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2009 Report to the Community


CONTENTS WELCOME & SUMMARY

CULTURAL CONTRACTS Cultural Organization Program (COP) Cultural Project Program (CPP) Neighborhood Touring Program (NTP)

CULTURAL FACILITIES City Owned & Operated Facilities Bath House Cultural Center Ice House Cultural Center Latino Cultural Center Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center South Dallas Cultural Center City Owned, Privately Managed Facilities

PUBLIC ART PROGRAM

THRIVING MINDS

RADIO & TV WRR Classical 101.1 FM City Cable Channel

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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This page: Neighborhood Touring Program artist, Jacco Velarde Front cover: Fire Fighting Science; Art Garcia; 2009 (Fire Station #33)


WELCOME The 2008-2009 fiscal year was an exciting one for the Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA), one that afforded us the ability to look back on past accomplishments, begin new initiatives and seek more opportunities for the future of arts and culture in our communities. In April 2009, OCA and the Cultural Affairs Commission celebrated their 20th Anniversary. In its two decades of existence, OCA has worked to foster a vibrant arts and cultural environment for Dallas citizens and visitors, and we are proud to share the celebration of this milestone with our diverse collection of cultural partners and organizations. This Report to the Community summarizes OCA’s accomplishments in 2008-09 and provides a brief view into the scope of our programs and services. Symbolic of our desire to energize and propel the arts and culture in Dallas forward, we unveiled a new OCA logo and launched a redesigned website that utilizes efficient calendar sharing technologies for our cultural centers and partners, creating easier access to a greater amount of information for our patrons. We took environmental responsibility and embraced “green” initiatives by transitioning to an online grant application process for our Cultural Contracts program. To better track our services and impact, we developed a new reporting system for collecting and analyzing program and attendance data from our centers and cultural partners. In 2008, OCA brought new programs to Dallas, such as Free Night of Theater, which links theaters from across the city with new audiences. In addition to all these initiatives and programming, OCA continued to oversee 20 city-owned arts facilities, coordinate public art projects, operate the City’s classical music station WRR 101.1 and City Channel, and promote public awareness of the City’s role in and commitment to the arts. The past 20 years have seen an unprecedented growth in Dallas’ cultural sector, making it one of our City’s best assets. We look forward to seeing the results of the next 20 years of collaboration. Maria Muñoz-Blanco, Director of Cultural Affairs Judy Pollock, Chair, Cultural Affairs Commission

OUR MISSION The City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs works to enhance the vitality of the City and the quality of life for all Dallas citizens by creating an environment wherein arts and cultural organizations thrive and people of all ages enjoy opportunities for creative expression and the celebration of our community’s multicultural heritage. Our mission is to establish a cultural system that ensures ALL Dallas citizens and visitors have an opportunity to experience the finest in arts and culture.

2009 Report to the Community | City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs | dallasculture.org

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SUMMARY The City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA) is advised by an 18-member Cultural Affairs Commission appointed by the Dallas City Council. OCA’s primary functions are executed in 5 key areas: Cultural Contracts, Cultural Facilities, Public Art Program, Thriving Minds, and Radio & TV. The City of Dallas has a strong focus on providing efficient, measurable, and wide-reaching services to its citizens. OCA, through the cultural partners our funding helps support and the system of cultural centers we own and operate, exemplifies this focus, impacting communities throughout Dallas. TOTAL SERVICES & ATTENDANCE: Calculated through monthly program and attendance reports and final reports, OCA funded organizations and City-operated cultural centers provided over 49,000 services during fiscal year 2008-09, reaching a combined attendance of over 5.6 million. COST PER SERVICE & ATTENDANCE: Calculated using OCA’s FY09 actual general fund expenses ($14.2 million) and attendance and services data as described above, the City invests an average of $286 per arts and cultural program. The cost to the city per citizen served is $2.53. TOTAL LEVERAGE: According to expense reports provided by OCA funded organizations and the annual audited financial statements of the Dallas Symphony Association, the City’s investment in the arts and culture of Dallas through OCA’s $14.2 million budget, resulted in estimated spending by those organizations of $123.3 million.

