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I N M OT I O N

YOUTH TONIC

W I N T ER 2 018

SPRING 2018


YOUTH TONIC

Editor’s Note: Everyone wants to stay forever young, but what if I told you that youth is a state of mind and not body? It is not the age you own, the wrinkles in your skin, or the decade that defines you. Samuel Ullman once said, “Youth is not a time of life; it is a state of mind; it is not a matter of rosy cheeks, red lips and supple knees; it is a matter of the will, quality of the imagination, a vigor of the emotions; it is the freshness of the deep springs of life.” PHOTOGRAPHY: LOGAN HOWELL

In our youth, our voices are loud and we are not afraid to be heard. This issue was inspired by the celebration of that mindset. It embodies the impact of youth and how our voices shape movement within the industry. Rebellion and individuality have the power to cause change within the common trend. Youth Tonic propels creativity and the exploration of new ideas and possibilities.

TAYLOR COLLINS EDITOR IN CHIEF


THE TEAM

E D I T O R I N CHI EF TAY L O R CO LLI NS AS S I S TAN T EDI TOR R A CH E L H O GAN L E AD P H O T O G R A PHER A NDR E A M I TE V D E S I GN EDI TOR NATA LI E LUTZ FASHION MARKET & ACCESSORIES EXECUTIVE RY L I E L AW R E NCE FAC ULT Y ADVI SOR T R U DI GI LFI LLI AN

FA SHI ON DI R ECTOR S CATH E R I NE W O NG YV E TTE CH AU B EA U TY & STR EET STY LE EDI TOR PAI GE PH I LLI PS CON TR I B U TOR S BR O O KE SAM UE LS M E AGH AN E VANS YO UNG O UM SE R A GR E E N CH LO E KE H N


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S THE STREET

THE BEAUTY

THE FASHION

THE INDUSTRY

THE SPOTLIGHT

02

Your Fenty Moment

05

Happier Daze

09

Wig Galore

WRITING AND DIRECTION: Brooke Samuels || PHOTOGRAPHY: Steffi Kutcher

WRITING & DIRECTION: Paige Phillips || PHOTOGRAPHY: Alec Landon

WRITING & DIRECTION: Paige Phillips || PHOTOGRAPHY: Hussain Al Balushi

13

Honey

19

Exuberant Shift

DIRECTION: Catherine Wong || PHOTOGRAPHY: Andrea Mitev

WRITING: Young Oum

21

Neon Nights

27

#Unbrand

31 35

DIRECTION: Yvette Chau || PHOTOGRAPHY: Zbigniew Sikora

WRITING & DIRECTION: Meaghan Evans || PHOTOGRAPHY: Mitchell Jensen

Roy Raviv: Ugly People Pretty Souls

WRITING & DIRECTION: Sera Green || PHOTOGRAPHY: Mitchell Jensen

You’re Only as Young as You Feel

WRITING & DIRECTION: Chloe Kehn || PHOTOGRAPHY: Hussain Al Balushi


Your Fenty Moment

WRITING & DIRCTION: Brooke Samuels PHOTOGRAPHY: Steffi Kutcher

Rihanna is an influencer in all areas

The set included looks for all people

of society; whether it is her music,

and body types. From beach wear

her brand, her style or her stance in

to motocross influences, oversized

politics and education, she impacts

garments

the younger generation. Fenty, was

are also featured. Streetwear trends

created through her partnership with

are represented through large rain

Puma in late 2014. Since then, Puma’s

gear with an industrial touch. New

sales have increased significantly

accessories

and she has earned her spot in the

bulky totes, cross-body bags, sleek

fashion industry.

sunglasses, bucket hats, and visors

with

bodycon

made

their

spandex

debut;

were presented. The Fenty x Puma Spring/Summer 2018 collection embodies futuristic

According to Vogue, Rihanna was the

athleisure with a retro tech twist. The

first woman to win a Footwear News

color palette is versatile; it includes

Shoe of the Year award in 2017, so

bright neons to earthy hues of

it is no surprise that Fenty Footwear

green and brown. Textures are wild

is

with sleek patent outerwear, velour

every occasion are presented in this

tracksuits,

translucent

collection from platform utility boots

garments. Rihanna put an obvious

to neon slides, and of course her

focus on detail with thick buckles

classic set of platform creepers. The

and belts, statement zippers, and

Fenty brand captures the modern

crisscross ties on pants and shirts.

