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­VoxMeDAL FA L L 2016

THE VOICE OF DALHOUSIE MEDICAL ALUMNI

The power of teamwork The CHEB opens its doors to intensive interprofessional training

ALUMNI MAKING A DIFFERENCE AART: A NATIONAL LEADER CONVOCATION 2016


VoxMeDAL

alumni.medicine.dal.ca

FALL 2016 TABLE OF CONTENTS WELCOME

Mailed under Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement #40601061

EDITOR Evie Sabean Croucher CONTRIBUTORS Jocelyn Adams, Fallon Bourgeois, Allison Gerard and Melanie Jollymore DMAA BOARD OF DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE Dr. John Steeves (MD’74), President Dr. Margaret Leighton (MD’77) Vice-president Dr. George Ferrier (MD’73), Treasurer Dr. David Amirault (MD’76) Past-president Dr. Ivan Woolfrey (MD’65) Honorary President MEMBERS AT LARGE Dr. Michael Banks (MD’70) Dr. Lori Connors (MD’05) Dr. Katherine Glazebrook (MD’94) Dr. Dan Reid (MD’70) Dr. Merv Shaw (MD’65) Dr. Colin Van Zoost (MD’09) Dr. Joanna Zed (MD’88)

Amazing advancements in medicine are made right here in the Maritimes. This is where tomorrow’s big leap forward

WHERE BREAKTHROUGHS BEGIN

EXECUTIVE EX-OFFICIO Dr. David Anderson (MD’83), Dean, Faculty of Medicine Evie Sabean Croucher, Alumni Relations Officer Sarah Tremaine, (MD’20), DMSS President Dr. Adam Harris (MD’12), Maritime Resident Doctors Representative Please send news, story ideas, comments, and/or address changes to: Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association Dalhousie University 5850 College St. Rm. 1-C1 PO Box 15000 Halifax, NS B3H 4R2 Tel: 902-494-8800 Fax: 902-422-1324 email: medical.alumni@dal.ca alumni.medicine.dal.ca facebook.com/dalmedalumni

takes its first step. It’s the product of the hard work and

4 DMAA president’s message 5 Dean’s message 6 DMND update 7 DMAA update

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COVER STORY 16 The power of teamwork: Collaborative Health Education Building opens its doors to intensive interprofessional training

ALUMNI MAKING A DIFFERENCE 18 Fertile ground

Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology develops AART into a national leader

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20 Is there a doctor in the house?

Researchers chart access to primary care across Nova Scotia

22 DMAA profile: Dr. John Akabutu

2016 DMAA ALUMNI AWARDS 12 DMAA Honourary President: Dr. Margaret Casey 12 DMAA Alumnus of the Year: Dr. David Kirkpatrick 14 DMAA Family Physician of the Year: Dr. Carlyle Chow 15 DMAA Young Alumnus of the Year: Dr. Raghu Venugopal

FACULTY OF MEDICINE 8 Canadian Institutes of Health Research awards funds to med schoolaffiliated researchers

tireless effort of our researchers.

9 Common over-the-counter meds show signs of boosting anti-cancer immunity

And it’s made possible by

10 Sir Charles Tupper inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame 11 From machines to medicine: The Dr. Robert and Mrs. Forsythe Prize

generous donors who contribute

CONVOCATION 2016

to a cause that will benefit VoxMeDAL is published twice a year by Metro Guide Publishing Publisher: Patty Baxter Advertising Sales: Barb McConnell

people around the world for generations to come.

25 Congratulations MD Class of 2016 26 Recipients 28 Class notes

BACK PAGE

We are Dalhousie Medical Research Foundation. Metro Guide Publishing 2882 Gottingen Street Halifax, Nova Scotia B3K 3E2 Tel: 902-420-9943 Fax: 902-429-9058 publisher@metroguide.ca metroguidepublishing.ca

FA L L 2016

THE VOICE OF DALHOUSIE MEDICAL ALUMNI

The power of teamwork The CHEB opens its doors to intensive interprofessional training

30 In memorium

ALUMNI MAKING A DIFFERENCE AART: A NATIONAL LEADER CONVOCATION 2016

CHEB Building Photo by Nick Pierce

ISSN 0830-5315 (Print) ISSN 2292-6348 (Online)

Learn more about our work DMRF.ca

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30 Paging all alumni! The DMAA wants to keep you connected to your medical school community

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WELCOME DMAA PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

WELCOME DEAN’S MESSAGE

DMAA Gala 2016: An annual prescription for better health.

Working to develop education, service and research at Dalhousie

By Dr. John Steeves MD President DMAA

By Dr. David Anderson (MD’83) Dean, Faculty of Medicine

Recently a medical colleague challenged his audience of clinicians with the statement “If not you, then who?” Mahesh Raju was making the point that becoming a member of the profession of medicine was the result of the efforts of many knowledgeable, skilled and caring people. As physicians, we are the direct beneficiaries of their activities. Supporting those (mainly volunteer-based) efforts with our own unique skills and perspectives (and yes, funding) is crucial to the development of the next generation of physicians. No one else can or should be expected to do it as well. Financial support of alumni is critical to programs and research that will ensure that Dal Medical School continuously adapts to societal change and future health care demands. The DMAA Gala is the association’s primary fundraising event used to support special student projects of Dal Med students that run the gamut from health advocacy to student wellness. Show your appreciation for the med school that made your career in medicine possible and support our future physicians by attending the DMAA 2016 Gala. Laughter and stories, meeting old friends and making new ones, fine food and an opportunity to appreciate all those who made our careers in medicine possible are just some of the elements of the 2016 DMAA Gala that can have a positive impact on your health. A few years ago The Harvard Mental Health letter “In praise of Gratitude” identified some of the research linking expression of gratitude with personal happiness and sense of well being that can persist for months. An activity reflecting on earlier positive memories was an essential element.

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More recently, pilot studies have been undertaken suggesting beneficial results using structured medical prescriptions for exercise programs for health issues as varied as diabetes and Alzheimer’s much like we do for medication. At DMAA our Rx for better health comes in the form of a ticket for the DMAA 2016 Gala Saturday, October 22 at Pier 21. As soon as you put down your VoxMeDAL,

connect with a fellow alum and make plans to attend. See you there.

John Steeves MD President Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association

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It’s been just over a year since I’ve stepped in as Dalhousie Medical School’s 13th dean. There were many proud moments during the academic year: welcoming a new batch of medical students and residents; watching our graduates cross the convocation stage; and visiting educators and students at our many teaching sites in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island. I’m pleased to say our five-year strategic plan for the medical school is really shaping up thanks to incredible engagement from the medical school community. Through surveys, retreats, town halls, and feedback from Dalhousie, the Nova Scotia Health Authority, and provincial government partners, we’ve landed on three strategic priorities: service and engagement; education; and research. It’s been an exciting journey, and I’m delighted to say that we’re almost ready to unveil things. I’ll continue to rely on faculty, staff, and student involvement as we implement our plan. We’re moving closer to our visit with the Committee on the Accreditation of Canadian Medical Schools (CACMS). In February 2017, the committee will be reviewing our undergraduate MD program. We hosted a two-day, mock accreditation in April to help us prepare for the visit. This sparked our accreditation ramp-up, and identified areas we need to focus on. It’s been an incredible amount of work to date involving over 100

faculty, staff, and students. I’m grateful for the dedication of our accreditation team and the many sub-committees working on our self-study report. On the education side of things, we’ve had a successful winter and spring. Our undergraduate medical education curriculum has been moved online. This is proving to be an excellent improvement in how faculty and students navigate our MD curriculum. In the postgraduate world, our residency programs fared very well in the 2016 CaRMS match: Dal and McGill had the fewest unmatched residency spots in this year’s process, which speaks well for the outstanding national reputation of our postgraduate training. Our SimEd Network is up and running, and I’ve taken on the role as chair of the network’s oversight committee. We’ll be moving forward in partnership with the Nova Scotia Health Authority, the IWK Health Centre, and the Faculty of Health Professions to advance simulation training, research, and interprofessional education at Dalhousie. 2018 is fast approaching; we’ll be celebrating two anniversaries that year: the medical school’s 150th and Dal’s 200th. Planning for 2018 is well underway, and I can assure you that this is a year to come back to campus. We’ll be sharing more about what’s planned in the months to come.

Finally, on behalf of the medical school community, I want to thank and recognize Dr. Gerry Johnston’s time as our associate dean of research. Gerry’s held the role for the past 11 years, and has been a champion of advancing the medical school’s and Nova Scotia’s research agenda. Under his leadership, we’ve seen the launch of the Life Sciences Research Institute (a $70 million state-of-the-art research and incubator space for the life sciences) and startup of the CORES research facilities. As Gerry moves into retirement, Dr. Roger McLeod, our assistant dean of graduate and postdoctoral studies, will be stepping into the position. It’s hard to believe that a year passes by so quickly. I’ll be seeing many of you in October for our annual alumni gala, but until then, feel free to get in touch with the alumni office, or me, if you have any questions about your alma mater. You can also stay up-to-date on our news and current affairs through our social media accounts (Facebook: Dalhousie Medical School; Twitter: @dalmedschool; Instagram: @dalmedschool). Until next time.

Richard Nickerson SENIOR FINANCIAL PLANNING ADVISOR, ASSANTE CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD. Assante Capital Management Ltd. (“ACM”), and Assante Financial Management Ltd. (“AFM”) are indirect, wholly-owned subsidiaries of CI Financial Corp. (“CI”). The principal business of CI is the management, marketing, distribution and administration of mutual funds, segregated funds and other fee-earning investment products for Canadian investors through its wholly-owned subsidiary CI Investments Inc. Wealth Planning Services may be provided by an accredited Assante Advisor or Assante Private Client, a division of CI Private Counsel LP. ACM is a member of the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada and the Canadian Investor Protection Fund. AFM is a member of the Mutual Fund Dealers Association of Canada (“MFDA”), and MFDA Investor Protection Corporation.

