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SPRING 2014

T H E D E F I N I T I V E G U I D E TO DA L L A S

JEFf

DUNHAM Politically Incorrect, Irritable And Irreverent — The Texas-born Comedian Cuts Loose PAGE 40

COLD CASE SOLVED?

nds Dallas Writer Fi e Th New Leads In y Lindbergh Bab g Kidnappin PAGE 32

GOING GREEN Urban Gardener Grows Business Organically

LOOKING INTO YOU A Texas Tribute To Jackson Browne

A CUT ABOVE Where To Find Big D’s Top Steakhouses

THE LUXURY OF TIME The World’s Most Expensive Wristwatch

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the art of shopping


apple b ot t eg a v e n e ta b u r b e r ry b v lg a r i cartier ch carolina herrera dav i d y u r m a n eiseman jewels gucci h u b lot k at e s pa d e n e w yo r k lo u i s v u i t to n m i c h a e l ko r s montblanc neiman marcus

nordstrom o f fi c i n e pa n e r a i o m eg a r o b e r to c ava l l i rolex s a lvato r e f e r r ag a m o

dress: roberto cavalli

earrings: eiseman jewels

bracelet: bvlgari

s t ua r t w e i t z m a n tag h e u e r t i f fa n y & c o. to d ’ s to ry b u r c h to u r b i l lo n va l e n t i n o v e r s ac e pa r t i a l l i s t

dall as’ finest shopping experience over 23 5 sto r es an d r estau r ants wo r ld - c l as s art n o rth par kc enter .co m


RICH IN HERITAGE The Beretta Gallery in Dallas, Texas exemplifies traditional Italian quality in every detail. Located in the exclusive Highland Park area, Beretta Gallery Dallas is the perfect destination for those wishing to indulge in the rich sporting heritage of Beretta. A unique assortment of clothing and accessories for the classic outdoorsman, from leather guncases and luggage, to sports clothing for all types of hunting, shooting and country living. A distinct feature is our fascinating library of hunting books, collections of beautiful one-of-a kind gift items and hand crafted works of art. The beautiful, well-stocked gunroom in Dallas showcases Beretta’s full line of pistols, field and competition shotguns, as well as Sako rifles. The history of Beretta’s nearly 500 years of quality gun making is best exemplified by are large selection of Beretta Premium Grade shotguns and express rifles. Our professional staff is ready to answer all your requests and they look forward to welcome you to Beretta Gallery Dallas.


CONTENTS

ISSUE 14: SPRING 2014

FEATURES 30 KING OF GREENS Next time you’re fine dining in Big D, take a look at your salad. Chances are good these greens came from Tom Spicer’s garden. BY FARAH FLEURIMA

32 COLD CASE CRACKED Dallas author Robert Zorn’s sinister tale, Cemetery John: The Undiscovered Mastermind of the Lindbergh Kidnapping, may help solve what was known as the “crime of the century” once and for all. EDITED BY ELLEN RITSCHER SACKETT

40 ON THE COVER: Comedian Jeff Dunham with his sidekick, Achmed the Dead Terrorist. Photo courtesy Jeff Dunham

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40 COMEDIC CHARACTER Ventriloquist Jeff Dunham explains how he made it from Dallas to stardom — albeit with a little help from his friends. BY DAVE MUSCARI

Photos courtesy Jeff Dunham

28 LATEST RELEASE Looking Into You is a tribute to singer and songwriter Jackson Browne that brings some of the world’s biggest names in music together on two CDs. DHM talks with Kelcy Warren, the Dallas man who made it happen. BY ELLEN RITSCHER SACKETT


Photo: Michel Gibert. Special thanks: Pascaline Rey.

l’art de vivre by roche bobois

Manufactured in Europe.

Profile sofas, daybed, cocktail table and sideboard, designed by Roberto Tapinassi and Maurizio Manzoni Cushions and throw, designed by Jean Paul Gaultier for Roche Bobois DALLAS - 1707 Oak Lawn - Tel. (972) 239-4430 - Open to the public and trade Monday – Saturday 9:00am - 6:00pm. ATLANTA - BOSTON - CHICAGO - COLUMBUS, OH - CORAL GABLES, FL - COSTA MESA, CA - DENVER - HOUSTON LA JOLLA, CA - LOS ANGELES - MANHASSET, NY - NATICK, MA - NEW YORK, 35TH ST - NEW YORK, 57 TH ST PALM BEACH, FL - PHILADELPHIA - SAN FRANCISCO - SAN JUAN, PR - SCOTTSDALE - SEATTLE - TROY, MI WASHINGTON, DC

Showrooms, collections, news and catalogs www.roche-bobois.com


CONTENTS

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Photo courtesy Robert Zorn

15 THE RUNDOWN Here’s some of what we think makes this part of the world special — from Dallas Hotel Magazine.

Antonio Scorza / Shutterstock.com

IN EVERY ISSUE

55 SHOPPING From trendy boutiques and highend malls to hip vintage stores, DHM knows the smart spots to shop in Big D. 61 ATTRACTIONS What will make your visit memorable? Allow DHM to recommend what to do and where to go for fun and adventure in and around Dallas. 67 DINING Whether you want a quick bite or a savory sit-down meal, there’s plenty of places from which to choose in Dallas. Take a glance at our guide before heading out on your next culinary excursion. 72 OUR PARTING SHOT A joint exhibition of two of the area’s most prestigious museums features the art of native Dallasite, David Bates.

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Evans Caglage / The Dallas Morning News

48 THE SCENE In Dallas, we’ve got events to suit everyone’s style. Check our calendar for the best of the city’s culture and entertainment during your stay.

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WELCOME

ISSUE 14: SPRING 2014

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Photo by David Woo

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Spring has sprung here in Big D, and that means the beginning of one of the most beautiful seasons of the year in Texas. While northern climates are still struggling with the woes of winter, Dallas is getting greener by the minute. From the beautiful blooms of the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden on the edge of White Rock Lake to colorful spring fashion on parade all around the area, this change in season always makes me smile. In this issue of Dallas Hotel Magazine, we start with a laugh — and who couldn’t use more of those? Jeff Dunham is one of the most popular comedians in the world. Not only is he credited with reviving the art of ventriloquism, he made it contemporary. Jeff’s hilarious characters include Walter, Peanut, Bubba J, Achmed the Dead Terrorist and Melvin the Super Hero Guy. We recently caught up with the Dallas native to talk about his skyrocketing career and life in the super-funny fast lane. It’s been known as the “crime of the century” for 80-plus years

— the kidnapping of the infant son of world-famous aviator Charles Lindbergh; the child was brazenly snatched from of his second-story nursery. The manhunt that followed changed the face of America. Now Dallas author Robert Zorn’s sinister tale of Cemetery John: The Undiscovered Mastermind of the Lindbergh Kidnapping brings to the forefront compelling new evidence that may help crack this historic cold case, once and for all. What do you get when you mix Texas’ top musical talent with classic Jackson Browne songs? Looking Into You is a well-known local tycoon’s pet CD project that inventively pairs some of the songwriter’s best works with the likes of Don Henley (“These Days”), Lyle Lovett (“Our Lady of the Well” and “Rosie”), Shawn Colvin (“Call It a Loan”) and other top musical artists. Then, join us behind Tom Spicer’s Dallas shop for a tour of his incredible organic garden of greens. His specialty is spice — the freshest varieties — and his best customers are many of the area’s top restaurants. We’ll explain.

Finally, our Parting Shot is a special tribute to native Texan David Bates and his amazing exhibition of art that’s happening simultaneously in Dallas and in Fort Worth. Looking for shopping, destination dining or an evening on the town? The Scene contains up-to-date listings on everything from concerts and sports to seasonal happenings and community activities, all designed to help plan your time in Dallas. Now matter what the season, welcome to North Central Texas’ home of fun. Please enjoy this edition of Dallas Hotel Magazine with our compliments. It’s the definitive guide for discerning visitors to Big D.

Pete Northway Publisher, Dallas Hotel Magazine


CHILDREN’S Kid Biz

THE PLAZA IS:

FASHION & CLOTHING Aftershock London Betty Reiter Calypso St. Barth Carla Martinengo Boutique J.McLaughlin Jos. A. Bank Clothiers LUBLU Kira Plastinina lucy Mal Malouf Mel Crews New Balance DFW Pockets Menswear The Biz Tootsies

DALLAS STYLE

JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES Bachendorf’s Castle Gap Jewelry Matthew Trent Ylang 23 FOOD & RESTAURANTS Corner Bakery Café Hillstone R+D Kitchen Sprinkles Cupcakes Sprinkles Ice Cream Taco Diner Tom Thumb True Food Kitchen HEALTH & BEAUTY Montana Salon Park Plaza Salon SPECIALTY SHOPS Apples to Zinnias Bag’n Baggage Calypso Home St. Barth lucky dog barkery Occhiali Modern Optics Orvis Dallas Pickles and Ice Cream Swoozie's The Iron Bed SERVICES E*Trade Financial Fidelity Investments Comet Cleaners Green Bank

PRESTO N RO AD AT NORTHWEST HIGHWAY theplazaatprestonce nte r.com

HERE, EVERY

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V I C E R O Y

Z I H U A T A N E J O

laid-back luxury and relaxed contentment Nestled on one of the country’s most beautiful The resort’s famous white-sand beach stretches 600 beaches, Viceroy Zihuatanejo is a paradise for couples feet along a gorgeous sweep of coastline. Spend the and families alike on Mexico’s Pacific coast. day relaxing on a lounger, shaded by palms and a thatched palapa, being pampered by a Beach Butler The 46 luxurious guestrooms and suites are tastefully and enjoying a massage in the Spa Palapa. appointed with artisanal Mexican design elements in earthy color palettes. All are just steps from the Guests indulge in massages and one-of-a-kind beach, have a unique design and a private terrace indigenous treatments performed by highly skilled or balcony overlooking lush gardens or tranquil therapists at the intimate spa. Zihuatanejo Bay. All suites have a private plunge pool. The fun and activities are nonstop with three Viceroy Zihuatanejo stands out for its gourmet dining, swimming pools, two lighted tennis courts, airfrom mouth-watering Mediterranean and Mexican conditioned fitness center and everything from seafood in La Marea and modern interpretations of windsurfing, snorkeling and deep sea fishing to fly Pacific-Mexican cuisine served al fresco in La Villa to boarding and nearby golf. Zihuatanejo Bay’s warm, fresh ceviches and 110 specialty tequilas in the Coral naturally sheltered waters are ideal for swimming Bar. Private dinners in La Cava wine cellar feature and water sports year-round. wine pairings drawn from a collection of more than 1,250 labels.

Toll-free 866-905-9560 | vz.reservations@viceroyhotelsandresorts.com | viceroyzihuatanejo.com


DFW TOWN CARS DFW Town Cars has been serving the Metroplex for over 25 years, and our philosophy has always been the same; we don’t need to be the biggest, we just need to be the best.

>>

When you travel with DFWTC, one of our professionally trained chauffeurs will arrive at your pick up destination on time and ready to assist you with anything you may require for your travels. Each of our vehicles is stocked daily with fresh bottled water and a morning newspaper. Upon your return, a driver will await you at your arrival area and take you directly to your destination, quickly and comfortably. DFW Town Cars prides itself on our “on-time” service. We constantly monitor the status of your arriving and departing flights allowing us to confirm your terminal, gate and flight information – always keeping you on schedule. Whether you’re traveling alone or require coordination for large groups, our extensive fleet of luxury vehicles allows us to provide professional top of the line transportation. Your time is very important and for your convenience, payment arrangements are handled at the time you make your reservation.

For professionally trained chauffeurs, make your reservation at www.dfwtowncars.com or by calling 214.956.1880 75

I

DALLAS HOTEL MAGAZINE


Here’s some of what we think makes this part of the world special — from Dallas Hotel Magazine.

Photos Courtesy Hublot

>>>>>>>>>>>Million O’Clock>>

The $5 Million When money is no object, what do you buy for the man who has everything? If bling is his thing, then consider gifting your guy with the world’s most expensive wristwatch, just as Houston-born celebrity singer Beyoncé Knowles purchased for her record producer and rapper husband, Jay Z. Referred to as “The $5 Million,” this watch is the most precious timepiece ever created by luxury watch brand, Hublot, and partner, Atelier Bunter, headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. This stunning fashion statement is part of Hublot’s flagship Big Bang series. The watch contains 1,282 diamonds, including more than 100 carats of baguettes and six square, emerald-cut stones weighing more than three carats each. The crown is set with a single 1.06-carat, rose-cut diamond

and 12 baguette diamonds totaling .67 carats, and the dial is set with 179 baguette diamonds totaling 8.75 carats. The 44 mm case, crown, dial, bracelet and clasp are 18K white gold, and the case back, also crafted in 18K white gold, is engraved with the Hublot seal. It took a full year and a worldwide search to find the near-flawless diamonds. The stones were individually chosen to match perfectly the construction of the watch’s case, dial and bracelet and to ensure they would be of the highest quality and consistent in color throughout. Each of the GIAcertified diamonds are graded A VVS in clarity (denoting very, very slight inclusions) and are designated Top Wesselton, the

classification for near-colorless diamonds. Then, one by one, the diamonds were resized to fit perfectly in place. The $5 Million took 14 months to complete. Twelve cutters worked for seven months, including a master craftsman from New York with more than 40 years of experience; he was responsible for cutting the largest stones, so they all would share the same “signature” cut. The five setters worked for seven months also, and the major specialists worked on the piece full time. Not to worry — the $5 million isn’t the only diamond timepiece

produced by Hublot. The Baby Million Big Bang, as it is called, is available for an asking price of $1 million. — ELLEN RITSCHER SACKETT

HUBLOT DALLAS NorthPark Center 8687 N. Central Expressway #1332 469.232.9449 HUBLOT HOUSTON Galleria Mall 5085 Westheimer Road, Suite B2635A 281.768.3950 hublot.com

D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E

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Photo by Bruno

TreAsure Trove>>

Ylang 23: Sophisticated Style Finding unique, designer jewelry in Dallas is easy, if you know where to look. Joanne Teichman grew up in Arkansas, near Texarkana, Ark., not far from the influence of the Dallas fashion scene. Trips to her grandmother’s house in the big Texas city included visits to Neiman Marcus. “Dallas was my shopping playground growing up,” she says. Joanne was living in New York City and working in advertising when she met her husband Charles, a retail consultant who had emigrated from Paris. Joanne’s familiarity with Dallas and its fashion tastes came in handy when she and Charles left New York for Dallas in 1985 to open what would evolve into the high-end designer jewelry store, Ylang 23. After 28 years at Galleria Dallas, Ylang (pronounced e-long) 23 recently moved to The Plaza at Preston Center, located at

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Northwest Highway and Preston Road. The new location is nearly double the space of the previous store, but the Teichmans don’t plan to fill it with more display cases. The new space has an airy, boutique feel, with space for entertainment and plenty of room where customers can relax. Unlike traditional jewelry stores, Ylang 23 doesn’t sell watches or diamonds. Instead, it offers collections of nearly 60 independent designers, from celebrity favorite Cathy Waterman (Taylor Swift’s earrings at the recent Grammy Awards) to regional designers such as Houston’s Ila & I and Fort Worth’s Megan Thorne, who creates bridal baubles. Through the years, Joanne has watched fashion’s notable names, including Chanel’s Karl Lagerfeld, who hosted a show last December

at Fair Park in Dallas, flock to the city in pursuit of its sophisticated clientele. “What we’ve seen is this organic growth and balance over the years that’s gotten stronger and stronger,” she says. The Teichmans put a premium on relationships with their designers. Ylang 23 often hosts trunk shows and in-store events where shoppers meet the jewelry designers. Joanne confesses a soft spot for young talent and is willing to interact with up-and-comers who reach out for critiques or advice. “We have taken on some of those designers in the earliest stages of their career, when they only had tiny little collections and no accounts,” she says. Ylang 23 prides itself on being among the first to offer designer jewelry through an online platform on an international

scale. Established designers, fearful of copycats, were hesitant at first, but the decision paid off. “For a lot of those designers, it’s a window on the world. It’s a way to be seen and to be noticed,” says Charles. The move to Preston Center places Ylang 23 in what Joanne calls a “sweet spot” for its core clientele. “We have always been so ahead of the curve in wonderful designer jewelry that you see in the fashion magazines, you see on celebrities, you see in the fashion press,” she says. “And guess what? It’s here.” — JAYME RUTLEDGE


David Woo

30 yeArs Young>>

Archival Photos courtesy of The Palm Restaurant

General manager Tonya Wilbanks and executive chef Andreas Kotsifos toast the The Palm in Dallas for providing three decades of excellent food and quality service to its customers.

