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HYPERREALITY

FALL 2019


HYPERREALITY

Letter from the editor In this issue we explore self-reflection in times of instability, an appreciation for what remains untarnished and the inability to distinguish between our perception of reality and what it actually is. It’s a well-known fact that fashion reacts to, and gets inspired by the world around it. During times of controversy, the runway is reclaimed as a site to express frustration surrounding concepts such as immigration, police brutality, transgender rights, climate change and a variety of other topics. Historically, in darker times, we craved an existential escape from all things fire and fury. We do this as a means of survival and to demonstrate strength, we hunt for the joy in music, art and community. Recently the world of fashion seems to be doing just that, reclaiming instability and uncertainty as an opportunity for innovation. By silencing its howls, and instead just pressing forward, we began to see runways with waterfalls, live orchestras and garments with an airy fragility of spun sugar. This exuberance inspired a magazine where what’s real and what’s fiction are blended together so seamlessly that the only crease is in the centerfold. We thought long and hard about how to emulate French sociologist Jean Baudrillard’s vision of hyperreality, as a dimension “sourced through a patchwork of false fabrications.” As our own version of hyperreality came into focus; each writer, photographer, director and stylist compared the world we live in with a false utopia, while creating content that engages with the indistinguishability existing between the two. Photograher: Jaycee Kalama

Pushing towards the imaginary wasn’t easy, it required saying yes to photographing in a pool, a science lab, a UFO and in South Korea. Saying yes to Jell-O, mirrors and the unpredictability of film. But was it worth it? Yes. The DAMchic team created a magazine that demonstrates the power of persistence and captures what happens when you seek out the light. I am so incredibly proud of what we have created. To the team, thank you for your brilliant ideas and for trusting each other to create an extraordinary issue that pushes beyond what we know to be real.

OLIVIA HARBAND E DIT O R - IN - CH IEF

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THE TEAM

EDIT O R - I N- C H I E F O L I VIA HAR B AND

A S S I S TAN T E D I T O R M E AGHAN E VANS

L EA D PH O T O GR AP H E R L O GAN HOWE LL

DES I GN E D I T O R M AR A WE E KS

DIVE R S I T Y & CO M M U NI T Y O UT R E AC H PA IGE PHILLIPS

CO N T R IB UT I N G D I R E C T O R S R O MAN COHE N A M NE E T S INGH J ES US R E Y E S L O GAN HOWE LL S A R AH R OGE R S K E AT ON S PR INGE R J E S S I CA THOMPS ON L A NIKAI YATOMI C HLOE KE HN V ICKI LIANG RYAN NE LS ON PA IGE PHILLIPS E M MA J OHNS TON A L E XIS S UAZO K E AT ON S PR INGE R K E L S E Y B IGE LOW Z A HR A J OS E PH J O CAR S TE NS E N TAYL OR B AR R ON

PHOTOGR A PHER S LYANNA HOANG L OGAN HOW EL L NYJAH GOBERT OW EN PREECE RAMZY AL -MUL L A CL AIRE NEL SON JACOB L E BEL L A JOHNSON JACOB L AGMAY JON HOPPER BRIT T NEE BARRY MOHAMED AL SAIF CANON W RIGHT SIERRA JOYNER JADE W EBST ER INÉS PL ANCHENAULT

F R EELA N CER S

SIENNA KASKE JACK HIL L ORION BIBEE ANIA T Y JOSH F INDL AY JEF F REY W U JAYCEE KAL AMA ABDUL BASIT HARUNA

CLOTHI N G

URBAN OUT F IT T ERS BUF FAL O EXCHANGE L OUIS VUIT T ON SHOP BGL IT T Z WAST EL AND DEMONIA SUIT E ZERO ZARA ADIDAS DOL L SKIL L Q-POINT ASRV NIKE ASOS

M ODELS

RYAN NEL SON NATAL IE VANDOMELEN SERENA BRUIN HAYL IE BENNE TT JACKSON SOOHAN SO N G MIN JUNG KIM YOUNG XIN RANA HYUID MCJO L OOFAT MEFLER JINYUN KIM KEL SEY BIGEL O W L ORENZO L OW E III KEYSHAW N DAV IS YOUNG OUM MARIA DUON G EMMA GARCIA ROBBIE PORT ON I ABDUL BASIT HAR U N A HEAT HER T OL IVER HANNAH DOVERSP IK E HANNAH COPHER SUMMER BURCH JVCKF ROST GEORGE ZAKAIB JURIANA SAGRERO NOAH DENKE R ONESIMUS CL ARK E SHEKINAH CL ARK E AMEER F OFANAH KIM KNUDT SON SANGHYEON Y U