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TOTAL SERVICES

49,431

TOTAL ATTENDANCE

5,606,502

COST PER SERVICE

$286

COST PER ATTENDANCE

$2.53

TOTAL LEVERAGE

$14.2M : $123.3M

2009 Report to the Community | City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs | dallasculture.org


20 YEARS OF CULTURE On April 12, 2009, the Office of Cultural Affairs (OCA) celebrated the 20th Anniversary of City Council’s approval of the ordinance that created the Office of Cultural Affairs and an advisory board of citizens, the Cultural Affairs Commission. In its two decades of existence, OCA has worked to foster a vibrant arts and cultural environment for Dallas citizens and visitors. OCA facilitates cultural programs, develops new cultural opportunities and partnerships, oversees 20 city-owned arts facilities, coordinates public art projects, supports Dallas’ diverse arts and cultural organizations, operates the City’s classical music station WRR 101.1, and promotes public awareness of the City’s role in the arts.

“The arts are a critical part of the spirit and identity of a community. The Office of Cultural Affairs is well aware that the arts also support creative business industries, cultural tourism, and the academic success of our children, who will lead this city in the future. We are thrilled to celebrate this milestone in our history, as it gives us the opportunity to reflect on our past successes as well as plan for continued growth and accomplishments in the future.” Maria Muñoz-Blanco Director of Cultural Affairs

Summer Camp at the Ice House Cultural Center

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20 DAYS, 20 DEALS!

In honor of our 20th Anniversary, OCA conducted a month-long celebration aimed at further raising the awareness of the City’s varied cultural offerings and setting the stage for the next 20 years of cultural excellence. OCA designed a web portal especially for the program where from April 13 through May 8, 2008 (Monday - Friday), the public could visit and receive exclusive discount deals to some of Dallas’ coolest arts and cultural events. Every day a new deal was featured. In addition, for each week of the celebration a different City Cultural Center hosted a free Open House event to welcome Dallas citizens and visitors.

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Summer Camp at the South Dallas Cultural Center


CULTURAL CONTRACTS 2008-09 RosterS COP Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico Artreach-Dallas Big Thought Children’s Chorus of Greater Dallas Dallas Arts District Alliance Dallas Black Dance Theatre Dallas Children’s Theater Dallas Contemporary Dallas County Heritage Society Dallas Historical Society Dallas Museum of Art The Dallas Opera Dallas Theater Center Dallas Wind Symphony Dance Council Daniel de Córdoba Bailes Españoles DFW International Community Alliance Fine Arts Chamber Players Greater Dallas Youth Orchestra Junior Players Guild Kitchen Dog Theater Maharlika Dancers U.S.A. Museum of African American Life & Culture Museum of Nature & Science Ollimpaxqui Ballet Company Sammons Center for the Arts Shakespeare Festival of Dallas Teatro Dallas TeCo Theatrical Productions Texas Ballet Theater Texas Winds Musical Outreach The Black Academy of Arts and Letters Theatre Three TITAS Turtle Creek Chorale Undermain Theater USA Film Festival Video Association of Dallas Voices of Change The Women’s Museum The Writer’s Garret

CPP American Indian Arts Council Act of Change Allegro Guitar Society of Dallas Arts District Chorale A.R.T.S. For People Artist & Elaine Thornton Foundation for the Arts Asian American Community-Alliance for the Arts