Happy 30th Birthday to The Palm in Dallas!

The original Palm Restaurant has always been one of New York City’s hot spots. Visitors can still see the early hand-drawn sketches on the walls that were restored in 1995.

The Palm Restaurant has a three-fold philosophy: Treat guests like family, serve great food, and always exceed expectations. In Dallas, that set of beliefs has been going strong for 30 years, since The Palm first opened its doors on Ross Avenue on Mar. 4, 1984. These beliefs are a continuation of the original restaurant’s philosophy that was formed in 1926 when Pio Bozzi and John Ganzi opened the first Palm in New York City. From day one, Bozzi and Ganzi shared their commitment to quality and generosity of spirit with each guest who walked through their doors. What began as a restaurant became a legend — a place not only to enjoy an excellent meal, but also to catch up with old friends, meet new friends, close business deals and celebrate family milestones. Still owned and operated by

members of the Bozzi and Ganzi families, The Palm continues to serve as a favorite “home” for countless patrons and restaurant employees. “We often say that The Palm isn’t a chain, it’s a family,” says Dallas’ general manager Tonya Wilbanks. “Our staff has been together for so long; many [have worked here] since we first opened,” she says. “We are like family to one another.”

The Caricature Tradition When The Palm first opened in New York, no funds were available with which to decorate. Luckily, its location on Manhattan’s Second Avenue was in close proximity to King Features Syndicate headquarters and attracted a large clientele of cartoonists. In exchange for their meals, artists would often draw creations on The Palm’s walls.

Since then, the flagship Palm has become a living museum of cartoons and caricatures featuring such famous faces as Popeye, Batman, Beetle Bailey, Hagar the Horrible and characters from “The Family Circus.” The Palm’s walls were professionally restored in 1995 to preserve these legendary sketches, many of which were drawn in charcoal and pastels. The tradition of decorating with caricatures has continued as The Palm has expanded across the U.S. and internationally. New caricatures of regulars and celebrities are added frequently to each restaurant’s walls. In Dallas, patrons can see renderings of Emmitt Smith, Troy Aikman, the Fox Sports Team, the late Kidd Kraddick and many other celebrities while dining.

The Menu “They say everything is bigger in Texas, and, at The Palm, we often say ‘Go big or go home,’” said Andreas Kotsifos, executive chef at The Palm in Dallas. The restaurant is known for prime aged, larger-than-life steaks, as well as gigantic Nova Scotia lobsters flown in fresh daily. But the original Palm began as an Italian restaurant. “We still feature the Bozzi and Ganzi family recipes in all our Italian dishes,” Kotsifos said. — ERS The Palm in Dallas is open for lunch Monday through Friday and for dinner seven days a week. Reservations are recommended. 214.698.0470. thepalm.com

D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E

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Surely, you Joust>>

Photos courtesy of Scarborough Renaissance Festival

Themed Weekends and Special Events

Step Back in Time

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A stroll through the village always leads to surprises. A group of boisterous peasants might interrupt the dulcet tune of a Celtic harp or penny whistle wafting through the air. While poking in stores filled with handmade trinkets and wares, shoppers may stumble upon an artisan, such as a glassblower, blacksmith, or candlemaker, hard at work. A fire juggler, knife thrower, minstrel or even a mermaid may capture one’s fancy. And a village visitor gnawing on a giant turkey leg or chugging down a pint of mead is bound to be close by. A variety of entertainment graces the 21 stages and outdoor areas throughout the 35-acre festival grounds. There’s much more to do than time permits in a single visit, but some events are not to be missed. These include the three daily jousts by knights in full combat armor on

April 12 and 13 CELTIC WEEKEND AND HIGHLAND GAMES April 19 and 20 RENAISSANCE EASTER AND CRAFTER’S SHOWCASE

The Scarborough Renaissance Festival offers a springtime escape to the 16th century Once upon a time, in a land not so very far away — only 30 minutes from Dallas, in fact — is a place reminiscent of days of yore, where women are addressed as “Milady” and men, as “Milord.” In the village of Scarborough, King Henry VIII and his royal court rule over the minions, and knights in shining armor prove that chivalry is far from dead. This fanciful 16th century English village magically appears each year during North Central Texas’ spectacular spring. All ages, some decked out in period costumes, come to join in the revelry that takes place every weekend through April and May and on Memorial Day. No worries if you’ve left your Renaissance regalia at home or just want to get in on the fun: Costumes, welcome but not required, are available for rent just inside the entrance or may be purchased at one of the many shops on the grounds.

April 5 and 6 OPENING WEEKEND Children ages 5 through 12 are admitted free all weekend (up to three children with each paid adult admission). Seniors (ages 65 and older) are admitted for $12. Discount is available only at the Ticket Office.

horseback, impressive birds-ofprey demonstrations, Cirque du Sewer (rat circus) and the hilarious Human Chess Match. And plan to stake out the best possible spot for the Grand Parade, a daily procession of the village’s cast of colorful characters who bring this fantastical place to life. For an escape from the hustle and bustle of city life, leave those Dallas skyscrapers in your rearview mirror and head south to Waxahachie. The Scarborough Renaissance Festival awaits. — ERS Tickets are $24 for adults, $10 for children ages 5 through 10, and free for children ages 4 and under. Parking is free, compliments of Waxahachie Autoplex. Individual and group discount tickets are available. For more information, visit SRFestival.com.

April 26 and 27 ROYAL ALE FESTIVAL Tastings of assorted beer and a variety of entertainment each day from 1 to 3 p.m. Tickets may be purchased online before the tasting. May 3 and 4 LEGENDS OF THE SEA WEEKEND May 10 and 11 MOTHER’S DAY WEEKEND “Royal Tea” with the Queen at 3 p.m. each day. Tickets may be purchased online. Seating is limited. May 17 and 18 RENAISSANCE ROMANCE AND CHIVALRY WEEKEND Wedding-vow renewal ceremonies; special enhanced wine tasting. May 24, 25 and 26 FINAL KNIGHTS WEEKEND Special Veterans’ Parade on Memorial Day, May 26. All veterans are invited to don the yellow sash and march in the parade. Ask for directions at the entrance.


Explore GAlore>>

SPOTLIGHT

Photo by Brinkhoff/Mögenburg

Photo courtesy Carry the Load

Everett Collection / Shutterstock.com

Christopher Halloran / Shutterstock.com

Natursports / Shutterstock.com

Turn to the Scene on page 40 for more Dallas event listings. Sports APRIL 10

Mavericks vs. Spurs American Airlines Center

Catch Texas basketball bedlam when a pair of former NBA world champs battle it out on the hardwoods.

Music

APRIL 25

Debby Boone and the World Famous Glenn Miller Orchestra Eisemann Center (Richardson)

She rocketed to success with “You Light Up My Life” and is now on tour reviving the lush big-band arrangements of the ‘40s.

Theater MAY 29

John Waters The Kessler Theater

The counter-culture artist, writer, actor and filmmaker (Hairspray, Pink Flamingos, Cry-Baby, Pecker) packs a potent punch with his latest one-man show.

Recreation MAY 26

Carry the Load Reverchon Park

Salute and support Texas’ first responders and their families at this Memorial Day celebration along Dallas’ Katy Trail.

Dallas Starts Here SMALLCAKES CAFÉ HERRERA SMASHBURGER POUF TWIN PEAKS LAVO COLLECTIONS CASTLE NAIL SPA URBAN OUTFITTERS WEST ELM GAP MOVIDA TRINITY HALL ANGELIKA FILM CENTER AMERICAN APPAREL CENTRE

On Stage JUNE 3-15

Mamma Mia! Fair Park Music Hall

Time says, “This high-energy musical brings happiness wherever it goes!” Hit songs by the Swedish pop band ABBA fuels the Dallas Summer Musicals favorite.

First stop: Mockingbird Station. Go where shopping, dining and entertainment are only the beginning. Take the DART Rail past the expected — and take your free time even further.


Experience the exquisite service, refined cuisine and award winning wine list. See why Biernat’s is noted as one of

“THE BEST RESTAURANTS IN AMERICA.”

a lbiernats .com


S PE CIA L A DV E RT IS ING S E CT ION

FEED YOUR NEEDS

Forget Chinese, French or Italian. You’ve come all the way to Texas — home of the steer — and you want some meat. From mouthwatering ribeyes to succulent strips, the best steaks in the country can be found right here. Because there’s nothing better than that first bite of premium beef grilled to perfection, we’ve rounded up a list of some of the best steakhouses in Dallas. At each one you’ll find fine dining, excellent service, extensive wine lists and prime cuts of beef you will be raving about for days.

D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E

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A cut above

the rest.


Bob’s Steak & Chop House is ranked as one of the top steakhouses in the county for a reason. We serve the best prime steak you’ve ever had. Our service is experienced, the wine list is extensive and the

bobs-stea k a nd c hop.c om

drinks are stiff. If you’re not a regular already, come by and let us show why we’re so proud of what we do and why you should be.

At our original Dallas location, Co-Owner & General Manager, Jessica Smith will help ensure that you have a perfect dining experience.


S PE CIA L A DV E RT IS ING S E CT ION

D a l l a s : The Prime Cit y FOR Prime Beef III FORKS

and adds the benefits of amazing guests, impeccable chef-driven cuisine, an award-winning wine list and unparalleled hospitality. 5251 Spring Valley Rd. 972.490.9000 delfriscos.com

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 2222 McKinney Ave. 214.741.2277 mortons.com

Serving the ultimate in Texas French cuisine, III Forks recreates the grandiose lifestyle experienced by Texans who believed that fine dining consisted of the best food, service and atmosphere. With over 25,000 square feet of elegant dining, III Forks can accommodate intimate parties as well as groups of up to 900, making it the perfect choice for any special occasion. 17776 Dallas Pkwy. 972.267.1776 iiiforks.com

AL BIERNAT’S

NICK & SAM’S BOB’S STEAK & CHOP HOUSE Ranked as one of the top steakhouses in the country, Bob's offers experienced service and an extensive wine list to top off the best prime steak around. Come by and let the staff prove why they’re so proud of what they do at Bob’s. LEMMON 4300 Lemmon Ave. 214.528.9446 DOWNTOWN 555 S. Lamar St. 214.652.4800 bobs-steakandchop.com

CHAMBERLAIN’S STEAK & CHOP HOUSE 5330 Belt Line Rd. 972.934.2467 chamberlainssteakhouse.com

DEL FRISCO’S DOUBLE EAGLE STEAK HOUSE

4217 Oak Lawn Ave. 214.219.2201 albiernats.com 26

D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E

OCEAN PRIME 2101 Cedar Springs Rd. 214.965.0440 ocean-prime.com

PALM RESTAURANT

2000 McKinney Ave., Ste. 100 214.855.5151 perryssteakhouse.com

THE PLACE AT PERRY’S 2680 Cedar Springs Rd. 214.871.9991 placeatperrys.com

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE 17840 Dallas Pkwy. 972.250.2244 ruthschris.com

SER STEAK+SPIRITS Hilton Anatole, Floor 27 2201 N. Stemmons Fwy. 214.761.7479 sersteak.com

SILVER FOX A USDA prime-beef emporium, Silver Fox is one of the few

The Palm’s doors have been

THE CAPITAL GRILLE 500 Crescent Ct., No. 135 214.303.0500 thecapitalgrille.com

Offering upscale American cuisine, Al Biernat’s specializes in prime steaks and seafood. Enjoy a semi-casual atmosphere and an award-winning wine list featuring more than 650 selections from around the world.

3008 Maple Ave. 214.871.7444 nick-sams.com

& GRILLE

open in Dallas since 1984. The restaurant has remained quintessentially Palm and quintessentially Dallas. From the caricatures on the wall of famous Palm regulars to the depicted Dallas Cowboys greats, you cannot find a better combination of smooth New York steakhouse style and Dallas charm. 701 Ross Ave. 214.698.0470 thepalm.com

PAPPAS BROS. STEAKHOUSE This restaurant planted its roots in Dallas more than 20 years ago and embodies the rich tradition of classic American steakhouses

10477 Lombardy Ln. 214.366.2000 pappasbros.com

PERRY’S STEAKHOUSE

exclusively prime steakhouses in America. Silver Fox’s delectable menu also features ocean favorites such as Atlantic salmon, jumbo sautéed scallops and succulent Australian lobster tail. FRISCO 1303 Legacy Dr. 214.618.5220 FORT WORTH 1651 S. University Dr. 817.332.9060 GRAPEVINE 1235 William D. Tate 817.329.6995 RICHARDSON 3650 Shire Blvd. 972.423.8121 silverfoxcafe.com


THE ORIGINAL COOL

SM

SINCE 1926

701 Ross Avenue | 214.698.0470 | thepalm.com/Dallas Lunch Served: Monday – Friday, 11:00 am– 3:00 pm Dinner Served: Monday – Thursday, 3:00–10:00 pm; Friday, 3:00–10:30 pm; Saturday, 5:00– 10:30 pm; Sunday, 5:00–9:30 pm PrimeTime at Palm Bar: Monday – Friday, 5:00–7:00 pm and 9:00 pm – Close Private Dining Rooms Available


BY ELLEN RITSCHER SACKETT

S

ome of music’s rock legends contributed their talents to honor another music legend, Jackson Browne (“Running on Empty,” “Doctor My Eyes,” “The Pretender”), thanks to the support of his longtime fan, Texas billionaire Kelcy Warren. The energyindustry mogul wanted to pay tribute to the man whose music has deeply influenced him through the years and speaks to his soul — “the Bob Dylan of his generation,” as Warren refers to him. “I think that this guy’s work is in that stratosphere.” It was Warren’s passion for the music that drove the 2-CD project, entitled Looking Into You after his favorite Jackson Browne song. Its meaning has changed for him over the years but still touches his heart. The lyrics flow easily off his tongue. “Well I looked into a house I once lived in

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Around the time I first went on my own When the roads were as many as the places I had dreamed of And my friends and I were one.”

to a mighty cast that includes Bruce Springsteen and his wife Patti Scialfa, Lyle Lovett, Bonnie Raitt, Keb’ Mo’, JD Souther, Bruce Hornsby, and Shawn Colvin. “Don Henley [Eagles] was probably the first artist I reached “Whoa!” he exclaims before out to, and he didn’t hesitate,” launching into the next phrase. Warren says. Henley gave the project “instant credibility” that “Now the distance is done made it easier to reach out to and the search has begun other artists. “That was a big I've come to see where deal,” he says. my beginnings have gone…” Warren chose the tunes to be recorded, and in some cases, the “My God! The man goes artists produced their own tracks. through two verses, and it’s like “I felt that if an artist was willing ‘Holy moly! You just captured to help us and wanted to play the 10 years of my life, buddy! And song they wanted to play, there where are you going next?’” was virtually zero chance that we With the help of his musicwouldn’t use it,” he says. business partner and friend, Jimmy The Indigo Girls, Bob LaFave, Warren made the 23-track Schneider, Jimmy LaFave, Joan project a reality through their Osborne and Paul Thorn are record label, Music Road Records. among those featured on Looking LaFave is one of the 22 singers Into You. They will sing their who covered Jackson Browne cuts from Looking Into You while songs for the album, in addition headlining at this year’s three-day

Dallas photographer Pete Lacker took this image (see album cover above) of Jackson Browne’s piano at his childhood home in Los Angeles, where he learned to play.

Cherokee Creek Music Festival in mid-May, held on Warren’s 8,000-acre ranch in the Texas Hill Country. Browne performed at the event in 2011, and while he and Warren have met several times, the singer is not involved in the project. “The Jackson Browne I know I know well. I know him extremely well through his lyrics,” Warren says. “I am very pleased to be a part of paying this tribute.”

G.J. McCarthy / The Dallas Morning News

Latest Release

Looking Into You is a tribute to singer and songwriter Jackson Browne that brings some of the world’s biggest names in music together on two CDs. DHM talks with Kelcy Warren, the Texan who made it happen.


