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DALLIANCE september/october ‘14


EDITORS LETTERS 03 DALLIANCE SOCIAL 05 MEET THE TEAM 07 CONTRIBUTORS NOTES 09 FASHION VS BEAUTY 11 SUNDAY MORNING 15 TEENAGE DREAM 17 HOW TO: GET YOUR DREAM JOB 19 THE GOLDEN ERA 20 EDITORIAL: TOTAL CONTROL 33 DAY IN THE LIFE: MERREL WESTHOFF 43 STYLE ICON: SOPHIA LOREN 49 RACHEL LENCHER 51


EDITORIAL: WILD HEART, GYPSY SOUL 53 FOUNDER’S PLAYLIST 72 BEST DAY OF YOUR LIFE 73 NEWTON’S BARE ELEGANCE 79 LONDON FASHION WEEKEND 81 EDITORIAL: FREE SOUL 83 WHO’S THAT GIRL: MARIE PIOVESAN 101 WILD WILD WEST 103 HOW I MADE IT 104 EDITORIAL: SUBURBAN DREAMS 109 KIM VICOTRIA JEWELS 132 MOODBOARD: TRIWA 143 BEFORE WE SAY GOODBYE 149


GILL

S

o I t h i n k i t’s t i m e I t e l l y o u g u y s the truth … I suck at writing editors letters.

Ever ything else that Dalliance throws my w a y I c a n d o ; I c a n d e a l w i t h t h e late nights and early starts; I can deal with the pressure and the deadlines, but t e l l m e t o w r i t e a n e d i t o r ’s l e t t e r a n d you will have me at a standstill. I ’v e b e e n s a t h e r e f o r o v e r a n h o u r n o w, looking at a blank word document with a l a t t e i n my h a n d , w o n d e r i n g h o w I c a n conclude the past couple of months. An d I j u s t c a n’ t . My l a s t f e w m o n t h s h a v e b e e n c h a o t i c , a n d my l i f e s e e m s t o b e a b i g c o m p l i c a t e d m e s s r i g h t n o w. S o r a t h e r than tr ying to explain this mess to you, I ’m t u r n i n g t h i s e d i t o r s l e t t e r i n t o m o r e of a thank you note. Thank you to L aura, who somehow has p u t u p w i t h m e f o r o v e r a y e a r n o w. I ’m f o r e v e r g l a d t o j o i n e d m e o n t h i s j o u r n e y. Thank you to ever yone who contributes to Dalliance. T h a n k y o u t o my f a m i l y w h o a r e a l w a y s s u p p o r t i n g my d r e a m s a n d a m b i t i o n s And thank you to you guys - the people w h o r e a d o u r m a g a z i n e . Wi t h o u t y o u , there would be no Dalliance. Once again, thank you. Love, Ja s m i n e x

Lett

FROM

EDIT


ters

M THE

TORS

WOODS

A

s I sat down to write this e d i t o r ’s l e t t e r, a m o n g s t business studies notes and math practice papers, there really is no other emotion running through me as strongly as ambition. L i k e m a ny o f y o u a r e a w a r e , I a m still a school student which makes this journey just the little bit more exciting-balancing homework and blazers amongst the exciting realm of t h e f a s h i o n i n d u s t r y, i n a l l i t s m u l t i faceted creative possibilities. When we started the magazine early in 2013, we did so with the aim of having a source to give those dreaming to w o r k i n t h e i n d u s t r y, a p l a c e t o d o s o. R e a l i g n i n g my s e l f w i t h t h i s g o a l the past two months, whilst I was assembling the content inspired me to s t a r t t h e ‘ Ho w I M a d e It’ s e r i e s , g i v i n g you the inspiration and motivation to continue chasing those dreams. He a r i n g a b o u t t h e j o u r n e y ’s a n d t i p s o f t h o s e w h o m I l o o k u p t o, f a s c i n a t e s me and I hope this new series interests you as well! I f y o u h a v e a ny r e q u e s t s o v e r w h o you would love to see in this series, d o n’t h e s i t a n t t o c o n t a c t m e a t l a u r a @ dalliancemagazine.com L o v e f o r e v e r, L aura x


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e h t t e e M


S D OO

W A R LAU

FOU

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N I M S

C DIRE E V I EAT R, CR ECTOR E D N R FOU INESS DI S BU

R DITO

& TOR

JOURNALISTS

KATRINA CALINGO CAITLIN HEARTFIELD

KENDALL SHIEH LAURA BARRY ALEXANDRA SCHERGER AMY MARTINS JORDAN WELLARD NATASHA NORFORD MONIQUE LA TERRA EMILY COSTI

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&E DER

SYBIL ODIAKA KASIA MILANCZUK CHRISTINA MARESCA ADAM FEKETE FRITZIE MANOY MARTINA FENECH EMMA EDGAR HILDA ALLEN JULIERT CAMERON


Contributors Page

Ken d al l Shieh

I WISH I WAS MORE LIKE

Er i n Wasson.

jour nal ist

MOST PEOPLE DON’T KNOW THAT

I used t o play v ol leybal l.

I’M MOST INSPIRED BY

t he bea ut y t h at sur r ounds me.

I FEEL MOST ALIVE WHEN I AM

having t oo much fun to think a b o ut t o m o r r o w .

I SPENT MY DOWN TIME

h a ng i ng o ut wit h fr iends.

TO RELAX I LIKE TO

do yoga.

I LOVE TO LISTEN TO

Red Hot C hil i Peppers and w at c h t he w a v e s at t he bea c h .


#1 ON THE TOP OF MY WISH LIST IS

world peace.

MY STYLE ICONS ARE

MY HAPPIEST MEMORY IS

Emmanuel le Alt and Hedi Slimane.

going t o t he lakehouse as a kid.

I WISH EVERYBODY COULD BE MORE

I DISLIKE PEOPLE WHO

o pen-minded.

I WISH I WAS BETTER AT

publ ic speaking.

WHEN I WAS YOUNGER I WANTED TO BE A

v et er i n ar i a n .

I’M OBSESSED WITH

simply fol low trends

Dot by Marc Jacobs.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS

IF I HAD UNLIMITED MONEY I WOULD

are not crucial, b ut ca n be helpful.

d o n at e t o e n v i r o n m e nt a l causes.

“ D AL L I AN C E M A GA Z IN E IS one to watch”


WHEN BEAUTY

BEATS FASH I ON BY LAURA BARRY


Our face defines who we are, as it is the pivotal characteristic of our very being and should we be aesthetically displeased with it, our entire self-image is shattered. Laura Barry explores the a more cost-efficient way and efficient way to.

