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Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists and Motorcyclists

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ADVANCE Autumn 2012 Contents 1 2 3

4 5

6 7 11 12

13 14 15

16 17

18

19 20 21 22 25

What’s on? See what are events are planned for the near future The Chairman’s comments The thoughts of Graeme McColm Membership Renewal - it is about what you can do for the group but also about what the group can do for you. Treasurer’s Report - see what the state of our finances are like. Annual Accounts - view the annual accounts for 2011/2012 Changes to driving licence rules in Great Britain - see what changes to driving licences are around the corner. Roadcraft 1960 - look back to when a driver needed a skipping rope. Sharing the road with others - a tip from IAM’s chief examiner does what it says. Sobering evidence - view accident statistics on any road Motorcycle Chief Observer’s Diary What’s going on inside the Chief’s helmet? The Secretary Reports - Helen tells it like it is. Can modern vehicles still surprise the driver? - With the fancy electronic driver aids can you still get caught out? Youth-related risk taking - the young take risks on the road - it’s official Obs Corner - Noticed something hatching on our roads? - Have you spotted all those extra white lines? Insurance Industry Access to Driver Database (IIADD) system - this is going to change the way you by vehicle insurance Driving at night in the 1950’s - tips from the 1950s Speeding the official statistics - some facts and figures on speeds Average distance travelled per person per year - looking at the travelling habits of Scottish residents Energy drink "crash risk" warning - these drinks can be a problem Barriers to change - crash barrier provision - especially for bikers. Get tough on drink driving say motorists - what motorists think about drinkers. Advanced drivers on course - research into Adv training Know your speed limits - IAM motoring tip Take me home, country road - IAM motoring tip Driving around bends - IAM motoring tip Advertiser’s Wall Find out who supports us & this magazine edition. © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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JOHN F. BLACK MOTOR ENGINEERS

~Air Con ~Diesel Tuning ~Servicing ~Repairs ~Diagnostics ~Exhausts ~Tyres ~Motorhomes ~MOT testing for classes 3,4,5 & 7

Tel: 01387 267473

6B Catherinefield Ind Estate, Heathhall, Dumfries DG1 3PQ


Group Committee Members for 2012/13 This magazine was published Group President: Tommy Jardine Chair, Chief Obs

Graeme McColm

Vice Chair

Jamie Wood

Secretary

Helen Cameron

Treasurer

Russell Wears

07707 035518

For more details of our activities see our web site at: www.iamdumfries.org.uk Contact the Group Secretary:

M/c Coordntr Phil Sayers Committee

by the Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists.

Stewart Cameron Anne Lind Andy Campbell Bob Sloan Andrew Bird Sheena Trail Elaine Paterson Clint Smith Chris McWhinnie John Parry

dumfries@groups.iam.org.uk

Facebook: Dumfries & Galloway IAM (Motorcycles) Group Magazine contributions to: editor@iamdumfries.f9.co.uk

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this magazine are those of the contributors and not necessarily To e-mail any member of the committee, please in those of the Editor, Group or the Institute of Advanced Motorists, to the first instance, use the group contact e-mail which the Group is affiliated. Reg address: dumfries@groups.org.uk Charity No. SC 023511

For all enquiries call: 07707 035518 or e-mail: dumfries@groups.iam.org.uk

What’s on? - check for details & late changes at www.iamdumfries.org.uk Next meeting: Monday 10 September 7:30pm - Aberdour Hotel David Lockwood talks about John Paul Jones Meetings: Aberdour Hotel, 16 Newall Terr. DG1 1LW, 7:30pm unless otherwise stated

Copy dates 2012 Latest date for submissions of articles for the next issue : 9 November 2012