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WELCOME DALHOUSIE MEDICINE NEW BRUNSWICK

DMAA UPDATE

Success, growth, leadership continues at DMNB

DMAA Update By Evie Sabean Croucher, Alumni Relations Officer

By Dr. Jennifer Hall, Associate Dean, DMNB

Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick (DMNB) has continued to grow and mature over the last 12 months. The Class of 2016 tossed their caps in mid-May and have begun the next phase of their medical careers as residents. This year, four DMNB students graduated as MD’s with distinction, with another eight taking home awards at Halifax convocation. Just under half of the students will enter Family Medicine residency programs with the remaining choosing Royal College Specialties. We are pleased to see a number of these new residents continuing their medical education in the Province in one of the many New Brunswick-based residency training programs. We are thrilled to watch yet another lively and dedicated class move forward. Dr. Robert Boulay, a physician in the Miramichi area, has been appointed Assistant Dean DMNB Clinical Education. Dr. Boulay will oversee the clinical curriculum delivery at DMNB across the four years of the undergraduate program. Dr. Lisa Searle, a practicing physician in Moncton, has been appointed Director of Faculty Development.

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The biannual Dalhousie Clerkship tour was carried out last fall with the Associate Dean UGME, the Assistant Dean Clerkship, and a number of Dalhousie Clerkship Directors joining the Associate Dean DMNB and the Assistant Dean DMNB Clinical Education. The leadership team met with the medical education leadership, students and administrative staff at each of the five New Brunswick clinical sites: Saint John, Fredericton, Miramichi, Moncton, and Upper River Valley. In curriculum based news, the implementation of Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship Dalhousie (LICD) in Moncton has been successful, with five students matching to the site in the 2015–16 academic year. The LICD is a model for the third year clerkship in which the core clerkship discipline units are integrated into a year-long program, which is based on continuity (of learning, learning environment, supervision and assessment, and patient experiences) and patient -centered care. Presently the LICD is administratively based in Miramichi Regional Hospital, the Moncton Hospital and Upper River Valley Hospital, New Brunswick.

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The research program at DMNB continues to enjoy success and growth due to the determination, innovation and drive of the Principal Investigators and their students. Their pursuits in grant acquisitions have led two graduate students to be awarded DMNB Graduate studentships each valued at $17,500, with grant acquisitions and revenues totaling $1,232,229. These achievements demonstrate their commitment to high quality basic science and clinical research at DMNB. With the continued development and maturity described above, DMNB has become a key resource to the Dalhousie Faculty of Medicine and a partner in medical education and research. Sincerely,

It’s hard to believe that fall has come so quickly. Things are moving right along here in the DMAA office and we’re working on a lot of great events and initiatives. We recently welcomed over 100 new students at orientation and are excited to get to know them over their four years at Dalhousie Medical School. I’d like to welcome our new staff member, Jocelyn Adams, to the role of Communications and Events Coordinator. Jocelyn has already been working at Dalhousie for a few years in the Department of Family Medicine and the School of Physiotherapy. Contact Jocelyn at any time if you’d like information on gala tickets, help planning your class reunion, or with any other questions you may have about DMAA activities. The DMAA Awards Gala is always an anticipated event. This year’s dinner will be held on Saturday, October 22. The 2016 award winners are truly exceptional physicians, and I encourage everyone to join us to celebrate their achievements. The gala is also the signature fundraiser for the DMAA. This event allows us to give financial support to current Dalhousie medical students to support their projects and programs. If you would like to purchase tickets for the gala, donate a door prize, or help in any way, please contact the DMAA office. 2018 is shaping up to be an exciting year for Dalhousie as the university celebrates its 200th anniversary, with our medical school celebrating their 150th anniversary in the same year. Many exciting conferences, lectures, and special events are being planned for 2018, why not add your class reunion? Maybe your class meets religiously every five years, or maybe you’ve lapsed for a few. What better excuse to get together than to celebrate 150 years of excellence at Dalhousie Medical School? The DMAA office can help you get in touch with lost classmates and start planning your event for 2018. Contact our office for details. In addition to anniversary events, the DMAA is looking for alumni to share their

favourite stories of their time at Dal. If you have a funny, interesting, or touching story you’d like to share please let us know! You can email medical.alumni@dal.ca with your memories. These stories could be shared in an upcoming anniversary issue of VoxMeDAL. I truly hope you all have a great fall and winter. As always, your DMAA staff is here to help you with whatever you need.

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FACULTY OF MEDICINE

FACULTY OF MEDICINE

Canadian Institutes of Health Research awards nearly $10 million to med school-affiliated researchers By Melanie Jollymore

Foundation grant recipients Two researchers with medical school affiliations received large foundation grants, which the CIHR website says are “designed to contribute to a sustainable foundation of new, mid-career, and established health research leaders, by providing long-term support for the pursuit of innovative, highimpact research programs.”

Rudolf Uher, MD, PhD, FRCPC, Psychiatry

Bill Baldridge and Bal Chauhan (Photo Credit: Brain Repair Centre)

While competition for Canadian of Institutes of Health Research funding awards continues to be intense—with only nine of 491 project grants going to researchers in Atlantic Canada—several Dalhousie Medical School-affiliated researchers secured substantial awards, together worth nearly $10 million.

localizing and tracking BBB pathology and testing potential new neuroprotective and therapeutic agents.

Project grant recipients

In his ongoing work to better understand and monitor the progression of glaucoma, Dr. Bal Chauhan and his team will use novel techniques and their CIHR funding to learn how retinal ganglion cells change and die in experimental models of glaucoma, and how this deterioration affects visual function over time. Their findings will help guide clinicians in their efforts to monitor glaucoma in their patients.

Six medical school scientists collectively secured $4.75 million in project grants, described on the CIHR website as “designed to capture ideas with the greatest potential to advance health-related fundamental or applied knowledge, health research, health care, health systems, and/or health outcomes… projects with a specific purpose and a defined endpoint.”

Craig McCormick, PhD, Microbiology & Immunology A new class of drugs against influenza viruses Dr. Craig McCormick and his team are investigating the possibility of repurposing an approved anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory drug into a weapon again influenza viruses. Already proven to be safe, this medication offers the opportunity to selectively disrupt influenza virus production without harming uninfected cells, before the virus has a chance to mutate into a drug-resistant strain.

Alon Friedman, MD, PhD, Medical Neuroscience Vascular pathology in traumatic brain injury Dr. Alon Friedman and his team are investigating traumatic microvascular injury in the brain—and damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB)—as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for long-term neurological and cognitive complications of traumatic brain injury. The new CIHR funding will allow them to test a new imaging approach for detecting,

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Balwantray Chauhan, PhD, Ophthalmology & Visual Science Changes in the retina and optic nerve in experimental glaucoma

Janice Graham, PhD, Pediatrics Global vaccine logics Dr. Janice Graham’s new CIHR funding will allow her and her team to work with the World Health Organization (WHO), government officials, scientists and community health workers to develop a framework for strengthening health systems in low and middle-income countries. Spurred by the difficulties communities and nations faced in coping with the Western African Ebola outbreak, this work will focus on creating a universal integrated platform for research, emergency response training and preparedness for future disease outbreaks.

Victor Rafuse, PhD, Medical Neuroscience Deciphering the mechanisms underlying synaptic dysfunction at the neuromuscular junction in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Dr. Victor Rafuse and the team in his lab are shedding light on the mechanisms that cause motor neurons to withdraw from the neuromuscular junction (the location where motor neurons physically contact muscle cells and release a chemical that signals the muscles to contract) in amyotrophic

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lateral sclerosis (ALS). Loss of these synaptic connections contributes to the death of motor neurons and accelerates the rate of paralysis in ALS. Dr. Rafuse and his team are using a variety of sophisticated models to identify potential targets for therapeutics that could stabilize these synaptic connections.

Restoring useful function to completely and permanently denervated skeletal muscles With a second major CIHR project grant, Dr. Rafuse will continue his work to explore how the nervous system may be bypassed altogether to stimulate muscle cells directly with light. These studies will lay the foundation for using this new technology to restore meaningful movement, such as hand grasping or breathing, to individuals whose hand muscles or diaphragm were permanently paralyzed due to motor neuron death after a spinal cord injury.

Christopher McMaster, PhD, Pharmacology Treating FEVR, an inherited childhood blinding disorder Dr. Christopher McMaster and his team have developed a class of novel drugs that they’ve shown in preclinical models to effectively treat the first stage of the inherited childhood blinding disorder known as familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR). FEVR begins with a lack of vascularization of the retina, followed by secondary aberrant “neo-vascularization” that can lead to retinal detachment and complete blindness. Current laser and surgical treatments help reduce blindness caused by this aberrant blood-vessel growth, but they do not address the original failure to develop retinal vasculature. New CIHR funding will enable Dr. McMaster to move this breakthrough therapy along the drugdevelopment pathway toward approved use in humans.

Common over-the-counter meds show signs of boosting anti-cancer immunity By Allison Gerrard

Early interventions to pre-empt severe mental illness Dr. Rudolf Uher wants to help families with a history of mental illness (such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression) prevent their children from developing severe disease. Families Overcoming Risks and Building Opportunities for Well-being (FORBOW) tests a novel pre-emptive early intervention called SWELL (Skills for Wellness). SWELL helps young people learn skills that not only address their present problems, but also equip them to deal with future challenges. In addition to testing the effectiveness of SWELL, the researchers are exploring whether or not a genetic test can help select individuals who are most likely to benefit from the intervention. Their vision is to provide timely personalized interventions to safeguard the mental health of the next generation.

Patrick McGrath, PhD, Psychology, Psychiatry and Pediatrics Accessible and cost Effective psychosocial health interventions for Canadians A CIHR Foundation Grant will enable Dr. Patrick McGrath and his team of staff and scientific collaborators to work in a partnership with the Canadian College of Family Physicians to develop, evaluate and disseminate a set of scientifically valid web- and smartphone-based applications (apps) known as HealthEnSuite. HealthEnSuite will be integrated with other resources so that family doctors and other providers can provide the apps to their patients. The apps help teach skills and provide social support to patients and families with health problems including depression, sleep problems and caring for someone with dementia. HealthEnSuite incorporates continuing education for healthcare providers and training for the next generation of investigators in this area. Its long-term sustainability will be ensured by the formation of a not-for profit that will license and export HealthEnSuite around the world.

Dalhousie Medical School researchers are investigating how common over-thecounter drugs used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders might enhance the body’s immune system and ability to fight off cancer. While a number of medications can modify immune function to enhance anticancer immunity, many of them can’t be used routinely because of negative side effects. But the Dalhousie team has found two everyday medications—ranitidine and famotidine—that reduce breast cancer growth and metastasis in mouse models. “The immune system plays an important role in defending against cancer,” says Dr. Jean Marshall, professor in the Department of Microbiology & Immunology and the study’s principal investigator. “It can both reduce the incidence of initial tumour development and slow down or prevent cancer spread.” In the general population, ranitidine and famotidine, more commonly known as Zantac and Pepcid AC, are regularly used to treat peptic ulcers and acid reflux. These non-prescription drugs, which are widely recognized as well tolerated and safe, are also used by cancer patients to ease chemotherapy-related nausea.