Fashion is often associated only with clothes, shoes and accessories from luxury powerhouses and high street heroes. Fashion is thought to be universally inclusive, given that every one of us must get dressed in the morning, and do so in order to communicate a particular image of ourselves to the public. However, even in the golden era of the blogger and street-stylers, fashion still remains out of reach for most people. Bloggers such as Jessica Stein, Tash Sefton and Elle Ferguson claim to mix high end with high street and as much as we all like to believe that it is a realistic representation of what fashion is today, the average person simply cannot drop hundreds, sometimes thousands, of dollars on an ‘investment’ piece.

An element of the fashion world many of us tend to overlook is beauty and cosmetics. Influenced just as much by trends, designers and seasons as its material counterpart, the beauty world is a more accessible and affordable way to follow the trends and engage in the luxury market. Once dominated by the world of women’s glossies, the Internet has revolutionized the beauty realm. Just as the street style blogger changed the way we consume fashion, so too has its Youtube counterpart, the vlogger, changed the way we receive information about cosmetics. Where a magazine beauty editor once stood, selling a fabulous product she was sent for free, now stands a fellow consumer with recommendations on everything from skin types, textures, techniques for application and cheap alternatives. Today the online world is a rich resource for cosmetic enthusiasts, allowing the average consumer access to real-person reviews of products detailing everything from what skin type it suits to the way it feels and the best way to apply it. Make-up artists such as Sam and Nic from ‘Pixiwoo’ share in-depth video tutorials on how to recreate the makeup looks seen on runways and in magazine editorials. My recent decision to do my hair and makeup for my wedding day had me turn to this online world for education and guidance. While I found everything I needed to perfectly create the look I wanted, I also found a deep love for makeup and beauty products.


While fashion editors attend runway shows for the new season collections, beauty editors take note of the hair styles and make-up looks that accompanied them, and while both sides of the same coin will be regurgitated upon the pages of various glossies and blogs, only one is truly transferrable to the real world - beauty. This year’s favourite trend, ‘norm-core’, marks a time in fashion where the consumer has blatantly identified the fashion world, from runway to editorial, impractical and out of reach. However, hair and make-up trends, as fleeting as they may be, remain consistently popular. It’s the transferrable, achievable and affordable nature of beauty that makes it welcoming and inclusive for the average person. Recreating a runway makeup or hair look for real life is easy and doesn’t require you drop the equivalent of

‘It’s the transferrable, achievable and affordable nature of beauty that makes it welcoming and inclusive for the average person.’ three month’s rent on this seasons must-have bag or shoe. More to the point, beauty allows the average person access to the luxury market. The luxury clothing market excludes the average consumer, with a classic Louis Vuitton Speedy Bandouliere .25 starting at AUD $1,580, the prices are hardly affordable. However, pop over to your local cosmetic department store and you will find Dior, Chanel, Burberry, Tom Ford, Giorgio Armani and YSL with prices starting at $45. Not to mention the small touches of luxury that go along side cosmetics, such as brushes, tools and fragrances by the same house. Fashion is a fickle friend when it comes to the wardrobe. Magazine editorials showcase outfits and ‘investment’ pieces that cost more than my monthly rent which, even if I could afford them, wouldn’t guarantee my ability to achieve that effortless chic so often captured on those glossy pages. When it comes to style, a lot of those effortlessly chic looks are carefully selected and styled, the ability to create the perfect outfit is learnt just as one learns to create the perfect feline flick with liquid eyeliner. The difference is that when it comes to the eyeliner, I can pop online and search for a tutorial, whereas I’m still struggling to nail that ‘effortless’ half-tucked shirt trend from last winter.


Easy like a

SUNDAY morning

Friday night celebrations, Saturday afternoon errands and evening catch-ups leave Sunday as a mandatory day of rest and rejuvenation. Whether you’re an early riser or you greet the day closer to lunchtime; with our Sunday morning guide, you’ll be ready to start the new week with a clearer and more productive outlook. Get ready to experience your most peaceful morning yet.


music

beauty

Opt for mellow, blissed out beats playing softly in the background

Lotions, masks and beauty treatments; treat yourself with the best of the best with these nutrient-dense cult beauty buys.

/ You’re Not Good Enough by Devonte Hynes / Losing You by Solange / Palo Alto by Devonte Hynes [5] / Gold by Bondax (Snakehips Remix) / Team by Lorde

sleepwear Don’t sacrifice comfort for style these pyjama sets will promise both! / Oysho Vestido [1] Sleepwear SS14 / Oysho Camisa Sleepwear SS14

candles Mix rich, creamy scents with a subtle spiced aroma to form a moodenhancing sanctuary. / Maison D’Amore [2] Fleur & Rhubarb / Maison D’Amore Feuille De Tabac

/ Liz Earle Cleanse & Polish [3] / Liz Earle Orange Flower Hand Wash

books You won’t want to leave the warmth of your bed with these page-turners / Gone Girl By Gillian Flynn If you’re apart of the minority who haven’t already devoured this psychological thriller, then do so ASAP before it hits the screens this October. Seductive and dangerous, you’ll wonder why you hadn’t read it sooner. / The Cuckoo’s Calling By Robert Galbraith [4] Written under J.K. Rowling’s pseudonym it explores a failing provate detective investigating a supermodels suicide. / The Heiress By Sara Sheperd Wrote by the author of Pretty Little Liars, Sara Shepherd writes a novel which includes a string of murders and tragedies that plague a beautiful and wealthy family.

2

4

5

3

1


I remember the first time I ever saw the film Clueless, and saw the fantastical human being that is Cher Horowitz light up the screen. I couldn’t imagine any young girl in the 90s who didn’t want to be like her, she had the life, the

Words by Alexandra Scherger

‘teenage dream’ if you will. The house, the car, the clothes, and that awesome boxy (however advanced for the time) computer that coordinated her daily outfits so perfectly, constantly saving her from a fashion faux pas. Looking back, it’s amazing to see how much importance a single film holds in the teen genre, almost setting the standard for more modern films of its kind to follow. Among others with a legacy like Clueless, they are the very few pieces of cinema that transcend time, stand out from the crowd are filed into their own category of elite. This is what some may call a cult film. Such films like Clueless have gone on to have their relevance transposed into other areas besides film, such as in leading the revival of pop-culture trends, particularly earlier this year when we saw many 90s style fashions being re-popularized. Clothing lines like Wildfox released a Clueless themed collection, a style of clothing which then went on to be advocated in the personal style of many celebrities, including Katy Perry, Rita Ora, and more recently rapper Iggy Azalea, in which she parodies a Cher Horowitz in the music video for her hit single ‘fancy’. Furthermore, Cher’s style was a piece of iconography in itself, a character in its own. Her fashion practically marked the teen style of the era; knee high socks, a plaid mini and fluffy sweater completed the look. We all then added the phrases “totally buggin” or “as if!” into our daily vocabulary and the process in becoming a wannabe Cher Horowitz was complete. But what I believe really made Horowitz so likable, enough to gain a strong cult following, was the fact that her personality differs from other characters of her kind. Rather than the self-centered rich girl we have come to

