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I N M OTI O N

WI NTER 2018


EDITOR’S NOTE “In Motion”captures the movement of fashion and explores what it could represent. This includes development, growth, change and progression in the abstract sense. Last year, DAMchic was the new kid on the block, but this year we know where we’re headed; it’s time to take action.

The fashion industry is ever-changing in movement. It continues to test new topics of discussion, push boundaries and experiment with new innovations. Each and every one of you takes part within this special movement. This year, we’ll even prove it to you. DAMchic is challenging the assumption that fashion is only for a specific ‘type’ of person. However, fashion has no type and neither does PHOTOGRAPHY: LOGAN HOWELL

DAMchic. Our magazine is for anyone who’s curious about what the students of OSU have to say about style—not as a trend—but as a statement of self expression.

This statement can be stretched into a variety of platforms. One may wear a pair of sweats because that’s what they woke up in. Someone else may wear them because it’s popular streetwear. Whatever that expression may be, we want to know about it. The motion of you choosing what to wear each and every day is a story. This story is what keeps the fashion industry moving towards new and creative ideas. Everything you wear has a story and DAMchic is where you should share it.

TAYLOR COLLINS EDITOR IN CHIEF


THE TEAM

EDITOR IN CHIEF TAYLOR COLLINS ASSISTANT EDITOR RACHEL HOGAN LEAD PHOTOGRAPHER ANDREA MITEV PRODUCTION EXECUTIVES CHLOE KEHN YVETTE CHAU FASHION MARKET & ACCESSORIES EXECUTIVE RYLIE LAWRENCE STYLIST JENNIFER JEFFRIES FACULTY ADVISOR CANDACE BALTZ

FASHION DIRECTORS CATHERINE WONG AMANDA NELSON BEAUTY EDITOR RAE MA STREET STYLE EDITOR PAIGE PHILLIPS CONTRIBUTORS BROOKE SAMUELS MEAGHAN EVANS KRISTINA REYNOLDS BRIAN NGUYEN SYDNEY SULLIVAN ANGELINA MACCA YOUNG OUM


IN MOTION

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S T HE S TREET

01

Champs

D I R E C T I O N & W R I T I N G : PA I G E P H I L L I P S

P H O T O G R A P H Y: H U S S A I N A L B A L U S H I

05

Skate

09

Frozen

DIRECTION: KRISTINA REYNOLDS

WRITING: ANGELINA MACCA P H O T O G R A P H Y: M I T C H E L L J E N S E N

T HE B EAUTY

DIRECTION: RAE MA

WRITING: ALEC LANDON P H O T O G R A P H Y: S Y D N E Y S U L L I V A N


T H E FASHI ON

11 17 25

Deviation

DIRECTION & WRITING: AMANDA NELSON

P H O T O G R A P H Y: A N D R E A M I T E V

Flight to Heaven

D I R E C T I O N : C AT H E R I N E W O N G

P H O T O G R A P H Y: A N D R E A M I T E V

Trends Transition

DIRECTION & WRITING: YOUNG OUM

P H O T O G R A P H Y: S T E F F I K U T C H E R

T H E I NDUSTRY

29

Is Goodwill the New Gucci? DIRECTION: MEAGHAN EVANS

WRITING: BRIAN NUGYEN P H O T O G R A P H Y: O L I V I A H A R B A N D

T H E SPOTLI GHT

33

Blind Rage: Tiger Hu

DIRECTION & WRITING: BROOKE SAMUELS

P H O T O G R A P H Y: O L I V I A H A R B A N D


Champs

D I R E C T I O N & W R I T I N G : PA I G E P H I L L I P S P H O T O G R A P H Y: H U S S A I N A L B A L U S H I

As usual, fashion continues to move at a fast pace.

better to associate with if you want to do a hoody

Various brands are now experiencing more growth

sweatshirt?”

within the industry, whereas in the past they had not gotten much exposure. Amongst these brands is the sportswear manufacturer, Champion. FILA, Umbro and FUBU are examples of brands that we used to get made fun of for wearing as kids. With Champion also being one of those brands, the tide changed for the company when athleisure became a trend for streetwear. New styles were offered and the brand was able to make a come up. In a short amount of time, Champion has been able to fulfill the needs of people in street style, high fashion and athleisure.