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TABLE OF CONTENTS SWIMMING

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CONTROL GROUP

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PAEPI

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HYPER BIONIC

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HEATHER TOLIVER

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THE NEW AMERICAN SOCIALITE

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ELECTRICAL TECHNICOLOR

28 LITHIUM

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SILVERADO

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CHROMATIC CONSUMPTION

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DREAM

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EXPERIMENT

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SWIM SWIM SWIM SWIM SWI SW S

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MING MIN MI M


Miller’s death, at the young age of 26, recontextualized his lyrics and breathed new life into them. Even an entire year later, his music has a social and emotional impact that continues to evolve with every listen.

A Tribute to Mac Miller Writer, Director and Model: Ryan Nelson Photographer: Logan Howell Stylist: Jaycee Kalama

For most, being trapped in a wooden coffin would cause a fit of unsteady breathing, heightened heart rate and an urge to cry out for help. But for one musical artist, this feeling of constriction was nothing out of the ordinary.

Malcolm James McCormick, better known as Mac Miller, was more than a talented lyricist. The Pittsburghnative rapper lived an inspiring, down-to-earth, yet troubled life that ended all too soon. In his mind, a battle between light and dark was constantly being fought and he struggled to find solace anywhere in the middle. Buried six feet underground, he used music, amongst other things, as a way to escape to the surface; he would do anything for a way out of his head. The dichotomy of his deepest, darkest thoughts and the light-hearted, playful rhymes that carry throughout his discography are what make Mac Miller’s music so distinctive.

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“I was drowning, but now I’m swimming” For the extent of his musical career, Miller fought to stay afloat in a pool of instability and anxiety, yet, his success and influence in the music scene are representative of his true dedication and passion for music. With the release of his fifth and final studio album, titled “Swimming,” Miller reached an expansive audience. An audience compiled of long-time fans, recent discoverers, and most importantly, a vast number of people who could relate to the extreme range of emotions written into Miller’s lyrics. As the number of people affected by depression, anxiety and insecurity continues to rise, the

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stories told in this album provide a sense of comfort to so many people looking for openness surrounding the subject of mental health. Locally, Oregon has been reported as having the highest prevalence of mental illness in the U.S., with more than 22% of the population diagnosed with a mental illness (Mental Health America, 2017). Alarming figures like these should be a sign that the conversation surrounding mental health needs to change, in order to allow people to speak openly about their experiences and get connected to the right resources.


With the news of Miller’s death in September of last year, fellow musicians and fans alike mourned the loss of the prolific artist by paying their respects to the uninhibited work Miller created during his career.

As GQ eloquently describes Miller’s timeless style and contagious charisma, “[His] music wasn’t so much a reflection of our lives so much as it was a model.”

A month after he passed, close friends and collaborators such as Vince Staples, Anderson Paak and Earl Sweatshirt, among many others, performed a sold-out tribute concert in his honor. While Miller himself may be gone, to many, his legacy continues to live on through his lyrics.

In hindsight, Miller’s death rearticulated the social and emotional impact his music truly possesses. The unrest that once inhabited the mind of a young musician can now be understood from a new perspective, and will unquestionably continue to resonate with listeners for years to come.

“In a way, this feels like living. Some alternate reality.”

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Control Control Control C o n t r o l

Group Group Group G r o u p

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No hazardous material present Director: Paige Phillips Photographer: Mohamed Alsaif Models: Serena Bruin and Haylie Bennett

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Haylie Jacket: Amazon Boots: Amazon Glasses: Amazon

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Serena Bodysuit: Amazon Cape: Amazon Boots: Amazon

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PAEPI

Director and Writer: Emma Johnston Photographer: InĂŠs Planchenault Model: Jackson Soohan Song

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The Faces of Seoul’s Hypermodern Street Style

Home of Seoul Fashion Week, Dongdaemun Design Plaza in South Korea is a truly unique spectacle. With its curving walls and slanted floors, the structure resembles an alien spaceship. Recently, streetwear has nestled itself within this architectural center. The streets are lined with stands selling pseudo Supreme hoodies and Gucci belts, making the plaza a quintessential place to capture South Korea’s fashion scene. The rise in streetfashion coupled with the modern design of Dongdaemun Design Plaza, flipped Seoul fashion on its head; think intentionally visible brand names, baggy cargo pants and chunky sneakers. A mere ten years ago, this display of excessive consumption, and a desire for individuality was not a cultural norm in Korean fashion.