From Regina George-like antics to lustful vampire romances, it seems as if teenagers will obsessively fan over any fleeting cheesy rom-com or drama these days. But there’s got to be more than meets the eye, more substance as to what makes them gravitate towards films of such sort. What is it about certain teen films that make them so immensely popular; enough to gain such dedicated followings? Here we investigate the anatomy of the teen cult film and the future for the genre.

know, Cher is generally good-natured and kindhearted. Though she does tend to value superficial means, namely

can to help others. Though her seemingly philanthropic

Teenage Dream

acts aren’t always done in the most effective manner, her

By Alexandra Scherger

her self-image and material wealth, she eventually learns to lend her wealth to a greater good. Whether it’s taking the new girl under her wing, to helping and donating to her school’s charity events, she seizes every opportunity she

ditzyness often blurring her good intentions; she still strives to be more than just a ‘ditz with a credit card’, something that is rarely seen in a female protagonist of the teen genre. Perhaps this is what makes a cult, the fact that a single character can lead a trend and be a role model, and even have significance for several generations of fans, as new female audiences that weren’t even youngsters of the 90s have come know and value Horowitz’s charm.


As a result, Mean Girls has been highly noted for its most quotable expressions, with many of its famous lines continuing to plague memes of the Tumblr-sphere. Once in high school a friend of mine planned to write her English analysis on the relevance of Mean Girls in terms of its best quotes, to which another one of my friends responded: “Well that’s going to be pretty difficult without talking about the whole film!” I think all Mean Girls enthusiasts can happily agree with such statement as the film is heavily laced with fantastic one-liners. From “You go Glen Coco!” to “On Wednesdays we wear pink” it’s hard to pinpoint the best or funniest line in such a rich script. Yet Mean Girls success has gone further than just starting an internet craze and a form of popular slang… it’s even gone as far to have an annual day dedicated for the film, October 3rd (in reference to a line in the movie by Lindsay’s Lohan’s character) and a stage musical is even confirmed to be in the works. These stats alone just go to show how much weight this film holds to its fans even years after its release. This teen classic doesn’t seem to be slipping from the pop culture radar anytime soon, which is surprising considering it was released 10 years ago, yes it has been that long! But the question I now ask is this: are there any more recent films of the teen genre that have the potential to be great cult classics than our beloved Mean Girls or Clueless? Perhaps Harry Potter? The Fault in Our Stars? And dare I say it, Twilight? In looking at the more contemporary, there seems to be a trend here; they’re either based on a bestselling book, or in the fantasy romance genre, rather than Since the 90s, many films have not been able to match

satirical comedies of the past decade. Fundamentally, said

or excel the popularity of Clueless; that is until Mean Girls

films have helped birth the ‘franchise era’, from the product

came into prominence. Mean Girls has become one of the

placement, to the merchandise being thrown at you left

few films to reach the same success and cult status of

right and centre to the point where it’s almost inescapable,

Clueless, and is arguably one the best teen comedies of

moviemakers have been able to further target their niche

all time; with its dialogue and unique plot in particular that

audience in many consumerist sectors.

affirms the films cult status. Though Mean Girl’s high school setting and plot crux isn’t that different to Clueless, the way

In realising this trend, is this where the future of cult film

in which the characters and script were so wittingly written

is headed? Has the genre lost its sentimental value in

is what makes the film a much more intelligent depiction

that its relevance or importance can only be measured by

of the high school life and its quirks. Hence, setting itself

extensive product pushing and financial gain? Perhaps so,

apart from being just another average teen chick-flick, and

but then again, without funding from the audience, there

saving itself from fading off into obscurity.

wouldn’t be any way to produce film at all.


HOW TO

Get your dream job Application Do: • Proof read your email again and again. It should be professional with NO grammatical errors. • Highlight why this is your dream job… and if it isn’t? Pretend! • Include relevant information in your resume. This is your time to brag, so include all your biggest achievements…it could be one of them that win you the job. • Keep your cover letter short and sweet. Most employees will only skim your cover letter, so get to the point right away.

Don’t: • Send chain emails. This is a huge nono. Addressing the email as ‘Dear All’ or even to the wrong person comes across not only as unprofessional, but also disrespectful. • Don’t fill you cover letter with constructive criticism. Highlight what YOU can do for the job, not what the job can do for you. • Include all information that the job search advertisement asks for.

Interview Do: • If you are applying for a job in fashion, make sure you know a good amount about the label/agency/ magazine and any photographers, models, designers and stylists that they work with regularly. Knowledge is power. • Research the place you are applying for extensively, and know about the people who work there and what they do. • How you present yourself is very important. Dress professionally, with good posture. • Fake your confidence, no matter how nervous you are. This includes smiling, firm hand shake, looking the employee

in the eye and act like you know what you are talking about. Practice possible questions that could be asked, again and again. You will earn the respect of the employer if you deliver articulate, informative answers. Ask questions and seem interested.

Don’t: • Don’t lie. It’s very easy to tell when someone is not telling the truth, especially when you state your biggest flaw as being a ‘perfectionist’. • Fidget. This is a major sign for nervousness • Be late. Arrive at least 5 minutes before your interview.


The

Golden Era by Amy Martins

O

nce upon a time, in this theatre of lights and shadows that is the fashion industry, there was a sorority of impossibly sophisticated models who had the power to dazzle everyone around them with their mile-long legs and unreal beauty; elevating modelling to a whole new level. The phenomenon of Supermodels – or the Golden Era, as I like to call it – of the late 80’s and early 90’s is something we all certainly feel nostalgic about. But, what was that special “something” this group of women had to make them stand out and therefore, have such a meteoric rise to stardom? I think it’s about time to find out.


Elle Macpherson When you earn a nickname as sublime as “The Body” after no less that 5 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition appearances, you know you’re kind of a big deal. We can all agree on the fact that her incredible figure is the one to blame for her enviable position in the great Olympus of models. Along with her radiant smile, unmistakable long blonde hair & her girl-nextdoor charm, Elle managed to win everyone’s


The rest is history as they say. But this girl didn’t get to where she is just because she had a pretty face and a body to kill. Her charisma, sympathy, professionalism, and most importantly; intelligence are the qualities that got Macpherson where she is now. Nearly three decades later, she remains at her best and is still on the crest of a wave.

Elle Macpherson

heart and became the ultimate beach babe.