Mullet still owns Champion clothing to this day. “I believe I still have a hood sweatshirt I got while playing team volleyball in 1982.” During the time that Mullet got her sweatshirt, Champion was one of the main providers for sports gear. Eric Ely, Oregon State University Assistant

Athletic

Director

for

Women’s

Basketball, says, “Champion was one of the main gears for uniforms, shirts, and practice gear and that type of thing, but Champion was doing a lot of different things. They were doing socks and some football equipment.” The other gear that

Champion has collaborated with some of the

was popular at the time was Nike and Adidas.

most popular streetwear brands. Connections

“The big competitors are Under Armor, Nike, and

with Vetements, Supreme and Bathing Ape have

Adidas. They were all duking it out,” Ely added.

been formed over the past few years. Since athleisure style was on the rise, streetwear brands wanted to collaborate with Champion because of what the brand is known for--sportswear. Kathy Mullet, anApparel Design professor at Oregon State University, says, “I believe these brands wanted to connect with Champion. As stated before, Champion has been around a long time as an American sweatshirt manufacturer, so who

01

The Street // Winter 2018

“CHAMPION IS BACK ON THE MARKET” - Eric Ely


All Clothing - Champion


Champion’s

quality

of

clothing

has

According to Sutton, the purchases of this

enabled Ely to keep pair of mesh shorts

line has been coming from the younger

from that time.

generation. “I definitely think that the

The growing popularity has influenced retailers like Urban Outfitters, Macy’s, ASOS and Zumiez to feature the brand in stores. It is even sold in the Beaver Store

younger customers are more interested in buying Champion sweatshirts and sweats now that they are becoming a lot more popular!”

as a collaboration between beaver gear

As time has changed, so has Champion’s

and Champion. “I think it is great when

brand. The brand has been recreated

an American company like Champion

and is now used in a way for people to

makes a comeback,” says Carly Sutton,

express

a Beaver Store employee and consumer

“Champion is back on the market,” says

of Champion.

Ely.

themselves

through

fashion.

The Street // Winter 2018

04


Skate

DIRECTION: KRISTINA REYNOLDS WRITING: ANGELINA MACCA P H O T O G R A P H Y: M I T C H E L L J E N S E N

It was in the1980’s that the skate culture community started gaining poularity. Originally skaters were labeled as rebellious youth who were out looking for trouble. What people didn’t see was that skateboarding was more than a hobby for most; it was a passion. In most skate parks, it doesn’t matter what your gender or skill level is, everyone just wants to see you succeed. Generally, it is an open and accepting community. In recent years skate apparel has become a trend worn by both men and women, due to its gender-neutral design. This trend is not limited to skaters. Anyone from Rihanna to Justin Bieber have been seen in brands such as Thrasher, a brand originally created by skaters, for skaters. “I think it’s really cool, the gender-neutral fashion, because it’s more inclusive,” said Emma Palin graphic design student. Clothing styles within this scene vary from person to person. According to Ian Lipanovich, business administration student, stiff and durable clothing is popular amongst many skaters.

The Street // Winter 2018

06


“THE COMFORT GOES BACK TO LOOKING AND FEELING GOOD.”

- Ian Lipanovich

Dickies and Carhartt are two common brand

“It wasn’t that they stopped representing skaters,

choices among skaters because of their reliability

it’s

and fabric tenacity. Not only are both brands

and it got publicity to where other people got

dependable, they also have a clean-cut look that

interested and people hopped in on that trend,”

both men and women can wear. This look includes

said Lipanovich “Now it is representing the newer

button down shirts and straight leg pants that

culture to continue business.”

that

they

represented

them

really

well

Lipanovich enjoys wearing, as they allow him to feel put together, but still comfortable. According

There are two types of skate culture, according

to him, this clothing design is something anyone

to

can wear.

management

Clay

Wood,

construction

student,

and

engineering

Lipanovich.