Group Members and Associates can get a free basic car wash, or two jet wash tokens when you fill up. Just show your membership card, or for Associates your IAM confirmation letter. Let the staff know you would like the free bike/car wash before you pay for your fuel. This offer may be withdrawn at any time. Š Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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The Chairman’s comments - Graeme McColm Welcome to the Autumn edition of our Advance magazine. Its been a very quiet summer, whether this is to do with the poor weather or the economy I am not sure, however, we need to promote the group’s activities and the IAM now more than ever. If you know anybody who would benefit from a ‘Skill for Life’ course and help to make our roads a safer place for all then please encourage them to put their names forward. The committee has decided this year to try to produce a printed syllabus so members can see at a glance what events are planned for the group year. This is no easy task as it means getting firm commitments, in advance, from the various speakers. I know Helen Cameron has been working hard getting out invitation letters to various organisations who might put up a speaker. We hope to get the syllabus finalised in the next few weeks. Inevitably given the timescale the first of this group year’s events, to be held on Monday 10 September, will not be able to be printed in the syllabus but please just come along to the Aberdour Hotel for 7:30pm. We will endeavour to put details up on our web site before this event for those who want to know in advance what they are letting themselves in for! May I take this opportunity to thank everybody for all their hard work over the last year. Especially those behind the scenes who give a lot of time and experience to helping out with paperwork and organisation. Thanks to all the observers, who give their time free of charge and their understanding partners who allow them their freedom to help out. Perhaps we still have an ‘indian’ summer to come and a few warm days in August haven’t been all we are going to get. Take care when out and about on the roads especially during the periods when we get a run of better weather as that always increases the numbers of visitors to our area. The committee has also decided to run another Race Night in March next year. This event is always well supported and is the only fund raising event we hold. I’m inviting all members to come forward with ideas for alternative and additional events which could be used to help raise funds for the group. The group has upgraded the radio equipment used by the motorcycle section and we have been selling off the old equipment. There are still some radio receivers available at the time of writing so if you are interested please get in touch - call Helen Cameron (07707 035518) and she’ll put you in touch with the right person who has the details. And finally - SAFE DRIVING © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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Membership Renewal It’s that time of the year again when membership subscriptions are due. Again we have held the annual fee at £10 which is a small sum and good value for all the Group has to offer. Everyone needs to complete a ’Membership (Renewal) Form’ which will be sent out or can be downloaded from the group web site. Please complete this form even if you are paying by standing order as this ensures we have the latest details for you - often people change their phone number/address and/or e-mail address and this can make it difficult for us to keep track of members and ensure that we can communicate effectively. If you have already completed a standing order form in the past then your payment will occur automatically on 16 November - thank you. If not then please consider doing so this year, it greatly helps with the group accounting. The standing order form (and membership renewal form) is available to download from the group web site. If you prefer other methods of payment then please do so but avoid sending cash through the post. The Treasurer, Russell Wears attends most group meetings and usually has copies of the forms with him if you want to pay him directly. If you signed the Gift Aid declaration on the membership form last year you don’t need to do it again but if you signed it some time ago or now wish to Gift Aid membership then please sign the declaration so our records are up to date.

Treasurer’s Report - Russell Wears The accounts have been approved by the auditor. In discussion with the auditor it is clear the working capital can sustain the group for another 3-4 years if the continued trend of deficit continues. Main area of deficit (£1,200) is in payments sustaining our charitable activities. There have been a few one off payments for goods which are sold on at cost (fleeces and polos) generally covering the outlay but not always. It’s noted that there remains a significant amount of asset tied up in goods waiting to be sold. Race night and general donations offset the overall deficit of some £1,800. Membership donations (fees) were around two members less this year (net change) but continue a downward trend. Future committee activity should focus on: 1) Admitting and keeping new members 2) Balancing the books. © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists 3


Enter charity name below

Enter SC No. below

SC023511

Dumfries and Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists and Motorcyclists

Receipts and payments accounts For the period from

Day

1

Period start date Month April 2011

to

Day 31

Period end date Month Mar

Year 2012

Section A Statement of receipts and payments Unrestricted funds

Restricted funds

Expendable endowment funds

Permanent endowment funds

Total funds current period

Total funds last period

to nearest £

to nearest £

to nearest £

to nearest £

to nearest £

to nearest £

A1 Receipts Donations

1,675

-

1,675

4,192

Legacies

-

-

Grants

-

-

Receipts from fundraising activities

620

620

804

Gross trading receipts Income from investments other than land and buildings

868

868

1,824

5

5

5

Rents from land & buildings Gross receipts from other charitable activities

A1 Sub total

999 4,167

-

-

-

-

999

1,695

4,167

8,520

A2 Receipts from asset & investment sales Proceeds from sale of fixed assets

-

-

Proceeds from sale of investments

8,520

A2 Sub total

-

-

-

-

-

Total receipts

4,167

-

-

-

4,167

A3 Payments Expenses for fundraising activities

209

209

Gross trading payments

242

242

Investment management costs

855

-

Payments relating directly to charitable activities Grants and donations Governance costs:

2,030

701

-

2,731

5,994

14

14

39

120

120

Audit / independent examination

-

-

Preparation of annual accounts

-

-

Legal costs

-

-

Other

-

-

A3 Sub total

2,615

701

-

-

-

-

3,316

6,888 error

A4 Payments relating to asset and investment movements Purchases of fixed assets

2,756

2,756

Purchase of investments

122

-

-

A4 Sub total

2,756

-

-

-

2,756

122

Total payments

5,371

701

-

-

6,072

7,010

Net receipts / (payments)

(1,204)

(701)

-

-

A5 Transfers to / (from) funds

(1,905)

1,510

-

-

(1,905)

1,510

Surplus / (deficit) for year (1,204)

(701)

-

-


Changes to driving licence rules in Great Britain Driving licence rules will be changing from 19 January 2013. There will be many new rules for motorcycles, cars towing trailers, buses and lorries. These changes could affect you as an existing or new driver. In general, entitlements held on existing licences remain but there are new rules which may require passing an additional test(s) in certain circumstances. The new rules affect the period of validity of certain licences (minibus, bus and lorries), impose new age restrictions for some classes of vehicle and impose new restrictions for existing and new drivers who wish to tow a trailer.

Example of the new style licence

As part of the changes to the new rules for driving, DVLA will also be issuing a new style of driving licence. You can find out the detail of how these changes may affect you by visiting the Directgov web site using the following link: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring/DriverLicensing/DG_201187 and then following subsequent links to your area of interest. Source: http://www.direct.gov.uk

Some things have changed, but not a lot - Ed I’ve recently been looking through a few advanced driving books from the past including the 1960 version of Roadcraft, the Police Drivers’ Manual and the 1956 edition of ‘Advanced Driving’ published by the British Safety Council - more on the latter book later in the magazine. Chapter 1 of Roadcraft looks at the physical and mental requirements of a driver and suggests the necessary high standard of concentration can be achieved by enthusiastic effort and self discipline, involving self criticism and an earnest endeavour to improve one’s control of thought and actions. © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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Sensibly it also suggests that the ability to react quickly can deteriorate in several ways. Undue worry, fatigue, illness, the effects of alcohol and certain drugs being well-known causes of lack of mental and physical well-being. The book goes onto to state that to improve his mental and physical condition, the average driver should live a normal and regular life and be moderate in all things; he need do nothing more. Finally in this section the book tells us that to shorten an abnormally long reaction time, especially in the case of the slower type of driver, some simple exercise should be taken, such as skipping for 15 minutes each day. This will help to co-ordinate the limbs and eyes. Let us know if you would like the committee to consider getting a supply of Dumfries Group branded skipping ropes for sale to our members!!

Sharing the road with others - a tip from IAM’s chief examiner Set out here is one of the many driving tips to be found on the IAM’s web site. This one advises drivers on sharing the road with other road users. ● Keep an eye out for cyclists and motorcyclists and give them extra space ● Use your mirrors so you see bikes approaching from behind. In particular

check your mirrors before changing direction, especially in traffic queues. ● If a motorcyclist is trying to get past in heavy traffic, let them. Don’t try and

hinder their progress because you are stuck. ● Give clear and early signals to allow other road users time to react. ● Don’t cut up a cyclist when turning left. Never overtake then turn left across

their front wheel. ● Overtake gently. Passing a cyclist quickly might

feel safe to you, but it doesn’t to the cyclist and the closer you are the more this is the case. ● Leave cyclists enough room when you pass

them to allow them to move out to negotiate drains and potholes. ● Check for bikes before opening the driver’s

door when you’ve parked. IAM chief examiner Peter Rodger said: “Sharing the road is an inevitable part of using it, as is the frustration that sometimes goes with that. But most road users don’t only use one mode of transport, so use that knowledge to be a bit more patient and understand the needs and risks of other road users.” © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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Sobering evidence If you ever want reminding how risky it can be out and about on the road network have a look at ITO World’s mapping service. This records virtually every reported fatality and injury that occurred on the roads in Great Britain in the period 2000 to 2010, as a result of a collision involving a motor vehicle.

TORTHORWALD

You can use the map to search place names and up comes a view of the area showing every motor vehicle related accident involving injury or fatality. The number of accidents is shocking, almost incredible not only in our area but just about anywhere in the country. Remember the map only records injury related accidents in the ten years to 2010 and excludes other types of incident.