“Jamaica Say You Will”

“Linda Paloma”

“Your Bright Baby Blues”

Bruce Springsteen and Patti Scialfa

Jeremy Cowart

Bonnie Raitt with David Lindley

Andrea Lucero

Maarten de Boer

Danny Clinch

Matt Mindlin

Thorsten Roth

“Rock Me On the Water”

Sean and Sara Watkins

“Fountain of Sorrow”

Keb’ Mo’

Paul Lohr

Matt Levitz Erin Fiedler Sean Smith

Don Henley and Blind Pilot

“Everywhere I Go”

Joan Osborne

ALSO FEATURING:

“These Days”

Lyle Lovett

“Late For the Sky”

Venice

Karla Bonoff

“Rosie”

Eliza Gilkyson

“For a Dancer”

Jimmy LaFave

James Glader

Michael Simon

“Before the Deluge”

J.D. Souther

“For Everyman”

Shawn Colvin

Indigo Girls

Ethan James Photography

“My Opening Farewell”

“Something Fine”

“Call it a Loan”

Ben Harper

Scott Newman

Project Daybreak Artist Management

Lucinda Williams

Pete Lacker

Michael Wilson

Danny Clinch

James Minchin III

“The Pretender”

“Running on Empty” Bob Schneider “Looking Into You” Kevin Welch “Our Lady of the Well” Lyle Lovett “Too Many Angels” Marc Cohn

“I’m Alive”

Bruce Hornsby

feat Joan As Police Woman MusicRoadRecords.com/JB

“Doctor My Eyes” Paul Thorn

“The Barricades of Heaven” Griffin House

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Courtney Perry / The Dallas Morning News

King of Greens Next time you’re fine dining in Dallas, take a look at your salad. Chances are good those greens came from Tom Spicer’s garden.

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n menus of Dallas’ finest restaurants, Tom Spicer’s name prefacing a salad or side of local greens has come to be as trusted and as well known as the chefs who turn his farm crops into fine cuisine. Spicer supplies salad makings to some of the top local dining destinations and is considered by many to be Dallas’ King of Greens. The former self-titled “farm flipper” came to Dallas in 1984 and worked for a hydroponic hothouse tomato and lettuce grower, among other businesses, before launching his own in July 2006. Today, Spicer tends his plot of farmland in the heart of

a gritty, but rising corner of the city, a space he describes as an oasis in old East Dallas. At his FM 1410 storefront, Spicer successfully takes both bigpicture and granular approaches to growing. He has learned from others’ successes, he says, but continues to experiment as he seeks the optimal soil-mineral mix for this climate. Business owner, musician, grower extraordinaire — the facets of this good-natured Louisiana native are as varied as the types of plants in his garden. His spring plantings include more than 30 kinds of baby greens, radishes, pea tendrils, carrots in all colors of the

BY FARAH FLEURIMA

rainbow and a handful of other edibles. His shop caters not just to chefs but also to home cooks and civilian food enthusiasts. Inside, the hubub provides a glimpse into Spicer’s passion for plants. Spicer’s sun-worn exterior initially projects an air of crustiness, but that melts immediately like a chocolate shell, and visitors find him warm, inquisitive and full of wonderful, colorful yarns about his life. Lucky visitors may be treated to a mini-tour, if he’s feeling especially chummy that day. “We allow people to come in … if they’re brave enough to venture in,” he notes.


Evans Caglage / The Dallas Morning News

Courtney Perry / The Dallas Morning News

Courtney Perry / The Dallas Morning News

LEFT: Tom Spicer holds a cucumber-flavored herb called borage in his mouth before eating it.

Lemon thyme (above) and lemon verbena (right) are two of the herbs Tom Spicer planted on the grounds of Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek for the hotel’s restaurant that serves haute cuisine — Texas style.

Food and gardening runs through his fascinating family tree. A Spicer ancestor, Arthur Griffin, was brought from England to America to serve as a gardener on a Vanderbilt estate. Spicer’s sister, Susan, is the owner and executive chef of Bayona, where she pioneered the wave of New Orleans modern cuisine. “[My mom] is from Copenhagen, Denmark, and my dad’s from Waycross, Georgia — does that make me a Danish cracker?” Spicer quips. “I hope not. … If you’re a Spicer, we have a coat of arms. We were spice merchants.” Born in New Orleans, Spicer took a green, leafy path to Dallas, one that foreshadowed the industry that would eventually drive his success here. “I started in Louisiana … I was working under a horticulturist. I learned to propagate under the curator of the City Park Botanical Gardens in New Orleans, Paul Soniat. … I interfaced with the senior citizens gardening movement there, and that’s where I first got heirloom stuff from,” Spicer said. “I had no idea there was a name for it; this is just what they grew when they were kids. They just wanted to plant [produce], and they had more than they could use, so I started bringing it to my chefs, and,

boom! Right then and there, I was shot out of a cannon.” A produce company saw his potential and joined his heirloom bandwagon. However, when another firm bought it out, moved away from specialty produce and focused on snagging large corporate accounts, such as the New Orleans school system and cruise ships, the resulting disconnect inspired Spicer to leave for Dallas. Once here, he fell right back into the produce-centric employment he loved and moved himself and the industry in a new direction. “When I was stacking apples [at the former Bluebonnet Natural Foods], I was not only finding out who the produce distributors were that we would buy from, but who the farmers were as well,” Spicer says. “Seeing the market change, I brought specialty produce to Dallas; it wasn’t here.” Spicer characterizes his career in 7-year cycles. The first kicked off after his time at Bluebonnet, when he became the aforementioned farm whisperer, bringing small operations to greater profitability. The second cycle was spent as a farm produce broker, which allowed him to work out of his home and rear his two sons.

Tom Spicer in his urban garden behind his store, FM 1410.

His current cycle includes launching and nurturing the urban garden as the go-to for fresh greens for Dallas restaurants like Bolsa, Lark on the Park, The Rustic and nextdoor neighbor Urbano Cafe. With its funky eclecticism, East Dallas and FM 1410 couldn’t be a better spot for Spicer. “The street we’re on is Fitzhugh Avenue, but I call it “Fits You” Avenue,” Spicer says. “It fits me, and we try to make it fit everybody. We’re not the kind of store where we’re wearing aprons with nametags; we’re primarily a wholesaler. “We’re isolated still, even though there’s been some earthshaking over here. There’s a big gap between our neighborhood and downtown. There’s a gap between us and the KnoxHenderson development — so we’re an island, we’re an oasis, but we have our own personality.” Even the ground out back has its own personality: The rich, carefully concocted mix has been crafted, recipe-like, by Spicer himself, with loads of tweaking. “I’m developing this soil’s terroirs, which it had when I started, but not a healthy one,” he says. “So we composted the whole thing. Now things we throw away go back into the soil, but it has to go through the

composting process. … I’ll use fish emulsions and microzymes. Then we just let it fallow and work it back into the soil. There are different techniques I wish I had more time to use, but we have to turn our crops over.” Indeed, the bulk of what he grows has a quick turnaround. Most of his crops are 10 to 21 days from seed to start and comprise a number of petite greens, which are snapped up in a flash by the hundred-or-so Dallas chefs he supplies. Still, despite the short growing periods, Spicer emphasizes that his business centers on quality before quantity. “Output — that’s just not the big picture for me. Having done this so many times, I know when we’re doing well,” he says. With a history in food as rich as the soil he works, one would think Spicer would hold up the foodie mantle proudly. One would be erroneous. “I was doing this before ‘foodie’ was even a word! Why do I become something I was, and now somebody wants me to wear a label? That’s a new term — people wouldn’t know what you were talking about 20 years ago, much less 30 years ago. I’m old-school.”

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Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

S E A C COLD

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Dallas author Robert Zorn’s sinister tale, Cemetery John: The Undiscovered Mastermind of the Lindbergh Kidnapping, may help solve what was known as the ‘crime of the century’ once and for all.

EDITED BY ELLEN RITSCHER SACKETT

D R K E C A C I

n March 1932, long before America was shaken by the grim stories of JonBenét Ramsey and Adam Walsh, a sensational child abduction case exploded into national headlines: the kidnapping, and consequent death of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh’s infant son. The Lindbergh case dominated the news for years and spurred the largest manhunt ever undertaken. At the time, journalist H.L. Mencken called it “the biggest story since the Resurrection.” To both many at the time and later generations, the taking of 20-month-old Charles A. Lindbergh, Jr., was simply the crime of the century. Charles Lindbergh was the golden boy of the aviation age that followed World War I. In 1927, his 3,600-mile solo flight from New York to Paris — the first nonstop air crossing of the Atlantic — was hailed universally as a feat of technical virtuosity and unalloyed courage. To his surprise, the shy, young pilot

was feted and decorated by the crown heads of Europe. Upon his return to the U.S., Lindbergh was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor and was greeted with the grandest ticker-tape parade in Manhattan, N.Y., history. That 34-hour flight aboard his singleengine monoplane, the Spirit of St. Louis, had come at the dawn of the era of electronic mass communication and multimedia barrage. The coverage brought Lindbergh instant worldwide celebrity at the age of 25. Lindbergh may well have been the first superstar, in later parlance, as his fame transcended cultural, professional and national boundaries. He was lionized as a handsome but modest hero who led America to a new threshold of greatness. During the next five years, Lindbergh would be lauded as an adventurer, author, test pilot, engineer, inventor and visionary of commercial aviation. And in what seemed to the public a fairy-tale denouement, he would marry the accomplished daughter

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Madeline Biebel

The culmination of research by author Robert Zorn and his father, Eugene, led to the publication of Cemetery John: The Undiscovered Mastermind of the Lindbergh Kidnapping.

of Dwight Morrow, a giant in the world of finance, America’s esteemed ambassador to Mexico, and a future U.S. senator. The abduction of little Charlie from the secluded Lindbergh estate near Hopewell, N.J., shocked the nation, which held its breath. For millions from coast to coast, lingering woes of the Great Depression were compounded by new pangs of alarm, anger and grief. Details of the crime scene, speculations about real and fictitious clues, rumors of underworld involvement, and stories of trails gone cold flooded all media week after week, deepening public anxieties and casting grave doubts on the effectiveness of law enforcement. Local and state police assets were stressed to the breaking point, and federal investigative resources were of limited use. Taking matters into his own hands, Lindbergh pushed to pursue each contact and lead, personally conducting searches by land, air and sea. He ultimately

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delivered a ransom for the return have occurred sometime between of his son, all to no avail. Seventy- 9 p.m. and 10 p.m. two days after the ordeal began, On a stormy, moonless night, Charlie’s scavenged remains were the only child of America’s most discovered deep in a roadside celebrated couple had been thicket on a hill a few miles taken brazenly, as five adults south of the family estate. In all elsewhere in the house were likelihood, the child had died on winding down their evening. the night of his abduction. Was this feat the result of careful Charlie’s nursery occupied the planning and execution or just southeast hazard and corner of luck? Did the n, ga “I had no idea, as I be the second kidnapping uld involve more floor of the how long the work wo e Lindbergh than one take, where the chas home. In the person? Was en ev or , would lead me aftermath it, in part, of the an inside how to pursue it” kidnapping, job? Was the three sections of a custom-made death of the child accidental or wood ladder were found 25 yards intentional, and, if the latter, why from that corner, near a cluster and how was he killed? of trees. An envelope containing Despite the eventual arrest, a ransom note was found on conviction and execution of the sill of a window through Bruno Richard Hauptmann for which the kidnapper apparently the crime, a great number of had entered. On that evening unsettling questions persist, and of March 1, Charlie had been they have haunted investigators put to bed at 8 p.m. It was later and students of the case for more determined that the breach must than 80 years.

A FATHER’S TALE Robert Zorn never aspired to become an historian and never intended to become an authority on the Lindbergh kidnapping case. The 56-yearold native Texan had charted a course that took him from St. Mark’s School of Texas in Dallas to Duke University, then on to the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Zorn’s trajectory was all business or, perhaps, theoretical economics, as he followed in the footsteps of his father, Eugene (Gene) C. Zorn, Jr., who was for many years chief economist of the Republic National Bank of Dallas. Zorn’s recent book, Cemetery John: The Undiscovered Mastermind of the Lindbergh Kidnapping, is a startling new take on the case that gripped America in the 1930s, with narrative roots that extend from the German immigrant community in Depression-era New York to the post-war Dallas of Bob Zorn’s childhood. In his painstaking


Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

Eleven-year-old Gene Zorn and his sister Glady stand outside the Bronx row house where their family lived in a railroad flat. The photo was taken four years before Gene witnessed his neighbors John and Walter Knoll meeting with Bruno Hauptmann at Palisades Amusement Park in New Jersey, nine months before the kidnapping. John Knoll nicknamed Glady “Honigplatz” which, translated into English, means “Honey Butt.”

re-examination of the case, Zorn has cut through decades of speculation surrounding the kidnapping, relying principally upon his own research, interviews and fieldwork. The work begun with Cemetery John continues. In effect, Zorn has become a full-time historian, working through the implications of his own discoveries in an effort to reconstruct the crime itself and get closer to the truth of what really happened in the Sourland Mountains of New Jersey on that night in March 1932. This investigative odyssey was inspired by Robert Zorn’s father, whose example set his son on the path of business, but whose stories would direct the son toward a different path. Gene Zorn was born in New York City in 1916. He often recalled for his son Robert vivid scenes and rugged lessons of his boyhood in the South Bronx. Gene had been a scrawny asthmatic as a child, blinded in one eye by an uncle on a

As a 15-year-old boy growing up in the South Bronx, Gene Zorn (1916-2006) unwittingly witnessed his German immigrant neighbors John and Walter Knoll conspiring with Bruno Hauptmann to kidnap the Lindbergh baby. Not until decades later, after he had become the chief economist at the Republic National Bank of Dallas, did Zorn come to understand the significance of what he had seen and heard on a summer day in 1931.

drunken tear. In the heyday of allowing the boy to tag along Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, Gene on excursions around New York was not allowed to play stickball City and introducing him to his in the streets with the other favorite hobby: stamp collecting. neighborhood kids. In the summer of 1931, John Gene’s father worked six days invited Gene to accompany him a week as a warehouse manager to Palisades Amusement Park in and had little time for his son. New Jersey. There, the 15-year-old Gene had a paper route and inadvertently observed a meeting brought in a little money for between John, his brother Walter, the family, as and a third he made his man they called my Bruno. The own way in the “It may well be that neighborhood three were in father’s accidental amid a rather rapt discussion witnessing of the colorful cast as Gene, after a meeting with a man of characters. swim, rejoined in s, wa o Among these, John at a un Br ed call he recalled, pre-arranged .” nt de fact, no acci were two meeting place. brothers, John The men and Walter Knoll. were speaking in German and The Knolls were German referred repeatedly to the town of immigrants, both in their 20s, Englewood. who worked in a local delicatessen As Gene approached, John and rented rooms in a row house abruptly ordered the boy to go on Jackson Avenue, three doors home to the Bronx. The curt down from the Zorn family. John dismissal was somewhat traumatic Knoll, the older of the brothers, for Gene, as he had never before took Gene under his wing, traveled out of New York. In

the end, he managed to make his way home to the Bronx by himself. Baffled and a bit shaken, he simply suppressed what he’d heard and seen that day, but he would not forget it. Gene attended City College of New York and Columbia University and went on to become a renowned economist. He was cultured and methodical. The author of hundreds of articles and professional papers, his analytical approach was cautious, his conclusions insightful. Advancement in his profession led Gene ultimately to Texas. In 1963, one month after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Gene walked into a North Dallas barbershop, picked up a magazine and happened upon an article about the Lindbergh kidnapping. In the story, he found detailed discussions of the physical evidence in the case and surmises about the likelihood that Hauptmann, who lived in the Bronx, had not acted alone.

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Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

Seen here is the 1932 police sketch of the kidnapper, known as “Cemetery John,” (left) and a photo of young Gene Zorn’s Bronx neighbor, John Knoll (right). The identity of Cemetery John was a mystery for 80 years, until the publication of Zorn’s book.

The kidnappers’ signature symbol appears in the lower right-hand corner of the ransom notes. The signature symbol looks very much like a cachet: artwork on envelopes that commemorates a historical event or feat.