80’s and 90’s look.

mesh

and

known

worldwide.

Shoes

for

FIND YOUR FENTY MOMENT WITH THESE LOOKS FOR LESS.

01 01

The Street // Spring 2018


TR ACKSUIT COUTURE

• W h i te Tu b e To p - U rb a n O u t f i t te rs $ 2 2 • Snap Awa y Tra c k Pa n ts - Ari tz i a $ 9 4 • Red He e l e d Bo o t i e s - G o o d wi l l $ 9

The Street // Spring 2018

02


GYM TO THE STREETS

Red Puffer Jacket - Forever 21 $35

• Sports Bra - Nike $35 • Black Sweatpants - H & M $23 • Red Patent High Top Converse - Second Glance $ unknown

03 The Street // Spring 2018


TROPICAL BREEZE

• Bo mb e r Ja c k e t - Z a ra $ 7 4 • Bl a c k Jo g g e rs - H & M $ 3 6 • Ai r F o rc e 1’s - N i k e $ 1 3 0

The Street // Spring 2018 04


W R I T IN G & D I R E CTION : P ai g e P hillips P HOTO G R A P H Y: Al e c Land o n Youth tonic represents the impact our generation has on fashion. When we look back at fashion from the 80’s, 90’s, and the year of 2000, you can see that for the most part everyone dressed similarly during their time. If you look at fashion now, you can throw people in different groups based on their sense of style. Youth tonic is the way our generation expresses themselves through fashion and what it means to be apart of a wave. This shoot was inspired by the Rihanna Fenty School shoot. Having the shoot on Oregon State’s college campus is what brought the theme of youthfulness to the shoot.

05 The Street // Spring 2018


07 The Street // Spring 2018


The Street // Spring 2018 08


Wig Gal Wig Gal Wig Gal Wig Gal Wig Gal Wig Gal Wig Gal


Galore Galore Galore Galore Galore Galore Galore

W RIT ING & DIREC T IO N: Paige Phillip s P HOT O GRAP HY: Hus s ain A l Balus hi

Wigs are trending like crazy! Some of our favorite celebrities are rocking different wigs each week. They give people the convenience of switching up a hairstyle, while avoiding hair damage. Before wigs became a trend, sew ins, glue-ins, micro-links, and clip in weaves were the way to go. Many of these techniques work, but can leave a lot of hair damage. Wearing one is simple. All you have to do is braid your hair and put a wig cap over the braids. After the wig cap is secured, you can simply put the wig on.

The Beauty // Spring 2018

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11 The Beauty // Spring 2018


Wanna make your own? Here’s what you’ll need: -Styrofoam Mannequin Head -Hot Glue Gun -Hair Wefts -Plastic Grocery Bag -Wig Cap

1.) 2.)

Place the grocery bag over the mannequin head and put the wig cap on top of the grocery bag. This step is important because without the plastic bag, the wig cap can get stuck to the mannequin head due to the usage of the

Take the hair wefts and start in the back, glue them in a circular motion until you reach the crown of the head.

3.)

Then take the hair that is remaining, roll it together and glue it in the space that is left. This is so the tracks don’t show.

4.)

Let the wig set and dry for a few minutes. When you are ready to wear it, take the wig off of the mannequin head and remove the plastic grocery bag.

