 0 0 6 0 7 6 7

that I know thatthat Imakes us know feel alive that makes us feel alive

 0

 P.M.  0 0   0 00 0 0

0 0 00 11 11 11 0 0 0 00 9 11 11 11 90 11 11 11 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 79 11 11 11 97 7 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 7 7 7

C 1st Pre-chorus (0:53) C 1st Pre-chorus We keep (0:53) this love in a photograph

17 17

134

Bsus4 Bsus4

*(strum P.M. w/fingers) * P.M.

Asus2 Asus2

5fr 134

C#m7 C#m7

(strum w/fingers) Gtr. 1 (acous.)

1

Asus2 Asus25fr

0 90 99 79 7

5

*Note in parenthesis played first time only. *Note in parenthesis played first time only.

where our eyes where our eyes

0 90 99 79 7 7 7

, ,

11 911 99 79 7


“ PHOTOGRAPH ” are never closing C#m7

P.M.

21

0 11 11 9

D

0 11 11 9

9

0

5 11 11 A 9

  0 7 7

0 11 11 9

9

1st Chorus (1:11) Keep me E Rhy. Fig. 3

 0 7 7 5

0

,775

5

0 7 7 5

5

6 7 0

6 7 0

6 7 0

6 7 0

6 7 0

6 7 0

eyes

0

0 0

0

meet

Gtr. 1

You

0 11 11 9

0

0

0

0

7

7

0 9 9 7

7

end Rhy. Fig. 2

0 0 9 9 7

6 7 0

jeans

0 9 9 7

9

9

holdin’ me closer

’til our

0 9 9 7

7

7

be alone

9

0 11 11 9

9

0 11 11 9

9

9

0 11 11 9

9

0

0 7 7 5

0 7 7 5

5

0

,775

0 7 7 5

0

5

0

5

Loving

 6 7 0

0

0

6 7 0

0

0

0

0

6 7 0

0

0

6 7 0

0

0

0

0

0

Remember

0

Loving that with every

your soul can mend piece of ya C#m7

7

7

E Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 9) Bass 35

39

7

F 43

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

that I we take

thing thing

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

know know with us when we die

7

9

9

9

9

9

9

are never closing (ooh) C#m7 9

9

9

9

9

9

9

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

7

5

were neverbroken

9

9

5

5

9

5

9

9

9

9

9

5

5

5

7

7

7

7

7

5

7

5

5

5

5

5

7

 

7

ourselves Bsus4

7

7

forever frozen

7

7

Where our eyes

7

still

7

7

7

So you can Bsus4

E 5

And it’s the only And it’s the only

hm

We made those memories for

Time’s

Asus2 9

9

I swear it will get easier (Hmm)

E

5

Our hearts

9

can heal

Asus2

2nd Pre-chorus (2:09) We keep this love in this photograph C#m7 Asus2 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 2 (see bar 17) 9

47

7

Bsus4 7

7

0 7 7 5

0

2nd Verse (1:33)

7

7

0 9 9 7

end Rhy. Fig. 3

Bass

 

0 9 9 7

Wait for me to come home

E Gtr. 2 plays Riff A one and one half times (see Fill 1 on previous page)

6 7 0

E

So you can Bsus4

6 7 0

0 9 9 7

0

won’t ever

0 11 11 9

P.M.

33

6 7 0

still

Asus2 Rhy. Fill 1

P.M.

0 11 11 9

6 7 0

C#m7

29

of your ripped Bsus4

0

5

inside the pocket

0

and time’s forever frozen E

P.M.

25

Hearts are never broken Asus2

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7 ! guitarworld.com

125


TRANSCRIPTIONS

G

“ PHOTOGRAPH ”

2nd and 3rd Choruses (2:26, 3:20) me the pocket inside hurt me That’s okay baby

(2.) Keep

of your only

jeans bleed

ripped words

Holding me closer inside these pages

me inside the necklace you got when you were sixteen hurt me well that’s okay baby only words bleed E Bsus4 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 3 simile (no P.M.) (see bar 25)

(3.) fit

 

51

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

’til our You just

Next to your heartbeat where I inside these pages You just

7

7

7

7

7

2nd time on 3rd Chorus, skip ahead to I Outro (bar 67)

55

eyes hold

meet me

You won’t ever and I won’t ever

be alone let you go

should hold C#m7

be me

Keep it deep and I won’t ever

within your soul let you go Asus2

9

H

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

Bridge (3:02)

Gtr. 1

59

P.M.

