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DRAFT DRAFT Version Version 11

K–12 Literacy & Social Studies Plan Supporting teachers to improve and enhance students’ learning experience

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Version One June 2017

Dallas ISD Teachers,

QR Code for Feedback

The Dallas ISD K–12 Literacy Plan was created to support and guide literacy instruction. The document continues to evolve to meet the needs of all Dallas ISD students. Future iterations will include additional resources, specialized departments’ input, and updates from stakeholder feedback. Do we want to We ask you provide feedback regarding this link: Dothis we plan wantusing to accept accept or just http://tiny.cc/literacyplanfeedback. Thefeedback feedback is from June 26, 2017 through feedback orperiod just post? post? September 15, 2017. We will post Version Two of the K–12 Literacy Plan online September 29, 2017.

Thank you for sharing in the joy of reading, and for your valued participation and input,

Derek G. Little

Shannon Trejo

Assistant Superintendent, Early Learning

Assistant Superintendent, Language, Literacy, and Social Studies

Release Date: June 2018 Version 1

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Contacts Reading Language Arts, Social Studies, and Early Learning

Arlena Gaynor Reading Language Arts Director agaynor@dallasisd.org 972.925.8966

Shalon Bond Social Studies Director shagibbs@dallasisd.org NUMBER?

NAME? Early Learning Director name@dallasisd.org 972.925.6760

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Contents Framing the Literacy Plan ………………………………………………………………………. How To Use the Literacy Plan ………………………………………………………………….. Overview of K–12 Literacy Plan ……………………………………………………………….. Elementary Classrooms Overview …………………………………………………………….. Learning Environment ……………………………………………………………………. Literacy Components/Sample Schedules ……………………………………………... Instructional Look-fors ……………………………………………………………………. Observation Checklists …………………………………………………………………... Update Middle School Classrooms Overview …………………………………………………………. Update at at final final version version Learning Environment ……………………………………………………………………. Literacy Components/Sample Schedules ……………………………………………... Instructional Look-fors ……………………………………………………………………. Observation Checklists …………………………………………………………………... Middle School Appendix …………………………………………………………………. High School Classrooms Overview ……………………………………………………………. Learning Environment ……………………………………………………………………. Literacy Components/Sample Schedules ……………………………………………... Instructional Look-fors ……………………………………………………………………. Observation Checklists …………………………………………………………………... High School Appendix …………………………………………………………………….

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Before you dive in, know that… Updated plan represents significant work to improve and enhance teaching & learning in Dallas ISD

…since the release of the 2017-18 literacy plan, the district has… …embarked on a major overhaul of its approach to teaching and learning. …solidified its Theory of Action and how that will impact campuses in 201819.

…created and released the Learning by Design Framework as part of its long range master plan. …begun creating an aligned, rigorous K-12 literacy and social studies curriculum. …launched a learning management system, where the curriculum is housed. Release Date: June 2018 Version 1

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Dallas ISD Theory of Action The district theory of action includes three core components

Managed Instructions with Earned Empowerment

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1 Managed Foundation

School Performance Ratings

Every school begins with the managed foundation for instruction and operations, which includes research-based, best-practice instruction and legal requirements

Every year, schools are rated according to the School Performance Framework using a whole child approach, which rates schools in one of five categories

3 Flexibility and Empowerment Based on ratings, school’s earn autonomies from the managed foundation, allowing schools to innovate & explore alternative methods and models

Dallas ISD SPF Ratings Accomplished

Breakthrough

Competing

Developing

Focus

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Dallas ISD Learning by Design framework This framework represents what teaching & learning in Dallas ISD should become

Define goals and develop a plan for success

Seek new knowledge through productive struggle

Develop and validate flexible, novel solutions

Deploy knowledge and skills to relevant situations

Pursue constructive feedback with a focus on goal progression

Motivate and inspire the learner Release Date: June 2018 Version 1

Taken from the Dallas ISD Long Range Master Plan

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Update Update at at final final version version

Tying the TOA, Learning by Design, and plan together The Literacy & Social Studies plan implements the TOA and Learning by Design

1 First, the theory of action governs all strategy and decisions in Dallas ISD.

2 Second, the Learning by Design framework demonstrates the overall learning experience every student should have in Dallas ISD.