Paepi, a Korean portmanteau for the Korean pronunciation of the English words “fashion people,” represents these distinctly contemporary attitudes and lifestyles of Korean youth. The paepi is more than a subculture, it’s a social practice mediated through style. The intricate detail, originality and playfulness of Seoul’s street fashion makes it noteworthy. It’s not uncommon to see young couples coordinate their outfits; from harmonizing color schemes to wearing matching ensembles, even down to the accessories. Fashion changed for young Koreans, growing up an in a world where they can order the exact outfit their favorite K-pop idol wore on tour and receive it in the mail the next day. They have an endless array of choice in the palm of their hands and along the streets of trendy neighborhoods. Paepi illustrates a new level of consumerism instilled in a younger generation of Koreans born into a culture of thriving capitalism, wealth and changing social attitudes.

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Models: Min Jung Kim, Young Xin, Rana Hyuid, Mcjo Loofatmefler and Jinyun Kim

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Director: Jesus Reyes Photographer: Jacob Lagmay Models: Kelsey Bigelow, Lorenzo Lowe III, Keyshawn Davis, and Young Oum

Kelsey Glasses: Forever 21 Shirt: Supreme Pants: Nike

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H Y P E R B I O N I C


As the rise of streetwear continues, brands realize that the less of something they make, the more people want to buy it

Lorenzo Jacket: Supreme x Nike Briefs: Supreme Pants: Balenciaga Shoes: Dr. Martens Mask: Amazon 19


Lorenzo

Lorenzo

Jacket: OFF-WHITE x Nike

Shirt: OFF-WHITE

Shoes: Dr. Martens

Pants: Balenciaga

2020


Keyshawn Jacket: Acne Studios Utility Chest Bag: Urban Outfitters Coin Wallet: Virgil for Louis Vuitton Pants: Zara Shoes: Dr. Martens

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Sneakers that sell out in seconds and hoodies with waiting lists, consumers turn to automated buying robots, that stand in online queues for the most coveted of drops. Their presence makes every release as chaotic as Black Friday. Even if you wait countless hours, fingers on the trackpad, ready to spend, you may still find yourself empty handed. The value of limited edition streetwear is more than monetary, it now takes time and sometimes artificial intelligence to get something truly hyped.

Lorenzo Jacket: Supreme x Nike Mask: Amazon 22


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Heather Toliver Illustrator and Writer: Lanikai Yatomi

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Toliver wears a metal carabiner necklace which reminds her of her climbing journey and experiences.

How one climber from Bend, OR ascends vertical terrain and finds courage in fashion To an outsider, Heather Toliver seems like a natural born climber, like someone who went straight from climbing her crib to climbing canyons, but that assumption could not be further from the truth. When traveling to Utah, she met climbers that inspired her with their adventures and passion for the sport. Toliver used rock climbing to connect with them and join in. She started off bouldering at first and realized that lead climbing would challenge her even more, in a way that she had never experienced before. Although she wanted to get better at climbing quickly, “Everyone in Bend is adventuring and hiking, these guys are inspiring,” Toliver said. Upon starting, she wanted to be as skilled as her husband Tim and the people around her. But it was actually Tim that convinced her to have patience and be cautious while building gradually upon her skill level. Clothing has played into her evolution as a climber. When setting out, she dresses for her mood, she wants to inspire herself for the day of adventure ahead. When she feels more nervous, she dresses nicer Toliver said. “People in Bend dress with labels, but I rarely do” Toliver said. “I don’t mind standing out,” she said, while describing her wardrobe. She wears plenty of vintage pieces, prioritizing wearing something fun. Even when facing her fears, only supported by ropes, Toliver’s fashion still comes into play.