The Beauty // Spring 2018 12


D IR E CTIO N : Cathe ri ne Wo ng

Direction: Catherine Wong P H O TO G R APH Y: And rea Mi tev PHOTOGRAPHY: Andrea Mitev


**Yellow Jacket: Second Glance

** Yellow Sweater - Seco nd Gl a nc e


15

The Fashion // Spring 2018


The Fashion // Spring 2018 16


17

The Fashion // Spring 2018


* * Red Jacket - Second Gl a nc e


Exuberant Shift

W RIT ING: Young O u m

A youthful mindset will keep you forever

The

young.

pallet

Prishchenko, personal stylist in Los

includes playful red, green, and blue

Angeles, and Liz Prishchenko, world

tones that will expose your fearless style.

wide traveler, are passionate about

This

season’s

color

fashionista

sisters

Emily

fashion; they’d even lend Cuffing

season

has

come

to

officially

an end. It’s time to

“We like keeping things classy”

you a dress for a night

EMILY AND LIZ PRISHCHENKO

They sat down to reflect

turn off Netflix, put away those sweaters,

out

from

their

closet.

on color trends that will help you freshen up your

and bring out your spring style. You may still feel the

blissful daily look. “We like keeping

crispy cold air in the morning and

things classy,” they said. With Emily

wear

Prishchenko

the

same

old

winter

outfit;

however, you know better than that.

19 The Fashion // Spring 2018

and

Liz

Prishchenko,

the whole squad will be on point.


NEON RED Show off your confidence! Neon red is the essence of this time for all genders. Kick off this season in this chic urban color. Plans after class? This dazzling color will amp up your careless-off-duty outfit. According to the Prishchenko sisters, bright red makes them feel energetic and appealing. Emily Prishchenko mentioned that this color is perfect for workout outfits. If this brilliant red is too bright for you, then use pop pink instead. The affable pink will bring out your warm, sexy look under sunbeams.

FAIRY GREEN Following up the tenderness of spring, we can’t forget the fresh green pieces. Do you remember the mysterious green glows from the Jolly Roger ship in Peter Pan? The pale and natural glow of the fresh green put you in a youthful mood. Fresh green is a versatile color. “It’s an easy tone that you can match with various colors,” Liz Prishchenko said. Play with other hues to create a free-spirited street styled look or a serene sophisticated ensemble. Likewise, green ash, which resembles black obsidian with a hint of emerald green, will add a frisky touch to your look.

OP TIMIS TIC BLUE Missing the cool breeze since the weather got warm? Don’t worry. Wear a foam blue that will uplift your day. Imagine the blue ocean that you went to during spring break. This light blue will remind you of the fresh breeze near the seaside. Layer the airy blues; the lightness of this look will make you want to fly. The Prishchenko sisters mentioned that this refreshing color will last throughout summer. When asked about men in foam blue, Emily Prishchenko said “I would think they are trendy and daring because it is very pastel toned.” Try this aquatic blue and be ahead for the next season, too.

The Fashion // Spring 2018

20


21 The Fashion // Spring 2018

PHOTOG RAPHY: Zbigniew Sikora

DIRECTIO N: Yvette Chau


Yvette: “Youth tonic represents restoring and refreshing the body, mood, and mindset. Feeling young means being lively and energetic. For this theme I chose neon because these colors represent vibrant and bright feelings. Neon is so strong and bold that it has the power of showcasing these vibes. The clothes were inspired by a vintage look because I wanted the viewers to feel like they were reminded of a time during youth freedom and rebellion.� - Yvette Chau

The Fashion // Spring 2018

24


# Unbrand

W RIT ING & DIREC T IO N: Meagha n E v a ns P HOT O GRAP HY: Mitchell Jensen

As we approach the age of advancing

Dr. Daniel Flatesek, an Oregon State

stop you from buying them right then

technology and the ever changing trends

University professor and the coordinator

and there?

of communication, we need to face the

of new media professor explains that

future of social media and embrace its

brands stay trendy and effectively reach

changes. Generation Z, yes that’s you,

their

will continue to rule Instagram, Twitter,

content curated for you, by people you

Snapchat and possibly even Vine 2.

respect whether they be your friends or

Continuing our reign over the media

celebrities you trust. “For me, it’s about

means understanding what the future of

having the right celebrity have the right

social media is and its role in our favorite

candid for you” Faltesek said.