Asian Film Foundation of Dallas Black Dallas Remembered Booker T. Washington High School Camerata Winds Chamber Music International Contemporary Culture Contemporary Theatre of Dallas Creative Arts Center of Dallas Crow Collection of Asian Art Dallas Asian American Youth Orchestra Dallas Bach Society Dallas Chamber Music Dallas Chamber Orchestra Dallas City Arts Dallas Holocaust Museum Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture Dallas Korean Cultural Foundation Dallas County Community College District (African American Read-In) Documentary Arts Echo Theatre Gaurangafest, The Hidden Glory of India Greater Dallas Asian American Chamber of Commerce Imagine the Impossible Every Child Indian Cultural Heritage Foundation Indian Classical Music Circle Indian Fine Arts Academy The Institute for Strings International Museum of Cultures Jewish Community Center of Dallas La Reunion TX Lone Star Wind Orchestra McKinney Avenue Contemporary Museum of Geometric and MADI Art Metropolitan Winds Making Connections National Association of Negro Musicians New Arts Six New Conservatory of Dallas Orpheus Chamber Singers The Out Takes Foundation Performing Arts Initiative Pegasus Musical Society Preservation Link The Southwest Celtic Music Association St. Paul United Methodist Church Texas Performing Chinese Arts Association ThinkIndia Foundation Voces Intimae WordSpace Women’s Chorus of Dallas

The Cultural Services Contracts division of OCA supports Dallas’ finest arts and cultural organizations and artists through three primary funding programs.

COP Cultural Organizations Program provides operational support to established organizations with budgets over $75,000. The COP provides funding for annual operating support for arts groups, with additional support for the operation of city-owned facilities.

CPP Cultural Projects Program provides considerable leveraging power for arts and cultural programming by funding up to 50% of project-specific expenses to established arts organizations.

NTP Neighborhood Touring Program provides support and opportunities for ethnic artists and cultural organizations to teach, perform, and exhibit at host facilities in Dallas neighborhoods.

2009 Report to the Community | City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs | dallasculture.org

Dallas Black Dance Theatre Pictured: Danielle Glover Credit: Brian Guilliaux

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COP ANALYSIS

In fiscal year 2008-09, a new monthly reporting system was implemented for COP organizations. As a result there is a greater depth of data available for this program.

COP PROGRAM TYPES

$0.89

Program Type

% of Services

% of Attendance

Camp/Class/Workshop/Residency

43%

6%

Exhibits

26%

29%

1%

2%

Fair/Festival/Carnival Performance/Presentation

19%

55%

Tour

1%

1%

Other

10%

7%

COP VENUE ANALYSIS % of Services

% of Attendance

Office/Studio Space

8%

2%

Broadcast facility (radio, TV, web)

0%

1%

Community service organization

2%

0%

City Cultural Centers

1%

1%

Program Type

Museum/Gallery

43%

39%

Health care facility

1%

0%

Library

1%

0%

Recreation center

2%

1%

Religious organization

1%

1%

College/University

0%

0%

School, Dallas ISD

20%

3%

School, Non-DISD

4%

1%

Senior citizen center

1%

0%

Street/fair/public space

0%

35%

14%

14%

2%

2%

Theater/performance hall Other

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One Thirty Productions at the Bath House Cultural Center


The Neighborhood Touring Program, as the outreach arm of the Office of Cultural Affairs, helps promote cultural awareness, heightens citizen understanding of art forms and celebrates the various traditions that contribute to the composition of Dallas. Artists apply annually for inclusion in the NTP roster; a review panel recommends artists who are then approved by the Cultural Affairs Commission.

NTP VENUE ANALYSIS Program Type Community or Senior Center Library Recreation Center

% of Services

% of Attendance

20%

7%

7%

4%

14%

8%

3%

1%

School

20%

24%

Other

36%

57%

Religious Organization

2008-09 NTP Roster DANCE Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico Arga Nova Dance Ballet Folklorico Viva Mexico Conte de Loyo Flamenco Theatre Dallas Black Dance Theatre Daniel de Córdoba Evelio Flores Dereque Whiturs Imagine the Impossible Indian Cultural Heritage Foundation Kumaasi African Ensemble Lela Bell Maharlika Dancers U.S.A. Manzanilla Flamenco Moussa Diabate Ollimpaxoui Ballet Company Ricardo Arreazola Rimonim Music and Dance Sandra Bryant