9

9

9

9

9

P.M.

9

0 11 11 9

9

9

9

9

9

0 11 11 9

9

9

9

9

6 7 0

0

0

6 7 0

0

0

6 7 0

0

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

7

I

6 7 0

6 7 0

Gtr. 1 67

6th C#m7

 11  9

0

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

6 7 0

 

0 11 11 9

0

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

0 7 7 5

5

5

5

Bsus4

 0 9 9 7

7

7

7

 5

5

5

5

5

 

7

7

7

7

7

& 5

0 7 7 5

0 9 9 7

7

0 7 7 5

5

0 7 7 5

 0 0 9 9

hearing you whisper through the phone Asus2

0 11 11 9

5

5

5

 

Wait for me to come home

I will remember how you kissed Bsus4

6 7 0

5

5

0 7 7 5

5

5

5

5

Go back to

 

Street

11 11 11 11 9 9

5

Outro (3:55) E

126

9

Wait for me to come home

E

71

9

Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fill 1 (see bar 31)

Asus2

Bass

63

9

you home

And if you When I’m away

Wait for me to come home

C#m7

0 11 11 9

9

And if me to come

Wait for

0 7 7 5

7

0 9 9 7

0 0 0 9 9 7

7

7

7

0 0 0 9 9 7

 0 0 0 9 9 7

0 0 9 9 7

 0 0 7 7 5

0 0 9 9 7

5 A

3rd Chorus (bar 51)

Oh you can

 7

7

0 0 0 9 9 7

 

7

0 0 0 9 9 7

7

under the lamppost back on

 7

0 0 9 9 7

Wait for me to come home

0 0 7 7 5

0 0 7 7 5

0 0 0 9 9 7

me

G



0 0 0 7 7 5

 


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TRANSCRIPTIONS

BRIGHT LIGHTS Gary Clark, Jr.

As heard on BLAK AND BLU Words and Music by GARY CLARK, JR. • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

Am

Am7 5fr

T 3111

Intro (0:00) Slowly q = 83 Am



T 31

Am7 Am

5 5 7 5 5

let ring 5 5 7 5 5

5 5 7 5 5

Gtr. 3 (elec. w/fuzz tone)

5

T 321

Am7 Am7add11

5 5 5 7

5 5 5 7

7

Fmaj7

5fr

T 333

Am7 Am7add11

Am(add9) 5fr

T 1311

Gtr. 1 (elec. w/overdrive and spring reverb) Rhy. Fig. 1 let ring 1 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 7 7 7 7 7 5 5 5 5 5 7

D/A

5fr

T 1111

T = thumb

A

Am7add11 5fr

5 5 5 7

5

5

5 5 5 5

5 5 7 5

Am7

5 5 7 5

5 5 7 5

5

5

5 5 7 5 5

 

Bass

Am Am7 Am7add11 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 twice (see bar 1)

Gtr. 3 Riff A 5

1

5 !

5 !



5

5

5 5 7

Bass Fig. 1

5

5

5

5

Gtr. 2 (elec. w/overdrive tone) Rhy. Fig. 1a

5 5 7 5

Bass

Am7 Am

8

5

5

5

0 !

 

5 5 7

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5 5 7 5

8

7

5 5



5 5

7

 10

5

3

5

3 3

10

Am7

5 5

0

5

7

5

5

Am7 Am7add11

1

5 5 5

5



5 5 7

5 5

5

3

8

7

7

BRIGHT LIGHTS WORDS AND MUSIC BY GARY CLARK, JR. COPYRIGHT (C) HOTWIRE UNLIMITED, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. USED BY PERMISSION.

130

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016


“ BRIGHT LIGHTS” Woke up yeah Gtr. 3 9

Am Am7 Am7add11 Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 1a (see bar 5) 1

5 !

Am7



5 !

5

Am

Am7

end Riff A

5

0 !