COLLIN

The number of deaths and serious injuries in just 3 or 4 miles east of the Dumfries bypass is shocking. Zoom into the on- It also acts as a reline map and you’ll see there are 14 deaths represented here minder of our role in Fatalities are represented by rectangles.

road safety. Recognising that the majority of collisions are caused by driver error, we have the specific objective of significantly improving driving standards through guiding people to the advanced test standard. Educating road users is the best way of reducing accidents because it’s drivers that cause accidents not vehicles. You can find the map at: http://map.itoworld.com/road-casualties-uk © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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Unit 3 Downsway Industrial Estate Dumfries DG1 3RS We offer the following services for your motorcycle needs:

·

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· MOT’s · Servicing · Repairs · Diagnostic testing · Sym warranty contract · Van available for collection/delivery or recovery of your motorcycle

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· MOT’s · Servicing · Repairs · Parts · Accessories · & More · We have an outdoor seated area and a relaxing indoor seated area with Sky TV

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Tel: 01387 320312 email: mucker5uk@yahoo.co.uk


Motorcycle Chief Observer’s Diary - Graeme McColm Well that’s another summer over and the weather has been dreadful with hardly a dry day all season. Andy Campbell and I went on a training course to Spittle of Glenshee. This was intended to give us an insight into the (IMI award - The Institute of the Motor Industry). This was a 2 day course, on the road on Saturday and Sunday, with question and answer sessions on Friday and Saturday nights. Andrew Bird and myself have now taken the new national observers award qualification (IMI award). I for one found it to be extremely intense and interesting. The test itself lasted over 3 hours and included practical and theory questions. I felt as if I was back at school having to study every night for weeks beforehand but it was well worth the effort as I was pretty pleased on the day. Once again we had a slow manoeuvrability evening, this was held in Bookers Cash & Carry; can I take this opportunity to thank them for providing their car park for our use? Due to the evening being a complete success we intend to hold another one fairly soon, so check your emails for further details. As normal on the first Sunday of the month we have had our motorcycle days. This year these events been taken by a number of observers and I would like to thank them for all their effort and expertise. Now I would like to draw your attention to the following news flash……. Every ‘Skill for Life’ course now comes with 12 months FREE RAC roadside and recovery cover (£106 RRP) so there has never been a better time to become a better driver! As a charitable organisation, this whole 'Skill for Life' package is available for only £139. No doubt everybody knows of someone who could benefit from a ‘Skill for Life’ course so now is the time to put their names forward. If every member signed up just one person we could double the membership of our club and make the roads in Dumfries & Galloway safer for all. Please enjoy what’s left of any good weather and fingers crossed we have a good autumn. Stay safe. © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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The Secretary Reports - Helen Cameron The start of our new session is fast approaching and I look forward to a varied programme of monthly meetings. At the time of print the speakers are not yet finalised but please keep checking the web site for up to date information. This year we hope to produce a syllabus which will give you key information and will be sent out along with renewal forms. The first meeting will be on the 10 September at the Aberdour Hotel - 7.30 pm. Details are not confirmed yet so please check the web site or just come along for a mystery night. The committee works very hard on your behalf to bring interesting and varied subjects and would appreciate the support on the evenings. It can be embarrassing if we bring a speaker along and only half a dozen people turn up. I’d like to thank all those who do attend and we always have a good evening. Any suggestions for speakers are always welcome. Over the summer we have had some passes and I would like to congratulate: Motorcycles: Daniel Bell and Yvonne Smith – m/c team. Car: June Houston (Obs: Bob Sloan), Rebecca Worrall (Obs: Helen Cameron), Christie Potts (Obs: Anne Lind). We’ll present their certificates at the September meeting. We are hoping to visit local supermarkets in the next few weeks to promote the IAM ‘Skill for Life’ package , so if you can spare an hour to help out please let a committee member know. We will put finalised dates on the web site or call the IAM mobile if you would like to help out. I’m hoping to meet lots of you at the September meeting.

Can modern vehicles still surprise the driver? Modern vehicles and the new technology fitted to them is not without problems. The driver can become isolated from the world outside, cosseted by air conditioning, distracted by sat navs, music systems, telephones and insulated from the road by improved tyres and suspension. New technology could lead to a driver becoming complacent by an exaggerated feeling of safety. There are a plethora of names for the various makes of vehicle control technology but put at its simplest you may have: TC (traction control) to control skidding when applying the accelerator; ESP (electronic stability programme) to control skidding when turning; ABS (anti-lock brake system) to control skidding when braking. You may have none, some or all of these features on your vehicle or you may drive more than one vehicle having different equipment - what ever the case perhaps now is the time to revisit your handbook to see how you should use the features fitted to your vehicle and most importantly consider what happens when they reach their limit - don’t get taken by surprise. 12