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Testing anti-cancer immunity in people “Because cancer patients often take these drugs to reduce chemo side effects, our team of clinical and basic scientists looked at how they impact function of the immune system in breast cancer,” says Dr. Marshall. “Our experiments have shown promising results; we found that daily treatment of ranitidine or famotidine inhibited the development and spread of breast tumours in mice.” The next step is to test whether the drugs have a similar effect on other cancers, and if they have the same impact on the human immune system in a project recently funded by the Canadian Cancer Society. “The outcome of our laboratory studies are exciting, warranting further investigation into their transferability to people,” says Dr. Marshall. “Ranitidine and famotidine have potential to safely prevent or slow down the development of cancer by boosting the immune response. If similar effects are seen in people, the drugs could aid in effective cancer immunotherapy or cancer prevention in those at high risk of developing the disease.” Working alongside Dr. Marshall are Dr. Lisa Barrett, viral immunologist and assistant professor in the Division of Infectious Diseases and Dr. Paola Marignani, professor in the department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and associate professor in the department of Pathology.

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FACULTY OF MEDICINE

FACULTY OF MEDICINE

Sir Charles Tupper inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame (CMHF)

From machines to medicine

Sir Charles Tupper was inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame (CMHF) at their annual gala on April 14 in Hamilton, Ontario. Tupper was the chair of the committee that was responsible for creating Dalhousie Medical School in the 1800s. He passed away in 1915 at the age of 94. On July 14, 1967 the Sir Charles Tupper Medical Building was opened in honour of Tupper, who was a dedicated physician, Father of Confederation, premier of Nova Scotia, and the prime minister of Canada. Tupper was the also the first president of the Canadian Medical Association and was president of the Canadian Medical Association and was president of the Medical Society of Nova Scotia (now Doctors Nova Scotia).

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An innovator in the field of psychiatry, Dr. Robert Forsythe’s impact and legacy carries on through the Dr. Robert and Mrs. Forsythe Prize. By Fallon Bourgeois

The late Robert Forsythe (MD’53) entered the world of psychiatric medicine at a time of fundamental changes; the years proceeding Second World War. And it was undoubtedly his own first-hand experiences as a war pilot that influenced his decision to pursue medicine at Dalhousie in 1948. Like many who served in the war, Dr. Forsythe observed radical changes in the personality and character in his comrades. “Bob always had an interest in people, but what he experienced during the war only heightened his curiosity and made him want to help others,” says Dorothy Forsythe of her late husband. While Dr. Forsythe was training to be a physician, the health-care system was feeling the post-effects of war with a sharp spike in the numbers of patients in institutional care. Understaffing, overcrowding and the lack of effective treatments often led to restrictive care, relying on methods involving seclusion, as well as chemical and physical restraints. As his education and experience evolved, Dr. Forsythe recognized that medical science was on the cusp of developing effective treatments for psychiatric illness. “When Bob began his career in the late 1950s, mental health was vastly different,” Dorothy says. “He was the first psychiatrist to use anti-psychotics in P.E.I. It was the first time the staff had seen real changes, and the patients benefited, too. The health and welfare of his patients always came first.” Over the course of his 50-year career, Dr.

Forsythe continued to influence and impact the field in many ways, including as Director of Mental Health in P.E.I. and as Chief Medical Adviser, Psychiatry and Neurology for the Department of Veterans Affairs. And making a difference in the lives of his patients always remained his top priority. “Bob was modest about his accomplishments, but he took great pride in realizing some of the ambitions that first set him on the path to psychiatry,” says Dorothy. “He had a very rewarding career and was grateful that he was able to have a positive impact on many people in the field—patients and colleagues alike.” And thanks to the Forsythes’ generosity, his legacy and passion for helping others will live on through the Dr. Robert and Mrs. Dorothy Forsythe Prize, which recognizes a graduating student in the Faculty of Medicine with an aptitude and interest in psychiatry. “Creating this award was a way to give back to Bob’s alma mater, which has always held a special place in our family,” says Dorothy. “We also saw it as a terrific opportunity to support students who could make great contributions to the field someday.” While Dr. Forsythe passed away just months before the first prize was awarded last May, Dorothy says they were both extremely proud to support a student and recognize their hard work and dedication to psychiatry. For Andrew Dutcher (MD’15), the first

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recipient of the prize, it was an honour to receive the award from someone he sees as an innovator. “Dr. Forsythe’s career was very inspiring,” says Dr. Dutcher who is doing a psychiatry residency in Calgary. “The Forsythes’ support meant a great deal to me during my fourth year of medicine and will continue to inspire me throughout my career in psychiatry.”

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DMAA ALUMNI AWARDS

DMAA ALUMNI AWARDS

2016 DMAA Honourary President : Dr. Margaret Casey By Jocelyn Adams Each year, the Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association (DMAA) celebrates our alumni who have significantly contributed to the medical profession. One of the DMAA’s most prestigious awards is the Honourary President’s Award. This year, the Association is proud to present the 2016 Honourary President’s Award to an exceptional alumna, Dr. Margaret Casey (MD’68). Casey served 25 years as Director of the North End Community Health Association Clinic, is a former director of admissions for Dalhousie University’s Faculty of Medicine, served as president of the DMAA Board of Directors, and is a recipient of the Order of Nova Scotia and the Order of Canada. Casey followed in her family’s medical footsteps and graduated from Dalhousie Medical School in 1968. “I came from a medical family,” she says. “I was very familiar with the culture and interested in the science of medicine. I also have deep Maritime roots and both my parents went to Dalhousie.” During her first years of studies, she was one of six females in her class. The women were older and had worked before entering medical school. “I was 26 when I started medical school and that was old in those days,” she says. “Since this time, I’ve been delighted to see the changes in the program.”

After graduating from Dalhousie, Dr. Casey practiced in a number of locations before entering a lifetime of learning in Halifax’s north end as part of a group of innovative women who were instrumental in opening a clinic in Halifax’s Gottingen Street. The clinic evolved into the North End Clinic, known today as the North End Community Health Centre. She spent the next 25 years as the Centre’s director in addition to being chair of their board of directors. “I had absolutely outstanding colleagues over the course of my career with the clinic,” she says. “The issues we dealt with were very challenging but the main thing was that I got to know the community. I realized their strengths and potentials and I loved every minute of it.” In her final two years as director of the clinic, she additionally became Director of Admissions with Dalhousie’s Faculty of Medicine. “I loved the position; it was so interesting to meet young people,” Casey says. Dr. Casey continues to give back to the community. At Dalhousie, she’s been involved in many roles and programs such as tutoring, IMU, a preceptor with Dalhousie’s Department of Family Medicine, Chair of the Admissions Committee, Chair of the Phase II Elective Unit and President of the Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association.

2016 DMAA Alumnus of the Year: Dr. David Kirkpatrick By Jocelyn Adams Dr. David Kirkpatrick (MD’79) is not one to easily accept praise. But the colleagues who nominated him for the 2016 Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association’s (DMAA) Alumnus of the Year Award believe he’s more than deserving and describe him as a “truly nurturing individual”. “He is an effective, solid, humble, surgical clinical and academic leader who exemplifies the qualities we always want to see in our alumni,” says Dr. John Steeves, DMAA President.

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Among his current appointments with multiple working groups, Kirkpatrick is an ENT specialist, a full professor and the head of surgery at Dalhousie University. He continues to improve the quality of the Nova Scotia Health Authority by implementing change and bringing better services to the people of Nova Scotia. In high school, Kirkpatrick’s plan to become a physician seemed impossible. Despite having a high IQ and a passion for science, he struggled academically. He

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Outside of the University, she’s volunteered with United Way, the Healthy Living Council, and has been a member of the CPCU Community and COPS Committee. Today, she continues to give back to the Community Foundations of Nova Scotia. “It is fair to say, if it hadn’t been for the sustained effort over many years of Margaret Casey, DMAA would not likely exist today,” says Dr. John Steeves, Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association President. When reflecting on her career and looking to the future, Casey has advice to new graduates. “I think the first thing to remember is to realize how fortunate you are,” she says. “It’s such a rewarding career and it has a wide range of impacts. As a physician you can be involved in so much. It’s also extremely important for young grads to give back to Dalhousie and to societies in general.” “I’m absolutely delighted and very proud to be chosen as the DMAA’s recipient of the 2016 Honourary President Award,” Casey says. “The DMAA is a great organization and it consolidates the experiences of the medical graduates and to get them all on board.”