5

5 5

0

1st Verse (0:35) York New outside my know Am

Gtr. 1 Rhy. Fig. 2 13

 

City Marcy’s name

of

lyin’ west by Am7

5 5 7

X X 5

5

5

Rhy. Fig. 2a Gtr. 2

  

the

floor

the

night

5

Rhy. Fill 1 7

5 7 5

X X

5

5 5

Am7 let ring

5 7 5

X X

let ring

5

5 5

5

5 5 7

on fifty-four the end of Am7add11

let ring 5 5 5 7 5

X X

0

Bass plays last bar of Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 8)

Bass plays first three bars of Bass Fig. 2 (see bar 17)

B



1

0 0 0

Woke up in Am7

Am7add11

5

let ring

5 5 7

X X

5

5

5 7 5

5

5

5

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 simile (see bar 5)

well yeah

Am

Am7

15

5 5 5 7

X X 5

5

5 5 7

5 5 7

5

Bass

5

5

5

let ring 5 5 7 5 5

X X 5

3

5 7 5

5

5 5

7

 5 5

end Rhy. Fig. 2a

 

*

7

*Note in parenthesis played second time only.

Am7

Am

X X

X

5

5

5

5

7 X

8

X

7

5

Bright Am7

Am7 Am7add11

5 5 7

5

5

well

let ring

7

5

let ring 5 5

 

5

0 X 5 7

5

5

Bass Fig. 2

5 5 7 5

7 7

know my name by the end of the night Am Am7 Am7add11 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 2 (see bar 13)

(play 3 times)

5

5 5 5

gonna gonna Am7

end Rhy. Fig. 2

Gtr. 2 substitutes Rhy. Fill 1 third time (see bar 14)

5

Gtr. 2 17

5 5 7 5

5

Am7add11

let ring 5 5 5 7 5

X X

Just You You

5 5 5 X

5

5

5

7

5 5 7

Gtr. 2

5

5 7

1

5 3

Gtr. 3

3

5

5

5

 5

5

1

0

guitarworld.com

131


TRANSCRIPTIONS

C

1st Chorus (0:21) my head lights big city goin’ to Am Am7 Am7add11 Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 1a twice (see bar 5)

Gtr. 1 21

5 5 7

5 5 7 5

5 5 7 5

5

5

5

Gtr. 3 25

5

5

5

5

5

5

3

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

3

5

5

5

0 0 0 0 0 0

5

5

5

5

5

 

Gtr. 1 5

7

5 5 7

5

Bass 5

1/4



5 5 7 5 5 7

7

  5 5 5 5

5

5

5

5 5 5

5 5 5

5

5 5 5

0 5

5

3

5

5

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

 0 !

5 7 5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

no

5

’cause

5 5 5

5 5 5 5

0

7

5

 5

8

5

 0 !

5 7 5

5

5

5

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5 5 5

5

5

5

 5

5

5

5

5

3

5

3

5

5

5

5

you don’t care Am7 Am7add11

5 5

7 7 7 7

7

1/4

5 7

7

5

5

5

0 5

0 5

 

7

5

 55 

5 5 5 5

5

5 7 5

1

5

5

5 5 7 5

Bright Am7

3

5

5

5

5

no



7 7

 5

7

Am7

0 5 5

8

5 5

end Bass Fig. 3 5

5

5

7

7

5

7 5

8

Start

5 5 5 5

5 5 7

5

my head

goin’ to Am7 Am7add11

5 5 7

I don’t care Am7 Am

Interlude (1:44) (Ah) Am Am7 Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 1a simile (see bar 5)

5 5 7

5

5

5

5

 5



5

5 5

city

1

1

Gtr. 3 29

5

lights big to my head city goin’ Am Am7 Am7add11 Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 simile (see bar 1)

 5 ! Bass

5 7 5

5 5 5 5

 5

5

5 5 7 5

5

5 !

Bass Fig. 3

5 7 5

5 !