audience

by

producing

fresh

authenticity. According to her Linkedin article, ‘Does Your Brand Tell a Powerful Story?’ Angela Ahrendts, previous CEO of Burberry and current Senior Vice President of Retail at Apple Inc. said

and

authentic–

“Great stories are relevant, compelling, emotive and authentic– allowing individuals and organizations to connect others with their ‘true north’.” ANGELA AHRENDTS

allowing

individuals and organizations to connect

Brands are going to show you your

others with their ‘true north’.”

favorite

icons

in

relatable

settings,

supporting the products you love. Even A connection is exactly what brands want with us. Companies want a relationship with their customers and to get it, they

better, they will link a “buy now” button below,

creating

a

seamless

buying

process for the consumers.

are going to produce social media content that directly relates to individuals

Picture this: a photo of ASAP Rocky

and generation Z as a whole. Genuine

appears on your Twitter feed. He’s

content is attractive to us because we

hanging out at a small house party with

can see ourselves fitting in with a brand’s

his closest friends. He’s just like you.

message.

wearing

He’s also wearing those Adidas you’ve

their clothes, walking in their shoes and

been looking into for days. With that

rocking their brand.

convenient “buy now” button, what’s to

We

can

imagine

at OSU explains that the most effective social

media

posts

The Industry // Spring 2018

“authentic,

creative and humorous”. The consumers, especially generation Z, respond better

the creativity and laugh at the humor. Jane Oliver, student majoring in digital communications

and

social

media

coordinator of Kappa Delta Sorority at OSU explained that within a true and sincere brand message, there is a reminder of difference. “Social media can help the fashion world to diversify their models,” Oliver said. “...and for someone who isn’t a typical model, I like to see that [diversity] in companies.” Sometimes, we get so engrossed by the ideal runway model that we forget about the actual majority of our culture and campus. The idea that only people like Gigi Hadid can rep cool products is out of date. Anyone can get behind the camera and produce great shots. When companies hire real people to showcase their

brand,

consumers

will

show

appreciation and, in most cases, brand loyalty will ensue.

27

are

connect to the authenticity, appreciate

“Great stories are relevant, compelling, emotive

professor for merchandising management

to this trifecta because we can personally

brands as well as in our own lives. Plainly said, the future of social media is

Dr. Ryann Reynolds-McIlnay, assistant


“For

people

who

want a curated feed, I would recommend consistency

in

the

types of photos you post whether it be location,

lighting,

filters, or the subjects of your photos” MARISA CHEN

“Also, find your voice through photos.

It

[your feed] should be a reflection of you.” MARISA CHEN

29

The Industry // Spring 2018


SO WH AT A BO U T YO UR SO C IAL M E DIA? When asked what she wanted from social networking sites in the future, Oliver explains that she wants to be more connected with friends, brands and current events. A better connection means more relatability. If companies and brands focus on an approachable brand message why shouldn’t you? Our lives are similar to that of a company and with the vast amount of social media platforms, we have the chance to create a brand message for ourselves. Marisa Chen, an OSU merchandising management student and creator of SincerelyMar, a fashion and lifestyle blog, compares our personal feeds to a catalog. Chen treats her Instagram and blog as such, putting together creative and consistent content that is #relatable. Chen ended her interview by giving a few tips for those looking to ramp up their social media. “For people who want a curated feed, I would recommend consistency in the types of photos you post whether it be location, lighting, filters, or the subjects of your photos. Also, find your voice through photos. It [your feed] should be a reflection of you.” Embrace the future of social media instead of letting it scare you. Use these platforms as a means to relate to brands and friends because in this world, connection is what we crave. Have fun with your feeds, be original and unbrand.

The Industry // Spring 2018

30


You’re Only as Young as You Feel D I R E CTION AND WR ITIN G : C hloe Kehn PH O TO G R APH Y: Hu ssai n Al Balus hi Youth means something different for everyone. Whether you associate it with a certain lifestyle or attitude, the idea of youthfulness evokes a unique feeling in each person. Ultimately, youth has no age. We can display this concept through the way that we dress. Our life experiences and responsibilities impact our clothing decisions. Although we may mature and grow older, a youthful spirit lives on forever. This photoshoot was inspired by the view that youth can encompass any age. We wanted to include nontraditional Oregon State students, since they have not been as widely represented in the past. They all have families of their own and unique pathways that lead them to where they are today.