discovered at an early age he was dyslexic and entered the Bachelor of Science program at Acadia University while on probation. “When I first started university I had no expectation of getting through my program. I had aspirations of going into medicine because of my family’s influence but I knew in my heart of hearts I wasn’t able to achieve that goal,” Kirkpatrick says. In his first year at Acadia, he realized he could overcome his challenges by changing how he absorbed material. He discovered through self-learning he was an auditory and visual learner. His studying techniques allowed him to graduate from university with honours and opened the door to study medicine. When he was accepted to Dalhousie’s Medical School, he recalls his parents were “somewhere between pleased and shocked.” The Kirkpatrick family has a longstanding history at Dalhousie. His father, uncle, grandfather and great uncle were all graduates of Dalhousie Medicine. David became the third generation to graduate from Dalhousie’s medical program in 1979. Kirkpatrick remembers his Dalhousie experience as enjoyable. “It was hard work but I had good teachers.” The late Dr. Stevens Thompson Norvell, from Dalhousie’s Department of Surgery, was an influential mentor who had an interest in education. Following his rotating internship at Dalhousie, Kirkpatrick practiced as a general practitioner and worked as a locum across Nova Scotia and later as the General Duty Medical Officer with the Canadian Armed Forces. After working as a general practitioner his interests shifted from general practice to a surgical discipline. He was first inspired by Halifax based ENT specialist Dr. Ron MacRae while working at the hospital at Acadia. MacRae travelled from Halifax to Wolfville to perform rigid bronchoscopies and he remembers he wanted to do the same. When Kirkpatrick was in general practice, he developed a lump on his neck and went into the ENT clinic. The head of the residency program saw him sitting in the waiting room and recalled that Kirkpatrick had an interested in joining the ENT program and proceeded to tell him they had a residency opening and offered him the position right there. He was recruited

to Dalhousie and completed his training in general surgery and ENT and wrote his Royal College exams in 1986. His passion led him to complete a fellowship in otology-neurotology from the University of Toronto. When in Toronto, he completed the first offered courses in endoscopic sinus surgery from a mentor who was pioneering this training in Canada. As the method was new world-wide, Kirkpatrick and his colleagues brought this surgery back to Nova Scotia. He returned home and developed a practice in otology-neurotoloy and endoscopic sinus surgery. He was appointed to interim head of an independent Department of Otolaryngology. To grow the department, he negotiated an AFP with the former Nova Scotia Minister of Health to move the Department into a Division of Surgery. Two years later, he was appointed as Head of the Division of Otolaryngology with the Department of Surgery. He held this position for the next 10 years. The movement allowed the division to grow its research, fill sub-specialties within the areas, improve the residency program and establish a much stronger division overall. “To this day it attracts the top applicants in the country,” says Kirkpatrick. All the people we bring in are so well trained, they’re just so good. I feel inferior to the people to the people that I work with.” Dr. Allan Purdy, a friend and colleague, describes Kirkpatrick’s work. “He was instrumental in building the division of surgery, actively recruiting an entire faculty. His great success at this time stems from his sense of trustworthiness.” Kirkpatrick continues to play a critical role within Nova Scotia’s health care. In recent years, he’s become interested in healthcare economics. More specifically, the relationship between the quality of health care and cost. “If you improve the quality of health care you can reduce cost,” Kirkpatrick says. In 2011, Kirkpatrick and his colleagues established the Nova Scotia Perioperative Advisory Committee. The most gratifying product of this committee was the agreement of funding for the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP). NSQIP will look at all surgical

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outcomes across the province 30 days after surgery and points out areas in need of improvement with resources on how to improve it. Nova Scotia will be the first to implement this program in Atlantic Canada, joining approximately 100 hospitals across Canada and 5,000 in North America. “It’s been very effective and has been in existence for 10 years. Recently, a hospital in Westminster, British Columbia, has shown significant improvement in the quality of health care since using this program,” Kirkpatrick says. “We expect the Nova Scotia Health Authority to save approximately $2 million in its first year of being implemented. The program will start in the fall of 2016.” Among the implementation of NSQIP, another highlight has been developing working groups that bring together specialists from across Nova Scotia to create a more integrated health authority. Their goal is to create a greater degree of standardization and treatment protocols across Nova Scotia. “It should be if you’re a patient from Nova Scotia and you enter the system you should be treated the same no matter where you enter it from,” Kirkpatrick says. In July 2016, Kirkpatrick was re-appointed as the chief of the Department of Surgery at Dalhousie University and Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) for another fiveyear term. In addition to having numerous publications and presentations, Kirkpatrick holds several appointments as an educator and evaluator. He sits on the editorial board for the Journal of Otolaryngology and is an advisor to the editor for Canadian Family Physician. He is a member of the Annual National Exam in Otolaryngology Committee and has served as a Royal Collage examiner. Kirkpatrick recognizes the continued love and support of his wife of 40 years, Paula Taylor, and their three children; Katie, Matthew, and Leigh, who have each pursued careers in fields he describes as “fascinating.” Outside of work, Kirkpatrick lives an active life and in 2009 climbed Mount Kilimanjaro. In his spare time he continues to enjoy hiking, cycling, photography, guitar and gardening.

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DMAA ALUMNI AWARDS

DMAA ALUMNI AWARDS

2016 DMAA Family Physician of the Year: Dr. Carlyle Chow

2016 Young Alumnus of the Year: Dr. Raghu Venugopal

By Jocelyn Adams

By Jocelyn Adams

Dr. Carlyle Chow (MD’68) has been a part of the community of Baddeck, N.S., for 48 years, providing exceptional medical care as a family physician. The Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association (DMAA) is happy to recognize the innovation, passion for the profession, and years of service of Chow as this year’s recipient of the Family Physician of the Year Award. Originally from Trinidad, Chow and his family moved to Canada where he entered Dalhousie’s Medical School in the 1960s. “My education at Dalhousie University was very rewarding,” said Chow. “At the time, we did a rotating internship at different hospitals and I was first introduced to Cape Breton after doing obstetrics in Sydney.” After graduating from medical school in 1968, Dr. Monty MacMillian first introduced to the idea of practicing medicine in Baddeck. “We came to Baddeck at a good time,” Chow says. During his first years of practice he started from scratch. “At the time MSI was non-existent and patients paid with what they could afford. Incomes were smaller and people didn’t visit doctors as often,” Dr. Chow explains. In addition to serving the people of Baddeck, he continues to help the First Nation communities of Waycobah and Wagmatcook. For many years he’s provided healthcare screening, illness prevention, diabetes care, and other services with the support of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. Unemployment and housing continue to present challenges within the communities. “When I first arrived, large families were living in two bedrooms,” he says. “Today, they have adequate housing.” In 1995, Chow helped to fundraise enough money to build a new hospital. “My goal was to get more care to the community of Baddeck by pulling resources together into one sector,” he says. Chow encourages medical students to consider practicing in a rural community. “People look to you for advice,” he says. “You get to see families grow up and you really get to know the town. It’s the

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only place for people to go. It’s good for physicians and for patients.” For many years, he and his wife Vera have housed students and residents during training. Many of the students returned to Cape Breton and are now specialists in a variety of areas. Dr. Chow’s medical contributions have impacted many Nova Scotians. In 2009, Doctors Nova Scotia presented him with the Senior Membership Award, which is bestowed to a physician who in addition to practicing for many years, is also widely respected and held in high regard by his or her fellow physicians throughout the medical community and the province. In 2010, the Cape Breton District Authority recognized his leadership and tireless work and presented him with the Dr. M.A. Naqvi Outstanding Health Care Professional of the Year Award.

“Carlyle is the exemplar of long-term, community-based family physician commitment to their patients which is the foundation of our health-care system.” — Dr. John Steeves, Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association President.

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With a keen focus on global health, Dr. Raghu Venugopal (MD’01), already has an impressive resume in his few years since medical school graduation. This year, the Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association (DMAA), is pleased to present Venugopal with the Young Alumnus Award. “Ensuring equal access for all requires not only innovative thinking, but a passionate commitment to help all those at risk to their health whether afar or close to home,” says Dr. John Steeves, Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association President. “Raghu walks the walk of health equity.” Venuopal’s motivation to study medicine and emergency medicine came from his desire to give back to society. “Medicine is an important tool for social good,” Venugopal says. “It’s a tangible way of contributing to society. I was motivated to pursue a career in medicine by the practically of helping people.” During his studies at Dalhousie, under the support of the former Dean of Undergraduate Studies, Dr. Mann, he completed a Master’s in Public Health with a focus on Global Health from Harvard University. “I was inspired to have a career in global health,” he says. “I always knew I wanted to play a key role in socialized medicine Canada. The Master’s in Public Health provided a strong foundation with the work I do today.” He continued to train and specialized in emergency medicine at McGill University, while working overseas with Doctors Without Borders. He later completed an international emergency medicine research fellowship from Johns Hopkins University. Inside the classroom and out, Venugopal continues to inspire medical students and residents. Following his

training, he accepted a position as Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto. Today he teaches global health, professionalism, medical ethics and post-graduate humanitarian emergencies. Venugopal feels there are many rewarding aspects of his career in teaching, emergency care, and his work abroad. “It’s amazing to teach postgraduate students global health and see them go out and do it. It’s also the day-to-day emergency care and helping people in their moment of need. Lastly, it’s extremely rewarding to work with vulnerable people overseas who are facing war and who are lacking basic health services.” Outside of Canada, he continues to mentor students in emergency medicine. He teaches for the Toronto Addis-Ababa Academic Collaboration in Emergency Medicine for physicians in Ethiopia. In recognition of his excellence in teaching, the University of Toronto presented him with the EM Resident Teacher of the Year Award (2010) and the Award of Teaching Excellence (2013). Among his many achievements, he is also an accomplished writer. To date, he is co-author of Emergencies Among World Travellers, wrote the chapter,“ Global Humanitarian Medicine and Disaster Relief” in Paul Auerbach’s Wilderness Medicine, and was editor of the clinical medicine section of the Oxford University’s clinical handbook on humanitarian medicine. Venugopal’s greatest contribution to medicine may be his work in public service. He has completed countless missions to countries facing war and crisis with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). Outside of his fieldwork, he’s served on the MSF Board of Directors, developed MSF-Canada’s clinical education and is an active coordinator

for MSF’s online telemedicine portal. In addition, he’s an active writer, fundraiser and blogger for MSF. “He’s one of the most active and valued members of MSF Canada,” says Dr. Bruce Lampard, past president of MSF Canada. Venugopal feels the key to working abroad is to have experience. He encourages all medical professionals who are considering working overseas to have a minimum of 10 to 15 years of medical experience. “The core of being a good mentor is experience. It’s having something to offer that trainees appreciate.” Dr. Sarah Giles appreciates all of the assistance that Venugopal has given her as she started in practice. “He’s helped to support me in the field, encouraged my research interest and helped my rural hospital choose the right bedside ultrasound machine,” says Giles, who is currently a physician with Stanton Territorial Health Authority in the Northwest Territories. “He is perhaps the most well rounded physician I have ever met.” In 2012, the Canadian Association of Emergency Medicine recognized him with the Dr. Helen Karounis Memorial Award for Professionalism in Emergency Medicine. For medical students and residents, Venugopal advises those interested in working overseas to do what they love. “It’s about balancing training with practical experience and getting out there and doing it,” he says. “Working abroad isn’t for everyone, it has to agree with you. Most importantly, you need to specialize in an area that you love in Canada. If you carefully plan your career you can take your skills overseas.” Dr. Raghu Venugopal is this year’s key note speaker at the Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association’s Gala October 22, 2016.