Naomi Campbell In my relatively short period of existence, I have heard an innumerable amount of people refer to Mrs. Campbell as “The Ebony Goddess”, and I think there’s really no other way to describe her. Naomi has a socking fierce look both on the catwalks and photo shoots. That stunning mixture of Jamaican beauty and gorgeous Asian features simply doesn’t go unnoticed.


wonder

why

Azzedine

Ala誰a made her his muse almost instantly when they met for the first time. He discovered Naomi (who considers Ala誰a as a father) in Paris, and after asking her to try on one of his dreamy designs, she saw something peculiar in her, so he granted Campbell the honour of walking for one of his shows. Azzedine has guided her professionally on her modelling career ever since. Some even say that he was the one who instilled in her that whimsical diva behaviour. Though we all know Campbell is a woman with a very characterized and controversial personality that has caused several legal disputes and countless

headlines,

being

strong and independent in an industry like this is essential to obtain success and Naomi surely was and still is.

Naomi Campbell

No


Kate Moss Lanky figure, short stature, crooked teeth, delicate bone structure‌ definitely not the look of that moment. That’s probably the reason why she became so big while fashion was living a moment of admiration for killer curves and excessiveness, she was a breath of fresh air that contrasted perfectly with all that extravagance.


Corinne

Day

friend,

photographer and roommate back in the late 80’s – saw “that to shoot her for a The Face editorial that’s now considered iconic and instantly turned Moss into her muse as well as a grunge referent. Brand Calvin Klein also seemed to have some kind of devotion for the model. After signing a contract with the company, she appeared in numerous ads for the fashion house (you know, the ones we all secretly wish we could’ve been part of). Her story is one filled with scandals, but rumours and controversy aside, we all have a special place for Kate in our hearts, some more than others, but we do. She has a special virtue, a magnetic personality that somehow makes you fall in love with her. So sophisticated, so irreverent, so unique.

Kate Moss

something” in her and decided


Linda Evangelista When looking at a picture of Linda Evangelista, you can’t help but feel utterly mesmerised by those hypnotic eyes. You can’t help but wish your hair looked that great after innumerable hair dyes & haircuts. You can’t help but wonder how she still looks so perfect in the L’Oreal advertisings. And, be honest, you can’t help but dream that one day you can also be able to say: “I don’t wake up for less than


famously said. You can’t help it. Because her chameleonic beauty and versatility as a model is and has always been hard to ignore. With a somewhat vulgar yet totally

glamorous

attitude

and nearly (if not completely) flawless facial features, Linda captivated not only all of us, but also one of the most relevant fashion photographers in history, Steven Meisel, who made her his muse and shot all of her Vogue Italia covers. She is considered the world’s star model and along with Campbell & Turlington, she is part of the so-called “Trinity” of supermodels. Today, she is fortunate enough to still continue to work as a model. As Manolo Blahnik once said, “Linda eternal”.

Evangelista

will

be

Linda Evangelista

$10,000 a day”, like she once


Linda Evangelista Two words: timeless beauty. That’s the secret to Cindy Crawford’s success. Almost 30 years after the wonderful days of glory, she remains one of the highest paid models and (to me at least) still holds the title of America’s sweetheart.


spectacular

body,

a

characteristic mole on top of her full lips and charm to spare, earned her a whopping 1,000 magazine covers. Did I mention that she has also walked the runway for literally everyone, from Chanel to HervÊ LÊger and Dolce & Gabbana? Uh‌ no biggie. Thanks in part to her looks, friendly personality and a natural talent for business, Cindy was the most successful of the original group of supermodels, and turned her name into an empire. This girl is something else.

Cindy Crawford

Her


Christy Turlington Irving Penn once said about Christy that she was “a full person, not just a vanity walking around on two feet. And that’s unusual in this field”. I couldn’t agree more with Mr. Penn, since Turlington has always depicted a very jovial, affectionate, admiring and down-to-earth image. And that, paired with her feline gaze and those memorable yoga poses, assured her a permanent position in “The Trinity”. Together with the other supermodel club members, she walked the catwalks of all the major fashion capitals and vamped for all the biggest campaigns. She was a favorite of brand Calvin Klein as well, being the face of fragrance “Eternity” for nearly two decades. Christy, like Elle, Naomi, Kate, Linda and Cindy, had so much more to offer to the world besides their beauty. They were a group of powerful women who knew how to intelligently win over the public with their natural charm and youthful personalities, crossing the barriers of the fashion industry and becoming stars in their own right. Those were the days.


Christy Turlington


TOTAL CONTROL PHOTOGRAPHER: Garth McKee STYLIST: Brookelyn Harrison MUA: Lisa Callus MODEL: Rhiannon Bradshaw @ Work Models


day in the life of

me r rel wes t hoff

Inspired by patterns, architecture and shadows, metal smith Merrel Westhoff creates all of her designs in her atelier in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. After she graduated fashion academy, Merrel traveled all over the world as a model. When she begin to work as a stylist, Merrel couldn’t find the right accessories which fitted her minimalistic and raw style, so she started to make her own pieces. Merrel combined her full time job as a stylist with a metal smith training. Meanwhile she works exclusively on the development of Monocrafft.


8am

9am

The voice of Lisa Bassenge wakes me up singing “Overload”, I take a shower and go to make myself some breakfast. I always have my breakfast in my bed whilst going through my emails and day schedule.

I start my day in the atelier. As this ‘little paradise’ is a part of my house, lots of hours are spent here. This place gives me so much energy; the light, the smell, the old tools, I’m really fortunate to call this my office. Also my new collection, Monocrafft Collection 2.0, is displayed in here. I launched it last month, so there is a lot of excitement in the air. I start making a custom made order. I have my own collection, but I take also orders upon request. I love to make something together with the future owner. Jewels are so personal and when somebody put their trust into my hands, it gives me goosebumps when I see their faces while trying their new soldiers on (as I call my jewels).


3pm

I leave the atelier to drive to Amsterdam where I visit one of my favourite shops, Cottoncake. This lovely place, with lovely people are selling Monocrafft and I show them my new Collection 2.0. This place is also quite dangerous for me as I like all their stuff! Today I don’t leave the shop without a new treasure. New sunglasses!

5pm

Rockin’ my new sunny’s I head to the Mercedez Benz Fashion Week which is throwing their opening party tonight. The host of this event is my dear friend Marvy Rieder, a beautiful Dutch model/ presenter and she requested some Monocrafft styles to wear during this week. As we go through her styling, we decide which jewels will fit her outfits.


6:30

I meet up with my friend Tamar who joins me at the opening party. I am wearing my new Chain Kneelets, which appear to be a ‘blogger attraction’. Some of them capture my soldiers and so I end up in the Grazia street style page. After seeing a couple of shows we are ‘cocktailing’ our way through this explosion of fashionable human beings and call it a night around 12am.

12am

Driving back to Rotterdam, I get really inspired. To me it feels like a mixture between Berlin and New York. It is well known for its modern architecture, creative scene and skyline. Yay! Sometimes I call it ‘Little Manhattan’! So whenever you have the chance to come overseas... put Rotterdam on your bucket list!