The

original, from the past, and the new, which is “The comfort goes back to looking and feeling

current. In the past, the skate scene was more laid

good,” said Lipanovich “Wanting to feel dressed

back than it currently is. Brands such as Supreme

up but still wear clothes you can throw yourself

may have once represented the original skate

around in goes both ways, gender wise.”

community but are now catering to the new one.

Skate fashion has not changed much in the last

“People tend to follow trends and trends change,”

ten years structurally, but what has changed is

Said Wood “Streetwear and fashion has so many

the amount personality that now comes through.

more people involved in it.”

In the past, skaters would wear a simple white tee and black pants. Now, they wear more colors,

Skate fashion has been a prominent trend in 2017.

patterns, and noticeable branding. Skate fashion’s

It will be interesting to find out if it will recede

popularity has lead a huge shift in what skaters

back to its original market of solely skaters or if it

wear.

will continue to grow amongst the public.

07 The Street // Winter 2018


The Street // Winter 2018 08


Frozen

DIRECTION: RAE MA WRITING: ALEC LANDON P H O T O G R A P H Y: S Y D N E Y S U L L I V A N

Like paint, gender can be fluid in movement,

certain amount of “fluidness” before they can

and the process of finding yourself amongst your

identify as being gender fluid, or perhaps something

own thoughts can be more slow-moving than

else,” Bostelman-Rinaldi said in an email.

some stereotypical ideas about gender identity, according to Rachel Yiting Ma, creator of the ‘Frozen’ shoot.

Ma created this project because she believes gender fluidity is something that is not discussed much in the university. Qwo-Li Driskill is a Women,

“I wanted there to be a bigger story to what beauty

Gender & Sexuality Studies Associate Professor and

could be within motion, and so I thought bigger,”

WGSS Director of Graduate Studies at OSU who

Ma said.

teaches about gender fluidity through the Queer

There are two concepts intertwining when it comes to the photoshoot, according to Rae. One is how thoughts and behavior can be changing, represented by blue paint; or they can be static,

Studies courses on campus and on Ecampus. They discussed how gender fluidity is a freely talked about subject in their particular field, however it is not always accepted outside academia.

represented by white paint. The dinosaur bones

“In WGSS and QS we discuss gender, including

around the two models represent the human skull,

gender fluid and gender non-conforming people

with the models being thoughts and behaviors

and identities often and freely,” Driskill said in

moving within. The overarching idea is, like

an email. “The larger reality is that people and

thoughts, gender can be fluid in motion.

communities who are outside of dominant culture’s

“Things like identities or genders or sexualities need to be talked about because there’s a ton of people out there who are going through the same

constructions of gender and gender expression experience ongoing violence, discrimination, and systemic oppression.”

thing and it’s really nice to hear someone’s stories

There are very few people who can fit into the tiny

about it,” Ma said.

confinements of what society thinks it means to be

In the series of hand photos, colors are coming and meshing together. According to Ma, this meshing is a visual representation of identity going over a breakthrough and being able to finally move those thoughts and paints around, within one another. Showing gender identity as a slow moving process is important because in doing so you show people a spectrum of where they may lie, according to Fern Reilly Bostelman-Rinaldi, Ma’s friend. Some may see gender fluidity as being an androgynous, tall, white individual, and if they are not matching that exact description, than they do not fall into the category of ‘gender fluid’, which is not the case at all. It’s important to allow people to identify as they’d like, and to not feel that they have to achieve a

09 The Beauty // Winter 2018

a man or a woman, according to Driskill. By talking about gender fluidity, we become aware of the ‘norms’ in our culture and how they are, in reality, social constructs. “Being able to share this story within DamChic is tremendously helpful for anyone who is trying to come out or has come out already, or just needs to hear something like a hopeful illustration,” Ma said.