The boy’s memories, buried for decades, began to re-surface. Gene continued reading and learned more about the ransomextortion plot, the gulling of the desperate Lindbergh, the midnight cemetery meetings in eerie proximity to his old South Bronx neighborhood, and a kidnapper calling himself John, who had collected the Lindbergh ransom in a Bronx cemetery and disappeared with the ransom money. Gene began to connect long-forgotten dots about the habits and eccentricities of his childhood friend John and the conversation he’d overheard decades earlier. That day, in a Dallas barbershop, Gene began a research project he would carry forward for the next 40 years. Gene soon immersed himself in the Lindbergh case and the search for “Cemetery John,” as the shadowy man in the cemetery had been dubbed at the time. Ultimately, Gene became convinced that he had witnessed

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the Knoll brothers conspiring own study of the Lindbergh case with Bruno Richard Hauptmann and the Knoll connection and to to kidnap the Lindbergh baby. follow up on clues and leads his At the time of the Palisades father had unearthed. outing, the Lindberghs “It was Christmas Eve of my maintained a home just up father’s 91st year,” Robert recalls. the road, at the Morrow estate “He was in Presbyterian Hospital in Englewood, N.J. Bruno in Dallas, and we both knew he Hauptmann had been tried for had little time left. I held his the crime in hand and in 1935, but went made the lf se my d “I have foun to his death promise to of n the surreal positio professing his continue his ive innocence and research. He being a lead detect ld co of implicating no was too weak st te ea gr in the others. If the to speak, but to ng vi cases — and ha Knoll brothers he smiled and learn the job while were involved, nodded. He they had understood. doing the job.” escaped notice It was the last and, in a sense, history, as well. thing he communicated to me.” Robert went to work. A SON’S PROMISE Eventually, he sold his ranch In conversation, it is clear that north of Dallas and moved Robert is still moved by his to New Jersey, suspending his father’s story and is determined business career to concentrate to bring some closure to this story full time on the investigation. that haunted his father Gene for Robert’s promise to his father much of his life. In 2006, Robert set him on a trail that would made a promise to pursue his cross two continents and eight

Three weeks after the Lindbergh ransom was paid, John Knoll became extremely generous to Gene Zorn by making contributions to the boy’s stamp collection. Gene, a future economist with a keen intuition into money matters, found it odd that the deli clerk, who lived in a rented room, could afford to buy entire collections of stamps from other collectors. This is one of three collectibles pertaining to Lindbergh that Knoll gave young Zorn (see Lindbergh Airmail postage stamp). Many others pertained to aviation.

decades of history. His findings, in combination with his father’s recollections and insights, have been remarkable. In late spring of 1932, John had become more ambitious in his acquisition of stamps for the collection that Gene occasionally helped him to set in order. He also became extremely generous in making contributions to his young helper’s modest stamp collection. Gene possessed keen intuition about money matters, and he found it odd that John, a deli clerk who lived in a very cheap rented room, could suddenly afford to buy entire collections of stamps from other collectors. This burst of philatelic acquisition and generosity began about three weeks after the Lindbergh ransom was paid. Three of the stamps John gave to young Gene related specifically to Lindbergh, while many others pertained to aviation in general. “An extraordinary number of written communications were conveyed from the kidnappers to


Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

John Knoll’s in-laws, Ida and Robert Karg, are seen here at their home in Germany. The Kargs told their daughter, Lilli, to “get rid of that bum [John Knoll],” and helped her plan an escape. In 1936, Lilli left Knoll, took the couple’s infant son and fled to Nazi Germany, where she and the boy lived until after WWII.

This photo was taken Dec. 8, 1934, aboard the luxury liner SS Manhattan on a trip from New York, N.Y., to Hamburg, Germany. The date was three-and-one-half weeks before Bruno Hauptmann, alleged accomplice of John Knoll, went on trial in a Flemington, N.J., court for murdering the Lindbergh baby. John Knoll (left), whose hair was dyed black, looks straight into the camera lens, while his bride, Lilli, gazes at her husband.

the Lindberghs, most of which carried a peculiar signature symbol as authentication,” said Zorn. “The kidnappers’ signature symbol bears strong resemblance to a cachet, the artwork on a posted envelope commemorating a significant event or personage.” Cachets are of particular interest and import to stamp collectors. “The deeper my father dug into the case and the more closely he examined the stamps that John Knoll had given him, the more convinced he became that Knoll was involved in the kidnapping,” says Zorn. The son also has become convinced that John intentionally planted clues about the crime with his father. “According to Dr. Craig Neumann, a leading researcher of psychopathic personality, Knoll likely had little interest in hanging out with a boy half his age,” Zorn noted. Professor Neumann’s suggestion is that Knoll had a plan — and a place in that plan for the boy: Gene would be the unwitting archivist of Knoll’s great

caper. “Viewed in that light,” the presence of a pronounced Zorn said, “it may well be that my deformity in the thumb of John’s father’s accidental witnessing of left hand—a deformity that had the meeting with a man called been noted in a key eyewitness Bruno was, in fact, no accident.” description of Cemetery John. Zorn has made every effort Photographs of John closely to contact surviving relatives of resemble law enforcement John and Walter in the U.S. and sketches of Cemetery John, Europe and has and physical come to know descriptions of y ar “An extraordin and admire many the two match number of written members of the uncannily. In Knoll family Zorn’s view, these communications through dozens of were conveyed from physical markers communications, constituted a the kidnappers to visits and breakthrough in the Lindberghs, interviews. “I’m the case. h ic grateful to these The true wh of most folks and have identity of r lia cu carried a pe tried my best to Cemetery John as signature symbol be sympathetic, had eluded while still painting investigators, but authentication” as accurate a Zorn became picture as possible,” he said. “The convinced that John was, in fact, fact that so much critical evidence the man who had taken the and information has come from ransom money that night in 1932. Knoll’s family is part of the About one-third of the $50,000 miracle of this story.” ransom was later traced to Bruno Family photographs and Richard Hauptmann; the rest was testimony have documented never recovered.

In December 1934, just three weeks before Hauptmann was to go on trial in Flemington, N.J., John spent $700 — the equivalent of nearly six years’ rent — to purchase two first-class, round-trip tickets to Germany. He sailed for Europe aboard the SS Manhattan, a deli-clerk emerging as a first-cabin tourist in the depths of the Great Depression. John boarded a ship to return to the U.S. on February 13, 1935, the same day Hauptmann was convicted of Charlie Lindbergh’s murder. John moved to Michigan with his bride for a time, then returned alone to New York, where he opened the first of three delicatessens. The source of his funding for these businesses is unknown. THE WORK ONGOING In fulfillment of the promise to his father, Zorn has spent years interviewing criminal experts, consulting forensics and language professionals, reviewing and analyzing photographs and

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Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

Photo by Madeline Biebel

The Delft tiles in the fireplace surround would have made it easy for anyone entering the Lindbergh home during construction to determine this room was a nursery.

Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

Robert Zorn is seen here straddling the window ledge at the southeast corner window of the Lindbergh baby’s nursery. It was through this window that the child was abducted. “Looking out that window, I could feel the contours of John Knoll’s depravity,” Zorn said. “It was haunting.”

In November 2012, Robert Zorn was one of five authors invited to speak at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in Dallas in support of the Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy.

handwriting samples, and sifting through mounds of archived evidence. “I’ve made over eighty visits to the New Jersey State Police Museum,” says Zorn. The museum houses 250,000 pieces of documentary and physical evidence in the Lindbergh case, including ransom notes and the kidnap ladder. Zorn has studied nd ha “I held [My Father’s] American to ise om pr e th history of the de ma d an . ch early 1930s to ar se re s hi continue understand He was too weak to better the and culture of the speak, but he smiled od. era. In addition, nodded. He understo he has focused he g in th st It was the la on the regional .” communicated to me history of both the Bronx and the Sourland Mountains near Hopewell, New Jersey, home to the Lindberghs’ 400-acre estate. Zorn believes he has gained significant insight into the case by watching classic 1930s gangster movies, as well as other films

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set in the period. “One of the most useful archeological tools for tracking historical detail is cinema. A scene in the Martin Scorsese film Hugo helped me to understand one of the more puzzling pieces of physical evidence in the case,” Zorn says. “I had no idea, as I began, how long the work would take, where the chase would lead me, or even how to pursue it,” Zorn says.” I have found myself in the surreal position of being a lead detective in the greatest of cold cases — and having to learn the job while doing the job.” Zorn’s approach is to get as close to the ground as possible, both figuratively and literally. He has spent hundreds of hours touring and walking the urban sites and open-country scapes of the Lindbergh case while studying maps, weather records, and terrain. “No detail can be considered too small,” Zorn says. The tiniest particle of evidence can illuminate the case in amazing

ways. “At the same time, it’s critical to keep an open mind about how the pieces might fit together and recognize that some questions simply cannot be resolved,” he explains. “It’s important, also, to retain a sense of the wider story and be prepared to give yourself over to it, to try to let the story tell itself, as much as possible,” Zorn notes. “My focus now is to re-evaluate from a different perspective the documentary and physical evidence that investigators have been looking at for decades. Much of this evidence has been misunderstood, ignored or overlooked, viewed as incomprehensible or dismissed as inconsequential.” Zorn’s journey has been transformative, a complex, life-changing experience. He admits to being overwhelmed occasionally by the work, but feels strongly that every day brings him closer to the truth of how this crime was planned and executed. His book has been met with


Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

Photo Courtesy Robert Zorn

Walter Knoll, one of the alleged kidnappers and younger brother of alleged Lindbergh kidnapping mastermind, John Knoll, chose Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, N.Y., for his final resting place. This cemetery is where Walter’s brother John first met the intermediary in the Lindbergh kidnapping case, “Jafsie” Condon.

Robert Zorn meets relatives of John and Walter Knoll in Herxheimweyher, the western German village in which the Knoll brothers were reared.

good reviews and has rekindled a critical flame among conspiracy theorists. But Zorn knows that with additional information, everything could change; cold cases can break in surprising ways. Criminal profiling experts are among those who support Zorn’s findings. Such experts include John Douglas, founder of the FBI Behavioral Science Unit; three former New Jersey prosecutors, including former Governor Brendan Byrne; and various experts in forensics, handwriting and psychopathic personality. Dr. Ed George, chairman of the statistics department at the Wharton School, estimates the probability of John Knoll’s involvement in the kidnapping is 99.9 percent. But support notwithstanding, Zorn is determined to get it right. “Should any evidence surface that disproves John Knoll’s participation in the kidnapping, I will review it with those who have endorsed my work and conclusions.” Zorn is

adamant that, if it becomes clear that Knoll had no involvement in the kidnapping, he will let it be known. The twinned tales of Lindbergh’s unprecedented fame and the terrible crime visited upon his family have made this story endlessly compelling. The shock effect of the crime on American culture may have diminished over the decades, but it has never gone away. The kidnapping and murder of Charlie Lindbergh established a benchmark of combined brutality, mystery, private dread, and public impact by which the most notorious crimes have come to be gauged. The case so outraged the nation that, in 1932, Congress adopted a sweeping Federal kidnapping statute still known today as the Lindbergh Law. For now, Zorn has more investigating to do. He is convinced he will uncover more evidence in what remains one of the most compelling true crime stories in American history.

A TALE OF TWO ROBERTS In the last issue of Dallas Hotel Magazine, another local author, Robert Edsel, was profiled. His bestselling book, The Monuments Men: Allied Heroes, Nazi Thieves and the Greatest Treasure Hunt in History, inspired a recent film that was directed by George Clooney and featured an all-star cast. Robert Edsel and Robert Zorn go back a long way. They were classmates at St. Mark’s School of Texas and have remained mutually supportive friends. In an interview apropos of The Monuments Men, Clooney said, “It’s so rare to do any story that people don’t know.” It seems a bit surreal that two long-parted friends and classmates would come to write about two of the most notorious crimes of the 20th century and that each, in the end, would find within his respective story an “unknown” story and illuminate it in a most improbable way.

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cOmediC CharActer

Ventriloquist Jeff Dunham explains how he made it from Dallas to stardom — albeit with a little help from his friends.

WRITTEN BY DAVE MUSCARI

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Photo courtesy Jeff Dunham

n

many thought was an art form all but left for dead on the side of the road: ventriloquism. Not since the heyday of legendary vaudevillian Edgar Bergan and his cheeky little sidekick, Charlie McCarthy, has anyone embraced the art form so effectively or successfully. Dunham didn’t just perform ventriloquism — he transformed it. He made the concept of a man and his dummy relevant again, with sizzling contemporary twists. And best of all, his schtick is hilarious. Sure, there are other ventriloquists performing, but no one quite like Jeff Dunham. “I was one of those lucky people who a passion “My schooling was learning to make an auditorium found at a very early age for what of teenagers at my high school laugh every bit as I could and would do for much as a sanctuary full of churchgoers.” the rest of my life,” Dunham told Dallas Hotel Magazine just and generally worked nonstop prior to his return to Dallas for a before becoming the proverbial overnight success. In the process, blockbuster February concert at the American Airlines Center. It he single-handedly revived what o two (or three) ways about it: Jeff Dunham is a peculiar bunch of guys. Talk about multiple personalities! The Texas-born comedian takes it to the extreme. The cavalcade of cracked-up characters he brings onstage during his performances range from a surly old grandpa to a dead terrorist whose favorite line is, “Silence! I kill you!” One media critic famously remarked that Dunham’s characters have more personality than most people’s friends. For 20-plus years Dunham played the comedy circuit across the country, made television appearances here and there

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was a rare chance for him to see family and friends backstage and to play to a sell-out crowd in his hometown during the current “Disorderly Conduct” tour. Dunham’s schedule is relentless: In the days leading up to the Dallas show, he was on the road, performing in Minneapolis, St. Louis, Lincoln, Neb.; Milwaukee, Little Rock, Ark.; and Kansas City, Mo., to name a few. In April, he makes his fifth trip to Europe. He also recently returned to South Africa for the second time, to sold out arenas. RIDING A WAVE OF COMIC SUCCESS Comedy Central thinks of Dunham as ratings divinity. And why not? His TV specials make up the cable channel’s most-popular programming of all time. His first was Arguing With Myself, a self-financed DVD taped in Santa Ana, Calif., in 2006. When it later aired on Comedy Central, the program drew a whopping 2 million viewers. That was followed by


Photo courtesy Jeff Dunham Randy Miramontez / Shutterstock.com

Characters such as Peanut (left) and José Jalapeño on a Stick (right) are two of Dunham’s popular sidekicks.

Dunham has said that legendary actress Bette Davis, with whom he appeared once on The Tonight Show, was the original inspiration for Walter.

the appropriately titled, Spark of Insanity, which was voted DVD of the Year by Amazon subscribers. The premiere of Dunham’s 2012 Comedy Central special, Minding the Monsters, was watched by 5 million viewers, making it the cable network’s most-watched broadcast of the year, and a DVD version of the show went platinum within its first week on sale. Dunham’s YouTube video clips have more than half-billion page views. In fact, critics say the web is the promotional vehicle that propelled the ventriloquist’s career to staggering new heights, especially in international markets. Dunham’s DVD sales have topped 4 million units. His merchandising — T-shirts, replicas of dummies, bobble-head dolls, even a line of wine — are big sellers. He’s made cameo appearances in films such as Dinner For Schmucks, starring Steve Carrell and Paul Rudd, and on hit network television shows, including NBC’s 30 Rock. As of this past January, Dunham’s voice

can be heard in the animated comedy, The Nut Job, starring alongside actors Will Arnett, Liam Neeson, Katherine Heigl and Brendan Fraser. For the past several years, Forbes has included Dunham in the magazine’s Celebrity 100 list of most powerful entertainers. In terms of earning power, he can go toe-to-toe with any of the top stand-up comics. Industry trade magazine Pollstar listed Dunham as the world’s top-grossing live comedy act two years running. The New York Times Magazine once declared Dunham “the most successful comedian working in America,” echoed by Time, which named him “the most popular comedian in the U.S.” However, unlike his comic colleagues, Dunham’s brand of stand-up is no solo affair; it involves an entire entourage made up of his outrageously colorful characters. His “dummies” are far from stupid; they can be alternatively sweet, sour, irritable, insulting, endearing and uproariously politically incorrect.

COURTING CONTROVERSY WITH CHARACTERS While Dunham may have created and hand-molded each member of his whack-pack cast, oddly enough they do seem to possess eerily distinctive lives of their own. “The genesis for each character is completely different,”

“If I come up with a new character that doesn’t entertain me after a few shows, he’s gone…” he explains. “There is no formula for creating them. The only thread I can see is that they all make me laugh, and I enjoy performing with them.” The humor can be a tad puerile and not necessarily for everyone in the audience. But for those fans that do connect — bull’s-eye! There’s his go-to guy, cantankerous Walter, the prototypical grumpy old man with an attitude to match.

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THE “SUITCASE GANG”

Dunham has said that Hollywood legend Bette Davis, with whom he appeared once on The Tonight Show, was the original inspiration for his opinionated dummy. However old friend Craig Harper, who spent time in radio and TV for several years with Dunham, takes another view; “I think Walter might be modeled on a couple of people we worked with many, many years ago … but I’ll never tell,” he laughs. Other characters include: José Jalapeño, a spicy little guy with a Mexican twist, perched on a wooden stick; the redneck, beer-swilling Bubba J.; frenetic little purple-colored Peanut, who

PEANUT Fast and furious, the lovable purple sidekick with a quick wit and unendingly energy is anything but a dummy.

