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Alan Vallada D’Amore, M.Arch. Architecture + Design Portfolio | 2013 - 2008

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Alan D’Amore, M.Arch | PORTFOLIO - light | Architecture + Design | SELECTED WORKS 2008 - 2013

PORTFOLIO Architecture + Design


CONTENTS

Architecture + Design


Matrix & field architecture | urban | landscape

Create - Live architecture | residential | urban

Co-existing systems architecture | addition | detail

design 1 | fall 2006 | UF

design 6 | spring 2010 | FIU

design 10 | spring 2012 | FIU

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Campus gleanings architecture | public

Cucumber effect architecture | mixed use | landscape

Furniture design | fabrication design - build | architecture

design 2 | spring 2007 | UF

design 7 | summer 2010 | FIU

MAA | fall 2012 - fall 2013 | FIU

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16

In-between | Affordable housing regionalism | residential | sustainable

design 4 | spring 2008 | UF

design 9 | spring 2011 | FIU

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cv 84

The temporal - marking the ground architecture | public | desert

Le quattro ville architecture | mixed use | detail

design 4 | spring 2008 | UF

comprehensive design | summer 2011 | FIU

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Curriculum Vitae contact | personal academic background professional record honors and awards exhibitions workshops publications professional | personal skills

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Carving the ground architecture | residential | landscape

Investigations on tectonics architecture | landscape | detail

design 5 | fall 2009 | FIU

design 10 | fall 2011 | FIU

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Public

62

Up above architecture | mixed use | infrastructure

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Pu

07

58

Re

Mu

Fa

Residential

Mixed use

Fabrication

(left)

ordinary beauty AIA photography competition best in show


ADDITION TO THE GOETZ GALLERY CO-EXISTING SYSTEMS Goetz Art Gallery, Munich - Germany

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EXISTING PROGRAM: Gallery collection of photos, paintings and drawings.

Pu

PROBLEM: Addition requires space to display heavy artifacts. The structure of the existing building does not provide for such heavy loads.

CO-EXISTING SYSTEMS

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PROPOSAL: Design an additional gallery space for the display of heavy objects as well as a workshop, both supported by a steel structured system.

year

spring 2012 | D10

instructor

Elizabeth Cardona

institution

Florida International University

project

Goetz Art Gallery

how relationships between the two should be organized and displayed. Herzog & De Meuron were highly sensitive

location

Munich, Germany

towards choice of materials, connections, form/context relationships and the unification of systems - because of

architects

Herzog & De Meuron

such great care and careful approach to the architecture and context, this project attempts to follow similar

client

Ingvild Goetz

concerns.

The contrast between existing program and addition generated the initial conceptual ideas, being that a gallery for all that is light (existing building) juxtaposed with the gallery for all that is heavy raised many design questions to


ANALYSIS OF EXISTING AND CONCEPTULIZING FORM

Timber structure supports the roof and makes up the construction of the floor on the 2nd level.

1ST FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR BASEMENT

Concrete c-channels support the entire 2nd floor. furthermore both the c-channels and the second floor rest on top of the retention wall that makes up the perimeter for the basement.

Moment of engaging interior with exterior order.

The order and scale of the structural elements along with how the vertical division of space is sequenced reinforces the building's ambiguous character - materiality and the constructed relationships between the later and the exterior composition ties the ambiguity of language together in unison.

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1.

2.

3.

4.

1.

Existing.

2.

Duplicated and spun on a hinge.

3.

The

boundary

of

the

duplicated

rectangle is folded by two points paralel to each other, latching the extended faces onto the middle portion of the existing building.

4.

Form constructs a quality of space necessary to generate public and intimate courtyards.

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DETAILED SECTION

a.

b.

e.

f.

c.

d.

g.

h.


b.

d.

a.

c.

A section cut through the main gallery space reveals the light condition desired for the display of art (space above) and the maximizing of light entering the space for the workshop located below the gallery.

e.

f.

g.

h.

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BUILDING’S SYSTEMS

Exterior cladding and elevator doors birch wood and metal structure

Concrete walls

Steel Structure

Stairs - birch wood Concrete floors

Steel plate walls Steel C-channel embedded in curtain wall Curtain wall - opaque glass

Exterior walls - birch wood cladding Upper glass band - opaque glass Retention wall - reinforced concrete Interior walls - plaster finish Concrete C-channels - mid structure Ground level glass band - opaque glass Timber structure - second level

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2. Some of the walls on the second floor of existing building are to be replaced by steel plates, others are to be demolished and replaced by marks made up of steel inlays on concrete floor. 1. Timber comulmns are to be paired up with steel columns where existing and addition connect. Timber beams were replaced by steel girders at connection point.