Bass

132

5 7 5

1

Gtr. 3

D

5 7 5

lights big Am

Bright Am7

5 5 5

 

5 5 5

5 7

7

8 7

5 7

 55  5

 5

5

 0 5

8

5

7 5

 7 7

5

0

1/4

(repeat previous bar)

5 5 5

5

5

0

5



3 5

5

 0 5

  8 0

7


“ BRIGHT LIGHTS”

E

2nd Verse (1:55) up with the bottle off with the bottle End it Am7add11 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 2a (see bar 13)

Gtr. 1

Rhy. Fig. 4

33

5 5 5

5 5 5

X

let ring 5 5 5 7 5

X X X 5

5

Am7

Takin’ shots waitin’ on tomorrow Tryin’ to fill up what’s hollow You gonna Am7 Am7add11 Am7 Am

5 5 7 5

X X

let ring 5 5 7 5 5

X X

X

Am

 

0

Bass

8 10 9 10

5

5

5

Bass Fig. 4

3

10 9 10

  5

5

5

know my name Am7 Am Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 2 simile (see bar 13) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 2a simile (see bar 13)

37 Gtr. 4 8 9 10

 

0

8 9 10

0

8 9 10

8

0

10 9 10

2nd Chorus (2:18) lights big city goin’ to my head Am Am7 Am7add11 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 (see bar 1) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 1a twice simile (see bar 5)

Gtr. 4 Riff B 41 13

13 !

14

13 !

13

Bright

 5

5

5

know my

5

name

10 9 10

3

0

*

 

5 5 7 5

*Gtrs. 1 and 2 silent

0 10 9 10

 

5

5

5

5

Bright

Am Gtr. 3

8 9 10

0

10 9 10

10 9

14

12

13

Gtr. 4 (w/clean tone and tremolo effect)

lights big Am

Am7

12

13

14

8 9 10

0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 2 simile (see bar 17)

F

 

0 8 9 10

 8  9  10

8 9 10

X

5

5 7 5

Am

7

You gonna Am7

 10  9  10

10 9 10

5

Am7

 10 !

5

X X

let ring 5 5 5 7 5

5

Gtr. 3 (w/overdrive tone and tremolo effect) let ring 8 9 10

5 5 7

13

city

goin’ to my head Am7 Am7add11

13 !

14

13 !

Bright

13

14

Am7

12

Bass plays Bass Fig. 3 simile (see bar 21)

lights big city goin’ to Am Am7 Am7add11 Gtr. 4 plays Riff B (see bar 41)

Gtr. 1 45

5 7 5

G

5 5 5 7

5 5 5 7 5

5 5 5 5

5 5 7 5

5 5 7 5

5

my head

5 5 7 5

5 5 7 5

5

5

D/A

5

(2:41)

Am

Gtrs. 1 and 2 49 5 5 5 7 5 5 Bass

5

5

5 5 5 7

5 5 5 7

5

5

5

5 5 5 7

5 5 5 7

5 5 5 7

5

5

5

3

5

 

5

I don’t care Am7 Am

no

5 5 7 5

5 5 5 7

5 5 5 5

5 7

5

5

(Hoo)

   5

’cause you don’t care Am7 Am7add11

5 5 5 7 5

5 5 5 5

5 5 7 5

5

7 5 5

5

5

Am7 5 5 7 5

5 5 7 5

5 5 7 5

5 5 7 5

5

5 5 5

let ring 5 5 7 5 5

D/A

Am7

 0

7 5

5

7 7 7

5

no

5

5

5

5 3

5

5

5

5

5

7

guitarworld.com

133


TRANSCRIPTIONS

H

Guitar Solo (2:47) Am Am7Am7add11 Am7 Am Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 2 twice simile (see bar 13)

Am7 Am7add11

Am7 Am

Am7 Am7add11

Gtr. 3 (w/fuzz tone)

hold bend and let ring 1

51



1

5 7

5 7 5 7 5

5  5 !

1/4

5

7

5



7

7

7

1

0 0

5

7

5 !

7

5

5

5

5

5 8

5 8

8

 1  5

8

7



8 5

5

5

3

Th.