SWEET DADDY Word! Old school, hip and totally street savvy, he’s a little playa’ who brings some soul to the stage.

WALTER Unapologetically opinionated, this ol’ grandpa puts a whole new spin on “in your face” with a never-ending stream of guff.

“I become a chameleon in front of any given audience: whatever their favorite for the night is mine,” says Dunham. “One night Peanut will be the hands-down favorite, and then another night it will be Walter or Achmed.” Dunham has flirted with controversy over the years. Some groups have leveled charges of racism at him, particularly regarding Achmed the Dead Terrorist, whom he introduced in the wake of the 9-11 attacks. Dunham calmed the waters, pointing out that comedy is the last form of free speech, as well as the fact that, in his act, absolutely no one is spared from the skewer.

laugh at the dead terrorist.” He continues to grow his rat pack of personalities, albeit cautiously. “If I come up with a new character that doesn’t entertain me after a few shows, he’s gone,” says Dunham. He adds that the audience has to believe whenever they’re hearing from the character for the first time, it’s also the first time he has heard it. “Onstage, the ‘relationships’ have to seem real. And honestly, many times when I’m laughing at something one of the little guys just said … it’s real.” Dunham’s personal story is also in big demand by his massive following of fans. Jerry Garcia had multitudes of Deadheads; Jimmy Buffett preaches to beer drinking, grass-skirted Parrotheads. But Dunham’s fan base, better known as “Dunham Maniacs,” is a breed apart. He has legions of fans with whom he regularly connects with via social media, reportedly as many as 8 million followers on Facebook alone. In 2010 he released an

autobiography, All By My Selves: Walter, Peanut, Achmed and Me. It became a New York Times bestseller. A year later, Jeff Dunham: Birth of a Dummy, aired on The Biography Channel; it has been listed as the cable channel’s highest-rated broadcast of all time.

“There is no formula for creating [each character]. The only thread I can see with them is that they all make me laugh.” has his own ventriloquist dummy named, naturally, Little Jeff; and Achmed, a would-be jihadist — if only he hadn’t blown himself up.

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“I try to make the majority of my audience laugh,” he told The New York Times in a 2009 interview. “That’s my audience. They’ll

HOW IT ALL STARTED Dunham was born in 1962 and was adopted and raised by devout Christian parents. An only child, he became interested in ventriloquism as a boy when his folks bought him a dummy one Christmas. It quickly became his passion, and in no time, he was entertaining neighbors and classmates. “Dallas was a perfect place to learn how to entertain a multifaceted crowd,” Dunham recalls. “The audiences weren’t too southern, or too middle America, too left or right.” “My schooling was learning to make an auditorium of teenagers at my high school laugh every bit as much as a sanctuary full of churchgoers at Highland Park Presbyterian or later at the


Photos courtesy Jeff Dunham

BUBBA J There’s redneck, and then there’s this goofy guy who takes trailer-park trash to a whole new level.

JOSÉ JALAPEÑO This spicy South-of-the-border con artist delivers his hilarious lines with a straight face…on a steek!

MELVIN THE SUPER HERO GUY This lovable nerd’s distinctive features are his phallic-shaped nose and the snazzy crime-fighting costume he bought on eBay.

ACHMED This would-be terrorist inadvertently made himself the victim of an accidental bomb blast. Now that’s funny!

Comedy Corner nightclub.” He worked at Six Flags over Texas and made guest appearances on area television stations. He once was interviewed by a local WFAA-TV reporter named Bill O’Reilly, now a heavyweight at Fox News. “I didn’t know that it was a nerdy little art that nobody did anymore,” he once told The Biography Channel. Later, he was cast as a spokesperson for car dealerships in Dallas and Tyler, Tex., always with a dummy on his knee. Dunham graduated from J.J. Pearce High School in Richardson, a Dallas suburb, and headed to Baylor University in Waco, south of Dallas, where he continued to hone his skills, working corporate gigs and college and club dates. On the weekends while his friends were partying, Dunham motored off to various gigs. He appeared in local commercials, worked as a disc jockey at KWTX-FM and ran camera for KWTX-TV. There, he connected with Harper, forming a friendship that has continued

for years. They shared a love had missed an assignment. So he He graduated from Baylor of television and, of all things, got this remote-controlled robot University with a degree in radio-controlled helicopters. to deliver his homework, right in communications, then moved “Jeff did mornings on the FM the middle of class.” to Los Angeles in 1988 and station, which was contemporary “Here comes this little robot, immediately hit the circuit – the hit music,” says Harper. “And he rolling across the floor right up Improv, Comedy & Magic Club in was also our in-house funnyman. to the professor holding Jeff’s Hermosa Beach, and others. I remember a couple of company assignment. He was always doing Five years later, after a rash of Christmas parties where Jeff was funny, off-the-wall stuff. We knew cancellations by NBC bookers, the entertainment.” Dunham also appeared in the local “I was one of those lucky people who found a segments within the Jerry Lewis Labor Day passion at a very early age for what I could Telethon, which KWTX carried. “One time, he and would do for the rest of my life.” went from running a studio camera on the telethon, to changing into a suit, he’d be huge someday.” he finally made his debut on getting Peanut and being on the By the mid-’80s Dunham The Tonight Show. It had been a telethon as talent, then going landed feature spots opening 10-year goal for the Texas comic, back and running camera again,” for name entertainers, including and, at last, he had arrived. laughs Harper, now a successful Bob Hope and George Burns. corporate vice president and In 1985, he went to Broadway as “HEEERE’S JOHNNY!” chief technology officer. part of the Ann Miller-Mickey Throughout Johnny Carson’s His college pal Archie Rooney burlesque romp, Sugar three decades on the show, Woodard, now a Dallas television Babies. Dunham appeared for Dunham had the distinction, engineer, also has fond memories 12 minutes onstage, which during a maiden Tonight Show of Dunham. “He was constantly allowed the show’s star to change appearance, of being one of only doing stuff outside the box,” says costumes. But it was just the a handful of comics invited to Woodard. “I remember once Jeff career jumpstart he needed. join the host on his fabled couch.

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Well, I’ll Be a Howdy Doody!

Terry Fator

Jay Johnson

Ronn Lucas

Born and reared in Dallas, the 48-year old comic and singer can do more than 100 impersonations as a ventriloquist. He uses almost 20 different puppets in his act. Fator won season two of America’s Got Talent on NBC. The following year, he signed as the headliner at The Mirage in Las Vegas.

He’s probably best known for his role on ABC’s idiosyncratic comedy Soap as Chuck, a ventriloquist convinced his dummy was real. Active in television and onstage, the Lubbock native’s Tony-Award winning Jay Johnson: The Two And Only opened on Broadway in 2006. “Bob,” his TV dummy, now makes his home in the Smithsonian.

The El Paso native has headlined in Las Vegas for years. He was a semi-regular on a revival of The Match Game and a version of The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour. Some of his favorite puppets include Buffalo Billy, a lovable West Texas cowboy, and Scorch, a green dragon who starred in his own short-lived sitcom on CBS in 1992.

To commemorate the occasion, Dunham pulled a series of vintage wisecracks out of his hat while sitting next to Carson. As the young comic nervously savored the moment, crusty old Walter glared at Ed McMahon and barked, “Stop sending me all that damn mail,” referencing the pitchman’s incessant wave of TV commercials promoting the American Family Publishers Sweepstakes. The dummy then took aim at a giggling Carson, quipping, “It’ll be a cold day in hell before I come back to this show!” The host and his studio audience erupted in laughter. During the commercial break,

seminal moment and an historic seal of approval for Dunham. Meanwhile, back in Dallas, Woodard was working at a local school when his old college chum called him out of the blue. “Have you ever wanted to be on The Tonight Show, Archie?” asked Dunham. He explained that he was talking to the show’s producers about his next appearance, which would require some audience participation. Apparently they were concerned about Dunham offending people and ordered him to bring in a stooge. “When I heard word ‘stooge,’ your name automatically popped into my head,” “Dallas was a perfect place to learn how to entertain Dunham laughed. “I go to a multifaceted crowd … The audiences weren’t too rehearsal, with no one in southern, or too middle-America, too left or right.” the audience, and they America’s biggest late-night practice making fun of me,” television host directed Dunham remembers Woodard. Because to a staffer who booked his next he was required to deliver a line appearance on the show. It was a on-camera, Woodard had to apply

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Photo courtesy Jeff Dunham

Did you know Texas is a breeding ground for some of the top ventriloquists in show business? Jeff Dunham may be the best known these days, but the state also can claim a number of others with similar skill sets.

Depending on the audience, one night Peanut will be the hands-down favorite, and then another night the favorite will be Achmed or Walter, Dunham says.

for a temporary Screen Actors Guild card. “He said my name on the air, then for the rest of the routine he just made fun of me.” So thanks to Dunham, “I got my 15 frames of fame,” says Woodard. “In fact, I think you can still search The Tonight Show database, and my name’s in there because of that one spoken line. I got a small residual check for the first and second appearance on The Tonight Show, all because of Jeff Dunham.” A 20-YEAR OVERNIGHT SENSATION The first appearance on The Tonight Show lifted his career. Dunham did more television and stayed active on the club circuit. In the early ‘90s he appeared regularly on NBC’s Hot Country Nights as comic relief for big-name performers of the day, including Clint Black, Pam Tillis, Alabama and others. He was slotted along with up-andcoming stand-up acts such as Tim Allen, just prior to the debut of Allen’s breakout comedy, Home


Randy Miramontez / Shutterstock.com

Dunham flirted with controversy regarding Achmed, a would-be jihadist, whom he introduced in the wake of the 9-11 attacks.

Improvement. In 1996, Dunham joined fellow Texas comedian Ellen DeGeneres on her ABC show. He played a ventriloquist at a convention, shoehorned into the same ballroom in which her friend’s wedding was scheduled to take place. An argument ensued as Ellen co-star Jeremy Piven told Dunham that he and his roomful of “wooden Americans” would have to leave. Harper remembers around that time attending the National Association of Broadcasters convention and spotting Dunham’s name on a marquee. He was headlining at The Sands Hotel on the Las Vegas Strip. “We met him backstage,” says Harper. “He took us to the parking lot to show off the brand new Hummer he’d just bought. The license plate read D-U-M-M-Y.” By the close of the decade, he was doing 200 or more dates a year, owning audiences in clubs and performance halls. He was hilarious and had carved an uncommon show business niche. After an appearance with Walter

on Fox Sports’ Best Damn Sports Show, different doors began to open. He even auditioned for a slot on the network’s Sunday NFL show. That’s when things began to change. Around the same time, the Blue Collar Comedy Tour, featuring the red-hot redneck humor of Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy, along with fellow Texans Bill Engvall and Ron White, was gaining serious traction around the country. Dunham’s humor connected well with the same audience, and Comedy Central noticed. Dunham’s appearance on Comedy Central Presents marked his first solo showcase on the cable channel. It would soon become his greatest launching pad. And the rest is show business history. Today, Jeff Dunham is one of the world’s biggest stars. And, thanks to him, ventriloquism is mainstream cool once again. “I don’t take any of this for granted,” he says. “We can all think back on any given day in our lives and wonder ‘what if’ a

certain thing had — or hadn’t — happened to us. Where would we be? What would be different?” To his friends back home, things haven’t changed that much. “It’s fun to know somebody like that,” says Woodard. “And it’s fun that he’s now being discovered by a new generation.” As for Dunham’s long, hard road to international stardom, “He remembers all of it,” Harper says with a smile. “The years and years of work to be an overnight sensation.”

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Antonio Scorza / Shutterstock.com

CALENDAR

APRIL 4–6

NCAA March Madness Music Festival Bruce Springsteen, Tim McGraw, Fun, Jason Aldean, The Killers and more Reunion Park

This free, three-day music festival brings some of music’s biggest superstars to the stage in celebration of college basketball’s biggest event, the NCAA Men’s Final Four. The non-ticketed event is open to the public on a firstcome, first-serve basis.

In Dallas, we’ve got events to suit everyone’s style. Check our calendar for the best of the city’s culture and entertainment during your stay.

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april APRIL 23

Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden

Dallas Blooms

Artens / Shutterstock.com

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Diana Ross

THROUGH APRIL 6

Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center

CALENDAR

Ross has helped shape the sound of popular music, from her years with The Supremes through today, paving the way for influential singers of successive generations with hits such as “Stop! In the Name of Love” and “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.” The concert benefits Vogel Alcove, a Dallas-based nonprofit that provides services to young children.

Spring is popping out all over! — especially at Dallas’ awardwinning, 66-acre botanical garden. Stroll around the grounds filled with spectacular floral displays and landscaping that feature hundreds of tulips, azaleas, daffodils, pansies, poppies and more than 100 blossoming cherry blossom trees. Hear live music during the Cool Thursdays series.

APRIL 1

APRIL 4

APRIL 3

McFarlin Auditorium

Billy Bob’s Texas (Fort Worth)

Bass Performance Hall (Fort Worth)

Esquire editor at large and author of the memoir The Know-It-All: One Man’s Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World offers his insights during this event.

His memorable hits range from “Will You Lay With Me (In a Field of Stone)” to “You Never Even Call Me by My Name”

David Allan Coe

Booker T. Jones Granada Theater

Sample small bites from some of the area’s top chefs who will share their talents to help the fight against neurofibromatosis.

His smoldering, organ-driven radio hits included “Green Onions,” “Hang ‘em High,” “Time is Tight” and more with the MGs (Memphis Guitars)

APRIL 2, 5, 11 & 13

APRIL 5

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

Texas Motorplex (Ennis)

Rossini’s romp centers on “Figaro, Figaro, Figaro,” the scheming barber. See it in person or catch the free, April 11 simulcast at AT&T Stadium.

Experience the rush of a lifetime sprinting on a quarter-mile track with up to 24 different 1,200-pound bulls on your heels.

APRIL 3–13

APRIL 12–3

Angelika Film Center, Alamo Drafthouse Cinema and other locations

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

Frontiers of Flight Museum

The Barber of Seville, The Dallas Opera The Great Bull Run

Dallas International Film Festival Cast, crew and fans are all regulars at this annual festival, discussing their work, previewing films, animated shorts and more.

Meyerson Symphony Center

Experience the ornate ecstasy of the Baroque. Conducting from the harpsichord, Ottavio Dantone leads works of Vivaldi, Corelli and Handel.

This classic story was a hit Disney movie that became a sensation as a musical featuring Belle, the young woman whose love transforms the Beast into a handsome prince. The musical launched in 2010 and has played to more than 35 million people worldwide in 22 countries. APRIL 15–27

Evita

The Pearl Fishers, Fort Worth Opera

Music Hall at Fair Park

Bass Performance Hall (Fort Worth)

Vows of eternal friendship are put to the ultimate test in this story of desire and sacrifice set in ancient Ceylon.

This third-annual festival focuses on Texas craft beers and the emerging North Texas craft-beer scene. Sample from exclusive kegs, rare brews, one-offs and special firkins from nearly 100 breweries, and grab good eats from food trucks.

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

Richard Termine

Royal Fireworks Music, Dallas Symphony Orchestra

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast

APRIL 19, 27 & MAY 2 APRIL 3–6

Big Texas Beerfest

APRIL 15–27

Motionhouse Performers have inventively created passionate theater fusing eye-popping images, action and dynamism to delight audiences worldwide.

Yo-Yo Ma, a 15-time Grammy-winner, has produced 75 albums, and is among classical music’s brightest stars. The cello virtuoso joins conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya and the FWSO for this all-Dvorak program, performing the Cello Concerto in B minor. APRIL 5

Angela Waye / Shutterstock.com

Dining Out in Dallas

fulya atalay / Shutterstock.com

APRIL 5 APRIL 2

Yo-Yo Ma, Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra

Amy Boyle

A.J. Jacobs, SMU Tate Lecture Series

Breathtaking and hopelessly romantic is the tragic story of the popular Angentine First Lady Eva Peron in this unforgettable, Tony Award winning rags-to-riches saga for the ages, with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice. Caroline Bowman plays Evita and getting rave reviews.

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CALENDAR MAY 4

may AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

Spring Celebration Gala, Dallas Black Dance Theatre

Steven Ray

Lisa Marie Mazzucco

Itzhak Perlman

MAY 16–17

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

Two evening performances celebrate the legacy of Ann Williams, DBDT’s founder and artistic director, with new company ballets choreographed by Lily Weiss and Christopher Vo as well as spectacular performances by the Texas Ballet Theater, Bruce Wood Project and Troy Powell of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.