FOLK Audrey McClure Melody Bell New Arts Six LITERARY Camika Spencer Nnamdi Orakpo MULTIDISCIPLINARY Alicia Holmes Augusta Ekong Elizabeth Anyaa Filipino Folk Arts Theatre Lydia Regalado Patrick Busby Len Barnett Russian American Center Making Connections Success I&I MUSIC Adolphus Hall Barri Pearson David Carr Jr. Herbie Johnson Inner City All Stars

Jacco Velarde Jamal Mohamed Joseph Gomez Richmond Punch South Dallas Concert Choir Texas Performing Chinese Arts Association Voces y Dancaz de Chile THEATER ARTS Akin Babatunde Rene Miche’al Jones S.H.R.E.E Foundation Teatro Dallas The Act of Change Willie Minor VISUAL ARTS Aroid Neal Cynthia V. Anzaldua Kym Haeng Nam Steve Cruz U. Crosby VET Michael Hawkins

Grant Applications Go Green The Cultural Services Contracts programs of the Office of Cultural Affairs support approximately 150 arts and cultural organizations each year. In January 2009, the OCA proudly transitioned from an old, paper-based system of applications to a new, online system. According to Charla Sanderson, Cultural Programs Manager, “The process for applications and cultural contracts management has improved significantly with this online system. In previous years, organizations and artists seeking support for their cultural services would submit a paper application. As part of the process of rating applications through peer review panels, we had to make hundreds of copies of the submitted paperwork and put them into large binders that were mailed to panelists.” In 2008, OCA made 65 four-inch binders full of application paperwork. In 2009, the Cultural Contracts team made only four binders with grant application paperwork, saving over

20,000 sheets of copy paper. OCA is licensing this new online system, CultureGrants Online from the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF), who developed the program in cooperation with a privatesector partner with a strong track record and significant experience in the online grants market. In addition to OCA, the system has been adopted by agencies such as the Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs, the Ohio Arts Council, and the Massachusetts Cultural Council. While the online system is definitely more environmentally friendly, partner groups have also reported the system to be very user-friendly. At introductory training sessions, the feedback was overwhelmingly positive. According to Sanderson, the transition has been very smooth. “The OCA’s partners have really embraced the new application system. Overall, it’s been a very welcome change.”

2009 Report to the Community | City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs | dallasculture.org

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CULTURAL FACILITIES The City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs is the custodian of 20 city-owned cultural facilities that, when combined, represent more than 1.5 million sq. ft. of space dedicated to arts and cultural functions in our community. Since the 1980s, the City’s capital investment in these cultural facilities exceeds $175 million. This public investment has leveraged private capital funds totaling half a billion dollars to develop one of the most impressive collections of City-owned

facilities in the United States. OCA operates five of these facilities directly, referring to them generally as the “Cultural Centers.” The Cultural Centers are as follows: Bath House Cultural Center; Latino Cultural Center; Ice House Cultural Center; Meyerson Symphony Center; and South Dallas Cultural Center. Other cultural facilities are managed through private/public partnerships with

THE SYSTEM City Owned & Operated Cultural Centers From l to r: Bath House Cultural Center Ice House Cultural Center Latino Cultural Center Meyerson Symphony Center South Dallas Cultural Center

City Owned, Privately Managed Facilities FROM L TO R: African American Museum, Black Academy of Arts and Letters, Dallas Black Dance Theater, Dallas Heritage Village at Old City Park, Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Museum of Nature and Science/Nature Building, Dallas Museum of Nature and Science/Science Building, Dallas Theatre Center/Kalita Humphreys Theater, Dallas Theatre Center/Heldt Administration Building, Fair Park Music Hall, Hall of State, Juanita Craft Civil Rights House, Majestic Theatre, Sammons Center for the Arts, The Women’s Museum

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NOTE: The AT&T Performing Arts Center (Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House, Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre, Elaine D. and Charles A. Sammons Park, and Annette Strauss Artist Square) were inaugurated in October 2009, outside of the fiscal year of this report and therefore are not included in the facility inventory.