Bass plays Bass Fig. 3 twice simile (see bar 21)

56

 5

7

Am

Gtr. 3 59

8

5

1

5

7

5

7

8

7

5

7

9

9



Am7 Am

9

9

7



5

7

Am7 Am7add11 5

7

5

7

Am7 Am7add11

5

8

5

7

5 5



5

7

7

5

7

5 5

5

5

7

7



7

7

Am7

7

5

5

7

5

8

8

5

7

5

7

5

7

Am7

5

7

5 5

5

7

5

5 5

7

3

Gtr. 1

5

5

Rhy. Fig. 5

Gtr. 2

5 5 7

5 5 7

5

Rhy. Fig. 5a

5

*

*

*

*

*

7 0

7 0

7 0

7 0

7 0

7

7

5 5 5

5 7 5

5 7 5

5 7 5

5 7 5

5 7 5

5 7 5

5 7 5

5 7 5

5 5 5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

9

*Substitute notes in parentheses when Rhy. Fig. 5a is recalled..

       =      

Am Am7 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 5 three times simile (see bar 59) 3

Am7add11

Am7

3

Gtr. 4 1/4 61 5

7

7

5

8

7

7

5

7

7

5

7

8

7

5

7

7

5

8

7

7

5

7

7

5

8

7

7

5

7

7

5

7

7

5

3

Gtr. 2 10

134

end Rhy. Fig. 5a 10

10

10 10 10

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

10

10 10 10 12

12

12

12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12 12

0

0


“ BRIGHT LIGHTS” Am Am7 Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 5a simile (see bar 59) Gtr. 4 63 (jjjq = jjjq) 5

7

7

5

7

7

5

7

7

7

5

7

7

5 7

5 7

7

3

Am7

5 7

7

3

5 7

7

3

7

5 7 5 7 5

3

Am7

3

Am7add11

65 7

5

7

5

3

I

67

7

8

7

5

3

5

7

3

7

8

7

3

5

5

7

 !

! 7

7

5

5

7

7

5

8

3

 5

8

5

7

5 7

3

8 

3

Get Am7 1

8

7

5

5

7

7

3

3rd Verse (3:32) lost in this city try to find myself I went Am7 Am7add11 Gtrs. 1 and 2 play Rhy. Fig. 4 twice simile (see bar 33) 2½

8

3

1

8 7

5 7

7

up a different Am

person Came down somebody Am7 Am7add11

7

else

I



7 5 5 5



7

Am7add11

5

Bass plays Bass Fig. 4 twice simile (see bar 33)

know it ain’t Am 71

J

right

but it’s all in my head Am7 Am7add11

Well I’m surprised that I’m Am7 Am

 14 14 !

Bright Am7

lights big

 

city

my head goin ’ to Am7 Am7add11

1/2

14

Bright

Gtr. 3 (w/fuzz tone, tremolo effect and heavy reverb) 12 13 14 3 5 Gtr. 2 (w/fuzz tone)

3rd Chorus (3:55) city to my head lights big goin’ Am Am7 Am7add11 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 1 twice simile (see bar 1) Gtr. 2 plays Riff A (see bar 5)

Gtr. 3 let ring throughout 75 13 13 14

still alive I should be dead Am7 Am7add11

Bright Am7



1/2

14

13

12

13

14

13

14

14

14

14

14

14

13

12

Bass plays Bass Fig. 3 simile (see bar 21)

lights big Am

city

Gtr. 3 let ring throughout 79 13 13 14

goin’ to my head Am7 Am7add11

 14 14 !

I don’t care Am7

1/2

14

14

13

12

no

13

14

’cause you don’t care Am7 Am7add11

13

14

  14

no 1/2

17 20

Boy you gonna

 20

guitarworld.com

135


TRANSCRIPTIONS

K

Outro (4:18) know my name Am Am(add9) Fmaj7

  !

Gtr. 3 83 20

Gtr. 1

Rhy. Fig. 6 5 5 7

5 5 7 5

0 1 2 3

0 5 7 7 5 5

3 0 1

Gtr. 2 Rhy. Fig. 6a



5 !

Bass

5

5 0

3 0

0 1 2 3 3

1

3

1

yeah you gonna know my Am

Yeah

 

1/2

2017

17

0 1 2 3

0 1 2 3

1 1

1

171717

19

0 1 2 3 1

1

  

1

1 1

1917

7

19

 

0 0 5 7

5 7

Am7 Am7add11

0 0 5 7 7 5

5

0 1 2 3 3 0 1



0 0 1 2 3

17

  19 17

name

 5  !