3 Third, the Literacy & Social Studies plan provides the implementation roadmap for the Theory of Action and Learning by Design for these two content areas. Release Date: June 2018 Version 1


How to use the plan Guidance on navigating the plan

The literacy plan is anchored in a common K–12 literacy framework. The plan is then sectioned for use at the elementary, middle, and high school levels

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Start with K–12 Overview

Presents the Dallas ISD approach to literacy, classroom context, and literacy components Update Update at at final final version version

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Then to desired school level

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Provides grade level guidance regarding classroom learning environments, instructional practices, teacher and student look-fors, and observation checklists

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Overview K–12 Literacy & Social Studies Plan

Building content and practices around a philosophy that believes in students’ abilities to drive their learning

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Edit Edit at at Final Final

How the plan comes together The plan provides concrete guidance for teachers and leaders based on the conceptual design & beliefs

First, the vision for learning drives everything…

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…then, the framework represents the conceptual belief system for the work…

…and, finally, the plan pulls together everything to guide teachers and leaders.

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High expectations for teaching & learning in Dallas ISD The plan is grounded in the commitments Dallas ISD is making to the learning experience

VISION for learning

COMMITMENTS

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Dallas ISD ensures our students are confident, independent literate or biliterate thinkers and productive citizens.

All Dallas ISD staff are committed to designing, delivering, and supporting instruction that:  inspires, engages, and empowers teachers and students;  is systematic and aligned across grade levels and content areas;  is inclusive of and differentiates for all student groups;  is based on comprehensive, authentic, research-based literacy approaches; and  leads to students owning their learning and achievement. 12


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Framework | literacy and social studies Framework captures overarching philosophy for instruction and student learning

The Dallas ISD K–12 Literacy & Social Studies framework is what anchors this plan and the new curriculum. It reflects the philosophy of gradual release towards student independence, the importance of content and skills, and the connections between reading and writing. Release Date: June 2018 Version 1

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Why the framework was updated Framework provides more clear approach to instruction, anchored in gradual release

Updated

× Combined discrete instructional practices with broader approaches × Contained uncommon terms × Implied a disconnect between reading & writing

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 Demonstrates required conceptual relationship between reading & writing  Grounded in gradual release  Supports grade-level & contentbased instructional strategies  Embeds language, literacy & social studies together 14


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Dallas ISD definition of curriculum Framework provides more clear approach to instruction, anchored in gradual release

Dallas ISD had to establish a common definition for curriculum. The framework integrates into the structure of the curriculum and instructional practices used.

The Dallas ISD curriculum sets intentional expectations for an equitable teaching and authentic learning process that: • are standards- and skill-based; • support and scaffold for all students; and • are measurable by multiple pathways.

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Specifically, the curriculum is a framework that includes: • A scope & sequence • Engaging strategies • Exemplars & models • Interventions & extensions • Resources

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The K–12 Dallas ISD literacy & social studies plan Creating a systemic approach to literacy and social studies

The plan is organized around the guiding philosophy for literacy & social studies, the content of that work, and the classroom practices that should used.

Philosophy  Reading and writing go together  Daily Independent reading is essential  Gradual release brings balance between on grade and independent levels  Students need texts that provide “mirrors, windows, and doors”

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Content  What do I teach?  How will I know students learned it?  How will I teach it?  How will I respond? Focused on content and skill development – listening, speaking, reading, writing, thinking

Practices  Based on how time should be spent in the classroom  Outlines roles for the teacher and student (i.e., modeling, collaboration, independence)  Differentiated for content, grade level, and student needs

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More on the Philosophy, Content, and Practices

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Update Update language language

Philosophy | gradual release Balancing modeling, collaboration, and independence

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MODELING “I Do”

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COLLABORATION “We Do”

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COLLABORATION “Yall Do”

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INDEPENDENCE “You Do”

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Update Update language language

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Philosophy | mirrors, windows, and doors Balancing modeling, collaboration, and independence

Every student needs access to texts that let them see themselves and make connections to their own life, experience other cultures and peoples, and travel to new places.

MIRRORS

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WINDOWS

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DOORS

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Content | tying the curriculum to PLCs Supporting teachers planning by provided robust starting points for each unit, that connects to PLCs

The K-12 literacy and social studies curriculum is organized around the four typical PLC questions, to better connect the curriculum to the planning structure used at campuses. WHAT DO I TEACH?

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HOW WILL I KNOW STUDENTS LEARNED IT?