Youth-related risk taking According to research by the World Health Organisation young people can present particular problems to themselves and other road users. Apparently while young children may inadvertently take risks because they lack appropriate skills to do otherwise, older children and adolescents may indeed have the skills but may actively seek out risk. Risk-taking behaviour may allow adolescents to feel a sense of control over their lives or sometimes to oppose authority. Research shows that there are high levels of ‘sensation seeking’ behaviour among young adults and a need to maintain a heightened level of physiological arousal. Young people consequently seek new This young pedestrian did the right thing situations and experiences to main- and waited. But a driver can’t be sure so tain this level, irrespective of the risks the wise approach with utmost caution. inherent in the experience. Such sensation-seeking frequently focuses on risky behaviours, including while driving a vehicle or crossing a road. Sensation seeking has been shown to rise between the ages of 9 and 14 years, peaking in late adolescence or the early 20s, and then declining steadily with age. Across all ages, particularly the young, sensation-seeking is more common among males than females. Being aware of these behaviours might go some way towards safeguarding you and the young from some of the dangers on the road. - Ed Source: WHO Dept of Injuries and Violence Prevention

On-line version of magazine and event news - Ed If you have not received e-mail notification about the publishing of this issue chances are that we do not have a valid e-mail address for you. Please let Christine Donaldson [arthurs place 20@ btinternet.com] (type it without spaces) know your e-mail address and she’ll make sure you know when the magazine is published and also keep you up to date about events. Our group magazine is available on-line - it’s bigger and all in colour. There are also over 20 back issues available on-line, just look for the links on our group web site or go to: http://issuu.com/dandg_adv_motorists_mcyclists. To cut costs the print run will eventually be phased out for most members. The only way to see our magazine then will be to view it on line. © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists 13


Noticed something hatching on our roads? Those of you with experience over a number of years may have noticed that there has been an increase in the use of centre hatch markings on our roads. Sometimes the reasons for their use is obvious such as in the first photo below where they separate opposing flows of traffic to/from the Cuckoo Bridge. Photo no. 2 may look safe for overtaking but there is a slight curve in the road and a layby ahead on the left. This example is on the A69; here high traffic volumes, slow heavy vehicles plus the lack of overtaking opportunities can lead to frustration and inappropriate overtaking. In this instance the hatching could deter a less competent driver from attempting a risky overtake. Often however hatching may seem to be used to effectively narrow the road, to deter overtaking, sometimes in places where safe overtaking could be carried out by a competent driver. It might be that sometimes markings have to be applied to suit the lowest common denominator! So what does the Highway Code say? Rule 130 says: Areas of white diagonal stripes or chevrons painted on the road. These are to separate traffic lanes or to protect traffic turning right. If the area is bordered by a broken white line, you should not enter the area unless it is necessary and you can see that it is safe to do so. If the area is marked with chevrons and bordered by solid white lines you MUST NOT enter it except in an emergency. So if you do decide to cross into a centre hatched area bounded by broken lines in order to say overtake, you are allowed to do so BUT you need to recognise hatching is often placed in areas where dangers may not be at first apparent and/or in sections of road with poor safety records. You will also Š Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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need to be able to justify your actions in relation to the requirement for it to be necessary and safe. It seems many drivers believe that you cannot overtake across centre hatching, so if you do so, bear in mind that they may be taken by surprise as you pass. Obviously this consideration is in addition to the assessment of the situation you would normally carry out before going to overtake. There is another factor to consider before crossing onto centre hatching - the condition of the road surface. Since little traffic has driven over the area there is a much greater potential for the build up of debris. This, together with the presence of all that paint, can have an impact on road holding especially for those of us who drive on two wheels.

Insurance Industry Access to Driver Database (IIADD) system The Insurance Industry Access to Driver Database (IIADD) system is a joint initiative of the DVLA, Department for Transport, and the insurance industry. Studies have shown that as many as 23% of motorists do not accurately declare their driving history to insurers, including up to 42,000 disqualified drivers, who had bought annual insurance in an attempt to evade detection. The insurance industry has agreed funding with the DVLA to set up the system which will enable insurers to get accurate information about driving offences, including points and disqualifications. The project, designed to tackle the thousands of disqualified drivers who had bought insurance in an attempt to evade detection, has been in development for three years, will now be put in place by DVLA. It could be up and running as early as 2014 and is described as a major initiative in reducing fraud. Under the proposed new system, drivers will use their driving licence number when applying for insurance, allowing insurers to run automatic checks with the DVLA database, giving access to accurate information on their licences. The data-sharing project is designed to close a "loophole" that allows people driving without a licence to take measures to avoid detection by the police. ANPR technology, used by the police to scan car number plates, shows whether a particular car is insured, has an MOT and a registered owner but ANPR does not show whether the registered owner has a valid licence. Source: http://www.abi.org.uk