C ELES T E BART HEL AGE: 47 FIELD OF STUDY: SCIENCE EDUCATION

With two master’s degrees under her belt and a Ph.D. on the way, Celeste Barthel is passionate and driven. Not only is she dedicated to studying science education, she is a mother of three boys. Her children are part of what make her feel youthful. To Barthel, youth means having fun and ongoing discovery. When it comes to fashion, she likes to switch things up and keep it fresh. While she enjoys fun flowy pieces, functionality is of high importance. “For me it has to also be functional for what is happening that day and match the level of professional or play that I am participating in for the day,” Barthel explains. Barthel emphasizes her love for boots; she even wears them throughout the summer. “If I had to pick the one thing that I wear most it would be boots,” she mentions. She cherishes her Dr. Martens and started wearing them years before they became popular. As a first generation Irish, her aunt would send them to her from Ireland when she was a child. On the topic of youth, she adds, “Never give up, if you have a dream, go for it even if the path is crooked.”

31

The Spotlight // Spring 2018


The Spotlight // Spring 2018

32


L A U R I LU TE S AGE: 30 | FIELD OF STUDY: PLANT PATHOLOGY

Lauri Lutes is busy working toward her Ph.D. in plant pathology while keeping up with her seven-year-old daughter. Her clothing choices reflect her need to be versatile and practical. She does this by dressing in layers. “My lifestyle requires me to seamlessly transition from one role to another – teacher, student, scientist, wife, mother – often while wearing the same outfit,” says Lutes. Leggings are a casual staple item in her wardrobe in which she can add a dress or skirt to create a professional look. Lutes’ Teva boots are her go-to shoes in the rainy Oregon climate because they provide comfort and functionality. She has an entire closet of heels but claims they mainly get worn when her daughter plays dressup. To Lutes, youth means being vibrant and energetic. “As an adult, I feel that I maintain my youthfulness by being able to participate in activities with my child– like, flipping upside down on the monkey bars, for example,” she says. While keeping her style functional and sensible, she still wears pieces that make her feel good. Lutes explains, “It’s also fun to have a child’s perspective of my wardrobe– if it were up to my daughter, I would be wearing bright colors, heels, and red lipstick every day, which just isn’t practical for me. Occasionally I let her inspire my 34 outfits. It’s a fun way to mix things up in a creative, new way.” 33 The Spotlight // Spring 2018


S Y D E L L E HA RRISON AGE: 35 | FIELD OF STUDY: PUBLIC HEALTH

Sydelle Harrison is getting a master’s degree in public health at OSU while running a small business on the side. She likes to support local businesses by incorporating wool from her hometown of Pendleton, Oregon, in her clothing and bag designs. It is a fun activity for her to do that doesn’t feel like work. When it comes to her personal style, she likes color. She noted that as a Native American, turquoise is a favorite. She owns a lot of beaded jewelry and prefers to wear tennis shoes. It is important for Harrison to be comfortable in what she is wearing. “I was really happy that they made it legal to wear sweatpants and jogger styles,” she jokes. According to Harrison, “Youth is more of a feeling.” She associates youth with being happy and being able to laugh at yourself. In her own life, she says that her kids are what make her feel young again because she can relive life experiences with them. To Harrison, youth is related to the idea of gaining knowledge. She recognizes the vast amount of available information in the world and is inspired by the process of learning.