The Beauty // Winter 2018

10


Deviation

DIRECTION: AMANDA NELSON P H O T O G R A P H Y: ANDREA MITEV

“DEVIATION MEANS TO DEPART FROM AN ESTABLISHED COURSE OR ACCEPTED STANDARD. DON’T BE AFRAID TO EXPRESS YOURSELF THROUGH FASHION, PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUALISM WHEN NAVIGATING THROUGH YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE. KEEP IN MIND THAT EVEN NORMAL DAY-TO-DAY VENTURES CAN BE BEAUTIFUL THROUGH MOVEMENT, FREEDOM AND RANGE OF MOTION.”

-Amanda Nelson

11 The Fashion // Winter 2018


13 The Fashion // Winter 2018


The Fashion // Winter 2018

14


15 The Fashion // Winter 20


The Fashion // Winter 2018

16


Flight to Heaven D I R E C T I O N : C AT H E R I N E W O N G P H O T O G R A P H Y: A N D R E A M I T E V


Ca mel D ress/ Ja cket - SECOND G LANCE Brown Leat her - THE ALLEY W hite but ton up shirt - RU NWAY EXCHANG E Bla ck Lea t her Jac k et - THE ALLEY Gre y pant s - G O ODWI LL


19 The Fashion // Winter 20


The Fashion // Winter 2018

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21 The Fashion // Winter 2018


The Fashion // Winter 2018

22


Trends Transition DIRECTION & WRITING: YOUNG OUM

P H O T O G R A P H Y: S T E F F I K U T C H E R Muted color palettes expose the transition between new and old. The colors picked for this season are gray backdrop, washed green and midnight blue. They have a great versatility that can be worn alone or mix-matched with other colors. This gives the advantage of creating a variety of looks from day to night.

This seasons colors will keep you on trend without challenging you. Have you ever looked at your wardrobe with a heavy sigh and worried about your wallet? No need to worry this season, these muted tones probably already exist in your wardrobe. Save your time and money and get on the track! Three people who all vary in personal fashion choices told us how they adopted these color trends.

GRAY BACKDROP

25 The Fashion // Winter 2018

WASHED GREEN

MIDNIGHT BLUE


GRAY BACKDROP Plain and simple, but versatile! Gray is one of those neutral colors that can be worn as an accent color with other hues. It can even be worn alone to create a gentle look as well. When it comes to work attire, young professionals use gray tones to create sophisticated, crisp looks. Ricky Verlini, who works at Selectron Technologies Inc. owns many gray pieces that allow him to style from lounge wear to work wear. “I feel like it’s pretty chill with everything” he says.

Nearly every day, he layers gray items in his outfits. According to him, his effortless chic looks could not excel without gray.

The Fashion // Winter 2018

26


WASHED GREEN Enough about grays? This season is all about transition. Muted green is a bright color with a gray undertone. Think of early winter morning landscapes with frost on green grass. Some might say it’s an unusual color for this season, but guess what? Adding a muted green piece can result in an elevated winter look. An accounting student at Portland State University, Daichi Tameshima usually didn’t shop for green clothing until he bought a muted green cardigan last week. He mentioned, “I get more compliments when I wear it.”

Muted green blew his mind; he had never thought the color would freshen his daily outfits. The best part of the muted green is that it can be matched with pale ivory, white or cream colored pieces. Voila! It enhances the elegance in your look.

27 The Fashion // Winter 2018


MIDNIGHT BLUE Still think black is the only classy color? Everyone needs one exquisite piece in their wardrobe, and anything deep navy blue is it; its color tone makes it easy to create a luxurious look. “Dark blue tones have a mystery and expansiveness sense of touch,� says Dorothy Hoeft, a Jr. graphic designer at Moon Media.

She has a wool coat in this tone, and says the color makes her look slimmer. What a keeper! Midnight blues brings out an excellent shadowy effect as well as display a sophisticated quality. Dark blues are the new replacement for black this season. A set of different shaded dark blues can raise your wardrobe to another level of modern classiness.