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The New American Socialite Director and Writer: Sarah Rogers Photographer: Lyanna Hoang Model: Natalie Vandomelen

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Natalie Cardigan: Vintage Clutch purse: Gucci

How Instagram influencers have evolved into socialites and the impact this has on our perception of self-worth You’re scrolling through Instagram late at night. Still scrolling, passing images of friends and family and cute animal videos. Photo after photo goes past. And then you finally pause on a particular post, it’s of your favorite influencer at an exclusive red carpet event in L.A., and now you’re interested. The glamour and glitz, it intrigues you. You say, “that’s goals,” and then click the icon image that displays a manicured selfie: big lips, fluffed hair and sculpted cheekbones. On her profile, you’re suddenly transported into her world but the underlying question is, does that world exist, and if it does, how do you get in? They are the children of the unholy god of Instagram— socialites: the rich and wealthy of our generation, put on display by a social-media platform. As humans, we feel comfort in being apart of something, we feel joy in being recognized, being liked in a way that goes beyond acceptance. Social-media popularity can play a part in this.

Socialites have been setting trends since the 18thcentury, but in the early 2000s, pop-culture icons like Paris Hilton inspired the idea of the influencer. An influencer could be the new American socialite based on posting about your lavish lifestyle, killer wardrobe and sensational beauty. Although it’s natural for people to compare themselves to others, research done by Danielle Leigh Wagstaff, a psychology professor at Federation University, believes that Instagram confuses our social comparison radar more than any other socialmedia platform. Is this comparison due to the fact that we can’t distinguish what is real and what is not? In a world where editing has become so normalized, what happens when we compare ourselves to these curated displays of a false reality? What happens when you wish you looked like her, but she doesn’t even look like that?

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ELECTRICAL TECHNICOLOR

Director and Writer: Jessica Thompson Photographer: Sierra Joyner Models: George Zakaib, Hannah Doversprike, Jvckfrost, Hannah Copher and Summer Burch

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Jvckfrost Vest: ASRV Pants: Jessica Thompson Seakers: Adidas Human Race NMD

The rainbow nation will reteach the values and the knowledge that has been lost to our greedy history, demonstrating how to have wisdom and extra-perception, and how unity, harmony and love is the only way forward. Peace. Love. Unity. Respect. These are the most important values according to the rave community. Respect for every fashion choice Respect for every dance style Respect for all forms of expression Respect for all body types The human body generates more bio-electricity than a 120-volt battery and over 25,000 British thermal units of body heat Now multiply that by 50,000 attendees, all dancing to a sound pressure level of about 20,000 watts of bass. The energy at these festivals are transcendent and intense, I can only offer you a glimpse of what it means to take a trip down the rabbit hole.

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Hannah D. Top: Rave Wonderland Mask: Shop Bglittz Bomber: Melrose Trading Post

Tophat: Buffalo Exchange

Each one of us is an aspect of the infinite. If you do not feel alien, boxed in, and at the same time, in awe of its beauty, wonder, and inspired to create, you are missing the point of this temporal existence.

The rave scene stemmed from the Acid House scene of the late 1980s, in London, England. The term ‘rave’ was used to describe the avant-garde, bohemian parties of the Westminsiter Soho beatnik set.

Raves were created to be an intentionally designed experience, the music, lighting, lazers and ambience were all fine-tuned to elicit and alter states of reality. What makes the steady rhythm of house music so distinct is the 120 beats per minute, which is actually the frequency of the fetal heart rate. This is also the same tempo believed to be used in tribal ceremonies around the world. Through communal dancing, flow toys, jewelry trading, rave attendees sought to reach group consciousness on a level they had never experienced before.

Rave culture in the United States is currently stereotyped with images of young adults wearing skin-tight neon outfits and leg wraps. However, in the United Kingdom, techno fashion is categorized with fishnets, black and white static graphics, pops of color, cargo pants and chain links.

To me personally, raving means individuality. It means supporting small local businesses like Shop Bglittz. It means marvelling in the beauty and histaria of my friends and artists. It means dancing and prancing with no care in the world. It means meeting amazing new people. It means family. It’s absolutely euphoric to be part of a crowd, consciously emulating an auric glow so loud and so powerful it speaks to the soul.

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George Jumpsuit: Buffalo Exchange

As modern fashion designers crave community and exaggerated style, a connection to rave culture emerges, but perhaps they are channeling more than just neon. Fashion houses such as Prada, MiuMiu and Balenciaga seem to embrace rave trends because they are about an altered state of mind, it creates a sense of euphoria that encourages unapologetic and groundbreaking style that may not have existed otherwise. During the 1980s, ravers differentiated themselves from other music-based parties at the time by participating in a new sense of community not previously made before. Today, even 40 years later, the community is remains immersed in the experience and the collective spark of peace, love, unity and respect.