Aerial view of gathering space at the North side of the site. The ordering of systems in relationship to the existing building is well balanced and holds the space within in an inviting manner for all guests to appreciate the architecture and the surrounding area.


BOK TOWER SPA CUCUMBER EFFECT Bok Tower Gardens - Lake Wales, FL

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Pu CUCUMBER EFFECT year

summer 2010 | D7

instructor

Camilo Rosales

institution

Florida International University

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The garden’s unique topography affords the opportunity to design on a slopping site, a rarity in south florida. Site design issues such as contour modification, cut, fill, and drainage were part of the studio effort. The aesthetic and phenomenological aspects of designing on a garden setting were also explored. The program lends itself to study natural light as a mood changing agent. Daylighting techniques both digital and analog were thoroughly examined.

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The spa is a place of quiet and tranquility. Natural light, water and secluded garden vistas create relaxing and contemplative atmospheres designed to refresh mind and body. The garden’s board of regents envisioned a spacious modern day retreat of refined elegance and discrete perfection. The new facilities were seamlessly integrated with the garden’s slope and took maximum advantage of sunlight and garden views. The project anchors its most prominent framed views to the garden's treasure, the bok tower. By carving into the ground the spa camouflages itself amongst the large oak trees and existing vegetation, whereas at other moments the building seems to flow above the slope of the landscape, capturing a long panoramic view of the garden.

3.

Bok Tower Gardens - Lake Wales, FL

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1.

The spa will cater to garden members and non-members for half-day and full-day sessions. The garden’s relative isolation and its original design philosophy of being a place created as a contemplative setting, enhances the spa’s mission of focusing on psychological and physical well-being. 1: Digital montage of southeast corner of spa, looking out to one of the framed views of the Bok Tower. 2: Interior shot - digital montage of the spa’s southeast corner. 3: Diagram of project chiseled out from a piece of cedar.

2.


-2 LEVEL B

A

GROUND LEVEL

a b

(above)

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Section drawing Aa.


-3 LEVEL

-4 LEVEL

(right)

Section drawing Bb.

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C. G. TRAINING FACILITY LE QUATTRO VILLE 15759 Captiva Dr. - Captiva, FL 33924

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Mu LE QUATTRO VILLE year

spring 2011 | Comprehensive Studio

instructor

Jason Chandler | Nikolay Nedev

institution

Florida International University

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The studio required to produce a schematic design drawing set. It was necessary to respect the Florida building code, and account for structure, mechanical ventilation, plumbing and electrical distribution. The site is long and both ends are near water – the east edge touches the intercostal and reaches further into it by the use of a private dock. The west edge meets the street but is abruptly pancaked with sand followed by the coastal waters. Due to location, the design asks for the project to be elevated one floor higher, utilizing the ground floor for parking. Program is divided in fours – administrative offices, dormitories, service/amenities, and a dock that follows the same form of the three before it. Each villa gained its own identity according to the type of program it fosters, addressing through design its essential needs and necessary structuring of interior and exterior order.


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ALAN VALLADA D’AMORE JASON CHANDLER C ::

COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN STUDIO

C

EXTRUDED-ALUMINUM STACK JOINT ANCHORED TO STEEL TUBE

C

LAMINATED ACID-ETCHED SAFETY GLASS STEEL SUSPENSION ROD

E

GALVANIZED-STEEL-GRATE CATWALK

F

CONCRETE FLOOR SLAB WITH POLISHED FINISHING

G

SUSPENDED CEILIING

08.08.11

D

T ::

SCALE AT 1/4”=1’

SANDBLASTED LOW-IRON CHANNEL GLASS WITH TRANSLUCENT INSULATION

B

COAST GUARD TRAINING FACILITY

WALL DETAIL 1

A

P ::

SCALE AT 1/2”=1’

WALL SECTION DETAIL

WALL DETAIL 2

T ::

F

D/B ::

Prof ::

SUMMER 2011 SOA | FIU

D

Y ::

B G

L ::

A

NIKOLAY NEDEV

E

A3.2


CARVING THE GROUND TECTONIC LANDSCAPE

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A

Re CARVING THE GROUND

a

year

fall 2008 / D5

instructor

Malik Benjamin

institution

Florida International University

05

The project explored the relationships of context and architecture always sensitive to site's orientation, control of natural lighting to specific programme and sloped site condition. The focus of the studio was to create a sequence of private and public spaces that dealt with circulation (ascent/descent) within space in relationship to context.