The Fashion // Winter 2018

28


Is Goodwill the New Gucci? DIRECTION: MEAGHAN EVANS

WRITING: BRIAN NUGYEN P H O T O G R A P H Y: O L I V I A H A R B A N D These days many students tend to shop at retail stores despite the negative impacts on sustainability. This includes wasting resourceful materials, creating larger landfills, and supporting sweatshop factories. With that in mind there’s a better

“It can save you so much money especially as college students who can’t afford high end fashion,”

alternative when it comes to picking out fashionable clothing.

- Anna Le

Thrift stores have plenty of trendy to vintage finds that saves you money and impact our world positively. Spending less time in retail stores and donating clothes will reduce the amount of waste and help benefit the renewable environment according to Emma Strgar junior in digital communication arts. “Consumers who care about

their product is degraded it makes them go back and buy newer ones and then the old one goes to landfill which becomes this whole cycle.”

the environment should do their best effort to shop at thrift

Retail stores also fuel the sweatshop industry because

stores and donate their clothes instead of throwing it away

it stimulates the cycle of buying, using, and disposing.

or just keeping it away like in their closet. By recycling your

According to Abbey Black, senior in ecological engineering

clothes it will keep them out of the landfill.” Strgar is a media

and climate neutral 2025 coordinator at the SSI, because

coordinator at the sustainability office.

sweatshop workers do no make living wages, they cannot

Event coordinator at the sustainability office, Anna Le, senior in fishing & wildlife mentioned the wastefulness and the cheap tactics used to get customers to return to retail stores. “Polyester is a form of plastic and so most of the time a retail store like Forever 21 will sell cheaper clothes that degrade faster than normal which forces more consumerism. Because

afford to try searching for another job. This is from the fact that is they were tim they risk losing their current job and not being able to support themseles. Even with that said companies still choose outsourcing the manufacturing of their product because of their cheap price, “Clothing usually comes from oversea because it’s cheaper.” According to Black, buying clothing second-hand, reduces your carbon output and keeps useable clothing out of the landfill. Also, large clothing companies stamp thier clothing patterns out of large sheets of fabric, which results in huge amounts of fabric being thrown away as scraps. “The purchase and use of clothing leads to the release of over 850 MtCO2 per year. (around 3% of gloabal production CO2 emissions.),” said Black. Another reason to shop at thrift stores is because they offer quality clothing for affordable prices. “It can save you so much money especially as college students who can’t afford high end fashion,” Le said.

29 The Industry // Winter 2018


*All Clothing - Goodwill


31 The Industry // Winter 2018


Taylor Bennett, senior in climate science encourages anyone who is curious to shop at thrift stores to try it out, as you could have a good time doing so. “If you’ve never shopped at a thrift store before but are interested in trying it out, get a friend to go along with you! It will be a good way to socialize and have a new experience without it being so intimidating.” Bennett is a climate neutral 2025 Coordinator at the sustainability office.

Strgar agrees with Bennett as she finds that it can be an adventurous new experience. “I feel that thrift stores are underrated. There’s a lot to be found which makes it fun. It’s really explorative as you can find stuff you might not be able to in the retail stores. You may find clothing you’re unexpected to find.”

If you’re trying to save money, care about sustaining the planet, and enjoy timeless and modern clothing, then try going to the thrift or second hand clothing stores located around campus. Since most are locally owned the money will go back to the community thus cycling the world positively.