Roy Raviv:

Ugly People Pretty Souls D I R E CTION AND WR ITIN G : Sera Green PH O TO G R APH Y: Mi tc h e l l J en s en A year ago, Roy Raviv picked up his first Brother XR3240 sewing machine. In turn, Raviv’s true potential for design brought his vision of clothing to life. Raviv was born in Israel and raised in Nevada, Philadelphia, and Oregon. He’s lived in Lake Oswego for 10 years, however, it wasn’t any of these places that inspired Raviv to sew. When asked if it was Lake Oswego and his high school that inspired him, he responded, “I wouldn’t say Lake Oswego inspired me, I would say I inspired me. Anywhere I would’ve been, I would’ve picked it up eventually.” Raviv started sewing because he wanted to personalize his own clothing. Raviv was already printing clothing at the time, but as he puts it, “the idea of me printing some shirts and getting it done by someone else wasn’t personal enough. I wanted to get more of a ‘from my hand to your heart kind of thing’, and so that’s why I started sewing.”

Throughout Raviv’s journey of designing, he has had full support from those around him. From his friends, to his family, and most importantly, his art teacher, “I would say my art teacher is a big part of why I’m successful and guides me towards that direction of becoming a better designer, becoming a better artist, and becoming a person who can make art that’s valued and that values their own art.” With this vision and a sewing machine on his table, Raviv created three brands in search of one with a message. This all changed during the Summer of 2017 when Raviv was at the airport and noticed the woman scanning his boarding pass, “well put together woman, hair tied back with every hair in place, makeup, no flaws, just scanning in being like a robot.”

35 The Spotlight // Spring 2018


8 billion people that live on this planet earth. You’re not going to be able to meet 8 billion people. Even if you were to meet a million people you still wouldn’t be able to.” His collection never failed to express this cold hard truth in such a subtle manner. The design appears so simplistic, yet carries the reality of a message that is so complex. With the creation of UPPS and many other individual styles Raviv was accepted to New York’s Parson’s University, one of the top fashion schools in the world. Roy strives to distinguish himself from other brands by staying diverse in his design skills, “In the future I want to be doing not just more prints and designs, but getting actual manufacturing on patterns I’m creating, measuring by hand, and getting different sizes in.” For all designers out there, know that if you put your mind to it, anything is possible. Raviv still plans to continue UPPS while attending Parson’s University, “Sure it will be hard. I’m sure it will take time and money, but everything takes time. I mean, this is the 3rd brand I’ve started, and it’s never easy”. Like Raviv, know that it will never be easy, but in the end, it will always be worth it.

s

This sparked his great vision, Ugly People Pretty

s

Souls (UPPS). Despite the woman being unrelated

t

to the brands inspiration, Raviv believes it could’ve

t

been more, “it could’ve just been a sign, it could’ve

t

just been that I was meant to see that one person

g

and those words were meant to pop into my head.

n

n

He saw it as a perfect description of today’s world.“If you’re not an ugly person with a pretty soul, you’re a pretty person with an ugly soul, and

,

I feel like there’s not really any in between.” UPPS

h

was “defining the cold hard truth” of the world, as

r

Raviv puts it, “that’s kind of what the world is like

d

you know? It is what it is.”

t

n

e

“It is what it is” in Raviv’s translation goes deeper below the surface. What he means is to “just accept it, you can’t control the masses, you can’t control

The Spotlight // Spring 2018

36


Thank You! PE O PL E

Loren Ash Edd ie Arroyo Perry Lin Rusty Root Lauren Turner Roy Raviv Celeste Frazier Bart hel Sydel le Harrison Paige Phil l ips Col lete Higgins Kolade Salaudeen Aryano Suzuki Ashl i Quintela Mingyuan Yang Amanda Hooser Aspen Sheets Claire Iwata Claire Dil ler Jeruebe Phil l ips Lauri Lutes

PH OTOGRAPH ERS Hussain Al Balushi Alec Landon Steffi Kutcher Andrea Mitev Mitchel l Jensen Zbigniew Sikora

C L OTH ING

Second Glance Second Glance Annex

PL AC E S

Gil bert Hal l - Chemistry Build ing Pg. 6 Corval l is Psychic Shop Pg. 21 - 24 1413 NW 9t h St. Corval l is Browsers’ Bookstore Pg. 25-26 121 NW 4t h St. Corval l is Second Glance - Pg. 03, 13, 18 312 SW 3rd St. Corval l is


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