2009 Report to the Community | City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs | dallasculture.org


nonprofit cultural organizations through long-term Management or Operation Agreements approved by City Council. At the City’s Cultural Centers, the public is engaged with vibrant and innovative programs that showcase artistic excellence and reflect the diversity of our citizens and neighborhoods. With more than 3,700 events a year, the Centers present an incredible array of programs that improve our quality of life, expand our business and tax revenues, and give a positive community image for our neighborhoods and our city.

CULTURAL CENTER EVENTS Event Type

% of Services

% of Attendance

Camp/Class/Workshop/Residency

29%

3%

Exhibits

29%

2%

2%

2%

Fair/Festival/Carnival Performance/Presentation

17%

84%

Tour

8%

1%

Other

15%

8%

THE “MORT” TURNS 20 The Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, designed by world renowned and Pritzker Prize winning architect I.M. Pei, opened its doors in September 1989 and in 2009 celebrated its 20th Anniversary.

Home to the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, the center sits in the heart of the expanding Dallas Arts District and is the result of a nearly 10 year public/private partnership between the City of

MortonCenter H. Meyerson Symphony Center Aerial view of the Latino Cultural

Morton H. Meyerson S

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Dallas and the Dallas Symphony Association, which led efforts to raise significant private funds to match the City’s public bonds investment. As the only symphony hall designed and built by Mr. Pei, the Meyerson is both subtle and signifcant and is the crown jewel of Pei’s buildings in Dallas which include Fountain Place, Energy Plaza, and Dallas City Hall.

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Bath House C U LT U R A L

C E N T E R

Program highlights for the Bath House Cultural Center, an art-deco facility located on the banks of White Rock Lake, include the 11th Annual Festival of Independent Theaters (FIT), 6th Annual Art Mart, 23rd Annual Day of the Dead Exhibition, and 13th Annual El Corazón Exhibition. The Bath House’s newest tradition, One Thirty Productions, a matinee theatre series, in only its second season of existence, was awarded a “Best New Play” Dallas/Fort Worth Theater Critics Forum Award for their premiere of Ellsworth Shave’s Under A Texaco Canopy and was also nominated for an American Theater Critics Forum Award for their production of One Thirty Productions’ Wedding Belles Wedding Belles.

The Latino Cultural Center (LCC) continued in its role as the premiere venue in Dallas for developing and celebrating Latino art and culture. Program highlights in 2008-09 include the 4th Annual Día de los Muertos Celebration, the 5th annual Posada, the 6th Annual Hecho en Dallas Juried Exhibition, and Papel Chicano: Works on Paper from the ColArt Workshop - Target Second Saturday lection of Cheech Marin, which marked the first time this collection was exhibited in Texas. The LCC, thanks to generous funding from Target, also continued to host a fun family day on the second Saturday of each month. Each Target Second Saturday (pictured) is a little different, with plays in Spanish, dance, music, or theater lessons, craft workshops, and films in Spanish.

CHANGE AND GROWTH The Ice House Cultural Center (IHCC) closed its doors to the public in September 2009. Tucked away on a quiet street in Oak Cliff, the center served the neighborhood residents for over a decade, showcasing many art exhibits, dance and theater productions, community workshops and much more. Managed by OCA since 1997, the center was home to many popular events and celebrations, such as Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), Virgen de Guadalupe exhibits and Día de los Niños (Day of the Children). Events such as these gave Latino and other families from the surrounding communities the opportunity to celebrate their heritage and traditions throughout the year.