Undeniably the reigning virtuoso of the violin, this magnificent performer enjoys superstar status rarely afforded a classical musician. Beloved for his charm and humanity as well as his talent, Perlman is treasured by international audiences who respond to his remarkable artistry and irrepressible joy for making music.

MAY 1–3, 5–6 & 15–18

MAY 2

MAY 16–17

Meyerson Symphony Center

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

Addison

Music director Jaap van Zweden leads a three-week series of Beethoven symphonies, concertos and chamber masterpieces. Programs include Beethoven’s Fifth and Ninth (“Ode to Joy”) symphonies and the “Emperor” Concerto featuring pianist Yefim Bronfman.

From classic pas de deux to awe-inspiring contemporary works, it’s an evening of artistry featuring some of the world’s most loved stars.

Sample food from top area restaurants, enjoy celebrity chef demos, wine tasting seminars, and the music of Texas musician Pat Green.

MAY 2

MAY 16–18

Command Performance Gala, TITAS

Zach Mahone

Beethoven Festival, Dallas Symphony Orchestra

Gavin DeGraw House of Blues

Lady Antebellum, Billy Currington, David Nail Majestic Theatre

The award-winning country-music trio makes a stop in Dallas on its Take Me Downtown tour to promote its fifth studio album, Golden. Fans will undoubtedly hear the hits that won them over, including “Need You Now” and “Our Kind of Love.”

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MAY 9

MAY 16–18

Wildflower! Arts and Music Festival Get in on this springtime North Texas arts and eclectic music festival that boasts six performance stages loaded with big-name entertainment, an open-air marketplace, a tasty food garden, a family-friendly zone and more.

David Downs Photography

Galatyn Park (Richardson)

This trio of bands has deep connections back to the golden era of 1970s classic rock in San Francisco. Dallas native Steve Miller is joined by one of music’s greatest horn sections along with superstar guitarist Neal Schon, Jonathan Cain and his Journey bandmates.

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Randy Miramontez / Shutterstock.com

Gexa Energy Pavilion

Pixar in Concert, Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra Bass Performance Hall (Fort Worth)

MAY 3-4

From Toy Story to The Incredibles and more, enjoy the music from these modern-day animated classics played with clips from the movies.

Oak Point Park & Nature Preserve (Plano)

MAY 23–25

Headliners include DJ David Guetta, Alabama Shakes, hip-hop artist J. Cole, Tegan and Sara, Violent Femmes and Third Eye Blind.

Ennis

Suburbia Music Festival

National Polka Festival

MAY 10

Czech heritage in Texas is on parade with polka bands, a variety of authentic foods, costumes, culture and more.

Arlington Music Hall

MAY 30–JUNE 1

Lee’s hit, “Lookin’ for Love,” spent months on the country and pop charts in 1980 was a driving force behind America’s urban-cowboy craze.

Fair Park

Johnny Lee, Luke Robinson

CityArts Festival

MAY 10–AUGUST 9

Enjoy demos, samplings, wine pairings, craft beer, liquor and wine tastings plus evolving cocktails, Scotch flight tastings and more.

Belmont Hotel

MAY 31–JUNE 8

Barefoot at the Belmont

MAY 25

Steve Miller Band, Journey, Tower of Power

Hits like “I Don’t Want To Be” made him a star. His “Best I Ever Had” sold over a million records.

Fork & Cork, A Celebration of Taste

The summer concert series features Will Johnson, Cas Haley, Tim DeLaughter, Gary Clark, Jr. and more playing to intimate crowds on a green lawn.

Always…Patsy Cline Casa Manana (Fort Worth)

Based on the true story of a friendship with a devoted Texas fan, the score features “Walkin’ After Midnight,” “She’s Got You” and “Crazy.”


june JUNE 7

JUNE 15

AT&T Stadium (Arlington)

James Taylor and His All-Star Band

Verizon Theatre at Grand Prairie

Art Streiber

Richard Thornton / Shutterstock.com

George Strait, Alan Jackson, Faith Hill, Kenny Chesney

CALENDAR

Concerts don’t get much bigger than this star-studded line up of country music greats. A 2006 Country Music Hall of Fame inductee, Strait is currently the undisputed “King of Country.” The native Texan brings an unmatched catalog of hits to the stage, including 60 number one songs, including “All My Exes Live in Texas.”

JUNE 3–15

Jersey Boys Bass Performance Hall (Fort Worth)

It’s the Tony-winning story of Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons’ improbable rise from Jersey do-wop group to stardom. JUNE 6-8

Hollywood Hits, Dallas Symphony Orchestra Meyerson Symphony Center

The glamour and excitement of Tinsel town come alive when the DSO presents famous movie soundtracks from films classic and new. NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 19

Alfred Stieglitz: The Art of Photogravure Amon Carter Museum of American Art (Fort Worth)

This display of 10 rare, large-format photogravures, reveal how the artist inventively tested inks and papers in his work. JUNE 12

Bobby Womack AT&T Performing Arts Center, Strauss Square

His “Across 110th Street” and “Woman’s Gotta to Have It” are classics, but only scratch the surface of an historic catalog.

Dallas Museum of Art

From quick sketches to watercolors, works by Degas, Cézanne, van Gogh and others, offer new insights into the working methods.

JUNE 19

justasc / Shutterstock.com

Rescheduled from earlier this year, the renowned classical pianist performs as part of an exciting new recital series.

Mind’s Eye: Masterworks on Paper from David to Cézanne

Night of the Proms: Michael McDonald, Kenny Loggins, Pointer Sisters, Chic Verizon Theatre at Grand Prairie

Catch pop-music royalty backed by a 24-person choir and an eight-piece band with eye-popping sets, spectacular light shows and top-notch audio. The audience becomes part of the show, singing and dancing in their seats.

JUNE 13

Bill Anderson

JUNE 19

Shen Wei Dance Arts, TITAS

Arlington Music Hall

For 50 years the man known as “Whispering Bill” been among country music’s most enduring entertainers and decorated songwriters. JUNE 21

Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band, John Fogarty

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House Shen Wei Production

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 26

Toyota Stadium (Frisco)

Attention Texas Parrotheads — it’s time to break out the grass skirts and Hawaiian shirts, and sing along to summertime favorites. JUNE 21

Blake Shelton, The Band Perry, Neal McCoy

Eddie Izzard

Gexa Energy Pavilion

The Oklahoma native’s hits include “Austin,” “Honey Bee” and “The Baby.” They’ve powered an career for one of country’s top singers. JUNE 27–AUGUST 10

Les Miserables, Dallas Theater Center AT&T Performing Arts Center, Wyly Theatre

This highly anticipated production features one of Broadway’s biggest shows with incredible staging and songs to match.

Artistic director Shen Wei, founder of Shen Wei Dance Arts, choreographed works for his company based on his own dance techniques. Internationally recognized for artistic vision, he choreographed the opening ceremonies of the 2008 Beijing Olympics. JUNE 24–25

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André Watts

Majestic Theatre

Quirky soliloquies have helped make the hysterical English comic, writer and actor a worldwide sensation. Izzard starred in the television series The Riches and his film appearances include Ocean’s Twelve, Ocean’s Thirteen and Mystery Men. NOW THROUGH AUGUST 25

Jade, or Not Jade, That is the Question Crow Collection of Asian Art

JUNE 2

Few artists can lay claim to the extraordinarily broad influence Sweet Baby James has had on American music over the years. Quintessential hits such as “Fire and Rain,” “You’ve Got a Friend,” “Carolina in My Mind,” “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You) and “Shower the People” span generations and are among pop music’s crown jewels.

Crow Collection of Asian Art

Develop a discerning eye for what’s real and what’s not by studying pieces from the museum’s collection and from generous loans of natural-worked stones. Primarily nephrite and jadeite, two distinct materials prized by collectors of Chinese jade, are on view.

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SPORTS APRIL 4-7

APRIL 10-JULY 12

AT&T Stadium (Arlington)

Spring Thoroughbred Racing Season

North Texas gets a serious taste of college basketball madness with the biggest match-ups of them all. The sport’s top teams, coaches and players will square off in this annual dash towards the final stages of the year’s biggest game to decide a national champion. MAY 12–18

HP Byron Nelson Championship Four Seasons Resort and Club (Las Colinas)

The native Texan’s accomplishments as a professional golfer were as impressive as his swing. He called the tournament named in his honor, “the best thing to every happen to me in golf.” Lord Byron’s legacy lives on at the annual PGA event that includes many of the game’s biggest names.

MAY 1–4

LPGA North Texas Shootout Las Colinas Country Club (Irving) MAY 3

FCD Academy vs. Dallas Texans Toyota Stadium (Frisco) MAY 18

Eleven stakes races, including the Grade 3 $200,000 Texas Mile and the Grade 3 $200,000 Lone Star Park Handicap, highlight the season as DFW’s largest such horseracing track opens with 50 events. Live racing is held four days a week at the facility just a short drive from Dallas.

FC Dallas Soccer

NASCAR

All homes games played at Toyota Stadium (Frisco) APRIL 12 VS. SEATTLE APRIL 19 VS. TORONTO FC MAY 4 VS. NEW YORK MAY 17 VS. CHIVAS USA MAY 31 VS. SAN JOSE JUNE 7 VS. COLORADO FCDallas.com

Texas Motor Speedway (Fort Worth) APRIL 3

Disco 5/10K Run

SMU Mustangs Spring Football Gerald J. Ford Stadium

Fair Park

Toyota Stadium (Frisco)

FC Dallas MoneyGram Nations Cup

APRIL 11–13 & 18–20

JUNE 14

Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center

Fair Park

APRIL 13–20

Dallas Mavericks Basketball

Mizuno Lone Star Volleyball Classic 5K Urban Dash Dr Pepper Dallas Cup XXXV APRIL 26

American Airlines Center APRIL 1 VS. GOLDEN STAR WARRIORS APRIL 10 VS. SAN ANTONIO SPURS APRIL13 VS. PHOENIX SUNS

Dallas

Dallas Stars Hockey

APRIL 27

American Airlines Center APRIL 8 VS. NASHVILLE PREDATORS APRIL 11 VS. ST. LOUIS BLUES

Various Locations

Pretty Muddy Run

Rise and Shine 5K Run/Walk Reverchon Park D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E

APRIL 5

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series final practice & qualifying

IndyCar Series Firestone 600 qualifying; WinStar World Casino & Resort 400 NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race

Crown Plaza Invitational PGA Tour MAY 31–JUNE 1

O’Reilly Auto Parts 300 NASCAR Nationwide Series

JUNE 6

MAY 19–25

Big “D” Texas Marathon, Half Marathon and 5K

APRIL 4

Texas 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series

Colonial Country Club (Fort Worth)

APRIL 6

NASCAR Nationwide Series Practice Sessions

APRIL 6

Dallas Fair Park

APRIL 5

52

Mikhail Pogosov / Shutterstock.com

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NCAA Men’s Basketball Final Four

Lone Star Park (Grand Prairie)

JUNE 7 Prince Fielder makes his Rangers debut

Texas Rangers Baseball Rangers Ballpark (Arlington) APRIL 1–2 VS. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES APRIL 11–13 VS. HOUSTON ASTROS APRIL 14–17 VS. SEATTLE MARINERS APRIL 18–20 VS. CHICAGO WHITE SOX APRIL 28–30 VS. OAKLAND A’S MAY 7–8 VS. COLORADO ROCKIES MAY 9–11 VS. BOSTON RED SOX MAY 16–18 VS. TORONTO BLUE JAYS MAY 20–21 VS. SEATTLE MARINERS JUNE 3–5 VS. BALTIMORE ORIOLES JUNE 6–9 VS. CLEVELAND INDIANS JUNE 10–11 VS. MIAMI MARLINS JUNE 24–26 VS. DETROIT TIGERS JUNE 27–29 VS. MINNESOTA TWINS Texas.Rangers.MLB.com

Firestone 600 IndyCar Series race TexasMotorSpeedway.com

Frisco RoughRiders Baseball Dr Pepper Ballpark (Frisco) APRIL 3–5 APRIL 6–8 APRIL 17–20 APRIL 21–24 MAY 3–6 MAY 8–11 MAY 21–23 MAY 24–26 JUNE 3–6 JUNE 7–10 JUNE 25–27 JUNE 28–30 milb.com

VS. NWA VS. ARKANSAS VS. CORPUS CHRISTI VS. SAN ANTONIO VS. MIDLAND VS. CORPUS CHRISTI VS. TULSA VS. SPRINGFIELD VS. SAN ANTONIO VS. MIDLAND VS. ARKANSAS VS. NWA


EVENTS APRIL 1–2 Dita Von Tesse (Burlesque) House of Blues

APRIL 12 Johnny Rodriquez (Country) Arlington Music Hall

APRIL 30-MAY 1 The Zombies (Classic Rock) Kessler Theater

THROUGH JUNE 15 Alexandre Hogue: The Erosion Series (Exhibition) Dallas Museum of Art

APRIL 16 Eric Johnson (Blues/Rock) Granada Theater

MAY 1–4 Tommy Davidson (Comedy) Improv (Arlington)

APRIL 1–3 Conan O’Brien (Comedy) Majestic Theatre

APRIL 18 Beethoven and Haydn, Dallas Symphony Orchestra (Classical) Meyerson Symphony Center

MAY 1 Kim Lenz and the Jaguars (Rockabilly) Gas Monkey Bar N’ Grill

APRIL 3 Amy Schumer (Comedy) Verizon Theatre at Grand Prairie

APRIL 18 Umphrey’s McGee (Jam, Rock) House of Blues

APRIL 4 Charlie Daniels Band with Sawyer Brown (Outlaw Country) Choctaw Event Center (Durant, OK)

APRIL 19 Mickey Gilley (Country) Arlington Music Hall

APRIL 4–5 Gilbert Gottfried (Comedy) Hyena’s (Fort Worth and Dallas) APRIL 4–5 Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo, TITAS (Dance, Comedy) Dallas City Performance Hall APRIL 5 Top Shelf Tour: Bruce Bruce, Arnez J, Earthquake (Comedy) Verizon Theatre at Grand Prairie APRIL 5 James McMurtry (Texas Country) Kessler Theater APRIL 6–JUNE 1 FOCUS: Rirkrit Tiravanija (Exhibition) The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth APRIL 8 Khatia Buniatishvili (Classical) AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House APRIL 8 Nina Totenberg, UTA Maverick Speakers Series (Lecture) Texas Hall (UT Arlington)

APRIL 19 Old 97’s, Black Joe Lewis,
Slobberbone and Madison King Country (Rock) AT&T Performing Arts Center, Annette Strauss Square APRIL 23 Kristian Bush (of Sugarland) (Folk, Rock) Kessler Theater APRIL 23–27 USA Film Festival Angelika Film Center APRIL 25–MAY 25 Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure, Dallas Theater Center (Theater) AT&T Performing Arts Center, Wyly Theatre APRIL 20, 25–27, 29 & MAY 3–4, 6, 9–10 With Blood With Ink, Fort Worth Opera (Performance) Bass Performance Hall (Fort Worth) APRIL 25 Waymore’s Outlaws (Outlaw Country) Arlington Music Hall APRIL 25 Monte Montgomery (Texas Country) Kessler Theatre

APRIL 8–13 Stomp (Performance) Bass Performance Hall (Fort Worth)

APRIL 25 National Kidney Foundation Bonne Santé Westin Galleria

APRIL 10 Ben Folds with the Dallas Pops (Pop) AT&T Performing Arts Center, Annette Strauss Square *

APRIL 25–26 Jamar Jones (Jazz) Clarence Muse Café Theatre

APRIL 10–13 Main Street Arts Festival (Music, Art, Food) Downtown Fort Worth APRIL 11–12 Cirque de la Symphonie, Dallas Symphony Orchestra (Classical) Meyerson Symphony Center APRIL 11 Los Lobos (Rock, Folk) Kessler Theater

APRIL 26, MAY 3 & 11 Cosi fan tutte, Fort Worth Opera (Performance) Bass Performance Hall (Fort Worth) APRIL 4 Diana Ross (Pop) Choctaw Event Center (Durant, OK) APRIL 26 Wishbone Ash (Rock) Poor David’s Pub

APRIL 12 BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet (Cajun) Kessler Theater

APRIL 27 Coriolanus (Shakespeare) AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House (Hamon Hall)

APRIL 12–13 Big Mamou Cajun Festival Traders Village (Grand Prairie)

APRIL 27 Kids in the Hall (Comedy) Majestic Theatre

APRIL 15 Pet Shop Boys (Pop) Majestic Theatre

APRIL 29 Dallas Chamber Orchestra’s Season Finale Beethoven and Schumann AT&T Performing Arts Center, City Performance Hall