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COVER STORY

COVER STORY facility also features a flexible, 170-seat classroom, a library and learning commons, and integrated information technology that allows many training exercises to be recorded for learning and assessment purposes. “We’ve always taught our students in silos but then evaluated them on how well they work on teams—we expected it, but we weren’t teaching it,” notes Noel Pendergast, a respiratory therapist and lecturer who coordinates the Faculty of Health Professions’ IP programming. “Now they are systematically learning about each other’s professions and scope of practice, how to communicate clearly and share leadership, and how to work as a well-coordinated team in response to the needs of the patient and family.” Over past decade or so, scores of studies have analyzed the crucial role of interprofessional communication and teamwork in protecting patient safety and wellbeing. “Root-cause analyses have found that up to 70 per cent of medical errors or adverse events befalling patients can be traced back to poor communication among members of health-care teams,” says Miller. “There is plenty of work to be done by all.” He points out that, not only does better interprofessional communication and

appreciation improve patient safety, it also increases professional satisfaction on the job by fostering stronger relationships, a more positive and collaborative workplace dynamic, and better morale. And, as much as students are accustomed to learning in professional silos, so are faculty members used to teaching only one profession to groups of students in the same program. “Faculty development is an important part of Dal’s IPE effort,” Pendergast says. “Our IPE governing committee is working on ways to build faculty members’ ability to teach and evaluate interprofessional teamwork skills. On top of that, they’re mapping the IP curriculum for students and developing strategies for fostering stronger teamwork among professionals already working in the health-care system.” According to Stephen Miller, the opening of the building has generated a groundswell of enthusiasm and activity. “People are very engaged and excited to be working together on the new IP programming in such a beautiful and functional building,” he says. “It offers a wide-open horizon for new initiatives in education, patient care, faculty development, and research.”

New Collaborative Health Education Building at Grand Opening

(Photo Credit: Nick Pearce)

The power of teamwork Collaborative Health Education Building opens doors to intensive interprofessional training By Melanie Jollymore Over the summer of 2016, Dalhousie Medical School moved its key clinical training facilities from digs deep in South End Halifax to a brand new building in the heart of the healthcare training district. The Collaborative Health Education Building (fondly known as the CHEB) sits on the corner of University Avenue and Summer Street, between the medical school’s iconic ivy-covered CRC building and the modern Life Sciences Research Institute, across the street from the VG Site of the QEII Health Sciences Centre. In the CHEB, med students will learn alongside their counterparts in other health professional training programs, in Canada’s first and so-far-only dedicated facility for interprofessional health care education. The CHEB will enable Dalhousie to significantly expand interprofessional

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learning opportunities for its 3,700 students in the faculties of Medicine and Dentistry, and the Faculty of Health Professions’ nine schools (Health & Human Performance, Health Administration, Health Sciences, Human Communication Disorders, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Pharmacy, Physiotherapy, Social Work). “We searched for governance models in planning this facility, but there are no other buildings quite like it in Canada or possibly even North America,” says Dr. Stephen Miller, an emergency physician at the QEII who is the med school’s assistant dean of clinical skills and interprofessional education (IPE) lead. “A lot of thought went into this building… It’s a big merger of wish lists, with priority on those facilities that will best foster core IPE programming.” The opening of the CHEB firmly positions

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Dal as a leading university in the realm of interprofessional health education. Work toward the facility began in 2008, when Dr. William Webster (dean of the Faculty of Health Professions at the time), approached his counterparts in Medicine (Dr. Tom Marrie) and Dentistry (Dr. Tom Boran) with the idea. The three deans worked together to engage the health education community in making plans, and to secure $38.5 million from Dalhousie University and the Government of Nova Scotia to fund the ambitious project. “The CHEB is equipped with a wide range of realistic clinical training facilities, including 24 clinic rooms, several procedure rooms, ultrasound equipment, two eightbed nursing wards, isolation rooms for infection control, a mobility terrace and a home care apartment,” says Stephen Miller. Many of these rooms have been designed to be re-purposed for different learning opportunities, with mobile equipment and moveable furnishings. “The students work together on simulation training exercises in teams made up of the same mix of professionals you would find in real-world practice settings.” The five-storey, 107,000 square-foot

Hands-on IPE By Madeleine Bohrer, Class of 2018 I had the opportunity to participate in Dalhousie’s first Health Care Team Challenge (HCTC) last year, one of my first big interprofessional experiences. My team went on to compete nationally, in one of the most challenging and rewarding experiences I have had in my undergraduate medical education so far. Working on a care plan with five strangers from different professions showed me what health care teamwork actually looks like. This experience inspired me and my HCTC teammate, Meghan Beals (BSc Health Sciences, Respiratory Therapy, Class of 2017), to reinstate Dalhousie’s chapter of the Health Science Students Association (DalHSSSA) and submit a bid to host the National Health Science Students Association (NaHSSA)’s annual conference. We won the bid and, thanks to perfect timing, were able to hold our student conference, “Diversity & Inclusion in Healthcare—diverse populations, diverse professions and inclusive, collaborative care” in the new CHEB building in March 2016. We brought in keynote speakers and a panel, displayed research posters related to different health care fields and interprofessionalism, and ran a simulation in the upstairs labs—my personal highlight of the conference. Taking part in simulations with students from other programs will help us learn communication skills crucial for working in a collaborative team and give us hands on experience in working with other health-care professionals. What could prepare us better for our careers? I believe that the CHEB has already increased interprofessional opportunities here at Dal, making us better care providers, future colleagues and patient advocates.

The six interprofessional competencies The Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative has identified six competency domains that highlight the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values that shape the judgments essential for interprofessional collaborative practice. They are: • interprofessional communication • patient/client/family /community-centered care • role clarification • team functioning • collaborative leadership • interprofessional conflict resolution

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ALUMNI MAKING A DIFFERENCE

ALUMNI MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Fertile ground

Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology develops Atlantic Assisted Reproductive Therapies into a national leader By Melanie Jollymore

Emily Robertson and her husband, David Irwin, with their long-awaited son, Braxton

Since the 1980s, infertility rates have doubled in Canada, so that now one in every six couples finds they cannot conceive without some form of assistance. “Women, couples and healthcare providers invest so much in preventing pregnancy, and just expect it to happen when the time is right… but then often it doesn’t,” says Dr. Linda Hamilton, a reproductive endocrinologist who completed her residency and fellowship training at Dalhousie Medical in the early 2000s and now serves as medical director of Atlantic Assisted Reproductive Therapies (AART) in Halifax, N.S. Part of the sharp increase can be attributed to women delaying pregnancy, but

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infertility is also increasing among couples in which the female partner is younger than 30. Studies show increasing numbers of men are affected by low sperm counts and low sperm motility—due in part to rising rates of obesity, diabetes, and other chronic health conditions that take their toll on fertility. Linda and her colleagues at AART—and Dalhousie’s Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, which established the fertility clinic in 2005—are working hard to improve success rates of in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures to help more couples start and grow their families. “We’re already among the top fertility clinics in Canada, with pregnancy rates higher than 55 per cent per cycle started

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for women under the age of 35,” Hamilton says. “We hope to push these rates even higher with the recent installation of a new climate-controlled Cell-Tek workstation for assessing and preparing eggs and embryos for fertility procedures.” AART is the first fertility clinic in Canada to install a third-generation Cell-Tek chamber. The workstation provides the optimal environment for eggs and embryos by strictly controlling temperature, humidity and carbon dioxide levels in the fully enclosed chamber, while filtering impurities such as dust particles, microbes and volatile organic compounds from the air inside. It is equipped with a high-powered microscope to allow staff to carefully examine eggs and embryos, and to conduct painstaking biopsy procedures for pre-implantation genetic testing of embryos. “Research shows these third-generation workstations can increase the numbers of viable embryos per cycle by as many as 50 per cent, which has huge implications for overall success rates,” Linda says. “We’ve also introduced an instant cryo-freezing method that further protects the viability of eggs and embyros by avoiding the formation of ice crystals, in contrast to slower freezing methods which produce ice crystals that can damage the genetic matter.” Embryos are frozen for many reasons. One is to allow for genetic testing when there’s a risk of a genetic disorder like cystic fibrosis, hemophilia, Huntington’s disease or other serious or fatal inherited condition. AART’s embryologists have trained intensively to perform the delicate task of removing two- or three-cell samples from the layer of the embryos’ cells that will form the placenta, which are then sent to New Jersey for genetic testing. In this way, unaffected embryos can be identified and thawed for implantation. Eggs and embryos can also be frozen to preserve or delay fertility—a particularly important option for women who are facing cancer treatment. “When women have to go through cancer treatment in their childbearing years, their future fertility is very much at risk,” explains Dr. Mike Ripley (Class of 2008), who did fellowship training in reproductive medicine at the University of Ottawa after his MD and residency training at Dal. “Chemotherapy and

radiation can trigger the death of eggs, early menopause, and other fertility-damaging effects… by freezing their eggs, or embryos fertilized with their partners’ sperm, they have another option for pursuing pregnancy once they’ve recovered from cancer treatment and regained their health.” Fertility preservation was a big part of Ripley’s fellowship training. Since his late 2015 return to Halifax to accept positions at Dalhousie, the IWK and AART, he has been working with his colleagues to establish the protocols and launch this service through AART. Pregnancy success rates with frozen embryos are nearly as high as with fresh embryos—embryos remain viable even after 10 to 15 years, Ripley says. Because of their high water content, eggs are less likely than embryos to survive the freezing and thawing process, but having her eggs frozen provides a woman facing cancer treatment with at least some chance of a future pregnancy. “Up until two years ago, egg freezing was solely experimental,” Ripley says. “It requires the proper equipment, media and protocols, all of which we now have in place at AART. We’re offering this service not only to women who want to preserve their fertility in the face of cancer, but also to women who want to delay childbearing—which could be for career reasons, or until they meet the right partner.” Regardless of the situation, no fertility treatment is covered by the governments in Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island or Newfoundland. The Government of New Brunswick does, however, provide $5,000 to couples for one IVF cycle—on condition that they receive treatment in New Brunswick. “Infertility is not generally recognized as a medical problem by governments,” Hamilton says. “But, in reality, it is a health problem that can be addressed with proper testing and treatment. Unaddressed, it can ruin lives and destroy relationships.” Governments may be reluctant to fund IVF but, as Hamilton explains, funding for single-embryo transfer procedures would actually save the health system money. “Couples footing the approximately $15,000 bill themselves will often insist that more than one embryo be implanted, to get more bang for their buck,” she says. “But they don’t understand the risks of multiples, including

The Cell Tek chamber enables AART staff members to examine eggs and embryos in a climatecontrolled environment.

pre-term birth, long stays in neonatal intensive care at $10,000 per day per infant, and even lifelong health problems.” Patient advocacy group, East Coast Miracles, commissioned a cost-benefit analysis showing that, if the Nova Scotia government funded IVF for single-embryo transfers only, it would save more than $11 million over the first five years of the program. Until such time as public funding is in place, couples in most of Atlantic Canada will have to continue to cover the costs themselves—and it’s a price many are willing to pay.