The Industry // Winter 2018

32


Blind Rage: Tiger Hu D I R E C T I O N & W R I T I N G : B R O O K E S A M U E L S | P H O T O G R A P H Y: O L I V I A H A R B A N D Meet Tiger Hu. He is currently a sophomore here at Oregon

world of art that I know now. In the end however, it was my

State University studying Design Management. This is a

idea to be different. I just didn’t and don’t fit in.” He said.

fairly new major under the business college, that allows

Tiger is a creative in many ways. His first creative outlet was

students to focus on design creation and management all at

photography, which eventually transitioned into a passion

once. With that being said, he did not begin his studies with

for clothing and style. He now has experience in modeling,

design in mind. Tiger started at Oregon State majoring in

Adobe Illustrator, personal style, and design. He is always

Biology, a completely different spectrum when compared to

searching for the next way to let his creative side shine.

design. It was not until he met his closest friends here, who with their encouragement led him to uncover his creative

He recently released his first design inspired by blind rage.

outlets. These friends exposed Tiger to their creative

This concept is important to Tiger because it represents

lifestyles and helped him to fine tune his own. They gave

how he became who he is today. Tiger believes that just

him the confidence to dress how he truly wanted without

like eyesight, anger is either present or nonexistent. He

caring what others thouht. Sometimes it takes surrounding

mentioned, “Sight is black or white, there or simply not.

yourself with the right people to realize what you are capable

Anger is the same…”

of. Tiger continues to collaborate and stay close with these friends today.

He used his expertise with Adobe Illustrator and implemented this emotion through a symmetrical black and white t-shirt

“I give credit to my close friends that were supportive of

and a pair of pants with screen printed graphics. Vertical

the things that I was doing and opening my eyes to the

images of eyes run down the middle of the back while on

33 The Spotlight // Winter 2018


The Spotlight // Winter 2018

34


35 The Spotlight // Winter 2018


the front, his own representation of blind rage is displayed.

When this creation sold out online,

he decided not to restock them. Tiger wants his creations to be for people to enjoy, rather than for making a profit. “This is my first release so I am kinda just playing with it and seeing what I can do creatively. The next drop will be a lot more creative.” Hu said. Personal style is very important to Tiger. He believes it is important to wear what you want versus what society tells you to wear. Identity is created within and he strives to be different by making a conscious effort not to fit the norm. Japanese culture and ideals serve as one of his main inspirations when it comes to fashion. “There’s an idea of androgyny in Japanese fashion whereas in the States the rules are more or less set in stone. The Harajuku fashion scene in specific embodies the idea of wearing what you want,” he explained. The culture in Japan is not reliant on celebrities or idols to influence their fashion sense. Their way of life focuses on wearing what they want when they want, without being conformed to what is expected, Tiger added.

“I GIVE CREDIT TO MY CLOSE FRIENDS THAT WERE SUPPORTIVE OF THE THINGS THAT I WAS DOING AND OPENING MY EYES TO THE WORLD OF ART THAT I KNOW NOW. IN THE END HOWEVER, IT WAS MY IDEA TO BE DIFFERENT. I JUST DIDN’T AND DON’T FIT IN.”

- Tiger Hu

These ideals have influenced Tiger to have a good balance of femininity and masculinity in his own personal style. He pushes the limits while embodying progressiveness in gender norms. This is how Tiger chooses to stand out rather than blending in. “I try and stay unbranded so I can let what I am wearing speak louder than who I’m wearing.” said Hu. Apparel design is one of Tiger’s many creative outlets that he uses as a hobby and a passion. There are already some new inspirations and ideas in the works, so be on the lookout for more designs by Tiger Hu.

The Spotlight // Winter 2018

36


Thank MODELS Frida Mata Alejandro Rojas Carrillo Spencer Lukela Quandre Brown Amber Hill Heather Thompson Yi Peng Teo Coco Higgins Tenen Osbey Tino Allen Grant Ballard Emma Bowder Halah Alameri Christen Clark Christian Wallace Tiger Hu Xuyang Huang Elyse Ziegelr Ian Lipanovich Clay Wood Brooke Samuels


ank You!

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PHOTOGRAPHERS Hussain Al Balushi

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Alec Landon

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Steffi Kutcher

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Olivia Harband

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Mitchell Jensen

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Second Glance

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Second Glance Annex

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Runway Fashion Exchange

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The Alley

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PLACES

Hu

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Corvallis Municipal Airport

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Laundry Mat

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MAKEUP

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Fern Bostelman-Rinaldi


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In Motion DAMchic Winter 2018  

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