Hannah C. Top: Urban Outfitters Bodysuit: Shop Bglittz Pants: Urban Outfitters Shoes: Demonia

Summer Bandeau: Shop Bglittz macramĂŠ halter: Q Point: Pants: Dollskill

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J

O

O

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S


Noah Jeans: Old Navy Jacket: Levis Shoes: Calvin Klein

Juriana Overalls: Suite Zero Overshirt: LF Sneakers: Nike Air Forces

LITHIUM Director: Zahra Joseph

Photographer: Nyjah Gobert

Models: Juriana Sagrero, Noah Denker, Onesimus Clarke, Shekinah Clarke

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Onesimus Jacket: Suite Zero Jeans: Wrangler Sneakers: Air Jordan 11 Retro Low

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Shekinah Jacket: Suite Zero Earings: Zara

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SILVERADO

Director and writer Roman Cohen Photographer: Claire Nelson Model: Ameer Fofanah

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Ameer Shirt: Buffalo Exchange Overalls: Buffalo Exchange Boots: Wasteland

The Yeehaw Agenda Close your eyes and picture a cowboy. Did you picture a white man? Why is that? There’s an untold narrative of the black cowboy, one that has been erased from old westerns and history books alike. Today, the resurgence of the black cowboy can be seen thriving in areas of music, art and fashion. Artists such as Solange Knowles, Beyonce Knowles-Carter, Lizzo and Lil Nas X are reclaiming the westernized view of the American cowboy, and bringing it back to it’s black roots.

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Director and Writer: Vicki Liang Photographer: Brittnee Barry Model: Robbie Portoni, Maria Duong and Emma Garcia

Cobalt-tinged blues radiate both on and off the

CHROMATIC CONSUMPTION Drawn away from the usual pairing of black and white, this past year has seen injections of vibrant, retina searing shades that pulsate

simply donning a solid-colored ensemble, to meshing different prints and textures— people can play all within the same color family

via monochrome outfits. From runway to streetwear, the trend of dressing in one color allows people to experiment sartorially— from

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runway, adding a cool punch to the trappings of

hues create an energetic vibe. Model Robbie wears a

streetwear style. Phosphorescent in nature, these

transparent blue raincoat and jersey shirt from ASOS.


Bright, bold shades of red symbolize both protest and play, a spectrum that has familiarized itself within our social climate. Glossy reds punctuate the lighter side— here, model Maria wears a pleated red satin dress from ASOS.

Tradition ties green closely with nature, as concerns surrounding climate change rise, our interest in sustainable and natural tones do as well. Earth-toned greens saturate our perspective for the future ahead. Model Emma wears a green two-piece suit from ASOS and a satin bralette from Victoria Secret.

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You feel the gravel digging into your feet; your heart racing. The moonlight allows you to see the path ahead but only just enough, leaving mystery in the trees racing by you. A rustle in the bushes behind you urges you forward but it’s not fast enough. You feel something pulling you back into the darkness and a scream escapes your lips. As your eyes bolt open, you plummet back into your bed. Although nightmares like these usually decrease as we transition from childhood into adulthood, the significance of these scary but realistic dreams begin to mean much more. Despite many adults brushing off these dreams as just a bad night’s sleep, these dreams can give crucial insight into inner struggles Through careful attention, self-analysis and a dash of Googling, hidden messages behind our dreams may help us to find meaning through our unconcious mind.

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Director: Chloe Kehn Photographer: Canon Wright Writer: Jo Carstensen Model: Kim Knudtson

One of the most common dreams, occurring roughly five times in every person’s life, is the never-ending falling dream. Heart racing and palms sweating, those milliseconds of plummeting towards the ground usually indicate that you feel like you’ve lost control. This feeling of helplessness can be related to a particular situation in life; maybe it’s in a relationship, or at work or school.

Dreaming that your teeth are falling out is a classic dream that usually catches us sprinting to the mirror to reexamine our oral-care regimen. Despite our initial reaction, this dream rarely actually means that we need to be flossing more. There are many ways psychologists have interpreted this wide-spread dream, but it’s usually between feeling like you are unable to make a decision, or that you must make a costly compromise. This loss of teeth something so heavily relied upon, highlights the cost of inaction while not making a decision. This dream could also be a sign that you’ve been confronted with a decision, but were unsatisfied with the options, leaving you with a bad taste in your mouth or in this case, a lack of teeth.