1

1

1 1

1

3

1 3

5 6

5

0

3 2

0 1 2 3 3

1

3

1

1720

Hey 19



  21

21

21

Bass

5

89

1

5

5

know Am 17

5

20

3

0

my

 136

5

17

5

0

3

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

17

0 1 2 3

0 1 2 3

0 1 2 3

0 1 2 3

1 1

1

1

1 1

7

3

5

  

0 0 1 2 3 1

3

1 1

 17 !

3

1

1

1

1

Hey

2

19

19

17

20 17

3

8

3

0 1 2 3

1 3

8

8

1

3

3

1

17

1

0

gonna

19

19

3

0

yeah

 

Fmaj7

18 17

3 1

17

name Am(add9)

   19 19 17

5

19

191719  21

Girl you

2

19

5

21



2017 17

name know my Am Am(add9) Fmaj7 Gtr. 1 plays Rhy. Fig. 6 two and one half times simile (see bar 83) Gtr. 2 plays Rhy. Fig. 6a two and one half times simile (see bar 83)

Gtr. 3 87

you gonna

19 18 17

8

19 17 20 17

8

8

8

19 18 17

8

8

19 17 20

7

8

7


“ BRIGHT LIGHTS” yeah Am

no

You gonna Am(add9)

Fmaj7



91 19 17

19 17

5

94

5

 20

17 17 17

1

1

Am(add9)

 20

20

Gtr. 1

20

0 0 5 7

1

17

1

5

3

2

3

20

1

16 16

19 19

17 19

 15  17 17 18

3

 1

1

1

1

20

17

20

5

20

5

3

1

5

3

5

20 20

20

8

7

3



0

5

6

7

0 1 2 3

0 1 2 3

1

1

0 1 2 3

0 1 2 3

1

1

5

5

3

1

1

the

7

5

1

1

20 20

Bass

3

 5

 5

5

0

3

2

 3

1

 1

1

1

1

7

5

0 1 2 3

0 1 2 3

1

0

1

2

17 17 20

 3

1

gonna know

1

3

0

Am

1

5

7 !

0 5 5 7

3

5

1

0

17 17 17 20

1 1

1

1

3

1

Gtr. 2

5 !

5

you

well



1



Fmaj7

1

night

7

1

5

17 17 17 17

0 1 2 3 1

20

2

end of

5

1

17

15 18

Hey

1

17 17 17

 0

1

Fmaj7

1

 5

3

1

1/4

0 0 5 7 5

 20

the Fmaj7

by

17

3

 3

Am(add9)

1

17 17

5

20

0 0 5 7 5

 20

name 1

my name Am(add9)

20 17

5

my

1

97

0

16 !

Am

1

Gtr. 3

19 18 17

20 17

1/2

19 19 19 19

know Am

1

1

0 7 5

5 !

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TRANSCRIPTIONS

X-RAY VISIONS Clutch

As heard on PSYCHIC WARFARE Words by NEIL FALLON • Music by CLUTCH • Transcribed by JEFF PERRIN

D5

E5 5fr

13

A

D5 7fr

G5 10fr

13

13

134

Intro (0:00, 0:46, 2:20) Moderately Fast q = 180 N.C.(G5)



(E5)

(G5)



3

0

   3

(E5)

D5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

5

5

5

5

a out covered

pack of Morse by the



Gtrs. 1 and 2 (elec. w/dist.) 1

0

3

3

0

3

3

0

Bass

B

0

Verses (0:02, 0:49, 2:23) thing that I thing that I thing I E5

1. First 2. Next 3. Last

0

did did remember

I

was was was

buy tap

* P.M.

3 7 5

9 7

0

smokes code ruins

(repeat previous bar)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

*omit P.M. on 3rd Verse

(Gtr. 2 w/wah, used as a gradually sweeping filter effect throughout 3rd Verse).

Bass Fig. 1 5

7

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Checked with don’t E5

I D5

0

0

in a know

to a wooden who’s

motel nickel to blame

and on that

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

for

consult the receiver but I

* P.M.