1:30

Home sweet home! A single ticket to dreamland please.

Merrel Westhoff, Designer and owner of Monocrafft Jewellery http://www.monocrafft.com/


So sp ph ye ot ia th ar lig Lo ic is s o ht ren so on It ld si h a in th ali bu nce s b tr at an t wh sh een ig t ue he bea at e w i d wo ut is as n t ab r y h ou ld an it 14 e t? i d a s st bo st y ut il le l

Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.


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By

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Born Sophia Villani Scicolone in Naples, 1934, to a poor single mother, Sophia Loren adopted her stage name after she began to gain prominent roles within the Italian film industry. Initially told she was not photogenic enough for the screen and would have little success as an actress, Loren disregarded all opinions and persevered with her talents, which inevitably lead her to her life long relationship and many film endeavors with highly successful Italian director, Vittorio De Sica. One thing Loren knew was to use was she had, and to use it well, flaunting her hourglass figure with the utmost effortlessness. Never afraid of feeling exposed she gained the title of sex symbol and goddess through numerous film scenes where she left little to the imagination. In Boy On A Dolphin (1957) she emerged on screen, rising from the depths of the ocean, soaking wet in an ochre yellow shirt-dress that had turned transparent, and left nothing to the imagination. She again dazzled her womanly frame in a sheer lace camisole in Marriage Italian Style (1964) and again accentuated her curves by donning a black silk corset, garter and stockings in The Millionairess (1960). Yet, her most notable performance was her ever so sexy

She always accredited her being so well endowed to her Italian heritage saying, “Everything you see, I owe to spaghetti.” Never shying away from a plunging neckline, Loren has embraced the beauty of her femininity by accentuating the things that make her woman, from showing off her voluptuous hips in figure hugging haute couture gowns to decorating her décolletage with the most elegant of jewelled necklaces made of diamonds and pearls. Loren has always been about making a statement, from her luscious and voluminous brunette locks to her fiercely elongated cat-eye makeup, her beauty was always in abundance.

“Loren has always been about making a statement, from her luscious and voluminous brunette locks to her fiercely elongated cat-eye makeup, her beauty was always in abundance. “ strip tease in Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963). For the majority of her red carpet appearances through out the 60s, 70s and 80s, Sophia Loren wore Valentino and even featured on the arm of Valentino himself to many events. However, for the last twenty years or so, Loren has been known as one of Giorgio Armani’s leading ladies. Since 1993, Armani has been her designer of choice as she said “When you dress in Armani, you can be sure you’ll never look like a Christmas tree.”

However, her most eloquent feature was the selfconfidence she possessed declaring “nothing makes a woman more beautiful than the belief that she is beautiful.” Still carrying that confidence today, at the age of 72 she posed for the racy Pirelli Calendar and was the oldest model to have been featured in the annual publication. It’s safe to say that Sophia Loren continues to prove that age is simply an attitude.


TheConcreteRunway.com Dress Stylist’s Own Jewellery


Photographer: Carla Barraez - @barraezcarla barraezcarla.squarespace.com Stylist & MUA: Jessica Estrada - @jes_estrada jessicaestrada.com Model: Julia Evans - Elite Models Miami - @julesevans Location: Miami, Fl.

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FOUNDERS

playlist JASMINE + LAURA

Sheets: Shannon Saunders Snap Out Of It: Arctic Monkeys I Wanna Be Yours: Arctic Monkeys Tessellate (Alt-J Cover): Ellie Goulding Bloodstream: Ed Sheeran You & Me: Zuper Champagne Coast: Devonte Hynes Zen: Eves Robbers: The 1975 Crimson and Clover: Joan Jett Round and Round: Ariel Pink Ride: Lana Del Ray


We constantly travel through seasons of our lives, and through the bumps and curves and tilts of the ride, it can at times seem better from one standpoint to another. Natasha Norford investigates into what really are the best years of our life.

I think it’s universally agreed that the early teens are fraught with far too much hormone and heartbreak to make the list, most of us are left with awkward photos, under-baked encounters with love and angsty pre-exam moments. All of a sudden, however, p-plated, radio-pop freedom is made available. Graduation, dodgy house parties, beach trips and identity crises hidden under second coats of mascara dot the high school timeline. It’s the years of your life you actually care about what happens on Facebook, celebrity crushes give you a rush, and under-paid cafe jobs fund insatiable obsessions with odd and unaccountable fads in fashion. Hazy memories of teary moments and breathless text chats till the wee hours stamp the late teens with all it’s wild and lonely weirdness.


20

the twenties. The twenties mark a time of transition from childhood to adulthood, when degrees turn into professions; ideas into practice or dreams into reality, and alternatively, into dust. You have a foot in both worlds, when you suit up and boot up during the week and strip down at music festivals on the weekend. Your twenties is the time for knuckling down, taking shifts with the long hours, doing the coffee runs, and living in leaky apartments on the questionable end of urban society. Thankless tasks and home-brand packaging and unreasonably good skin make for a good staple of this ten-year span, networking and building for a better decade to follow. It’s not all microwave meals though. Your roaring twenties are a time of unrivaled energy, rose-tinted ambition, surging waves of social success.

At this stage there probably are no frisky kiddies on the scene, ruining tops with milky burps and gifting eye-bags with sleepless nights of teething. There’s risk and romance, the occasional all-nighter in some jazzy bar and unreasonable shoe purchases that you don’t have to explain to anyone later on.

This is the time in your life you take road trips, backpack the Himalayas and eat Twisties for days on end without changing jean sizes. Psychologists from the University of Hampshire found that older adults often report more memories from ages 17 to 24 more than any other period of their life span. Somehow the events that unfold in your early, mid and late twenties lodge in the brain as ideal. People tend to frame memories from this time positively, even if the actual events were difficult or uncomfortable at the time. It’s been called the “reminiscence bump,” where we make an overrepresentation of personal struggle in our early years. Kristina Steiner, doctoral student in psychology who led the research observed that “one of the theories on reminiscence bump is that what we’re really doing is following this cultural life script. Graduating high school, graduating college, and maybe getting your first job — these are all seen as positive events that our culture supports. So when you ask people, ‘tell me about your life,’ they’re going to default to these culturally appropriate events.”


30

the thirties.

The thirties start to get all a little more stable. Remember Jenna in ‘Suddenly 30’? “Thirty, flirty and thriving. Thirsty, flirty and thriving.” Hopefully the hard work you’ve already been put through has paid off. You’ve obtained a steadily inclining career, an attractive mate, and added some sort of worldly wealth to your name. You’ve kicked out the housemates that used the sink as a dumping ground and replaced it with someone you’re ‘going steady with.’ Regular, sensible organic muesli choices replace the infrequent donut breakfast of yesteryears. You host dinner parties, read recipe books (as opposed to trusting your intuition and eating the burnt out remains), and you actually begin to buy wine based on blend and not on price. Savings go into house refurbishments and not extravagant Europe trips. You start to read challenging books because you actually enjoy them and not just to steal intelligent lines from them for conversation.