Driving at night in the 1950’s According to the book ‘Advanced Driving’ published by the British Safety Council (circa 1956) driving at night had the same challenges back then that we have today. Improvements in technology have helped of course but now © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists 15


there is significantly more traffic which creates increased demands for the modern driver. The book states that 90% of night time accidents are directly attributable to not driving within one’s visibility. The book suggests a few tips including: ‘If the beam of a headlight will light a man’s head 80 yards away then they need badly lowering’ and ‘Instruct your passengers not to light cigarettes or pipes unless with a shielded match’. On the subject of how to avoid being dazzled by oncoming traffic it refers to many suggestions from the sublime to the ridiculous and in particular to a Justice of the Peace who announced from the Bench that he closed both his eyes!!!! It suggests too that, after dark, signs to watch out for include lorry drivers using hand signals (not all vehicles had flashing indicators back then) - with dirty hands - as they are apt to be indistinguishable from dusk onward. It concludes if you start to feel sleepy stop and get some exercise and practise deep breathing etc!

Speeding the official statistics Statistics released by the Dept for transport show that compared to 2001, the percentage of vehicles exceeding the 30 mph speed limit on built-up roads has fallen for every vehicle type. Between 2010 and 2011, the percentage of cars and motorcycles exceeding the 30 mph speed limit increased to 47 and 50% respectively. On motorways, 49% of cars exceeded the 70 mph speed limit in 2011, unchanged from 2010. 13% of cars in 2011 were recorded as travelling at 80 mph or faster, continuing the downward trend seen in recent years. Over 83% of articulated heavy goods vehicles exceeded the 50 mph speed limit on dual carriageway and 71% exceeded the 40 mph limit on single carriageway non-built-up roads. In 2011, motorcycles had the highest average free flow speeds across all road types except motorways. In addition 20% of motorcycles were travelling 10 mph or more above the speed limit on motorways and 21% on dual carriageways, the highest proportion of any vehicle for these road types. Source: DfT © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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Average distance travelled per person per year (miles) Scottish residents travel within GB: from National Travel Survey 1998/99 2004/05 2009/10 Walk 226 169 153 Bicycle 37 25 34 Driver of car, van or lorry 3652 3549 3484 Passenger in car, van or lorry 2139 2072 1822 Other private transport (m/cycle, private hire 250 172 227 etc) Local bus 480 441 489 Surface rail 509 465 391 Taxi/minicab 75 61 57 Other public transport (air, ferry, non-local bus) 345 379 354 All modes 7713 7332 7010

Energy drink "crash risk" warning Old news this but just a reminder that drivers who use “high energy” drinks to keep them going might fall foul of a hidden danger in relying on caffeine drinks, which can even lead to increased weariness behind the wheel. US Research has shown that just an hour after drinking a highly caffeinated and sugared drink, tired drivers can experience serious lapses in concentration and slower reaction times as the drink wears off. Excessive caffeine consumption can cause similar symptoms to alcohol intoxication. Neil Greig, IAM Director of Policy and Research, said: “Energy drinks are good as a quick fix, but they’re no substitute for regular breaks. Having a highcaffeine drink is a one-off hit – you can’t repeat it, as this type of drink does not produce the same effect in a couple of hours’ time.” In order to beat fatigue on long drives the IAM advises: ▪ Consider stopping overnight on long-haul journeys. ▪ Share the driving with someone else – don’t do it all yourself if you don’t have to. ▪ Stop every two hours. ▪ If you start to feel tired while driving, don’t rely on air con or an open window: find a place to stop. ▪ Only get back behind the wheel when you are properly refreshed. ▪ When driving, tiredness can be a killer as it affects reaction times and concentration. © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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What do you know about IAM history? Did you know that Denise McCann, former Chairman and Managing Director of the driving school, BSM (1957) was a founder member of the Institute of Advanced Motorists?