6

0

0

0

0

0

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

9 7

0

0

0

*omit P.M. on 3rd Verse

end Bass Fig. 1 0

142

0

0

0

0

5

5

5

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

5

7

0

0

0

0


“X- RAY VISIONS” my

horoscope on the who didn’t

know

phone

do it N.C.

9

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Sitting every E5

Before With 1/4

3

0

3

0

the bed on could complete it passes day that

I

1/4

1/4

3

0

3

3

0

3

0

3

3

0

with my briefcase I was quickly it keeps on

in my overtaken getting

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

5

5

5

5

5

5

hands But that D5

stronger

Gtrs. 1 and 2 * P.M. 12 7 5

9 7

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

7 5

0

7 5

7 5

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 3)

patiently by really E5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 16 7 5

9 7

awaiting angry doesn’t

the

bother

any of me

spirits

word ’cause I

from Ronald get off N.C. 1/4

* P.M.

0

my command Reagan and Nancy on the danger

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Bass plays Bass Fig. 1 (see bar 3)

1/4

3

0

3

0

1/4

3

0

3

3

0

3

Bass 5

7

0

0

0

0

C

3

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

1

8

1

8

1

prophetic prophetic

   0  

Chorus (0:25, 1:11, 2:45) Telekinetic Telekinetic Telekinetic Telekinetic N.C.(E5)

N.C.(F5)

19

0

0

0

dynamite dynamite dyn a dynamite

-

mite

12

12

12

12

12

12

12

9

7

7

7

5

7

7

7

4

Substitute Bass Fig. 2, third and fourth repeats on 3rd Chorus (see bar 24)

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

guitarworld.com

143


TRANSCRIPTIONS

Psychic Psychic Psychic Psychic 22

N.C.(D5)

10

9

is is is is

warfare warfare warfare warfare

real real real real

D5

10

12 10

10

12 10

12 10

12 10

12 10

12 10

12 10

12 10

12 10

0

0

0

0

0

Bass Fig. 2 5

25

5

5

5

5

5

better believe know what you’re thinkin’ better believe know what you’re thinkin’

12

12

7

12

7

10

7

5

5

5

me

12

7

12

7

9

7

5

10

4

9

5

5

5

X-ray X-ray X-ray X-ray

brother sister brother

me

12

5

10

4

10

5

5

 

5

5

0

5

7

0

0

0

2nd time on 1st Chorus, go back to A Intro (bar 1). 2nd time on 2nd Chorus, continue to D Guitar Solo (bar 28). on 3rd Chorus, play 4 times then skip ahead to F Outro (bar 52).

vision vision vision vision

w/wah

5

0

You I You I

T - t - t

5

7

5

7

5

 

3

end Bass Fig. 2 7

5

7

 

*

5

7

5

7

5

3

3

*Play note in parenthesis first time only.

D

Guitar Solo (1:33) N.C.(G5)

Gtr. 2 28 0 0

1/4

0 0

0 0

3 3

3 3

1/4

0 0

0 0

3 3

3 3

1/4

0 0

0 0

Bass Bass Fig. 3 3

3

3

5 5

5 5

1/4

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

3 3

3 3

1/4

0 0

0 0

3 3

3 3

1/2

0 0

0 0

5 5

5 5

0 0

0 0

0 0

1/2

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

10 10

8

(repeat previous two bars)

32 10 10 10 12 12 10 10 10 12 12

0 0

10 0 10 0 10

10 10 10 10 12 10 10 10 10 12 10 10 10 10 12

0 0

0 0

10

8

10

8

10

8

6

6

  

end Bass Fig. 3 3

144

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

3

GU I TA R WOR L D • F EBRUA RY 2016

3

3

3

3

3

3

10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

10

8

10

8 10 8

10

8


“X- RAY VISIONS”

36

Gtr. 2 0 0

1/4

0 0

0 0

3 3

1/4

3 3

0 0

0 0

5 5

1/4

5 5

0 0

0 0

7 7

1/4

7 7

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

0 0

3 3

3 3

1/4

0 0

0 0

3 3

3 3

0 0

0 0

0 0

15 15 15 15

15 15 15 15

15 15 15 15

15 15 15 15

0 0 0

0 0 0

15 15 15 15

* 15 15 15 15

0 0 0

Bass repeats Bass Fig. 3 (see bar 28) 40 10 10 10 12 12 10 10 10 12 12

0 0

10 10 10

0 0

10 10 10 10 12 10 10 10 10 12 10 10 10 10 12

0 0

0 0

10 10 10 12 12 10 10 10 12 12

0 0

15 15 15 15

0 0 0

0 0 0

  

*w/echo effect

E

Interlude (1:54)

3. And

on

Gemini

N.C.(G5)

G5

Gtrs. 1 and 2 44 P.M.