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The IHCC was well known for working with community partners and schools. They often collaborated with local dance studios, instructors and artists to offer free or low-cost programming to residents in classes such as photography and guitar, and dance lessons in salsa, merengue, Aztec dance and folklorico. In addition, the center hosted mural painting programs where high school students worked with local artists to create large works of art. The IHCC will be missed greatly by the community, but with its closing comes the opening in 2010 of the 5,000-plus square foot Oak Cliff Cultural Center which will be located just a few blocks away from the Ice House at 223 West Jefferson Boulevard.

2009 Report to the Community | City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs | dallasculture.org


2008-09 Capital projects

• Completed waterproofing and HVAC system re-design for the African American Museum Phase I Renovations. • Began construction for the Hall of State Phase I Renovations: install fire sprinkler system, replace roof, replace HVAC system and renovate skylights. • Completed renovations of the Black Academy of Arts and Letters facility.

• Completed design and awarded construction contract for the City Performance Hall. • Upgraded security system at the WRR studios in Fair Park. • Upgraded remote broadcast equipment for WRR, allowing the station to broadcast high quality audio wirelessly from virtually any location. • Awarded construction contract for renovations at the Oak Cliff Cultural Center. • Awarded the study contract for Master Plans for the Dallas Theater Center (Kalita Humphreys Theater) and Asian American Cultural Center.

• Installed new HVAC system at the Science Place in Fair Park. • Began construction of the Annette Strauss Artist Square located in the Dallas Arts District. • Executed a Development Agreement and started construction on the City Performance Hall Garage. • Construction of the AT&T Performing Arts Center reached the final stages for the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House, Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre, Elaine D. and Charles A. Sammons Park. • Completed replacement of garage elevator and water infiltration remedies at the Dallas Museum of Art. • Completed exterior cleaning and maintenance, acoustical equiptment upgrades and design services for noise mitigation plan at Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. • Completed site improvements to improve water filtration issues at The Women’s Museum.

South Dallas C U L T U R A L

C E N T E R

The South Dallas Cultural Center (SDCC) continued to provide a wide variety of programs inspired by the vibrancy and diversity of the African Diaspora to the South Dallas Community. Seeking to educate and inspire audiences through the visual, media, literary and performing arts, SDCC’s program highlights for 2008-09 include the 8th Annual South Dallas Dance Festival, 13th Annual Summer Arts at the Center, and most notably, the new, family friendly program, Soul Children’s Theatre. Soul Children’s Theatre is modeled on the Suitcase Theatre, a 1930s project of Langston Hughes that utilized amateur actors to bring to life stories based on the real lives of reguBeckles Dance Company - South Dallas Dance Festival lar folks. Latino Cultural Center


PUBLIC ART The City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs Public Art Program collection numbers over 300 individual works and features pieces by world-renowned artists, including many Dallas area artists, some of whom have achieved international recognition. All have made a significant contribution to the vibrant culture of Dallas. 2008-09 saw the completion of six new public art projects (see below) and 43 public art conservation projects. Conservation highlights include the reinstallation of 1800 lights on Ed Carpenter’s Lightstream and repair of Alta Mira, a mural by Hank Black at the Dallas Zoo and Floating Spheres by Marta Pan in front of City Hall. The Cultural Affairs Commission’s Public Art Committee recommended artists for projects at Kidd Springs Recreation Center (Anitra Blayton) and Bexar Street Corridor Project (Emmanuel Gillespie), both of which were endorsed by the full Commission. City Council approved contracts for artist Art Garcia to fabricate and install a site-specific sculpture in the Bishop Arts District and for artist Rex Kare to fabricate and install

A NEON ADDITION

In 2009, AT&T donated a pivotal work of art from their corporate collection to the City of Dallas. Neon for Southwestern Bell, created by artist Stephen Antonakos in 1984, was part of Southwestern Bell’s effort to improve Dallas’s central business district. The 34 foot high and 75 foot long multicolored neon light sculpture was part of the One Bell Plaza landscape for over 25 years. Appraised at $90,000 the Neon for Southwestern Bell is considered an important addition to the City’s Public Art Collection. Prominent placement for the sculpture is under consideration. two site-specific sculptures inside Lochwood Branch Library. The artist team, ie creative artworks, from Vancouver B.C. was chosen in September 2009 to design and fabricate a new work for the Vivarium entryway at Texas Discovery Gardens. Additionally, in June 2009, an online walking tour map of Downtown Dallas Public Art was launched.