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HOW WILL I TEACH IT?

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HOW WILL I RESPOND?

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Practices | three areas Teachers and leader must plan for and implement all three practice areas

Learning Environment

✓ Ensure the classroom learning environment is properly arranged (e.g., collaborative stations, small group areas) ✓ Have a designated classroom library that contains diverse genres, titles, formats, and levels ✓ Implement literacy & social studies blocks as suggested

Student Data

✓ Use available progress monitoring tools as prescribed and with all students (e.g., Istation, Achieve 3000) ✓ Use student data (from formal assessments, conferring, anecdotal notes, etc.) to form small groups and inform instructional practices

Literacy Instruction

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✓ Implement the research-based practices included in the plan throughout all components of literacy & social studies ✓ Achieve student independence through purposeful gradual release ✓ Use teacher and student look-fors to help plan lessons

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A final word on the components from the previous plan These components can be found referenced in the specific practices

Remember the four components that the previous literacy framework and plan were built around? Well, teachers can still use these to guide their instructional practice. You will find the components linked to the instructional practices later in the plan.

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E

Elementary Classrooms

Grades K–5

Learning environment and schedule, instructional practices, and look-fors

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The Literacy Plan | Elementary Schools Tailored approach to foundational elementary grades

This section of the literacy plan is specific to elementary schools. The section is organized as follows: Learning Environment

E1

E2

Learning Environment key elements needed to support literacy instruction Literacy Block Schedule recommended schedules to address all four literacy components

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Instructional Practices

E3

Instructional Practices specific practices for each component with look-fors

Observation Checklist tool to gauge if instructional Need & Need to to rethink rethink the the checklists & practices arechecklists being consider the & consider using using the “teacher “teacher & student student implemented appropriately routines” routines” E4

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E1

E2

E3

E4

The Elementary School Learning Environment Checklist for best-practice learning environment

Update Update language language & & include include sample sample floor floor plan plan

Successful lessons require a specific, center-oriented learning environment.

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Environmental Elements Table or desk arrangement allows students to hear and see instructional materials and promotes participation and engagement Large rug to define whole-group area Visual aids are evident (e.g., anchor charts) Word Wall is visible to students and utilized daily Access to large writing space visible to all students Designated area for small group instruction where students are visible to one another Materials for lessons are readily accessible (e.g., leveled text, sticky notes, whiteboards, text for every student, dictionaries) Routines established for all components (i.e., transitions, group work, daily direct instruction, sustained independent writing time with conferring, sharing) Expectations are set for productive independent and group work

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E1

E2

E3

E4

Elementary school literacy block | Overview | K-2 Focused time for instruction of each literacy & social studies practice1

Practice

15 mins

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Mini Lesson

15 mins

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Read Aloud

15 mins

WORD WORK MODELING

Need Need to to correct correct content, content, 165 minute period timing, timing, language language & & add add social READING WRITING social studies studies practices practices Time Description Practice Time Description

COLLABORATION

Guided Reading

Mini Lesson

10 mins

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Shared Writing

10 mins

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Guided Writing

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Indep. Reading

20 Mins

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Indep. Writing

10 mins

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Reader’s Workshop

45 Mins

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Writer’s Workshop

20 Mins

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INDEPENDENCE

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How How do do we we show show when when “reading” “reading” and and “writing” “writing” things things can can be be happening happening at at the the same same time? time?

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E1

E2

E3

E4

Reading practice | mini lesson | suggested strategies Deeper dive into reading practices

Mini Lesson Instructional Strategy

Sample Strategy

How It Works Add descriptive language

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E1

E2

E3

E4

Writing practice | shared writing | suggested strategies Deeper dive into reading practices

Shared Writing Instructional Strategy

Sample Strategy

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E1

E2

E3

E4

Look-Fors | Word Study What should be seen in the literacy classroom during word study