 

3

On bass Pisces On lead Aries

the drums

(play 4 times)

3

3

3

3

3

3

   

3

guitar

presenting

guitar

we have

(play 4 times)

light P.M.

5 5 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

 

5 5 3

Bass repeats first bar of Bass Fig. 3 (see bar 28) throughout Interlude Go back to

48 5 5 3

F

And on

the

microphone

5 5 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

5 5 3

N.C.(G5) (E5)

5 5 3

 3

Bass 3



0

0

0

3

0

3

3

3

(E5)

D5

0 !

E5 w/bar *

 0

0

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

7 5

0 9 7 0

-3/4

0 !

9 7 0

5

5

5

5

5

12 10

-1

0

 

9 7 0

-1/2

0

9 7 0

9 7 0

(grad. detune string) -1/4 *

-1½

0

0

0

0 !

0

*Single version of the song ends here, with the guitar playing just the fretted E5 chord and quickly choking (muting) the strings.

(Segue to “Firebirds”)

D5

-1

-1/2

Go

5 5 3

(G5)



9 7 0

Intro (bar 1)

Outro (3;28)

Gtrs. 1 and 2 52

56

A

Scorpio

 

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From

The Best Note-for-Note Transcriptions Available

00690178 00142819 00123558 00690820 00123216 00691051 00690489 00694930 00694832 00129737 00139086 00119629 00129545 00690936 00124873 00694869 00138731 00139967 00130786 00127184 00690819 00122443 00125661 00128917 00691024 00120220 00139460 00113073

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IT MIGHT GET WEIRD INSIDE THE MINDS OF SOME OF THE WORLD’S MOST CREATIVE CUSTOM-GUITAR BUILDERS

GEAR ADRIFT

Thorsten Wolf’s The Pacific guitar and mobile amp unit

W

For more information, visit Thorsten Wolf’s Facebook page: Facebook.com/ ThorstenJohnWolf

E’VE PREVIOUSLY featured

a few war-themed guitars on this page, but this instrument is the only one that was designed by someone who actually fought in a war. Thorsten Wolf, who based this guitar on the television mini-series The Pacific, about Marines fighting the Japanese during World War II, is a retired German army master sergeant who was part of the forces that served in the former Yugoslavia during the Yugoslav Wars of the Nineties. Wolf’s creation started off as a Cassandra Elk Doomsday VII guitar built by designer Stuart M Bilcock. Featuring a body made from an assemblage of three low-budget Strat copies, the guitar was already unusual. “The first time I held it in my hands I knew it was a great guitar,” says Wolf. “I decided to give the guitar character that reflected my own life.” Although Wolf obviously wasn’t an American solider who fought during World War II, he related to the way the Marines were depicted in The Pacific. “Soldiers in the field have to improvise all the time,” he explains. “You have to put things together that you would never combine in civil life. The Pacific did a great job showing how the Marines had to steal things from army troops since they weren’t given the equipment they needed. This guitar is a mixture of ‘stolen’ equipment, but fully functional and with heart and soul.” The guitar’s graphic decorations came from a metal box housing a DVD collection of The Pacific. Wolf removed the guitar’s three original pickups and installed a Strat-style pickup at the bridge and a Schaller acoustic guitar pickup at the neck. Because the electronics were rewired as well, Wolf blocked off the positions of the pickup selector switch that would operate as a kill switch with tape marked “No!” The pieced-together weirdness even extends to the Wolf’s custom amp rig he built to go with the guitar, consisting of two practice amps and various pedals. “I wanted to show how a highly mobile amp unit would look if a soldier built it in the field,” he explains. — By Chris Gill

Have you created a custom work of guitar art suitable for It Might Get Weird? Email us at soundingboard@guitarworld.com!

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