“Thirty, flirty and thriving. Thirsty, flirty and thriving.”


40 the forties.

The forties creep up with all undue ceremony and screwed facial expressions, but the bark is generally worse than the bite. At this stage you’ve half the friends you had twenty years ago, but the ones you do are clean keepers. Impressing the neighbours is less of a necessity and figuring out how to deal with unruly teenagers becomes a bit more of a priority. You might have jumped ship, cut ties, sailed through divorce and come out the other side with plans for nothing but relocating to London and buying a cafe and blending beans on some kitschy corner. That’s the thing about your forties, so much can happen to change these ten years. Afternoon strolls become an attractive way to spend a Sunday afternoon. Linen softener is a staple in the weekend grocery shop, and you’re beginning to think it’s probably about time to have a mid-life crisis, but heck that takes up too much time/energy/money/space, so why bother? You still like the idea of a frisky night, but the actual practice

is far more depleting than what you remembered it to be. Instead, you spend your pocket money on classy frames, comfortable soles and car seat covers. The inner creative starts harping up about beginning some sort of pathetic excuse for a novel before it’s too late... and you consider the fairly stable success of a Meyer, Grisham, Sparks and other similar paperback’s. Either that or the left-winged accountant you always knew starts to collect receipts and track your spending. It’s a billcentric time. Not incredibly fun, but you’ve never been so organised. It’s taken this long to learn how to turn up to conferences on time, but better late than never. You’ve taken up the unfortunate habit of self-diagnosing your ails through the Internet, and a concerning list of illnesses are cropping up. Wrinkle lines are beginning to rear their ugly heads, and it’s the flick of the switch; you’ve decided.


50 the fifties.

Mellowing out and marshmallowing down into the little space you’ve created comes with turning 50. You’ve had a really dashing birthday, and there’s something a little Sean Connery sexy about the age. Diets have ceased to entertain, and you’ve dropped the much overused saying “oh I really shouldn’t,” every time someone pulls out a box of Lindt. Although physical appearance will usually be something a woman will always care about, it no longer takes the precedence it used to. It’s almost frightening to relinquish such a long-term priority; some respond with a backlash of Botox and medical interventions, others take it for what it is. Surveys show that most women in their 50’s become more comfortable than ever in their bodies, and release much of the self-critic that can often hamper us for so long. For many, the fifties are both sobering and liberating. There’s a span of time to accomplish what we want to do, and that time frame becomes very apparent. At the same time, a freedom emerges when we emotionally understand the power in dropping unessential concerns and worries that use to seem important. While we consider it a ripe

old age in Australia and America, Scandinavian and European countries such as the Netherlands consider it a triumph of wisdom and experience. Grey hairs gradually replace natural colour and the experience offers us a choice. To embrace life’s organic course or to dye frantically over. With no wrong and no right decision involved, it’s a little physical truth of the response you are giving to the other emotional, spiritual and mental areas of life. There comes about what is called the ‘empty nest syndrome,’ a term coined for the result of children leaving for university, work or travel. At first it may be depressing, but psychologists have found the eventual response to this period incredibly exhilarating. The moment becomes opportune for no longer needing to simply provide for others, for mortgages or familial responsibility. Both men and women are given that ‘second chance’ to change careers, re-educate or downsize living quarters and start up a herb garden. It’s a time found to drive many women to address aspects of their lives they’ve long been unhappy with.


“The Golden Age is no one time. The Golden Age can only be you, in this present.”

For so long these things have been ignored under the pressure of financial and professional security. House and Garden subscriptions are no longer ridiculous, sensible linen pants replace worn in denims, and you’ve the time to read up on Monet, Manet and Renoir. Family shifts, and there is suddenly time to cultivate friendships. ‘Girls nights out’ during childrearing years turn into leisurely lunches, long weekends away, or midweek excursions on the yacht. The fifties are a milestone, half way through a century. While the accomplishment is certainly momentous, it exists without being as loud as the teen years, brash as the 20’s, materialistic as the 30’s or as harried as the 40’s. With each stage of life, there comes its blessings and curses. For the majority of nations around the globe, women outlive their men. Facing the decades after the mid-way point will stretch with all their own infinite joys and lows. There can’t be a worst or a best time of life, when faced with it. Different points might be harder or easier, but the route continues steadily on, no matter how many corners crop up in the journey. At the end of the day, you face yourself only. You are a collection of all those moments, the laughs and bills and wines and tears and goodbyes and hellos. Each decade imprints itself onto you with its own loving caress or cold shoulder. The Golden Age is no one time. The Golden Age can only be you, in this present.


bare elegance

HELMUT

NEWTON

by amy martins


Many people believe that Helmut Newton is the best photographer in history, with writer J.G. Ballard considering him “the greatest visual artist in the world”. Such strong statements might be debatable, but what is certain is that he was the photographer who best knew how to make reality of the erotic fantasies of the 1960’s sexual revolution, breaking all existent taboos at the time and turning fashion photography into what is today. He was undoubtedly the most imitated photographer of his time, because his portraits of women were both seductive and alluring, representing a concealed version of reality. The Helmut Newton woman took the lead, towering over men wearing little more than a pair of heels, lounging by the pool sipping lemonade whilst surrounded by French gentlemen with a nonchalant expression because, well, she knows everyone wants her.

became calculating and manipulative perpetrators of a crime of passion, with a haughty and domineering attitude through his lens.

Helmut Newton was the great portraitist of erotic sophistication; luxury, glamour, designer clothes and stilettos. His aim was to empower women instead of victimising them, showing through his usually black & white pictures that they were independent, provocative and stronger versions of his always fabulous models. They

His photographs have a strange and unmistakable sensitivity and are somewhat oneiric whilst being artfully perverse and vicious with a touch of cynical and materialistic humour to them…that’s pretty much the definition of Newton’s women isn’t it? Women that would much rather lead than follow, and would do so either impeccably dressed in a silk slip dress or entirely undressed.


L O N D O N /F A S H I O N

W E E K E N D/

In London the month of September is dedicated to fashion with not one but two festivals. Just after London Fashion Week (12th-16th of September) wraps up and every fashion editor and Instagramfamous-blogger has flown off to their next destination, the Vodafone London Fashion Weekend will launch at Somerset House in Central London. Organised by the British Fashion Council, the biannual four-day event came about in order to demonstrate the creative and commercial importance of the British fashion industry. The extended weekend gives the fashion-forward crowd and consumers an opportunity to see runway shows, shop at designer pop-up stores and listen to expert discussions.

immerging designers and renowned labels at fashion-insider prices.