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1. (left) Section Aa, looking West. 2. (above) Photograph of physical model constructred from basswood, chipboard, museum board and plaster. View of the Southwest side of the project.

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AFFORDABLE HOUSING THE IN-BETWEEN SW 62nd Terrace Miami, FL 33143

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Re CREATE-LIVE year

spring 2011 | D9

instructor

Camilo Rosales | Brett Moss

institution

Florida International University

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The project’s main focus was to combine regional architectural qualities of South Miami and greater Miami with methods for designing a scenario that would generate high levels of social activity within the category of affordable housing. Furthermore the project aimed to avoid eclecticism and strived to combine elements from the local vernacular, Mediterranean, and modern styles. Incorporating modern/affordable housing with sustainability, aspired to educate the public and the user, enabling people to afford something modern and beautiful. This house becomes an example for the neighborhood and generates the opportunity for the public to embrace and learn more about sustainability in architecture and as a way of life.

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PLAN VIEW

Ambiguity between levels of privacy are designed by manipulating the essence of fence, roof, and porch. The in-between spaces occupying such boundaries are responsible for the gradual gain of consciousness between what is public and what is private. The layering of spaces occurs within the very public (the street) to the very private (the entry of the home). Instead of an abrupt change in experience, one is led from one end of the spectrum to the other by means of sequential moments of pause. Herman Hetzberge values this kind of space due to the rich level of interaction it generates between the built environment and the user along its multiple levels of intimacy. 34

East Facade


7

6 5

4

3 2

1

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INFILL HOUSING CREATE-LIVE

Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, FL 33139


Re CREATE-LIVE year

spring 2010 | D6

instructor

Elizabeth Cardona

institution

Florida International University

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The design 6 studio sought to examine housing - a comprehensive housing project in an urban context. The studio focused on the organizations and studied adjacencies of living. The concept of living and the providing of its meaningful shelter were explored as a seamless event that included many scales: from the scale of the city down to the scale of furniture. The studio visited the city of Savannah, Georgia. The city of Savannah was used as precedence for understanding this expansive ideal of living. As the preeminent American model city, the studio focused on its remarkable urban infill housing.

South entry from the commercial steet, Lincoln Road.


One of the project's criteria was to work closely in designing an approach for each individual unit where program is subdivided and coordinated according to levels of intimacy. Images 1-3 describe such exercise. Image 1 shows the moment of entry to the filmmaker's home. At the oppositite side of the unit, image 2 highlights a space where the occupant can be at home and distanced from the entry door. image 3 depicts the bedroom and most intimate space located on the second floor.

1.

2.

3.


North entry


ARCH

ITEC

The project houses an architect, a sculptor, a dancer, a filmmaker, and a painter. The residents create in their private quarters and display their work along the walls and floor of the courtyard. The open ground level sustains a flow between its commercial side (Lincoln Rd.) and the alleyway. The inviting atmosphere allows for the heavy pedestrian traffic to engage with occurring events and displayed art scattered along the courtyard.

OR LPT

SCU

LERY GAL

fourth floor

LINCOLN RD. Longitudinal section cut from North to South end of the project.

T


TER

PAIN

A section cut from the North to the South end of the project highlights the inviting quality of the ground floor, an unrestricted access from both ends of the building. it also frames the possible moments of interaction between the residents themselves and the public below.

R

CE

N DA

FIMLMAKER

ALLEY


Plan view. Pencil on Vellum

DESERT PROJECT

THE TEMPORAL - MARKING THE GROUND Black Rock Desert, NV

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Pu TEMPORAL MARKINGS year

spring 2008 | D4

instructor

Donna Cohen

institution

University of Florida

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The studio explored perhaps the most fundamental part of the design process: understanding of, and sympathy with the "natural site". The project took inspiration and conceptual direction from the phenomenological and physical understanding of the specific site. the students were encouraged to connect individual investigations to larger ideas and cultural themes in areas such as art, literature and popular culture. Those lines of inquiry challenged assumptions of the site presented, the conventions of architecture, and personal beliefs.