Barriers to change - IAM news The IAM is calling the government to redesign crash barriers to make them more motorcycle-friendly. While crash barriers have saved the lives of thousands of drivers, hitting a crash barrier is a factor in eight to sixteen per cent of rider deaths. When they hit a crash barrier, riders are 15 times more likely to be killed than car occupants. In a crash, barrier support posts can worsen injuries by five times. Most UK crash barriers are designed to protect car drivers and passengers when a car hits a barrier; it will redirect a car away from a hazard and slow it down over a short distance. The car, seat belts and air bags help to minimise injury. For motorcyclists, hitting a crash barrier can mean serious injury or even death as the rider’s body takes the full impact. Writing in the summer issue of the IAM members’ magazine Advanced Driving, IAM chairman Alistair Cheyne OBE said: “Roads in general and crash barriers in particular are largely designed with four or more wheels in mind. The needs of more vulnerable motorcyclists must become a priority. “Britain leads the world on road safety, but lags behind on this issue. Existing standards and guidelines for road infrastructure – and barriers in particular – must be changed so they take proper account of motorcyclists.”

Get tough on drink driving say motorists - IAM news Eighty per cent of motorists say those who repeatedly drink drive should have their vehicles seized and sold or scrapped, according to a poll by the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists)1. Fifty per cent think that this should also happen to drivers several times over the limit. The respondents were also behind reducing the drink-drive limit. Sixty-six per cent want to see the limit reduced, with most of these saying it should be lowered to a maximum of 50mg of alcohol per 100ml of blood. Twenty-eight per cent think we should have a zero-tolerance policy. People convicted of drink driving generally lose their licence for a year and receive an average fine of £240. Fifty-seven per cent think this is too weak, © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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and that punishments for drink drivers should be tougher – thirty-eight per cent much tougher. Other findings include: ● Fifty-five per cent of poll respondents support a proportionate, graduated system of penalties, if the limit was reduced. For example, lower penalties would be given to drivers caught under the current limit, but above the new one. ● Almost half of respondents admit to having a drink while driving, within the current limit. ● Seventy-nine per cent say a decrease in the limit wouldn’t affect their enjoyment of an evening out. Nineteen per cent said it would. ● Eighty four per cent said a reduction in the limit wouldn’t change their plans to go out. IAM chief executive Simon Best said: “The support is there for tougher treatment of drink drivers. “Not only do the majority want a lower limit – they also want tougher punishment for those that break the law, especially the worst offenders who present the greatest danger to other road users, their passengers and themselves. “Our poll shows a desire to see more effective drink drive levels as well as much greater consistency of enforcement, prosecution, and sentencing, which reflects the level of danger associated with drinking drivers.”

Advanced drivers on course - IAM news Drivers coached beyond the L-test to advanced driving standard are more aware of other road users, road conditions and hazards on the road, according to a study by Jean Hopkin Research Associates, published today1. Ninety per cent of advanced drivers are more aware of other road users, and potential hazards. Sixty-six per cent believe that advanced driver training helped them to avoid an incident or collision, and 78 per cent have better car-handling skills. The independent survey of 2,500 IAM members also shows that advanced driving saves fuel and money. Sixty per cent say their driving is more fuel efficient as a result of taking a course. The top ten reasons for taking the advanced driving course are: ● greater awareness of potential hazards and difficult driving conditions ● greater awareness of other road users ● improved general driving outlook/ philosophy © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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● ● ● ● ● ● ●

improved planning and anticipation smoother driving/ better progress improved use of road space more alert driving – less ‘driving on auto-pilot’ better car handling skills improved confidence in my driving; and more tolerant and aware of the behaviour of other road users.

Men are more likely than women to say their driving has become more responsible, considerate, and tolerant, and that they drive less fast as a result of the course. Women are more likely than men to say their driving had become more decisive and confident. Eighty nine per cent agree that taking the IAM test had a permanent positive effect on their day-to-day driving. Women were more likely to report lasting effects on their driving style than men. Among 17 to 29 year-olds, 49 per cent took the advanced test to get cheaper insurance and 60 per cent to reduce their risk of being involved in an accident. IAM chief executive Simon Best said: “We know that educating drivers and changing their attitudes to driving makes them safer. This report also demonstrates an improvement in hazard awareness and therefore a reduction in the likelihood of an accident. “Young and inexperienced drivers in particular will benefit from further coaching, but more experience on the road doesn't mean that your attitude to driving is any healthier. Advanced drivers are significantly safer in a number of key areas, including speed, maintaining safe distances between themselves and other drivers, cornering and use of mirrors.”