This year THEOUTNET.com will be showcasing new-season trends in a series of curated Trend Catwalk Shows at the Official British Fashion Council Showspace and will offer advice on tailoring the latest trends to suit individuals. Visitors will also get a first look at exclusive Designer Catwalk Shows where designers including Amanda Wakeley and Nicholas Oakwell London will present their AW14 collections. Bookings are essential for both the Trend and Designer shows as they are expected to sell fast. Vodafone London Fashion Weekend will also become home to exclusive designer pop-up shops and will feature over eighty of the UK’s favourite brands including

In addition to runway shows and pop-up shopping visitors can listen to hair, beauty and skincare experts as they share advice during scheduled talks and demonstrations. Beauty professionals from TONI&GUY and Maybelline New York will reveal the hottest trends in hair and makeup and visitors will have the opportunity to indulge in manicures and massages. Throughout the weekend fashion editors, stylists and trend experts will give free talks at the Events Lounge where in past years guest speakers have included Henry Holland and Caroline Rush (CEO British Fashion Council). Caroline Rush has said the upcoming September festivals will ‘reflect the breadth of British fashion talent as never before.’ Each visitor will also receive an exclusive tote bag designed by the queen of Brit handbags; Lulu Guinness. Throughout her twenty-five year career Lulu has developed a characteristically quirky style and the limited-edition tote will no doubt show off her signature style as well as Lulu’s iconic scarlet lipstick. Each visitor is also encouraged to jump on social media and tag the event using #LFWend. To purchase tickets or for more information visit: www.londonfashionweekend.co.uk

/by Monique La Terra


FREE SOUL

PHOTOGRAPHER: Anastasia Solodovnikova MUA: Anastasia Zaharova STYLIST Polina Zheleznikova MODELS: Natasha Utkina and Elina Sabirova @ Andy Fiord


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(Left) INTIMISSIMI Top TOPSHOP Jacket BCBGMAXAZRIA Skirt (Right) AMERICAN APPAREL Top ZARA Pants


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Who’s

THAT GIRL? Marie Piovesan is fashion’s Parisian darling, who so rightly described her nationality to Russh Magazine claiming that ‘the French don’t do anything besides smoking and making love’.

Despite being late to the modelling scene by fashion’s standards (Marie was discovered at 25), she’s certainly made up for lost time, fronting campaigns, magazine covers and editorials; her signature moody stance captivating all whom come across her work. She’s the kinda girl who drinks whiskey late into the night, and conceals a level of mystery at all times - an energy that leaves people desperately trying to figure out who she really is.


The fashion industry, like any creative realm, has been said to be extremely hard to break into. With aspiring journalists, designers, stylists, editors and PR agents all competing for a place in the coveted world, the advice of those who have succeeded is valuable and essential to follow. In our new ‘How I Made It’ series, we talk to those who have indeed turned their dream into reality. Check back next issue for more!

H OW I MAD E I T Photography by Bridget Fleming http://downtownfrombehind.com


Jesse Jesse Hart is without a doubt one of Australia’s most sought after fashion stylists. Having worked in the industry for over a decade, she has held jobs at both Shop Til You Drop and Cleo Magazine as a Fashion Director, whilst also working freelance. Her clients include Billabong, Talulah, Visa and many more.

W

ho do you look up to?

I look up to people that have worked hard and are strong and confident in their field. Different people have inspired me. The list is too long.

W

W

hat was your big break?

My big break was when I came back from living overseas and I interned as Cosmopolitan Magazine. I bumped into the Fashion Director in the hallway and begged her to let me assist her. She gave me a chance and believed in me.

hat does your job entitle?

As a stylist your role is so versatile. One day you are running around sourcing clothes, props, locations and models and other days you are shooting on location or in a studio. Meeting, mood boarding and researching trends are all apart of it also. Every day is different, but that is what makes it so much fun!


Hart stylist I

n your opinion, what is a ‘red-flag’ to avoid doing when trying to break into the fashion industry? Don’t think you can walk straight in and land your dream job. It takes time.

D

o you believe social media has a large impact on ones success within the industry? I think social media is a great platform to showcase your work. If you are successful within the industry it’s because you are good at what you do.

W

hat characteristics are important to possess in order to make it in the industry?

It’s not glamorous at all and you to be prepared to work hard. Be able to take all feedback about work and use it in a constructive way. Always say yes and don’t take it all too seriously because at the end of the day its just fashion - we’re not saving lives.

W

hat has been the best and worst experience you’ve had on the job so far? The best part is seeing it all come together and after all the hard work you see an image come to life that you were apart of. Ah man, too many bad times but in saying that there has been just as many good times.

W

hat do you think has been the key to your success? I don’t know really. I have stayed true to myself. I have always listened and watched and I don’t think I am a selfish stylist. I style for whom the person is that will be receiving the image/look or whatever you may have it. It is important to know that it’s not for you it’s for a mass audience.

WEBSITE: www.jesse-hart.com INSTAGRAM: @jessedhart CONTACT: The Ministry of Talent @ www.theministryoftalent.com


Bridget photographer W

hat does your job entitle? Photographer, creative strategist and coffee hunter.

Bridget Fleming owns the photographic blog ‘Downtown From Behind’, a series dedicated to exploring the streets of downtown New York, and the characters that bring life to such an intriguing city. Bridget has also had experience as a fashion photographer, her images gracing the pages of Grazia, Vogue, Harpers Bazaar and Marie Claire.

W

hat do you think has been the key to your success? My career experience pre photography, some luck and a little talent.

D

id/do you have a mentor or somebody who has supported you throughout your journey? Several. Ironically, no photographers! But one or two media and advertising creatives and business entrepreneurs have been in my life as mentors for ten plus years.

W

ho do you look up to? Ordinary people who accomplish great things.

W

hat was your big break?

An article on coolhunting.com that lead to a full page story and interview in the New York Times within hours of being published.


Fleming W

hat has been the best and worst experience you’ve had on the job so far? A great day is having a great team, fortunately that’s been frequent. Incompetence generally leads to ordinary experiences.

W

hat characteristics are important to possess in order to make it in the industry? Be intuitive, hustle and find new ways to do old things.

D

o you believe social media has a large impact on ones success within the industry? Social media has provided a platform for the ‘new editors’ to be seen and heard in what has been a traditionally closed industry. It has created an entirely new and exciting channel of communication, championed a shift in the way brands connect with an audience and it has had a profound impact on many successes in the industry. I’m an advocate. I love media.