“It’s so worth it, to hold that baby you’ve always dreamed of in your arms,” says Emily Robertson, of Dartmouth, N.S. She had tried for years to get pregnant with no success, until tests revealed both of her fallopian tubes were blocked due to surgery she’d had for a rare bowel disease when she was 12. Emily and her husband, David Irwin, conceived their now two-year-old son, Braxton, with help from Dr. Renda Bouzayen at AART, and are hoping to conceive a second IVF baby in the near future. “My whole life all I ever wanted was to be a mother… without AART my dream would have never come true.”

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ALUMNI MAKING A DIFFERENCE

ALUMNI MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Is there a doctor in the house?

Family medicine research guides future of primary care

Researchers chart access to primary care across Nova Scotia By Melanie Jollymore

Dr. Emily Marshall shares preliminary findings of the MAAP-NS study (Models and Access Atlas of Primary Care in Nova Scotia) with colleagues at Dalhousie’s Primary Care Research Day in June 2016. Primary care planners and policymakers in the Nova Scotia Health Authority know for a fact that the numbers of people looking for a family doctor, or other primary care provider, are on the rise. NSHA is getting more calls than ever to its Primary Care Connects line, while Statistics Canada data shows that the percentage of Nova Scotians reporting they have a regular medical doctor dropped from 93.6 in 2010 to 89.4 in 2014. What these numbers don’t reveal is the “why?” behind the trend and what it actually means to people, practitioners and the health-care system as a whole. Dr. Emily Gard Marshall is determined to get to the bottom of the issue. A PhD researcher in Dalhousie’s Department of Family Medicine, Dr. Marshall is leading a large Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation-funded study called MAAP-NS (Models and Access Atlas of Primary Care in Nova Scotia). Although she is an independent researcher, she’s working

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closely with Dr. Rick Gibson, chief of family practice for NSHA’s Central Zone, and others who will plan services in light of the findings. Through MAAP-NS, Emily and her team have surveyed every primary care practice in Nova Scotia on issues of access, comprehensiveness of services and models of care, and are conducting in-depth interviews to learn more. Their aim is to pinpoint the societal shifts, systemic factors and practice changes that are driving decreased access, while developing a roadmap for planners and providers to follow in their efforts to connect patients to services. “We know we have an aging population that’s living longer with multiple chronic conditions, in a system that’s still largely based on a fee-for-service model that doesn’t support physicians or nurse practitioners to provide the comprehensive monitoring and management such complex patients

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need—or even provide billing codes for email or telephone consultations that would help patients and save everyone time,” Gard Marshall says. “On top of that, there’s a lack of timely access to specialists and services in the community that leaves some physicians feeling unsupported to take on new patients.” Her survey struck a chord. Typical survey response rates among doctors hover in the range of 30 per cent, but 60 per cent of providers and 85 per cent of practices responded to the MAAP survey. Some of the early (anonymized, aggregate) findings about after-hours access have already been put to use. “MAAP data informed the spread of the Urgent Care Centre model to additional communities within the Central Zone of NSHA,” notes Dr. Tara Sampalli (PhD), NSHA’s director of research and innovation in primary health care and chronic disease management, and an assistant professor of medical informatics at Dalhousie University. “The goal of this model is to improve access and continuity of urgent primary care after hours. The data was also useful in a quality initiative to improve the consistency of physicians’ after-hours phone messages.” Emily and her team are digging deep to learn more about family doctors’ decision-making when it comes to taking on new patients. “We’re asking family doctors about what factors lead them to decide their practice is full and, conversely, how do they go about taking on new patients?” she says. “Are they taking new patients on a first-come, first-served basis, are they triaging based on urgency of need, or are they booking ‘meet and greets’ with potential new patients to determine a good mutual fit? Are there patients with certain conditions or in certain circumstances they are more or less likely to take?” The researchers are also examining how many hours primary-care providers spend on direct patient care and other tasks. “We know very little across the country about how family physicians are working and why they make the choices they do for their practice,” Marshall says. “When we’ve finished analyzing all of our data, the results will help us figure

out how to deploy and fund primary care services to better meet the needs of an aging and chronically ill population that’s having an increasingly difficult time finding a primary-care provider.” As Emily notes, a growing body of evidence points to the value of primary care delivered by large interprofessional teams. The MAAP data shows that such teams can provide a more comprehensive range of services and accept more patients with more diverse needs, with added benefits of being able to consult with colleagues, share the on-call schedule, and delegate administrative tasks. Marshall has presented early findings to the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness, NSHA and at national and

international conferences. Interest is so high, the research team is now preparing to launch similar surveys in the rest of the Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland. “We’re creating MAAP Atlantic and securing ethics approvals we can measure the impact of system changes in each province over time and compare the results across provinces,” says Marshall, adding that health system reforms in Nova Scotia have already led to several improvements. “We’ve found that wait times are reasonable for urgent and non-urgent care, we have fairly high adoption and use of the electronic medical record and, unlike some provinces, we have a low percentage of high billers.” For more information about the MAAP study, visit: www.dal.ca/maapstudy/

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Researchers in Dal’s Department of Family Medicine are building regional and national research networks and working with providers and policymakers to find the answers that will shape the future of primary care. Dr. Fred Burge, Dr. Emily Gard Marshall, Dr. Helena Piccinini and Beverley Lawson are exploring how primary healthcare services can be organized, delivered and funded to provide more effective and cost-effective care to aging populations with higher rates of chronic disease. They’re gathering evidence and creating tools to help family physicians and the health care system: • make better use of the electronic medical record as a means of planning and prompting more proactive care • accurately assess frailty and provide more compassionate, appropriate care to these vulnerable patients • improve the management and outcomes of chronic disease, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer • provide more comprehensive, compassionate and continuous long term, palliative and end-of-life care

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DMAA PROFILE

DMAA ALUMNI RECOGNITION AWARDS

58th Annual Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association Awards Gala Dinner Every year the Dalhousie Alumni Association (DAA) honours four outstanding alumni who are making a difference in their communities.

Saturday, October 22 at 6 p.m. Pier 21 in Halifax, N.S. Celebrate the accomplishments of four outstanding alumni:

This fall, Dr. John Akabutu (MD’67) is the recipient of the 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award By Jocelyn Adams Akabutu first introduced advanced oncologic care for children in Northern Alberta and is a pioneer of blood stem cell storage transplantation in Canada. Over his career, his research findings have increased the survival rate of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia by an impressive 85 per cent. Akabutu’s attraction to medicine was his passion for helping others. He arrived at Dalhousie’s Medical School in 1964 from England. “I wanted to do something to help people. Dalhousie was a wonderful experience academically and socially. It was through my mentors during medical school who helped guide me specialize in pediatrics,” Akabutu says. “All along the way mentorship is very important,” he continues. “During my electives at Dalhousie, it was my professors who were intellectually stimulating and who made the most significant impression on me.” His experiences at Dalhousie University led him to explore pediatrics. Following his graduation from medicine in 1967, he moved to Cincinnati. In two years he completed his residency in paediatrics at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Centre. It was during his time at the Children’s Hospital where he developed a strong foundation in paediatric oncology. He returned to Canada following his studies to accept a position at the University of Alberta. During the mid-1970s, the survival rate in Alberta for children with acute leukemia was around 10 per cent. Akabutu’s goal when coming to the University of Alberta was to change this survival rate. Through the

assistance of his mentors at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Akabutu developed a strong working team to tackle children’s acute leukemia. “At first people were resistant, even my colleagues, to having a nurse as a core component of our research team,” Akabutu says. “Physicians didn’t want nurses to have a similar responsibilities as physicians.” In 1975 other departments within the University of Alberta followed suit and were incorporating nurses as a part of their core research teams. One of the most transformative experiences of Akabutu’s career was the development of the Comprehensive Hemophilia Program. At the time, children with hemophilia became crippled as a result of blood getting in their joints. To prevent this outcome, he and his team collected data on hemophilia and developed a home-treatment program for families to eliminate trips to the emergency room. The program was presented to Alberta’s provincial government and was later implemented as a national program across Canada. “This was a life changing for families and a transformative experiences of my life,” says Akabutu. Today each province has a program like this across Canada. Building his research, Akabutu’s second career highlight was the development of a cord blood program. The idea was established following a presentation by a physician in New York on the use of stem cells. Akabutu returned to Canada inspired as he was on the hunt to help a young girl from Alberta who was diagnosed with acute leukemia. Unable to find a bone marrow transplant for the young girl, Akabutu examined cases

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• Alumnus/a of the Year (Dr. David Kirkpatrick, MD’79) • Honorary President of the Year (Dr. Margaret Casey, MD ‘68) • Family Physician of the Year (Dr. Carlyle Chow, MD ‘68) • Young Alumnus/a of the Year (Dr. Raghu Venugopal, MD ‘01)

from the United States where cord blood from stem cells had been successfully transplanted. He decided to try a new approach for the girl by evolving a bank to collect and store cord blood. With the support of a rural community in Alberta and the provincial and federal government, they raised $60,000. The funds were used to develop the first public cord blood bank. Today the bank has been given to the Canadian Blood Services. “Dr. Akabutu has changed the lives of many young people with medical conditions,” says Dr. Eldon Smith, a friend and colleague. One of his most memorable experiences was after Akabutu developed a mouthwash for those undergoing cancer treatment who can find it hard to eat. “There are limitations with eating and in order for them to recover they need to eat,” says Akabutu. It’s known to his younger patients as “yuck wash” and is also used by pharmacies for canker sores. Once, when in a hospital elevator, he was recently given a large hug after a man asked if he was Dr. Akabutu. The patient, who had recovered from a bone marrow transplant, told Akabutu that the mouthwash had saved his life. This moment showed Akabutu the impact his creation had on people. After a lifetime of research and remarkable breakthroughs in the Canadian health-care system, Akabutu is pleased to accept the DMAA 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award. “This is a huge honour for me,” he says. “I never in my wildest dreams expected it. It’s just something else.” Dr. Akabutu and his family plan to attend the 2016 Dalhousie Alumni Awards Gala on Thursday, Oct. 13 in Halifax.