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40 47’03,85” N 119 12’43,83” W ELEVATION = 3907 ft

REVEAL

MARKS

ASSEMBLE

z

38

z

z

z

WATER

ARRIVAL

ACTIVITY

SLEEP

BURNING MAN EVENT/DEPARTURE

DISMANTLE

RESIDUE

THE PERMANENT


1-4: Photographs of final physical model. 3. Photo of sectional elevation cutting thorough Northwest / Southeast ends of the project. 4. Photo of South elevation.

1.

4.

2.

3.

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9.

2.

8.

1.

3. 7.

THE TOWER PROJECT UP ABOVE

Parque do Ibirapuera area - Sao Paulo, SP Brazil

10.


5.

Mu 03

UP ABOVE 4.

6.

year

spring 2008 | D4

instructor

Donna Cohen

institution

University of Florida

The tower project introduced an open-ended thinking field based on the combination of infrastructures. The development process overlaps urban approaches and various programme into integral markers within the city grid. Each structure is capable of sustaining essential local needs for a larger portion of the grid it operates in, simultaneously assisting in the city’s long term obstacles such as transportation and pollution - two sensitive topics in a city such as Sao Paulo, Brazil. The tower becomes an extension of the ground level until it is drastically separated and suspended above the city line. The freed space in-between the two masses act as a joint to the existing surrounding vertical city made up of skyrises and the new mega structures, all interconnected via membranes floating high above ground. A new order takes hold of the air space above the old chaotic city grid.


1.

2.

4.

Images 1-6: Photographs of physical model.

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3.

5.


Photograph of physical model, highlighting the elevated mass suspended above the city line.

6.

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CAMPUS GLEANINGS RESTRUCTURING THE EXISTING SW 13th St, University of Florida - Gainesville, FL


Re CAMPUS GLEANINGS

02

year

spring 2007 | D2

instructor

Lavent Kara

institution

University of Florida

The project was an intervention dealing with sectional ribbons not plan patterns. Based on an existing fabric, the studio’s focus was to comprehend the language of the standing structure so to reconfigure, add, and adapt into a new entity.


(above)

1.

2.

3.

4.

4.

5.

6.

7.

1-8: Multiple opportunities within campus for the unfolding of the project. 5. Image of chosen nook utilized as project’s context.

Existing structure chosen for site analysis and subsequently integrating installation onto it.


MATRIX / FIELD A SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS


Re A SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS year

fall 2006 | D1

instructor

Nancy Sanders

institution

University of Florida

01

An anterior project, the CUBE, is situated in a dynamic field and unfolds itself in a process of organizational transformation. An analysis of selected images - and the derived poetic definitions of them - drove the construction of a matric composed of the harvested images and selected moment details of the CUBE. The Mondrian painting, “Broadway Boogie Woogie�, and its precise measured grid structure, provided an additional proportional framework. When intersected with the systems of the CUBE, this juxtaposition gave birth to anew spatial network. INTENT: To introduce an open-ended thinking field based on cartesian space, yet transcends the finite boundaries explored in the cube project - a familiar, platonic volume that served as a neutral three-dimensional universe in which dynamic spatial relationships, as well as fundamental design vocabularies, are studied. To understand and organize space, time and materiality. To train the ability to perceive and model/draw fundamental spatial orders.


(below)

Images 1-4 inform of the three interwiding systems that construct the project.

1.

Massing diagram.

2.

Circulation diagram.

3.

Program diagram.

4.


1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

INVESTIGATIONS ON TECTONICS THE PAPERCLIP

Images 1-6: Sketches unfold the design process and development of conceptual relationships.

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Mu INVESTIGATIONS ON TECTONICS year

fall 2011 | D10

instructor

Elizabeth Cardona

institution

Florida International University

10

This semester required a formal and technical investigation of issues related to the architectural artifact. The primary course objective for this studio was the development of a medium scale work of architecture to a reasonably complex level of technical, material, structural and programmatic development. The studio focused on the architectural detail as a way to coceptually spark an idea for a work of architecture to be developed in the spring semester.

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SCALE/PERCEPTION

PEELING

TRACES

BRUTE/DELICATE

PINCH/PRESSURE

REFLECTION/COPY

COMPRESSION/EXPANSSION

LAYERS

3

1

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2

LIGHT CONDITION

DEPTH


This photo symbolized the image as the mind's eye, made possible by tracing an experience combined with a personal memory of a paperclip. The flexible framework or the copies of

rough, heavy and ambiguous edges

the original paperclip were named the ROOM (representation of original) and the GARDEN (memory of original). They were named as such because as the process of making begun, the system of patterns utilized to create the architectural language originated from the copy of the original fabric. In the same way, the language of landscape was derived from the systems of patterns found in the memory of the original fabric. What followed was two series of diagrams: The first set literally described the existing systems. The second set is the result of the manipulating and adapting the existing systems. The end result of this study was a physical model. It conveyed an ambiguous sense of scale but most of all its paperclip-ness was untraceable. Systems and patterns derived from an existing origin, are

M

light and clear linear boudaries

oriented strand board plywood

re-ordered and adapted to engage the observer in a process of discovery – linking to the existing but perceived as a new meaning.