* Outdoor Venue

MAY 2–3 Tom Arnold (Comedy) Hyena’s (Fort Worth, Dallas) MAY 2–4 Texas Scottish Festival & Highland Games (Recreation) Maverick Stadium, UT-Arlington MAY 3 Mike Epps (Comedy) Verizon Theatre at Grand Prairie MAY 3 Reba (Country) Choctaw Event Center (Durant, OK) MAY 4 Cottonwood Art Festival (Music, Art, Food) Cottonwood Park (Richardson) MAY 8 Justin Currie (formerly of Del Amitri) (Pop) Kessler Theater MAY 9 Christina Perri (Pop) House of Blues MAY 10 Ben Folds (Pop) AT&T Performing Arts Center, Annette Strauss Square* MAY 10 Joe Ely (Texas Country) Granada Theater MAY 10 Mark Morris Dance Group AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House MAY 13 Ingrid Michaelson (Pop) House of Blues MAY 14 Ledisi, Robert Glasper Experiment (Pop, Soul, Jazz) Majestic Theatre MAY 16 Joan Osborne (Pop, Folk, Rock) Kessler Theater MAY 16–17 Steven Michael Quezada (of Breaking Bad) (Comedy) Hyena’s MAY 16–17 Kim Jordan (Jazz) Clarence Muse Café Theatre MAY 17 Dave Matthews Band (Jam) Gexa Energy Pavilion* MAY 17 Foreigner, Styx, Don Felder (Rock) Verizon Theatre at Grand Prairie MAY 17 Al Stewart (Pop, Folk) Poor David’s Pub

MAY 19 Neil deGrasse Tyson (Astronomy, Lecture) AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House MAY 21–25 Spank! The Fifty Shades Parody (Theater) Bass Performance Hall, McDavid Studio (Fort Worth) MAY 22 Morrissey (Rock, Pop) Majestic Theater MAY 22 DSO on the GO White’s Chapel United Methodist Church (Southlake) MAY 23 Bob Schneider (Rock, Pop, Folk, Country) Levitt Pavilion (Arlington)* MAY 24 Bruce Robison & Kelly Willis (Texas Country) Medical Center of Lewisville Grand Theater MAY 24 Liberty Fest (Food, Music, Arts & Crafts) Farmers Branch Historic Park MAY 29–JUNE 1 Finesse Mitchell (Comedy) Improv (Arlington) MAY 29 Dallas Symphony Orchestra Community Concert Series Klyde Warren Park MAY 30–JUNE 1 Rob Schneider (Comedy) Improv (Addison) MAY 30–JUNE 1 Swan Lake, Texas Ballet Theater (Dance) Bass Performance Hall (Fort Worth) JUNE 5 Romeo Santos (Latin Pop) American Airlines Center JUNE 5–8 Charlie Murphy (Comedy) Improv (Addison) JUNE 6–8 A-KON (Rap) Hilton Anatole JUNE 7 Noel Paul Stookey (of Peter, Paul & Mary (Folk) Poor David’s Pub JUNE 13 Trout Fishing in America (Pop) Bass Performance Hall, McDavid Studio (Fort Worth) JUNE 18 Boston, Doobie Brothers (Classic Rock) Allen Event Center JUNE 20–21 Martha Burks (Jazz) Clarence Muse Café Theater NOW THROUGH JULY 6 June Wayne: The Tamarind Decade Amon Carter Museum of American Art (Fort Worth) THROUGH AUGUST 31 Samurai: Armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection (Exhibition) Kimbell Art Museum (Fort Worth)

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SHOPPING

SHOPPING CENTERS ALLEN PREMIUM OUTLETS Home to 100 designer namebrand outlets such as BCBG Max Azria, Coach, Cole Haan, J.Crew, Juicy Couture, Lacoste and Last Call by Neiman Marcus, it also offers savings up to 65 percent!

entertainment venues, including Hyena’s Comedy Nightclub and the Angelika Film Center. The Station delivers its signature vibrancy around the clock. 5307 E. Mockingbird Ln. 214.452.7180 mockingbirdstation.com

WEST VILLAGE

NorthPark Center Allen Premium Outlets

Galleria Dallas is the only North Texas home to TOUS, BCBGeneration, Tourneau, Brahmin, Sony Style and Karen Millen — plus favorites Louis Vuitton and Tiffany & Co. From its legendary ice rink to chic dining, Galleria Dallas is a destination. 13350 Dallas Pkwy. 972.702.7100 galleriadallas.com

HIGHLAND PARK VILLAGE This shopping village is as close as you’ll get to Rodeo Drive. Built in the 1930s, this ultrachic corner of high-end shopping in Dallas’ most exclusive neighborhood sports boutiques such as Hermès, Jimmy Choo, Escada, Cole Haan, Chanel, Ralph Lauren, St. John and more.

NORTHPARK CENTER NorthPark Center offers more than 235 stores and luxury designer and trendsetting boutiques, including Gucci, Bvlgari, Valentino, Bottega Veneta, Versace, Cartier, Louis Vuitton and Oscar de la Renta, and top-tier anchors including Neiman Marcus and Nordstrom. Guests also enjoy a movie theater, restaurants, a world-class art collection and award-winning architecture. 8687 N. Central Expy. 214.361.6345 northparkcenter.com

Home to the independent Magnolia Theatre, this hotspot for shopping, dining and entertainment has plenty of shops and boutiques. Nestled at the northern tip of the Uptown entertainment district, the Village is easily accessible via the McKinney Avenue Trolley. McKinney Avenue & Blackburn Street 214.922.9622 westvil.com

JEWELRY BACHENDORF’S The first Bachendorf’s store opened in 1977 featuring highquality handmade custom jewelry and an extensive collection of watches. Today, Bachendorf’s continues the family tradition of offering the finest designer timepieces and collectibles. PRESTON CENTER 8400 Preston Rd. 214.692.8400

DIAMOND DOCTOR

47 Highland Park Village 214.559.2740 hpvillage.com

MOCKINGBIRD STATION Conveniently located on the DART train line, this urban village has 40 shops, restaurants and

An urban oasis, Preston Center’s walkways invite leisurely strolling past one-of-a-kind shops and restaurants suiting every taste. The Plaza is home to dozens of delightful stores you won’t find anywhere else in Dallas like Sprinkles Cupcakes and Tootsie’s. 8311 Preston Center Plaza Dr. 469.232.0000 theplazaatprestoncenter.com

820 Stacy Rd. Allen, Texas 972.678.7000 premiumoutlets.com/allen

GALLERIA

THE PLAZA AT PRESTON CENTER

Plaza at Preston Center

With roots as a true wholesaler, Diamond Doctor sells the same high-quality diamonds to its customers as it does to retail partners. Stones are purchased from mines, allowing Diamond Doctor to offer top-quality GIA Certified diamonds for a

fraction of the price. Service is personalized with strict attention paid to desires and preferences. 972.342.6663 8127 Preston Rd. diamonddoctor.com

EISEMAN JEWELS The destination for luxury jewelry, Eiseman distinguishes itself among America’s best with a unique collection of designs, timepieces and colored and white diamonds of sizes not available in most U.S. cities. Named the Best Independent Luxury Jeweler in the U.S. in 2010. Eiseman recently opened a new Rolex store as it celebrates 50 years. NorthPark Center, Ste. 514 214.369.6100 eisemanjewels.com

JERRY SZOR CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY A destination for those in search of inspired, extraordinary jewelry, Jerry Szor Contemporary Jewelry is referred to by clients as one of Dallas’ best-kept, modern secrets. The jewel-box gallery exclusively represents many of the finest, most-talented contemporary jewelry artists in the world. 6131 Luther Ln., No. 210 214.691.5400 jerryszor.com

YLANG 23 Owners Joanne and Charles Teichman have met the designers, know the collections and can even find pieces from previous seasons. Bringing you the ultimate level of service, they can help find the perfect gift and take time to gift wrap and ship the order within a day to your specifications. Now open in a beautiful new location. 8300 Preston Rd., Suite 700 972.980.0819 ylang23.com D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E

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creative staff makes all the difference in this one-of-a-kind store with great prices.

SHOPPING

6105 Sherry Ln. 214.696.8634 clothescircuit.com

SPECIALTY SHOPS ALLIE COOSH

CLOTHESHORSE ANONYMOUS

Designer Paulette Martsolf dreamed of coming to Texas to design women’s clothing and jewelry, opening this store in 1989. It has since become a women’s paradise, and her designs have become world-known.

Internationally recognized, Clotheshorse Anonymous is a fashion mecca of women’s designer resale with 26,000 consignors and growing! 11661 Preston Rd., Ste. 236 972.233.7005 clotheshorseanonymous.com

Legendary Dallas Fashion at Astonishing Resale Prices.

David Woo

6726 Snider Plaza 214.363.8616 allie-coosh.com

Clotheshorse Anonymous

Beretta Gallery

BERETTA GALLERY Located in Highland Park Village, Beretta Gallery is the destination for those wanting to indulge in the rich heritage of Beretta. Today, Beretta continues the almost 500-year-old tradition of producing custom-made shotguns and side-by-side Express rifles for the discriminating gun owner. 41 Highland Park Village 214.559.9800 dallas.berettagallery.com

FORTY FIVE TEN One of Dallas’ premier boutique destinations, Forty Five Ten boasts a reputation for offering the best of the best. Set in a beautifully renovated historic building, it houses a world-class mix of the top collections for women, men and the home. Its acclaimed café, the T Room, is a chic lunch spot. 4510 McKinney Ave. 214.559.4510 fortyfiveten.com

INDIGO 1745

Clothes Circuit

6105 Sherry Lane @ Preston Road Dallas, Texas 75225 (214) 696-8634

Open 7 days a week www.clothescircuit.com

CLOTHES CIRCUIT This treasure trove of upscale resale fashion has been dressing women of all ages for nearly three decades. A knowledgeable,

A boutique for men and women specializing in premium denim and sportswear, Indigo 1745 carefully selects its products to fit a calm, cool lifestyle. Whether looking for clothing, bedding, accessories or a special gift, you’ll find this shop excites the senses and offers something that is personal for you and your style. 370 W. 7th St. 214.948.1745 indigo1745.com


SHOPPING NEIMAN MARCUS DOWNTOWN When Neiman Marcus was founded in 1907, Dallas saloons outnumbered doctors, and the best hotel was $3 per night. From day one, the goal at Neiman Marcus was to showcase the finest merchandise in the world and to provide personal service that exceeds expectations. These remain its guiding tenets today. 1618 Main St. 214.741.6911 neimanmarcus.com

Enjoy a selection of premier mens and ladies apparel, hats, belts, buckles and jewelry as well as the largest collection of handmade cowboy boots in the United States.

85 Highland Park Village 214.780.0555 qcustomclothier.com

Pinto Ranch

At this shop you’ll find more than Q CLOTHIER

This store specializes in the custom tailoring of suits, sport coats, slacks, topcoats, shirts and much more. All garments are constructed from the world’s finest fabrics, with suits built using handselected fabrics from prestigious

furniture piece is born of a close collaboration between the brand, designers, and manufacturers, many of which can be customized to specifically suit your needs. 1707 Oak Lawn Ave. 972.239.4430 roche-bobois.com

NorthPark Center, Ste. 2184 214.217.6200 pintoranch.com

PINTO RANCH

just western wear, you’ll find a lifestyle. Offering a wide range of exclusive collections, Pinto Ranch embodies the romanticism and traditions of the old West combined with contemporary style and handcrafted quality.

mills such as Loro Piana, Holland & Sherry and Dormeuil.

STANLEY KORSHAK

Roche Bobois

ROCHE BOBOIS A leader in European high-end furniture, has always been in a class of its own. With a network of 240 stores in 40 countries, the company has just celebrated its 50th anniversary. Known for its high quality, European knowhow, and customization, each

Named one of the 50 most influential men’s stores in America by Women’s Wear Daily, the esteemed bible of the fashion business, Korshak is far more than a savvy men’s store, purveying the finest suits, sportswear, shoes and furnishings. It also carries the most in-demand women’s couture and designer sportswear and accessories. Discriminating bridesto-be should visit the bridal salon. 500 Crescent Ct., No. 100 214.871.3600 214.473.9700 stanleykorshak.com


MAKE A DAY OF IT! Amon Carter Museum of American Art www.cartermuseum.org

See Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks, Norman Rockwell’s Freedom from Want and Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup in Art and Appetite: American Painting, Culture, and Cuisine. On view through May 18. Admission is free. Edward Hopper (1882-1967), Nighthawks, 1942. Oil on canvas. Art Institute of Chicago, Friends of American Art Collection

Kimbell Art Museum www.kimbellart.org

Samurai: Armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection through August 31. Visit the NEW Renzo Piano Pavilion; admission to the permanent collection is always FREE. Photo by Robert LaPrelle

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth www.themodern.org

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and the Nasher Sculpture Center present a joint exhibition of the work of artist David Bates on view through May 11. Left to right: David Bates, Female Head – R.P. (detail), 2002. Painted plaster, steel, and wood. 38 x 20 x 25 inches. Private Collection. Photo: Tom Jenkins. Courtesy of Talley Dunn Gallery, Dallas. © David Bates. David Bates, Self-Portrait with Drawing (detail), 2011. Oil on panel. 24 x 16 inches. Private Collection. © David Bates

Fort Worth’s Cultural District www.FortWorth.com


ATTRACTIONS

EVENT CENTERS

your clients in one of the spacious, open-air suites or try your luck at a foul ball where the proximity of the fans to the action is among the closest in the major leagues.

AMERICAN AIRLINES CENTER The American Airlines Center has set a new standard for sports and entertainment. Home to the Dallas Mavericks and the Stars, it features 142 luxury suites and room for 20,000 fans. The AAC brings the hottest sports, concerts and family entertainment to town.

Rangers Ballpark in Arlington

Showcasing hundreds of performances every year, with four spectacular venues and a 10acre urban park, the center plays host to some of the most virtuosic artists and performers as well as premier touring productions.

AT&T STADIUM Take a tour of the eighth wonder of the world, the $1.15 billion AT&T Stadium in Arlington, featuring the largest LED screen in existence.

2100 Ross Ave. 214.954.9925 attpac.org

900 E. Randol Mill Rd. Arlington, Texas 817.892.4161 dallascowboys.com

EISEMANN CENTER

Carter Rose

Located in the heart of Richardson’s business and technology area, the Charles W. Eisemann Center has been recognized as one of the leading performing arts facilities serving the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

This beautiful baseball-only facility serves as the centerpiece of a 270acre complex. You can entertain

GENERAL ATTRACTIONS DALLAS ARTS DISTRICT

Ffooter / Shutterstock.com

AT&T PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

RANGERS BALLPARK IN ARLINGTON

2301 Flora St. 214.670.3600 dallassymphony.com

1000 Ballpark Way
 Arlington, Texas
 817.273.5222 texasrangers.com

2500 Victory Ave.
 214.222.3687 americanairlinescenter.com

AT&T Performing Arts Center

plays host to various music legends throughout the year.

2351 Performance Dr. Richardson, Texas 972.744.4600 eisemanncenter.com

MEYERSON SYMPHONY CENTER Elegantly fused into the surroundings of the Arts District, the Meyerson Center has become a landmark. Renowned architect I.M. Pei’s masterpiece is home to the world-class Dallas Symphony Orchestra and also

This rare gem encompassing 68 acres and 19 blocks is the centerpiece of Dallas’ cultural life. With arts venues such as the Dallas Museum of Art, the Nasher Sculpture Center and the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, this area is home for art lovers.

and discover wildlife from around the world. The zoo is home to the only koalas in Texas, along with kangaroos, lorikeets and more from Down Under. The 11-acre Giants of the Savanna showcases elephants, lions, giraffes and other favorite African species. 650 S. R.L. Thornton Fwy. 469.554.7500 dallaszoo.com

2200 Ross Ave., Ste. 4600E 214.744.6642 thedallasartsdistrict.org

Dallas Zoo

DALLAS FARMERS MARKET

MUSEUMS

One of the largest outdoor markets in America, this is where the locals go for the freshest produce grown right here in Texas. Also offering specialty and international products, the Dallas Farmers Market provides a unique shopping opportunity. 1010 S. Pearl Expy. 214.939.2808 dallasfarmersmarket.org

DALLAS WORLD AQUARIUM Situated near the historic West End District, this colorful aquarium is home to an array of vibrant marine life. A unique display of flora and fauna from five continents, 14 countries, three oceans and numerous seas and rivers offers a glimpse at some of nature’s most beautiful creatures. 1801 N. Griffin St. 214.720.2224 dwazoo.com

DALLAS ZOO Go on an urban safari just south of downtown Dallas

AMON CARTER MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART This museum houses one of the nation’s pre-eminent collections of American art, from early 19th-century expeditionary art to mid-20th-century modernism and contemporary photography. The museum is also home to nearly 400 works by Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell, two great artists of the American West. 3501 Camp Bowie Blvd. Fort Worth, Texas 817.738.1933 cartermuseum.org

DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART Located in the Arts District, the museum features an outstanding collection of more than 24,000 works of art from around the world, from ancient to modern times. 1717 N. Harwood St. 214.922.1200 dallasmuseumofart.org

D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E

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KIMBELL ART MUSEUM

of modern and contemporary Quality is of the highest importance international art housed in in the compilation of masterpieces 53,000 square feet of gallery that call the Kimbell home. Come space at The Modern. visit the new $137 million Piano 3200 Darnell St. Pavillion opposite the museum’s Fort Worth, Texas original building designed by the 817.738.9215 themodern.org great Louis I. Kahn.