Keynote address from Dr. Raghu Venugopal (MD’01)

Event proceeds benefit student projects and scholarships

Celebrating accomplishment

We know that just about every day, our alumni are working hard to create new medical knowledge and improve the health of people in our communities. With so many people accomplishing great things in the medical field, we feel that it’s important to recognize those who are making an impact on the lives of others.

Buy your tickets online now at alumni.dal.ca/dmaagala or call 902-494-8800 Full name:________________________________________________________ Class year:____________ Guest name(s):____________________________________________________ Address:_______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ Phone:_______________________________________ Email:___________________________________ q I do not give consent for the above to be updated as my preferred contact information

DMAA Alumni Awards Gala Dinner Saturday, October 22, 2016, 6 p.m.

MAIL OR FAX REGISTRATION FORM TO: Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association 5850 College Street, Room 1-C1 PO Box 15000 Halifax, Nova Scotia • B3H 4R2 Fax: 902-422-1324

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 1055 Marginal Road, Halifax, NS

Tickets: $125 Number of tickets: ___________ x $125 Total amount: $ ___________________________ q My cheque for $ _________________ is enclosed (Please make cheques payable to the Dalhousie University) Please charge $ _______________ to my q Visa q MasterCard q American Express Account number: ______________________________________________ Expiry date: _______________ Name on card: (Please print):_______________________________________________________________ Signature:______________________________________________________________________________

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CONVOCATION 2016

CONGRATULATIONS MD CLASS OF 2016! Welcome to the Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association

The students graduating with distinction pose for a photo at the Dean’s Convocation Awards ceremony.

FULL PAGE AD

Dr. Garth Christie (MD’66) toasts the graduating class of 2016. President Richard Florizone takes a selfie with the Dalhousie Medical School class of 2016

The students graduating with distinction pose for a photo at the Dean’s Convocation Awards ceremony.

DMAA President, Dr. David Amirault (MD’76) presents class of 2016 valedictorian, Dr. Leo Fares, with his Gold D award.

Dean of Medicine, Dr. David Anderson (MD’83) is presented with a signed class photo of the class of 2016. Dr. Brett Barro is the 2016 recipient of the C.B. Stewart University Medal in Medicine.

Graduates with Distinction: Brett Barro Claudia Cote Mariah Giberson Emma Harris

Greg Hosier Jessie Kang Jonathan Melong Nicholas Mooney

Dr. David Rhys Williams, OC, receives an honourary degree at convocation. Dr. Williams is an emergency medicine physician and astronaut who holds the Canadian record for space walking— nearly 18 hours.

Eric Pond Alexander Poulton Tara Riddell David Ritcey Ethan Toumishey

DR. C.B. STEWART UNIVERSITY MEDAL IN MEDICINE For the highest standing in the regular medical course Brett Barro

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CONVOCATION 2016 RECIPIENTS

CONVOCATION 2016 RECIPIENTS

Dalhousie Faculty of Medicine Convocation Awards and Scholarships

Shannon Murphy Presented by Dr. Annalee Cohen (PhD’71), Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

DR. C.B. STEWART UNIVERSITY MEDAL IN MEDICINE For the highest standing in the regular medical course Brett Barro Presented by Dr. Evelyn Sutton (MD’84), Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION Nicholas Mooney Brett Barro Eric Pond Claudia Cote Alexander Poulton Mariah Giberson Tara Riddell Emma Harris David Ritcey Greg Hosier Ethan Toumishey Jessie Kang Jonathan Melong Presented by Dr. Evelyn Sutton (MD’84), Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education

AWARDS & SCHOLARSHIPS DR. LEO HOROWITZ PRIZE IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY For demonstration of the greatest interest and aptitude towards the study of radiology Lesley Latham Presented by Dr. James Clarke (MD’01), Department of Radiology DR. EDWIN F. ROSS PRIZE IN PEDIATRIC SURGERY For demonstrating an aptitude and interest in pediatric surgical care Erin Quigley Presented by Dr. Sally Ross, daughter of Dr. Edwin F. Ross DR. ROBERT F. SCHARF AWARD IN EMERGENCY MEDICINE For outstanding combination of clinical ability, motivation, and professionalism in emergency medicine Tara Dahn Presented by Laurel Joudrey, daughter of Dr. Robert Scharf THE EMERSON AMOS MOFFITT RESEARCH PRIZE For undergraduate research in anaesthesia Hannah Dahn Presented by Dr. Romesh Shukla (PGM’78), Head, Department of Anesthesia UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT AWARD IN ANAESTHESIA For outstanding capabilities in the field of anesthesia throughout his or her medical program Stephen Middleton Presented by Dr. Ben Schelew Shukla, Department of Anesthesia DR. I. M. SZULER AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN UNDERGRADUATE INTERNAL MEDICINE Awarded to the fourth-year student who,

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during their MTU rotation, best demonstrates personal and academic qualities exemplified by Dr. Szuler Stephen Middleton Presented by Dr. Katherine Radchuck (MD’15), daughter of Dr. Irene Szuler (PGM’79) THE DMRF DR. RICHARD B. GOLDBLOOM AWARD IN PEDIATRICS For best combining medical knowledge, clinical skill, and sensitivity to the social and emotional needs of children and their families Chelsea Hammer Presented by Dr. Richard Goldbloom, OC and Barbara Hughes (daughter) DR. CARL PEARLMAN PRIZE IN UROLOGY For the greatest aptitude and interest in urology Katherine (Katie) Anderson Presented by Dr. David Bell (MD’84), Head, Department of Urology DR. FRANK G. MACK PRIZE For showing excellence in the care of urological patients Gregory Hosier Presented by Dr. David Bell (MD’84), Head, Department of Urology DR. S. G. BURKE FULLERTON AWARD For greatest promise and potential shown for family medicine in fourth year Brittany Gillis Presented by Dr. Kathleen Horrey, Undergraduate Director, Department of Family Medicine DR. LEONARD, KAY AND SIMON LEVINE SCHOLARSHIP For academic excellence and to the medical student who is pursuing studies in family medicine Ethan Toumishey Nicholas Mooney Presented by Dr. Kathleen Horrey, Undergraduate Director, Department of Family Medicine DR. LAWRENCE MAX GREEN MEMORIAL AWARD For best combining compassion and clinical competence during the clerkship in obstetrics and gynecology Justin White Presented by Dr. Jillian Coolen (MD’03), Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology DR. N. N. ISA ACHIEVEMENT AWARD For outstanding achievement during his/her core rotation in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the Saint John Regional Hospital Rebecca Topp Presented by Dr. Jillian Coolen (MD’03), Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology

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ANDREW JAMES COWIE MD, MEMORIAL MEDAL For the highest standing in obstetrics and gynecology Tara Riddell Presented by Dr. Jillian Coolen (MD’03), Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology DR. ROBERT & MRS. DOROTHY FORSYTHE PRIZE For a strong aptitude and interest in mental health through clinical, research, or volunteer endeavours Tara Riddell Presented by Dr. Michael Teehan (PGM’84), Department of Psychiatry DR. W. H. HATTIE PRIZE For highest standing in fourth-year medicine Spencer Holowachuk Presented by Dr. Shelly McNeil (MD’ 94), Division of Infectious Diseases & Division of Paediatrics MICHAEL BROTHERS PRIZE IN NEUROSCIENCE For demonstrating an aptitude in the area of neuroscience Margaret (Maggie) Moores Presented by Tommy Brothers, son of Dr. Michael Brothers (MD’80) DR. ROBERT C. DICKSON PRIZE IN MEDICINE For highest standing in all examinations in medicine in all four years Alexander Poulton Presented by Dr. Shelly McNeil (MD’94), Division of Infectious Diseases & Division of Paediatrics DR. JUAN A. EMBIL AWARD FOR RESEARCH IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES RESEARCH For completing the best research project in infectious diseases during all four years of study Farhan Khan Presented by Dr. Shelly McNeil (MD’94), Division of Infectious Diseases & Division of Paediatrics DR. GRAHAM GWYN MEMORIAL PRIZE IN NEUROLOGY For demonstrating excellence in neurology Caitlin Jackson-Tarlton Presented by Dr. Virender Bhan (PGM’89), Head, Division of Neurology DR. J. C. WICKWIRE AWARD For demonstrating highest competence in patient contact during the four-year program Kelly Fenn Presented by Dr. Virender Bhan (PGM’89), Head, Division of Neurology KIDNEY FOUNDATION OF CANADA, DR. ALLAN COHEN MEMORIAL PRIZE IN NEPHROLOGY For demonstrating the greatest aptitude in clinical nephrology

SOCIETY FOR ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE AWARD For excellence in emergency medicine Charlotte Crosbie Presented by Dr. David Petrie (MD’89), Head, Department of Emergency Medicine JAMES WALKER WOOD AWARD IN MEDICINE Awarded to a student entering a family medicine residency program at Dalhousie with preference given to a student who has shown an interest in rural family medicine Sarah Sampson Presented by Dr. Kate Walker Wood, granddaughter of Dr. James Walker Wood THE ALBERT A. SCHWARTZ PRIZE IN ORTHOPEDICS For demonstrating aptitude and excellence in orthopedics Devin Ferguson Presented by Dr. David Kirkpatrick (MD’79), Head, Department of Surgery DR. JOHN F. BLACK PRIZE For the highest standing in surgery Claudia Cote Presented by Dr. David Kirkpatrick (MD’79), Head, Department of Surgery DMRF DR. J. DONALD HATCHER AWARD FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH For the most meritorious and significant research project during the undergraduate program, including summer electives Claudia Cote Presented by Emma Hatcher Roberts, granddaughter of Dr. J. Donald Hatcher, THE LOURDES I. EMBIL AWARD FOR CARDIOVASCULAR RESEARCH Awarded for clinical research in cardiology, cardiovascular surgery, cardiovascular pharmacology, physiology, or other fields associated with clinical cardiology Claudia Cote Presented by Dr. Kim Styles, Division of Cardiology THE BARBARA L. BLAUVELT CARDIOLOGY PRIZE Awarded to a fourth-year student who has shown the greatest interest and degree of inclination towards the study of cardiology Lauren Hanes Presented by Dr. Kim Styles, Division of Cardiology DR. R. O. JONES PRIZE IN PSYCHIATRY For the highest standing in psychiatry during the entire medical program Lauren Hanes Presented by Dr. Michael Teehan (PGM’84), Department of Psychiatry