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Making as Method: Rediscovering the Essential Nature of Familiar Things How much transformation or distancing from the original existing fabric is enough to compose new meaning without losing fundamental connectivity, allowing us to recognize the remaining traces of its origin? At what point can we accept the re-composed identity as new? In observing our existing physical environment, things tend to lose their meaning because we have grown overly familiar with them. We tend to disengage from our surroundings, forgetting the essential beauty in what we perceive. This research aims to utilize the making process as a means for rediscovering the essential nature of these neglected things. The act of making or modifying a mundane object can serve as a means for revealing what has been hidden by too much familiarity. In the process of making, designing, and carefully observing an ordinary object, familiar meanings disappear and are replaced by a deeper understanding of the relationship between component parts, maker and object, user and object, and object and its environment. The meanings associated with such commonplace objects are transformed, producing a rich understanding of their essential qualities. The problem at hand is a two part negotiation: How much transformation or distancing from the original existing fabric is enough to compose new meaning, without losing fundamental connectivity and allowing us to recognize the remaining traces of its origin? At what point can we accept the re-composed identity as new? The photograph of the building of the school of architecture (image 1), and both photos portraying the essence of a paperclip (images 2 & 3) are examples of this search for balance between existing and adapted systems. The SOA building is the simplest product of this exploration. The exercise is successful in creating something new and exciting by seamlessly bridging the discoveries made during the process of making. The new understanding of the re-configured systems does not completely neglect their origins, but continue to reference them throughout their transformation. The exercises related to the paperclip are similar to that of the SOA building, until it reaches a point of acknowledging which generated relationships between new and original are successful. In the process of constructing a new understanding, the manipulated systems utilized in the second exercise are distorted to a point at which recognition of the original system is near obliteration. These relationships are explored in a four part process. OBSERVING is the initial phase in which an existing body of systems and patterns activate interest in the observer – instinctively, an analyses of such familiar relationships begins. In observing and imagining possible re-configurations within the existing systems, the next phase of this process is DESIGNING. In the design phase, re-structuring the order or its adaptations dictates levels of disengagement and connectivity with its origin. A flexible framework is initially necessary to entertain a variety of opportunities that are further investigated in the MAKING phase, where the final push to refining the balance between elements takes place. In making, the intellectual negotiations are turned down and the process takes up on a more visceral approach to problem solving. During the process of making, the combination of a flexible but orderly framework along with an intuitive means of producing, allows for a highly engaged mode of operation. While in this phase the first glimpses into the final redefined system are revealed. And finally, the last phase of this process is the comparing and contrasting of the original existing fabric to that of the newly developed one. How successful is the end result in projecting the essence of the original without being literal or too vague?


In examining all produced projects during this research, a vibrant layer of patterns and systems emerges, highlighting an integration between all artifacts. When all projects are combined under one umbrella, each provokes a small discovery towards a path for greater and more meaningful conversations. These projects make up a network that receives constant feedback during and after the process of making, which continuously raises the question of how two pieces come together. Most importantly, their potential role in generating new meaningful ideas provide structured models that may be explored in site-specific projects within the field of architecture. The research became a constant exploration of the process of making and the refinement of a policy. A policy is an organized manifestation of contemporary structures used to critically generate engagement with issues at hand. The founding structures forming this policy constitutes a particular process of making, designing, and careful studying of our physical environment. Energy is focused on how to replace familiar meanings with a deeper understanding of the relationship between component parts, maker and object, and object and its environment. The idea behind the development of a policy is to create ground rules that can be tested and manipulated within the realms of architecture and furniture, simultaneously. For example, a unit of architecture - a small room or a pod - can be designed and fabricated to house a furniture piece and initiate a dialogue between context and existing systems in a small scale production. To elaborate on both scales simultaneously is to consider both human and city needs. The infused furniture piece is much a part of the whole order as any other element constructing the measurable and immeasurable qualities of the architecture. Furthermore, the policy is efficient exactly because of its highly intuitive approach. It allows me to have at least three attempts to test and learn how to solve the design problem. One: the first design is driven by logical patterns and reactions to the design problem. Two: utilizing the first design as its point of departure, the second design derives from an instinct for recognizing the existing patterns and systems. In collaboration with instinct, the power of intuition takes charge of generating and/or organizing the relationships that bond those structures. With so much beauty produced from intuitively driven moments, it may be fair to say intuition is not a farfetched concept and it ought to be practiced more often during every design process - more than any other sense. Three: the physical expression of a third design is often absent because within the realms of my mind I instigate and reflect on the process of making and revisit the decisions taken by the intuitive approach. Gained from testing is the assemblage of knowledge that makes up the third design, the recognition of potentially meaningful ideas that will continue to shape the design, and the opportunity to infuse a higher level of significant complexity in the structure of the design.