ATTRACTIONS CROW COLLECTION OF ASIAN ART This 12,000-square-foot museum includes four light-filled galleries that house selections from the permanent collection including a widely acclaimed array of Chinese jade. The Crow also features touring exhibitions from Japan, India, China and Southeast Asia.

3333 Camp Bowie Blvd. Fort Worth, Texas 817.654.1034 kimbellart.org

2010 Flora St. 214.979.6430 crowcollection.org

THE SIXTH FLOOR MUSEUM AT DEALEY PLAZA Home to priceless documentary and photographic records, the museum offers self-guided tours providing an intimate view to those seeking information and understanding about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. 411 Elm St. 214.747.6660 jfk.org

The Modern Art Museum in Fort Worth

PEROT MUSEUM OF NATURE AND SCIENCE The Kimball Art Museum in Fort Worth

Crow Collection of Asian Art

MEADOWS MUSEUM

Crow Collection of Asian Art: Jade Room

GEORGE W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL CENTER AND LIBRARY Located on the picturesque campus of SMU, the Bush Center invites you to learn about President and Mrs. Bush and the American Presidency. Explore the interactive museum galleries, sit in the Oval Office, enjoy the Texas Rose Garden, eat lunch, shop in the Museum store and stroll through the 15acre park filled with native Texas prairie grasses and wildflowers. 2943 SMU Blvd. 214.200.4300 bushcenter.org

The culmination of decades’ worth of work, this 180,000-squarefoot facility extends beyond the typical museum experience, offering the young and the old the opportunity to explore new ideas through tangible, galvanic exhibits.

The Sixth Floor Museum

The Meadows Museum is a resource of Southern Methodist University that serves a broad international audience. The museum presents an exciting series of special exhibitions, public 2201 N. Field St. lectures, symposia and gallery talks 214.428.5555 featuring university professors, perotmuseum.org visiting scholars and artists. 5900 Bishop Blvd. 214.768.2516 meadowsmuseumdallas.org

NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER The Nasher Sculpture Center features a regularly changing selection of works from the Raymond and Patsy Nasher Collection, including ethnographic and archaeological Latin American pieces and American modernist pieces in both its indoor galleries and outdoor sculpture garden. 2001 Flora St. 214.242.5100 nashersculpturecenter.org

George W. Bush Presidential Center

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D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E

Designed by Japanese architect Tadao Ando, The Modern maintains one of the foremost collections of postwar art in the central United States. You will find over 2,600 significant works

Mark Knight Photography

MODERN ART MUSEUM FORT WORTH

Perot Museum of Nature and Science


Checkout upon arrival.

Experience the serene atmosphere of the Omni Dallas Hotel’s signature Mokara Spa, a calming oasis in the heart of downtown. Begin your retreat in the relaxation room, and then make your way to a true spa escape as you enjoy your choice of body treatments. Complete your total departure by indulging in our delectable dining options, from farm-to-market creations at Texas Spice to savory fare at Bob’s Steak & Chop House.

214-744-6664 • omnihotels.com/dallas

©2014 Omni Hotels & Resorts


Let us help you make DALLAS your HOME briggsfreeman.com


Uptown Downtown INFORMATION INFORMATION CENTER CENTER

Jeanne Anderson welcomes guests to the Uptown Downtown Information Center, the city source for learning how to live, work and play in Dallas. Opening late spring. 214.353.2500

W

elcome. I’m Jeanne Anderson, Manager of

play in these wonderful, new urban neighborhoods. That’s

the Uptown Downtown Information Center

what the Uptown Downtown Information Center is all

located in the heart of Dallas. What we’ve

about—connecting people with luxury leases, amenity rich

learned is that as more and more people move here, there’s

high-rises, sophisticated town homes and extraordinary

a great need for information on just how to live, work and

living. Please look for our grand opening in late spring.

2500 Cedar Springs, Dallas, Texas 75201


DINING

ABACUS

THE CAPITAL GRILLE

This eclectic Dallas restaurant pushes the envelope with its fusion cuisine. Legendary chef and owner Kent Rathbun offers world cuisine ranging from Thai, Spanish and Japanese to “homeboy” dishes like bacon and eggs.

A block from the Arts District, this restaurant offers works of art, like steaks dry-aged on-site. With an extensive wine list, Capital Grille surrounds diners with the very best. Rich African mahogany paneling and warm lighting set the tone for a comfortably elegant evening at this upscale spot.

4511 McKinney Ave. 214.559.3111 abacus-restaurant.com

AL BIERNAT’S Offering upscale American cuisine, Al Biernat’s specializes in prime steaks and seafood. Enjoy a semi-casual atmosphere and an award-winning wine list featuring more than 650 selections from around the world. 4217 Oak Lawn Ave. 214.219.2201 albiernats.com

BABOUSH This restaurant, born inside a traditional market in Marrakesh, embodies the market’s way of life. Named for Moroccan slippers, Baboush lets diners slip into a Moroccan state of mind while dining on exotic small plates inside a sleek, vibrant space.

500 Crescent Ct. 214.303.0500 7300 Dallas Pkwy. Plano, Texas 972.398.2221 thecapitalgrille.com

CHAMBERLAIN’S STEAK & CHOP HOUSE Open for almost 20 years, Chamberlain’s serves the finest steaks, seafood and prime rib in a traditional fine-dining atmosphere. Chef Chamberlain will dazzle your taste buds in a relaxing atmosphere sure to please, washing away the hustle and bustle of a busy lifestyle. 5330 Belt Line Rd. 972.934.2467 chamberlainsteakhouse.com

bagels, breads and pastries. See website for more locations. 7522 Campbell Road, No. 117 972.248.0608 cindisnydeli.com

CITY CAFÉ Come enjoy this exceptional white-tablecloth bistro. The menu changes seasonally, remains New American– California. Impressing even distinguished chef Julia Child, City Café has been recognized in Texas Monthly, Food & Wine and Wine Spectator and received AAA’s Diamond Award. 5757 W. Lovers Ln., Suite 101 214.351.2233 thecitycafedallas.com

DRAGONFLY Diners here enjoy a collision of global cuisine in a playful, intimate atmosphere. Dragonfly offers fabulous views of the Dallas skyline. After dinner, stop by the Urban Oasis nightclub for a nightcap and experience the best of Dallas nightlife. 2332 Leonard St. 214.550.9500 hotelzazadallas.com

3636 McKinney Ave., #160 214.599.0707 baboushdallas.com

BOB’S STEAK & CHOP HOUSE This noted steakhouse is consistently ranked as one of the top in the country. The experienced service and extensive wine list top off the best prime steak around. Come by and let the staff prove why they’re so proud of what they do at Bob’s. 4300 Lemmon Ave. 214.528.9446 555 S. Lamar St. 214.652.4800 bobs-steakandchop.com

Cindi’s New York Deli

CINDI’S NEW YORK DELI Enjoy authentic New York and Southern-style favorites right here in North Texas at one of Cindi’s many locations. From reubens and matzo ball soup to pancakes, and chicken and dumplings, Cindi’s offers delicious breakfast and lunch selections, plus fresh

Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House

DEL FRISCO’S DOUBLE EAGLE STEAK HOUSE Del Frisco’s Double Eagle Steak House planted its roots in Dallas over 20 years ago. The restaurant embodies the rich tradition of classic American steakhouses and adds the benefits of amazing

guests, impeccable chef-driven cuisine, an award-winning wine list and unparalleled hospitality. 5251 Spring Valley Rd. 972.490.9000 delfriscos.com

EDDIE V’S Setting the standard for fine dining, Eddie V’s features awardwinning concepts that focus on the freshest seafood, delectable steaks, quality ingredients, exciting atmosphere and a staff that is dedicated to every detail. 4023 Oak Lawn Ave. 214.890.1500 eddiev.com

FEARING’S RESTAURANT Chef Dean Fearing has created seven spectacular dining settings in one restaurant. Diners can sample Dean’s innovative menu, including Texas farm-to-market specialties and the restaurant’s gracious, attentive service in a succession of unique indoor and outdoor environments. 2121 McKinney Ave. 214.922.0200 ritzcarlton.com

FERRARI’S ITALIAN VILLA Offering prime steaks, chops and fresh seafood accompanied by heartwarming entrées prepared from 100-year-old Sardinian family recipes, Ferrari’s gives every guest a taste of traditional Italian fare. Ferrari’s boasts two locations, private dining rooms, patios and even a full bocce-ball court. GRAPEVINE 1200 William D. Tate Grapevine, Texas 76051 817.251.2525 ADDISON 14831 Midway Rd. Addison, Texas 75001 972.980.9898 ferrarisrestaurant.com D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E

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THE FRENCH ROOM Nationally recognized and critically acclaimed, The French Room at The Adolphus Hotel features a menu rich in fresh seasonal ingredients and an award-winning wine list. It has garnered Gourmet’s top ranking as the best Dallas restaurant for three consecutive years. 1321 Commerce St. 214.742.8200 hoteladolphus.com

JAVIER’S Straying from the Tex-Mex concept that includes tacos and enchiladas, Javier’s focuses on a more realistic image of Mexico City dining. The low-lit dining room at Javier’s is replete with mounted game, large paintings and hanging plants. If you come searching for the traditional Tex-Mex restaurant, you will be disappointed, but if you come looking for a taste of the heart of Mexico, you’re at the right place! 4912 Cole Ave. 214.521.4211 javiers.net

KENICHI A modern restaurant and lounge, Kenichi features contemporary Asian cuisine and world-class sushi. Kenichi’s upbeat, modern atmosphere makes it a great place for dinner, before a game, during happy hour or after work. 2400 Victory Park Ln. 214.871.8883 kenichidallas.com

LARK ON THE PARK Lark on the Park is a new contemporary, urban restaurant located on the edge of Klyde Warren Park in downtown Dallas. Lark introduces two new exciting chefs, Melody Bishop and Dennis Kelley, and features seasonal cuisine with a global influence. Illustrators are heavily featured on chalkboards throughout. 2015 Woodall Rodgers Fwy. 214.855.5275 larkonthepark.com

MANSION RESTAURANT Offering fine cuisine for over 20 years, the Mansion has remained one of Dallas’s biggest and best splurges. The Mansion’s talented culinary team offers guests one of the most inviting, approachable and valuable dining experiences in Texas. 2821 Turtle Creek Blvd. 214.443.4747 mansiononturtlecreek.com

MEDDLESOME MOTH A great bar with great food, this gastropub offers a full bar and features 40 draft beers with a few live ales and at least 75 bottles to help round out the selection of the city’s best beer menu. 1621 Oak Lawn Ave. 214.628.7900 mothinthe.net

Kevin Marple

DINING

Meddlesome Moth

MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE Morton’s The Steakhouse in Uptown combines generous portions of high-quality food prepared to exacting standards with exceptional service in an enjoyable dining environment. 2222 McKinney Ave. 214.741.2277 mortons.com

Lark on the Park


Dallas is 1,127 miles from the heart of Mexico City, but only minutes away from Gourmet Mexican cuisine. Setting the bar for Continental Mexico City Cuisine for the last 35 years, Javier’s is not your typical Tex-Mex Restaurant. You will not find tacos or enchiladas here, but you will find delicious dishes of tenderloin beef, fresh seafood, shrimp, chicken and quail dishes seasoned with traditional spices of Mexico, and influenced by its Spanish heritage. Javier’s will change the way you think of Mexican food. We surround you with a classic colonial sophistication that you will not want to leave behind. And why should you? After dinner enjoy the wonderful ambiance of the famous cigar bar, and select from the large selection of premium cigars, ports, and handcrafted drinks in a sophisticated ambiance that you won’t find anywhere else in Dallas.

4912 Cole Avenue Dallas, Texas 75205 214-521-4211


DINING NOBU The dining room of Nobu’s Dallas outpost recalls the New York City location of Nobu but adds a touch of Texas charm. Nobu Dallas can be your destination for dinner in the dining room or at the bar, drinks in the bar lounge or a private function in the skylight room. 400 Crescent Ct. 214.252.7000 noburestaurants.com/dallas

PALM RESTAURANT The Palm’s doors have been open in Dallas since 1984. The restaurant has remained quintessentially Palm and quintessentially Dallas. From the caricatures on the wall of famous Palm regulars and Dallas Cowboy greats, you cannot find a better combination of smooth New York steakhouse style and Dallas charm. 701 Ross Ave. 214.698.0470 thepalm.com

a warm, comfortable atmosphere and some of the best steak in the country. Whether it’s dinner for two, a business meeting, or a private party, Ruth’s Chris can accommodate your needs. 17840 Dallas Pkwy. 972.250.2244 ruthschris.com

SMOKE This restaurant pays homage to an old-fashioned smokehouse, with cooking from scratch and authentic Southern flavors. Employing time-honored cooking techniques and a commitment to local ingredients, Smoke offers down-home cooking done right. 901 Fort Worth Ave. 214.393.2300 smokerestaurant.com

SAINT ANN RESTAURANT With the largest garden patio in Dallas, St. Ann Restaurant is located in the Harwood district. The historic St. Ann’s School was converted into a restaurant and bar surrounded by art. 2501 N. Harwood St. 214.782.9807 saintanndallas.com

SODA BAR

Palm Restaurant

PYRAMID RESTAURANT & BAR The Fairmont Hotel’s Pyramid sports sleek contemporary decor and an exciting menu. The culinary philosophy draws inspiration from local purveyors and emphasizes fresh, local ingredients in an effort to minimize its carbon footprint and support the local economy.

Relax above the city streets of downtown Dallas at the rooftop SODA Bar at NYLO Dallas South Side. The stylish lounge and adjacent pool are perfect for enjoying a refreshing cocktail while soaking in magnificent views. SODA Bar also features a casual grill for tasty meals and small plates. 1325 S. Lamar St. 214.421.1080 nylohotels.com

1717 N. Akard St. 214.720.5249 pyramidrestaurant.com

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE This well-known Dallas steakhouse provides guests with

SODA Bar at NYLO Hotel


enjoy authentic new york and southern style favorites

5 great DFW locations

cindisnydeli.com


OUR PARTING SHOT

David Bates Retrospectives WRITTEN BY DAVE MUSCARI PHOTO BY DAVID WOO

The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth and the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas present a joint exhibition of the work of artist David Bates. On view through May 11, the exhibition marks the first collaboration between the two prestigious museums. For more than four decades, the native Texan has merged his distinctive American modernist style and masterful technique in creation of art that is both soulful and accessible. This thoughtful retrospective documents the extensive scope of Bates’ media and subject matter. On display are 45 sculptures and 20 related paintings and drawings in Dallas and approximately 45 paintings in Fort Worth.

David Bates’ work will also be featured in a show entitled Painting and Sculpture at Talley Dunn Gallery, 5020 Tracy Street in Dallas, from April 5 through May 24. 72

D A L L A S H OT E L M A G A Z I N E


Walt Sisco / Courtesy Dallas Morning News

For 25 years, The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza has been telling the story

of President John F. Kennedy’s life, death and legacy through historic photographs, films, artifacts and oral histories. Plan a visit to The Sixth Floor Museum today and take a trip back to the sixties.

Monday Noon to 6 p.m.; Tuesday – Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Open daily except Thanksgiving and Christmas.

See what others are saying on TripAdvisor.

411 Elm Street | Dallas, TX 75202 | 214.747.6660


oyster perpetual date jus t special edition

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Dallas Hotel Magazine - Spring 2014  

In this issue, we profile Dallas-born comedian and ventriloquist, Jeff Dunham (and his friends). We also take a look at a local produce spec...

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