Word Study TEACHERS are…

STUDENTS are…

✓ Using relationships between letters and ✓ Providing grade-appropriate, explicit sounds to decode words, in context and reading instruction in a logical sequence isolation (across two languages when ✓ Selecting appropriate Tier 1, 2, and 3 appropriate) words (in two languages when appropriate) ✓ Using various methods to determine word ✓ Planning effective instruction and guided meanings (across two languages when practice (e.g., word sorts, manipulating appropriate) word parts, Frayer Model) ✓ Using high-frequency words and academic Need Need to correct correct content, content, ✓ Using and maintaining Word Walls on to a in reading, writing, and speaking timing, add timing, language language & & vocabulary add regular basis ✓ Interacting with Word Walls and other social studies social studies practices practices ✓ Modeling how to solve for unknown words reference materials, including technologyin reading and using spelling patterns to based references, on a daily basis spell new words ✓ Using common spelling patterns to spell ✓ Providing feedback and opportunities for words correctly extensive practice ✓ Internalizing word study skills to develop automaticity and fluency (across two languages when appropriate)

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M

Middle School Classrooms

Grades 6–8

Learning environment, schedule, instructional practices, and look-fors

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The Literacy Plan | Middle Schools Tailored approach to middle grades

The middle school section is organized as follows: Learning Environment

M1

M2

Learning Environment key elements needed to support literacy instruction Literacy Block Schedule recommended schedules to address all four literacy components

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Instructional Practices

M3

M4

Instructional Practices specific practices for each component with look-fors Observation Checklist tool to gauge if instructional practices are being implemented appropriately 32


M 1

M1

M2

M3

M4

The Middle School Learning Environment Checklist for best practice learning environment

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Environmental Elements Table or desk arrangement allows students to hear and see instructional materials and promotes participation and engagement Print-rich environment (e.g. accessible anchor charts, interactive word wall) Large writing space (board/screen, chart paper) visible to all students Designated areas for small group instruction (e.g., literacy stations, strategy groups, classroom library) Materials for lessons are readily accessible (e.g., text, sticky notes, whiteboards, text for every student, dictionaries) Routines established for all components (i.e., transitions, small group instruction, whole group instruction, sharing) Expectations are set for productive independent and group work

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M 1

M1

M2

M3

M4

Look-Fors | Writing What should be seen in the literacy classroom during writing

Writing TEACHERS are…

✓ Modeling the writing process through a variety of genres ✓ Using mini-lessons to teach specific writing skills and strategies ✓ Guiding students through the writing process ✓ Connecting reading and writing instruction ✓ Conferring with students to address specific areas of growth and provide feedback ✓ Embedding grammar instruction throughout the writing process

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STUDENTS are…

✓ Regularly engaged in a variety of writing tasks ✓ Engaged in discussions about their writing and the writing process ✓ Using various references, including technology, for writing support ✓ Applying the writing process to a variety of genres and structures ✓ Revising and editing writing in response to feedback ✓ Sharing their writing ✓ Applying grammar conventions in speaking and writing

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M 1

M1

M2

M3

M4

Observation Checklist | Word Study Word Study TEI Domain

Item

Not Observed

Needs Suppor t

Proficien t

N/A

Environment

Students have access to dictionaries, thesauruses, and other appropriate resources. The classroom has an interactive word wall that appears to be updated regularly. The classroom has an interactive word wall that contains mostly Tier II words. Teacher/Student Actions Teachers focus their lesson on a specific TEKS for vocabulary. Teachers plan effective instruction and guided practice (e.g., manipulating word parts, Frayer Model). Teachers select appropriate Tier 1, 2, and 3 words. Teachers provide feedback and opportunities for extensive practice. Teachers and students utilize and maintain Word Walls on a regular basis. Teachers model how to solve for unknown words in reading and use spelling patterns to spell new words. Students use relationships between letters and sounds to decode words, in context and isolation. Students refer to a word wall in oral or written responses. Students use various means to determine word meanings. Students interact with reference materials, including technology-based ones, on a daily basis. Students internalize word study skills to develop automaticity and fluency. Students use high-frequency words and academic vocabulary in reading, writing, and speaking.

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3.1 3.1 2.4 2.1 2.1 2.1 1.4 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.3 2.4 3.3 2.2 2.4

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Middle School Appendix Additional Sample Schedule

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M1 Day

M2

M3

M4

The Middle School Literacy Block | Sample Detailed 45-Minute Schedule

Literacy Component

Instructional Practice

Word Study 10m

Frayer Model

Text Analysis 15m

Interactive Read Aloud/ Shared Reading

Teacher selects complex texts and creates text–dependent questions aligned to a particular reading purpose or TEKS. Teacher reads the text to students as they follow along in their own copy. While the teacher is reading, students are annotating the text—marking portions where they have questions, when something surprises them, or writing the gist of a portion of the text. Teacher guides students to a deeper understanding of the text with the use of text-dependent questions.