I

n your opinion, what is a ‘red-flag’ to avoid doing when trying to break into the fashion industry? Mass emails

BLOG: www.downtownfrombehind.com WEBSITE: www.bridgetfelming.com INSTAGRAM: @bridgetfleming CONTACT: The Ministry of Talent @ www.theministryoftalent.com


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SUBURBAN DREAMS PHOTOGRAPHER & STYLIST: Heather Gildroy, MUA: Matthew Militello, MODEL: Braina Laviena


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1 0 Q U E ST I ONS WI T H

Kim Victoria Jewels INTERVIEWED BY EMILY COSTI


D

esigner Kim Victoria Wearne draws inspiration from the starkly fascinating Australian landscape, geological topographies and the ancient jewellery she has been awed by in museums worldwide. Originally self-taught, Melbourne-based Kim Victoria honed her craft with a Bachelor of Fine Art from RMIT majoring in Gold and Silversmithing. Armed with a First Class Honours award in Interior Design, Kim has developed a label that strikes a coherent balance between conceptual practice and quality craftsmanship, with pieces intended to remain timeless. The designer’s unique vision has seen her receive local acclaim, with a solo exhibition for her 2012 Volcanic Opulence Collection at Pieces of Eight, several installations at Alice Euphemia, and an Art Start grant to further her study of opals in Coober Pedy.


NOW YOU WERE ORIGINALLY SELF-TAUGHT, FROM WHAT AGE DID YOU LEARN THE CRAFT AND WAS THERE SOMEONE WHO GOT YOU INTERESTED IN CREATING YOUR OWN JEWELLERY? I started making jewellery when I was about 21, but have made things since I was a child. During my interior design degree I was taught by an amazing gentleman named Andrea Mina who crafted astoundingly complex small-scale pieces. I would say that this was when I realised that I preferred to physically make pieces rather than design things for others.

I UNDERSTAND YOUR DESIGNS ARE DIRECTLY INFLUENCED BY AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPES. WHEN DID YOU DECIDE TO BASE ON YOUR JEWELLERY DESIGNS ON THAT TOPIC? I just love the colour and forms found in our landscape. The plants and animals are like crazy, beautiful aliens that border on the grotesque.


“I will usually start by making collages and drawings that incorporate my own photographs, pages from books and anything that takes my fancy.� - KV


WHEN DESIGNING NEW PIECES HOW DOES THE PRODUCTION PROCESS WORK? I will usually start by making collages and drawings that incorporate my own photographs, pages from books and anything that takes my fancy. These two dimensional works then inform my three dimensional jewellery pieces which are lost wax cast, engraved, polished and hammered into their final forms.

OPALS ARE A FREQUENT FEATURE IN YOUR DESIGNS, WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO INCORPORATE THE BEAUTIFULLY UNDERRATED SOUTH AUSTRALIAN MINERALOID INTO YOUR DESIGNS? I love opals for exactly the same reason that I love Australian flora and fauna. They are so mysterious, magical and almost vulgar in their colour saturation. However, when they are cut into clean, geometric shapes, they are just stunning. I also like that they are mined in Australia and I have recently been to Coober Pedy to meet a couple that find and cut the stones themselves. I have some spectacular stones from them that are incorporated into the collection stocked at Pieces of Eight in Melbourne.


“..I had a confidence in my work that I had not had before and to see this reflected in sales and having clients seek me out was very encouraging.� - KV


BUSINESS SEEMS TO BE GOING GREAT FOR YOU AT THE MOMENT; YOUR ONLINE STORE HAS SOLD OUT OF ALL THE DESIGNS. WAS THERE A SPECIAL MOMENT WHERE YOU REALIZED THAT LIFE, AS YOU KNEW IT WAS CHANGING? My business has really built momentum over the last eighteen months. I’m not sure that there was one particular moment, but I do remember the day that I looked at the list of pieces due to stockists and clients and thinking “oh my goodness, how am I ever going to finish all this work?!’ It was such a great feeling, because I had a confidence in my work that I had not had before and to see this reflected in sales and having clients seek me out was very encouraging.

IF YOU COULD JEWEL UP ANYONE IN THE WORLD, FAMOUS, DEAD OR ALIVE WHO WOULD IT BE? AND WHAT WOULD YOU DESIGN FOR THEM? Louise Bourgeois. She is one of my favourite artists and I love that she worked until the end of her life. Have you ever seen a photo of her hands? They were these amazing, long, fine and veiny instruments capable of making such influential work. I would love to make her a gigantic opal cocktail ring. Something gold and absolutely encrusted with diamonds, pearls and engravings.


“..I want to be able to make a living from working with my hands and being surrounded by the brilliant creative people that I continually meet in my line of business..� - KV


IS THERE A MINERAL YOU HAVEN’T WORKED WITH AND WOULD LOVE TO IN THE FUTURE? MAYBE A RED OR BLACK OPAL? I am quite interested in Ethiopian opals. Some of them are translucent with internal planes of colour that look like cellophane mixed with glitter. They almost look unnatural because they are so psychedelic.

FIVE YEARS FROM NOW, WHAT DO YOU HOPE TO HAVE ACHIEVED WITH KIM VICTORIA JEWELS? I really hope to build the volume of commission work as it such a joy to make things that mark a special moment in people’s lives. I am also developing an exhibition that includes sculpture and drawings as I feel creatively revitalised when I mentally step out of making jewellery for a while. Most of all I want to be able to make a living from working with my hands and being surrounded by the brilliant creative people that I continually meet in my line of business.


“The magic and wonder contained in those finely crafted pieces of jewellery from thousands of years ago is one of the reasons that I love jewellery so much. � - KV


WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO THOSE WHO FEEL JEWELLERY MAKING IS AN OLD TRADE? I agree! It is an old trade but that does not mean it is a dead trade. The magic and wonder contained in those finely crafted pieces of jewellery from thousands of years ago is one of the reasons that I love jewellery so much. These things live on long after we have returned to the earth and have stories to tell.

I READ YOU ARE IN THE PROCESS OF CREATING SOME NEW DESIGNS, COULD YOU SHARE ANY DETAILS OF WHAT TO EXPECT? They are heavily influenced by my time in Coober Pedy. The colour palette is very much about the sky and the dirt and the jewels themselves are informed by my photographs of the region.

Kim will be overseas until October 14th 2014.


BEFORE WE SAY GOODBYE

what we’re loving


Other than the stuff that gets us through our studies - like large quanities of coffee! We have been loving anything that can help keep us relaxed; whether that be listening to newly released singles ‘Sheets’ by Shannon Saunders or ‘Games For Girls’ by Say Lou Lou; blogs such as hippie, hippie - milkshake!, figtny and outandabout or late night beauty rituals that usually include Frank Original Body Scrub and Maison D’Amore candles.

Profile for DALLIANCE

DALLIANCE Magazine: Sept/October 2014  

DALLIANCE Magazine are proud to present their big September issue!

DALLIANCE Magazine: Sept/October 2014  

DALLIANCE Magazine are proud to present their big September issue!