Dreaming of running can indicate that you’re preparing the strength you’ll need to reach a goal or overcome a challenge. Because it takes hard work and determination to run, it’s logical that you will have to use this same conviction when overcoming something in your life. The interpretation of running can change depending on what you’re running from. For example, sprinting from a killer could suggest worry about your quality of life, or panic about how much you think you can accomplish. Being chased by a deadly animal could be a physical manifestation of your initial gut reaction to a person or certain event that was unexpected or surprising. This flight reaction causes your subconscious-self to dream of running.

Kim Pajamas: Serenedelicacy

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Experiment Director, Writer and Photographer: Logan Howell Model: Sanghyeon Yu

Catching up with designer Sanghyeon Yu on how storytelling and design go hand-in-hand

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOURSELF AS A DESIGNER? I’m just a dude printing t-shirts, man, [laughs] to be honest. I don’t have fancy elaborations about myself. I don’t see myself as important as the designs are. Which I guess is all about my brand identity too. Let’s say I sell this briefcase to someone else, and you have your own interpretation of it, I want to see that. Not like ‘Oh this is Yuxa, a Yuxa bag.’ I want to see how other people perceive my designs. It’s like how in photography, many photographers could shoot the same model but it’s always different. I want to see that happening. That’s what got me into all of this. Seeing people wearing my stuff. At the very first drop, I didn’t really think that way. I just thought, ‘oh, my friends like my designs, maybe I can print more and they’ll wear it” and then I would see them around campus or at parties wearing my things and be like, ‘wow this is fun, this feels good.’ I see people wearing my t-shirts as comfy clothing, like sleepwear, and I’m happy with that. My designs are like my kids, I love every individual design. I just like to see my designs go out in society and interact with people. It’s so fun. HOW DO YOU TAKE ADVANTAGE OF AN IDEA AND FURTHER YOUR CREATIVITY? From a lot of failures. A lot of failures. Because making furniture is my job

Designer Sanghyeon Yu examines interior of handmade Epoxy briefcase. Inspired by

now, I’ve been making pieces for about four years now. And I always make

the play “Death of a Salesman,” Yu wanted to reclaim the negativity he associated with

mistakes, and those processes make me think about the materials a lot. Like

traditional breifcases.

types of wood have different hardness and grain directions. It really comes from that obsession, because you want to make the right furniture for the right purpose. WHAT DO YOU THINK MADE YOUR LATEST FASHION SHOW WITH

SO THAT’S NOT WHAT I SEE IN THIS BRIEFCASE, HOW DID YOU TAKE

DAMCHIC A SUCCESS?

THAT IDEA AND MAKE SOMETHING BRIGHT AND EXCITING?

The models have their own characters. So, like, the title of the fashion show

Good question, I’ve never explained this to anyone. So like, salesman suit

was Dr. Terra’s Guests. Bri was representing Dr. Terra and she opened the

with a briefcase, they work all day every year. He doesn’t know where he’s

portals, and she brings the disfuture people to the show. I liked that show

going or what he’s passionate for, he just makes money. So I feel the negative

because it goes really well with the storyline. Everything went really well

impressions from that form. Guy in a suit, holding a briefcase. And that

together. If you are showing the clothes, they’re just cool clothes… I think it

briefcase gave me a feeling of like, being blocked away from people and

should focus more on stories. When I’m putting it all together, I’m thinking,

society or himself. And at that time, I was messing with the Epoxy material, and

what material is this, what is it used for, why am I using it, what’s its story?

thought maybe I should make a briefcase out of it. You can see what’s inside and that will make a better impression for those people. I wanted to change

HOW DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?

the negative feelings that I typically get from normal briefcases.

I find inspiration from movies or from books, and shapes. I get most inspired by shapes and structures. But mostly, movies also play a big role in

SO YOU FELT THAT ENERGY AND WANTED TO REDEFINE IT?

storytelling. This particular briefcase is called Death of a Salesman. Do you

Yeah, I was really lucky ‘cause I was messing with that material. I was trying to

know the play? I was just reading that and was like, ‘life of people is so simple

make a chair but I was more inspired by the briefcase so I switched directions.

and repetitive and depressing.’

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Hyperreality  

In this issue we explore self-reflection in times of instability, an appreciation for what remains untarnished and the inability to distingu...

Hyperreality  

In this issue we explore self-reflection in times of instability, an appreciation for what remains untarnished and the inability to distingu...