2008-09 COMPLETED PROJECTS

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Eliseo Garcia Elemental Forces Fire Station #35 2008

Bruce Taylor Untitled (Seating Elements) Farmers Market 2009

Art Garcia Fire Fighting Science Fire Station #33 2009

Bruce Taylor Untitled Fire Station #42 2009

Art Garcia Peaches (table and stools) Farmers Market Shed #2 2009

Carolyn Brown Paradise Garden Wall 2009

2009 Report to the Community | City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs | dallasculture.org


Untitled; Bruce Taylor; 2009 (Fire Station #42)


THRIVING MINDS Thriving Minds, a ground breaking partnership between the Dallas Independent School District, Big Thought, the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs and over 50 local arts/cultural organizations, is one of the most comprehensive city-wide arts learning initiatives in U.S. history. Thriving Minds is driving citywide improvements in education through three main components: In-School Arts Integration (ArtsPartners), Out-of-School Time Family Creative Learning (After School Program), and Communications (information, audience development strategies, technology/evaluation). Through Thriving Minds, OCA developed a specialized data collection tool for research and evaluation purposes, which is being used to track cultural programs that the OCA supports, with details on attendance, target age group, location, and more.

Free Night of Theater DART ad

To support both audience development and family engagement in Thriving MInds, OCA focuses on city-wide engagement initiatives, such as Free Night of Theater and 20 Days, 20 Deals: Celebrating 20 Years of Art & Culture.

OCA is also leveraging the involvement of local public broadcasting company KERA’s Art&Seek initiative in a community arts portal linked to the newly designed OCA website. Here citizens can access information on programs, ticketing, classes and workshops in areas such as music, free events or family programming. OCA is the first organization in the region to partner with KERA in this fashion.

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SUMMER CAMPS

In June and July 2009, over 200 Dallas children enrolled in summer camps at each of the Office of Cultural Affairs’ Cultural Centers. By partnering with the Thriving Minds educational initiative and local artists and cultural organizations, new, day-long camps were held at the Bath House and Ice House Cultural Centers, in addition to the successful, long-running camps at the South Dallas and Latino Cultural Centers. Taken together, the camps taught a vibrant arts and culture curriculum to a large, diverse group of children in various neighborhoods throughout Dallas. While the kids that attended the summer camps reported a high level of satisfaction, their parents were also excited that the art-focused camps promoted the development of critical thinking skills, creativity, self-expression, and communication. Children at each cultural center were able to participate in a number of high quality arts activities, including theater performances, visual art projects, musical and instrument instruction, as well as dance recitals. Each camp held a culminating event, exhibition, or performance that demonstrated the accomplishments of the participants. No doubt the participating children will remember their fun summer at the Cultural Centers for years to come.

Summer Camp at the Ice House Cultural Center

2009 Report to the Community | City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs | dallasculture.org


FREE NIGHT OF THEATER In the fall of 2008, the Office of Cultural Affairs partnered with Theatre Communications Group (TCG), to bring the national audience development and awareness initiative, Free Night of Theater, to Dallas for the first time. Working with more than 25 local participating theaters, Free Night gave away nearly 5,000 free tickets to over 100 performances to Dallas citizens and visitors.