Fa 10.4

R.H. FRAME year

fall 2012 | MAA

instructor

Eric Peterson

institution

Florida International University

Stainless steel rods Pallet wood Glass Red clamps

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Stainless steel rods Pallet wood Glass Red clamps

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Fa LIGHT TABLE spring 2013 | MAA

instructor

Eric Peterson

institution

Florida International University

Pallet wood Plywood Plexi glass Steel Stainless steel hardware

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10.6

year


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Pallet wood Plywood Plexi glass Steel Stainless steel hardware

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Fa WHAT’S IT FOR spring 2013 | MAA

instructor

Eric Peterson

institution

Florida International University

Reclaimed brazilian cedar Pallet wood Steel Leather

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10.7

year


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Fa A CHAIR FOR A CHAIR spring 2013 | MAA

instructor

Eric Peterson

institution

Florida International University

Pallet wood Reclaimed brazilian cedar Maple Steel rods Stainless steel hardware

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10.8

year


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Pallet wood Reclaimed brazilian cedar Maple Steel rods Stainless steel hardware

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Fa MY FAVORITE MISTAKES 10.9 year

spring 2013 | MAA

instructor

Eric Peterson

institution

Florida International University

Reclaimed brazilian cedar Maple Steel dowels White oak dowels

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63


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Reclaimed brazilian cedar Maple Steel dowels White oak dowels

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Fa CRAFTY PALLET fall 2013 | MAA

instructor

Eric Peterson

institution

Florida International University

Pallet wood Nails Resin

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11

year


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Pallet wood Nails Resin

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- Aê Gabriel, você ta mudando as tuas musicas? - Não, to musicando as minhas mudanças... - Aê Gabriel, are you changing your songs? - No, I’m singing my changes...

Gabriel O Pensador, Masturbação Mental.


Alan Vallada D’Amore Architectural designer (M.Arch) with 2 years of experience in the academic field, taught architecture design studios, utilizes furniture design as a study model for resolving issues in architecture, developed book-format publications and continues to provide design solutions for artists and architecture firms in the Miami area. A combination of international backgrounds and travelling experiences have aided me in becoming an open minded, competent, effective and efficient individual; I work well under pressure, enjoy problem solving and tackling new situations. I am comitted to each and every goal at hand and thrive when working in a team. I enjoy team work and I am inquisitive, methodical, approachable, friendly and eager to learn.

ACADEMIC BACKGROUND 2012 - 2013 :

Florida International University Master of Arts in Architecture Research in Furniture Design

2009 - 2012 :

Florida International University Master of Architecture

2006 - 2008 :

University of Florida Bachelor of Arts in Architecture Incomplete

Date of birth: Nationality:

March 31, 1986 Brazil

Address:

1303 E. Benton Lake Dr. DeLand, FL - 32724 United States +1 (386) 956.8255 damoreworkshop@gmail.com

Phone: E-mail: Linkedin:

http://www.linkedin.com/ pub/alan-d-amore/25/305/ba7

Portfolio:

http://issuu.com/damoreworkshop


As Casas onde Morei Nas casas onde morei, Posso ver o que deixei. No eco que reverbera, Na imagem que carrega, Do telhado ao porão, Tem a minha mão. Silhueta circunscrita Na casa dos poetas, Dos músicos, das melodias, Das costureiras , das fantasias, Aguςada manifesta, Bagagem que navega Retratada Em uma moldura dourada.

Ana D'Amore November 10, 2012


Alan Vallada D’Amore, M.Arch. Architecture + Design Selectec Works 2013 - 2006

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M. Arch., Alan D'Amore | Architecture + Design Portfolio 2013