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Harbors provide safety for ships to escape storms. In the same way this project seeks to provide safety for migrants who have attempted to make the journey across the Straits of Gibraltar. Thousands of migrants cross the dangerous waters ever year in search of employment in markets throughout Europe. Strong currents funneled into the narrow gap coupled with winds that are among the strongest in the world the Strait takes countless lives every year. The project consists of a rescue-training center, which then doubles as the main point for migrants who have failed in their crossing attempt. The projects roof is conceived as an extension of the surrounding ground plane, this attempts to provide the migrants with a sheltered and concealed resting space before they are required to return to the city life. The individual program pieces are placed along the ocean side of the project. This serves to emphasize the sense of security, as the migrants are sheltered behind a series of large cast in place concrete elements.


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Lounge Exam Room Emergency Room Doctors Office Clinic Storage Managers Office Counselors Office Immigration Assistance Operational Control Locker Room & Storage Restrooms Kitchen & Dining Room Classroom Boat Storage Child Play Area Relaxation Area

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Designed in collaboration with the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, this project was conceived as an extension of the Folk Art Museum in New York. The purpose of the museum is to introduce people to Southern and Caribbean Folk Art. Three main factors drove the buildings design. First, the Ogden expressed a desire for the museum to have the flexibility to allow not only for showing fixed art pieces but also for dance and lyrical performances. Secondly, the museum desired to include a series of classrooms in the project. Finally, in order to encourage a connection between museum patrons and the artists the project included a set of artist apartments for artists in residence. In keeping with many of the ideas surrounding Southern Folk Art, the materials are left largely unfinished throughout the building. The building is formed largely by a series of interconnecting and shifting elements that allow for views and sound to transfer throughout the building.


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Bedroom

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Administration 304

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Auditorium 203

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Womens

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Recieving

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Cafe 104

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Project Ish(mael) is an addition to a shelter for homeless or abused women in New Orleans. The studio spent 6 weeks designing the project, through conversations with the residents and coordinators of the shelter, and through an examination of other similar projects, specifically those or Rural Studio. The current shelter space lacked any dedicated space for the children to play, thus this became the focus for our addition. Conceived as a tree house for the children the project attempts to provide each child with a space of their own. In keeping with the idea of a tree house the roof and structure was designed as a canopy for the rest of the project. Supporting the canopy are a series of wooden slats that provide a visual block from the surrounding streets, yet allow for air to flow through. A thick wall located facing the neighboring church anchors the entire project. This wall contains a series of moveable partitions that can be used to create individual study spaces for the children, or they can be closed to allow for the space to become a large open play area.



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