POULENC PRIZE IN PSYCHIATRY For the highest standing in psychiatry Jonathan Melong Presented by Dr. Michael Teehan (PGM’84), Department of Psychiatry EARLE FAMILY PRIZE To provide an annual prize to one or more students who have demonstrated the skills necessary to practice rural medicine in New Brunswick. Taryn O’Neill Andrew Chan Presented by Dr. Evelyn Sutton, (MD’84), Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education DR. RAM SINGARI BOODOOSINGH MEMORIAL PRIZE For demonstrating clinical skill and a sense of humour that most brings “art” to the practice of medicine Andrew Chan Presented by Dr. Wendy Stewart, Director, Medical Humanities-HEALS Program HUNTER HUMANITIES AWARD For outstanding contributions in the area of medical humanities and demonstrating the humanistic qualities of caring and compassion in the care of patients Jessie Kang Presented by Dr. Wendy Stewart, Director, Medical Humanities-HEALS Program DR. MABEL E. GOUDGE PRIZE For outstanding achievement among female medical students Jessie Kang Presented by Dr. Evelyn Sutton (MD’84), Associate Dean, Undergraduate Medical Education DR. CLARA OLDING PRIZE For the highest standing in the clinical years with character and previous scholarship being taken into consideration Jessie Kang Presented by Rebecca Hebb (greatgranddaughter) and Gordon Hebb (grandson) of Dr. Clara Olding (MD’1896) DR. J. W. MERRITT PRIZE For the highest standing in surgery in all four years Jessie Kang Presented by Janice Flemming (daughter) of Dr. John W. Merritt (MD’28)

2016 LAUNCH AWARDS

DALHOUSIE MEDICINE NEW BRUNSWICK CLINICAL SKILLS AWARD Director’s Choice- excellence in clinical skills. The recipient is chosen by the director of the Skilled Clinician Course Sean Wilson Presented by Dr. Chris Vaillancourt STEFAN MILDENBERG AWARD A graduating DMNB Student who has contributed to the field of Social Pediatrics Claire Humphrey Presented by Dr. Sarah Gander

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AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN GERIATRIC MEDICINE Given to a graduating DMNB student who demonstrates aptitude and excellence in the field of Geriatric Medicine Claire Humphrey Presented by Dr. Donald Sutherland INTERNAL MEDICINE Given to a graduating DMNB student who demonstrates aptitude and excellence in the field of Internal Medicine Shona Philip Presented by Dr. Nessa Gogan NEPHROLOGY Given to a graduating DMNB student who demonstrates aptitude and excellence in the field of Nephrology. Presented on behalf of Dr. Paul and Mrs. Eileen Handa Shona Philip Presented by Dr. Nessa Gogan EMERGENCY MEDICINE Given to a graduating DMNB student who demonstrates aptitude and excellence in the field of Emergency Medicine Taryn O’Neill Presented by Dr. Chris Vaillancourt PHYSIATRY AWARD Given to a clinical clerk who has demonstrated outstanding exceptional skills and true enthusiasm towards the speciality of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation on behalf of the Stan Cassidy Centre. Justin Parker Presented by Dr. Forsythe SURGERY AWARD Given to a clinical clerk who has been recognized for his/her demonstration of aptitude and excellence in the field of surgery Edward Percy Presented by Dr. Forsythe DR. N. N. ISA ACHIEVEMENT AWARD Given to a clinical clerk who has demonstrated outstanding clinical proficiency and interest in Obstetrics and Gynaecology during their clerkship core training at the Saint John Regional Hospital Rebecca Topp Presented by Dr. Forsythe FOSTERING PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY AWARD This award is presented to a student who has demonstrated the attributes of professionalism, community service and teamwork during their training through the Humanities Program at Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick. Duncan Bowes Presented by Dr. Wendy Stewart

HUMANITIES AWARD This award is present to a member of the graduating DMNB class who has demonstrated the attributes of humanism during their training, and contributed to the concept and spirit of the Humanities in Medicine. Edward Percy Presented by Dr. Wendy Stewart

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CLASS NOTES Do you have an award or update that you would like to share with your classmates? Let us know at medical.alumni@dal.ca. 1950s Sophie Hofstader (MD’56) was inducted into the Scarborough Walk of Fame in the category of Health and Science on October 17, 2015. Scarborough is part of Toronto, Ontario, with a population of more than 600,000 people. More information can be found at www.scarboroughwalkoffame.com. Alan Hebb (MD’59) recently published a book about his grandfather, W. E. Hebb and his activities in business, civic affairs and music. As a sideline to his stationery business, W. E. Hebb published postcards with historic views and interesting backgrounds, including the Forrest building, Halifax Medical College, Military Hospital staff, and others. The book should appeal to history buffs as well as those interested in viewing and collecting vintage postcards. alanrhebb@gmail.com

1960s Mervin G. Shaw (MD’65) received a Canadian Medical Association senior membership award in honour of his

decades of medical practice. Dr. Shaw is a Past-President of the Halifax Medical Association, Doctors Nova Scotia (when it was the Medical Society of Nova) and Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association, and spent eight years as the Medical Director for the Workers` Compensation Board of Nova Scotia.

1970s Thomas Marrie (MD`70) has been appointed as Dean Emeritus in the Dalhousie Faculty of Medicine, effective July 1, 2016. Renn O. Holness (MD’75) received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Annual Congress of the Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation Congress in June 2016. Dr. Holness completed his residency at Dal (1972-1976); then a fellowship at Hospital for Sick children in Toronto, returning to Halifax in June 1977. He was prof/head of neurosurgery from 1987-2000, examiner then chair of RCPS examining board in neurosurgery; and secretary then president of Canadian Neurosurgical Society from

1992-1995. Dr. Holness retired from Dalhousie/QE2 in 2009 and has been busy travelling back and forth to Jamaica setting up neurosurgical services at Cornwall Regional Hospital in Montego Bay, teaching medical students and residents for the past six years. He received an honorary DSc from the University of the West Indies. “I lived in Nova Scotia for over 35 years and am proud to be a Nova Scotian and have been part of the Dalhousie community, which allowed me to be fulfilled professionally and to contribute to developing a first class division of neurosurgery.” – Dr. Renn O. Holness

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1980s David Haase (PGM’81) was this year’s recipient of the Dr. G. W. Archibald Goldheaded Cane Faculty of Medicine Award in Humanities. Dr. Haase completed his Internal Medicine Residency at Dalhousie and is currently a part-time professor in the Department of Medicine, and the Division of General Internal Medicine.

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Allan Abbass (MD’87) was named the Distinguished Professor of the Year 2016 at UCLA Department of Psychiatry and was named Visiting Professor at the world’s leading Psychotherapy Institute, the Tavistock in London, England.

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Michelle Dow (MD’87) was installed as President of Doctors Nova Scotia at their annual meeting in June 2016.

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Greg Raymond (MD’88) was promoted to full Clinical Professor as of June 30, 2016, in the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Alberta, where he has been working since 1998. Additionally he received “Teacher of the Year” awards in the Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging Department in 2010 and 2014. Dr. Raymond also serves as radiology consultant for Mercy Ships International, and works as a cardiothoracic and general radiologist at several hospitals in the Edmonton area. He hopes his class of ‘88 will hold a 30-year reunion in 2018, as he would love to come and reconnect with old friends.

Dalhousie Medical School graduates from the classes of 2005, 2006 and 2007 got together for brunch in Toronto on February 28, 2016.

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Dr. Sandy Kapur (MD’91) is currently serving as President of the Canadian Society of Allergy & Clinical Immunology, for a twoyear term. He is the first physician from Atlantic Canada to hold this position.

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Halifax Satellite Location Family Focus Medical Clinic 5991 Spring Garden Road Call for Appointment.

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BACK PAGE

Paging All Alumni! Dalhousie Medical School was the place you learned, worked, and played. The Dalhousie Medical Alumni Association wants to help keep you connected to your medical school community. Connecting with the DMAA is a great way to keep in touch with former classmates and see what’s happening now at Dalhousie. Visit our website at medicine.dal.ca/alumni to learn more. Have you recently moved or changed your email address? Make sure that the DMAA has your most recent information so that you don’t miss out on important information, reunion invitations, or event announcements in your area. Contact medical.alumni@dal.ca or 902-494-8800 to update your info.

Upcoming Events Mark your calendars… 2018 is the 200th anniversary of Dalhousie University and the 150th anniversary of Dalhousie Medical School. Planning is already underway for 2018, with lots of exciting events and activities scheduled. What can you do? Stay connected! • Follow DMAA on Facebook and Twitter (@Dal_DMAA) for timely updates and information about our events. • Visit medicine.dal.ca/alumni for in-depth information about DMAA activities.

IN MEMORIAM The DMAA acknowledges the passing of our alumni with sincere sympathy and gratitude for their contributions to medicine. If you know of anyone to note in this section, please contact medical.alumni@dal.ca. Dr. Stewart T. Love, (MD’56) Passed away July 28, 2015

Dr. Henry Litz (MD’74) Passed away March 21, 2016

Dr. John Goodwin (MD’80) Passed away October 5, 2015

Dr. Oliver H. Millard (MD’55) Passed away March 29, 2016

Dr. Donald Seaman (MD’57) Passed away November 26, 2015

Dr. Roger Flinn (MD’71) Passed away March 31, 2016

Dr. Roland Perry (MD’61) Passed away February 25, 2016

Dr. George H. Cook (MD’54) Passed away April 1, 2016

Dr. Robert S. Grant (MD’48) Passed away March 1, 2016

Dr. Barbara A. Eisener (MD’81 Passed away April 5, 2016

Dr. J. Frederick Harrigan (MD’54) Passed away March 9, 2016

Dr. Joseph M. MacSween (MD’70) Passed away April 23, 2016

Dr. Emeric Hofstader (MD’53) Passed away March 13, 2016

Dr. Lewis B. Woolner (MD’42) Passed away June 13, 2016

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Plan ahead! Reach out to your classmates to see if they’d like to plan a reunion in 2018. Why wait for the five or ten year mark to get together? Participate! Do you have a great story about your time at Dalhousie Medical School? Send it to the DMAA office, and it may be published in a special anniversary edition. Email your memory to medical.alumni@dal.ca


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