Know your speed limits - IAM motoring tip Road safety charity the IAM offers weekly motoring tips from Britain’s top advanced driver, Peter Rodger. This time, he is advising on managing your speed. Look well ahead and be ready for other drivers’ reactions especially when they spot a camera at the last second. They will often slow down faster and more than they need to. ● Watch out for speed limit changes early by looking further ahead. They are often as you leave roundabouts and junctions on main routes. ● If you have trouble staying at a set speed when driving a manual car, stay in a gear that will help you to remain at a legal speed. For example, when driving in town at 30mph, third gear is a good choice in some cars. Try what works for you and your car. ●

© Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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Speed limits are a maximum speed, not a minimum. If conditions are bad, reduce your speed. ● Always drive at a speed that allows you to stop safely on your own side of the road within the distance you can see is clear. ● Don’t be pressured into breaking the speed limit by drivers behind you. ●

IAM chief examiner Peter Rodger said: “Know the speed limit and always abide by it. That doesn’t mean you have to drive slowly, but we all have to stay within the limit. “If you need to make good progress, carry out well timed overtakes, smooth, progressive cornering and timely, controlled acceleration without breaking the limit. Shorter journey times are about average speed, not achieving high speed” To help drivers stay safe and enjoy their driving, the IAM has the website, drivingadvice.org.uk, with traffic updates, weather forecasts, and driving tips.

About Driving advice and tips from the IAM Driving advice can be found at www.drivingadvice.org.uk. For biking advice and tips, go to www.bikingadvice.org.uk, with traffic updates, touring advice by country and all you need to know about events and local groups. Tips cover riding with pillions, in groups and night riding. There’s also a videos page and you can upload your touring photos and stories - get involved at www.betterbiking.org.uk. ● Follow the IAM on Twitter @IAMgroup. ● The IAM is the UK’s largest independent road safety charity, dedicated to improving standards and safety in driving, motorcycling and cycling. The IAM operates an occupational driver training company IAM Drive & Survive. With over 200 local volunteer groups and more than 100,000 members in the UK and Ireland it is best known for the advanced driving test and advanced driving, motorcycling and cycling courses. ● ●

Take me home, country road - IAM motoring tip The IAM offers motoring tips from Britain’s top advanced driver, Peter Rodger. This time, he is advising on tackling rural roads. ● Summer sees more vulnerable road users out such as horse riders, cyclists and walkers. If you see them, pass wide and slow, and if this means hanging well back until you can overtake gently, do it. ● Horse box drivers will avoid stopping and leave longer following distances to give their animals a smoother ride. Be patient and don’t cut them up. ● When there are wildlife warning signs, take heed of them. If a deer runs out in front of you, keep an eye out, as more may well follow. © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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● Ease off when approaching field entrances and gateways – unless you can see there is nothing. Where there are farm vehicles moving about, there is likely to be slippery mud on the road when it’s wet. ● The national speed limit, 60mph, is an absolute maximum, not a target. Speed limits differ for drivers who are towing. The maximum speed limits for a car and trailer are: 60 mph – motorway and dual carriageway, and 50 mph on other roads. Be sensitive to this. ● Rural roads often have overgrown verges, bushes and trees which will block your view. Always drive to be able to stop within the distance you can see to be clear. On a single-track road you need to double that stopping distance. IAM chief examiner Peter Rodger said: “Rural roads are more fun to drive than long, straight ones, but they are responsible for the majority of fatal and serious accidents. “Ask yourself, can you stop in the distance you can see to be clear? And have you anticipated the approaching vehicle or junction hidden around the bend? Drive to the road and weather conditions to ensure you stay safe while enjoying your time in the country.”

Driving around bends - IAM motoring tip Peter Rodger explains how IPSGA, can help you to drive as smoothly as possible through bends: Information. What’s going on around you? Check your mirrors to work out the movements of other road users. Position. After confirming it’s safe, take the best position for dealing with the bend. On a left-hand bend move closer to the centre line and on a right-hand bend closer to the kerb or verge, but stick to your lane. This will improve your view around the corner. Speed. Adjust your speed to prepare for the corner. Gears. Once you’re at the right speed, select the right gear. Adjust your speed early so that you have time to separate changing speed from changing gear. Accelerate. Once you can see through the bend, accelerate smoothly if it is safe, bearing in mind the road conditions. Gently accelerating through a corner balances the car. If it’s slippery, hold your speed steady until you have straightened up. IAM chief examiner Peter Rodger said: “Preparation is key with most things in life, and cornering safely is no exception. Changing gear or reducing speed once in the bend unbalances the car, which is at best nerve-wracking, and at worst dangerous. You’ll also make better progress through bends if you use this sequence, and can enjoy the feeling of accelerating smoothly away afterwards.” © Dumfries & Galloway Group of Advanced Motorists & Motorcyclists

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