Strategy Groups/ Literacy Station

Teacher pulls group of students who need to work on a particular skill or TEKS and provides differentiated, explicit teaching, prompting, and support. The rest of the class is divided into literacy stations where they are completing a culminating task in response to text analysis, independently practicing previously taught strategies and skills, reading and comprehending self-selected texts, working in a writing process station, or working with a technology-based program (e.g. Achieve 3000, Istation, Compass Learning).

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Small Group Instruction 20m

Text Analysis 25m 2&3

Brief Description Teacher selects high-impact words that students will encounter in texts selected for the week. Teacher and students create Frayer Models to represent the words’ meaning, including definition, examples, non-examples, and characteristics of the word

Teacher selects complex texts and creates text-dependent questions aligned to a particular reading purpose or TEKS. Interactive Students read independently or in pairs and annotate the text—marking portions where they have questions, when Reading/ Evidence- something surprises them, or writing the gist of a portion of the text. Students use their annotations to help them based Writing answer text-dependent questions, which teacher develops to bring students to a deeper understanding of the text. Students complete a culminating task—responding to an evidence-based writing prompt—after the read.

Small Group Instruction 20m

Strategy Groups/ Literacy Stations

Teacher pulls group of students who need to work on a particular skill or TEKS and provides differentiated, explicit teaching, prompting, and support. The rest of the class is divided into literacy stations where they are independently practicing previously taught strategies and skills, reading and comprehending self-selected texts, or working with a technology-based program (e.g. Achieve 3000, Istation, Compass Learning).

Writing 25m

Grammar in Context/ Writing Process

Teacher identifies grammar concept aligned to the TEKS and appropriate text to present concept in context. Teacher provides grammar mini-lesson using the model sentences and explicit instruction in the writing process. Students practice the grammar concept through writing, integrating the new concept with prior knowledge of grammar conventions and the writing process.

Small Group Instruction 20m

Literacy Stations

Teacher groups students appropriately and assigns to Literacy Stations, which include independent writing, editing/revising, grammar review, or vocabulary work. Students use the writing process throughout Literacy Stations to draft, revise and edit, which may include peer editing, and analyze mentor text for writing features.

4&5

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H

High School Classrooms

Grades 9–12

Learning environment, schedule, instructional practices, and look-fors

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The Literacy Plan | High Schools Tailored approach to middle grades

The high school section is organized as follows: Learning Environment

H1

H2

Learning Environment key elements needed to support literacy instruction Literacy Block Schedule recommended schedules to address all four literacy components

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Instructional Practices

H3

H4

Instructional Practices specific practices for each component with look-fors Observation Checklist tool to gauge if instructional practices are being implemented appropriately 39


M 1

H1

H2

H3

H4

The High School Learning Environment Checklist for best practice learning environment

✓

Environmental Elements Table or desk arrangement allows students to hear and see instructional materials and promotes participation and engagement Print-rich environment (e.g. accessible anchor charts, interactive word wall) Large writing space (board/screen, chart paper) visible to all students Designated areas for small group instruction (e.g., literacy stations, strategy groups, classroom library) Materials for lessons are readily accessible (e.g., text, sticky notes, whiteboards, text for every student, dictionaries) Routines established for all components (i.e., transitions, small group instruction, whole group instruction, sharing) Expectations are set for productive independent and group work

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High School Appendix Additional Sample Schedule

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H1

H2

H3

H4

The High School Literacy Block | Overview Focused time for each literacy component

Throughout the week, the literacy block consists of all four literacy components either taught directly or within the context of another component. For example, students can analyze a mentor text within writing instruction or students can write in response to reading during text analysis. High-level literacy instruction requires careful planning for each component of the day.

45-Minute Period

SAMPLE 5 Day Lesson Cycle Reading Language Arts Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

Word Study (10 Minutes)

Text Analysis (25 Minutes)

Text Analysis (25 Minutes)

Writing (25 Minutes)

Writing (25 Minutes)

Text Analysis (15 Minutes)

Small Group Instruction (20 Minutes)

Small Group Instruction (20 Minutes)

Small Group Instruction (20 Minutes)

Small Group Instruction (20 Minutes)

Small Group Instruction (20 Minutes)

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