DALLAS

Following Free Night 2008, TCG worked October 16 - November 10, 2008 with Shugoll Research to survey nearly 6,000 participants from across the country. Mark Shugoll, project director, summarized the research: “TCG’s Free Night of Theater program continues to attract a more diverse audience in terms of age, race, income, and theatergoing experience to our not-for-profit theatres than our current audience. It is clearly helping to build audience as our research continues to show that first time attendees to participating theatres are returning as paying customers.” Survey Highlights for Free Night Dallas: • 95% of Dallas audiences rated the program as Excellent/Very Good • 70% of Dallas audiences reported that they attended a theatre they’d never been to before (national average - 69%) • 49% of Dallas audiences reported that they returned to the theatre they attended and purchased a ticket (national average - 34%) • 43% of Dallas audiences report that they attend theatre more since Free Night • And 85% say they attend more because of Free Night

“Dallas’ inaugural Free Night was a tremendous success, with research showing that nearly 50% of last year’s patrons returned to that theatre again to purchase a ticket. Through Free Night, Dallas’ theatres are banding together to strengthen the awareness and involvement of our community towards live theatre and we are excited to see the fruits of these efforts.” Maria Muñoz-Blanco Director of Cultural Affairs

One Thirty Productions presents Driving Miss Daisy

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RADIO & TV WRR 101.1 WRR Classical 101.1 FM is the first licensed broadcast station in Texas – and the only municipally-owned commercial station in the U.S. dedicated to classical music. WRR operates under an FCC license and its 100,000 watt signal reaches a listening area spanning 100 square miles. 2008-09 highlights include the launch of a satellite studio at One Arts Plaza in the Arts District (the “WRR Music Lounge”) and the live coverage of the 13th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. WRR’s production of the Cliburn was heard across the globe and used by many news outlets, including Minnesota Public Radio’s Performance Today. WRR held many live events through the year, including the traditional Picnic in the Park concert at the Dallas Arboretum and the Caroling at the Adolphus noontime concert series.

TWICE THE CELEBRATION

In November 2008, WRR celebrated the 20th anniversary of Art Matters with hosts Quin Mathews and Sharon Benge. The weekly program takes an in-depth look at the arts in North Texas and is known for its insightful interviews of local and visiting artists. WRR’s website, wrr101.com, celebrated its 10th anniversary that same month – one of the first stations streamed through broadcast.com. City Cable Channel Fiscal year 2008-09 was the last year of OCA’s oversight of City Cable Channel 16. OCA staff provided the technical and production support to operate the City Channel, which cablecasts City Council and committee meetings as well as programs produced by the City’s Public Information Office. In 2009, a state-of-the-art digital television studio was built in City Hall to further the use of this asset to inform the public about city services. Locally-produced programs included Dallas Culture Scene¸ a quarterly 30-minute magazine format that highlights the arts in our community.

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Folklorico Dancing


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Dallas City Council Mayor District 1 District 2 District 3 District 4 District 5 District 6 District 7 District 8 District 9 District 10 District 11 District 12 District 13 District 14

Tom Leppert Mayor Pro Tem Dr. Elba García (through 5/2009) Delia Jasso (current) Pauline Medrano David A. Neumann Deputy Mayor Pro Tem, Dwaine R. Caraway Vonciel Jones Hill Steve Salazar Carolyn R. Davis Tennell Atkins Sheffie Kadane Jerry R. Allen Linda Koop Ron Natinsky Mitchell Rasansky (through 5/2009) Ann Margolin (current) Angela Hunt

Cultural Affairs Commission Place 1 Place 2 Place 3 Place 4 Place 5 Place 6 Place 7 Place 8 Place 9 Place 10 Place 11 Place 12 Place 13 Place 14 Place 15 Place 16 Place 17 Place 18

Manulita Nellie Tafalla Daniel Reyes Anastasia “Tasie” Semos Frederick Linton Medlin Matilda B. Louree Tailim Song Sabra Wigfall Daisy Faye Gafford W. Lee Carter Clayton P. Henry Lark Montgomery James M. Welch Maura Wright-Conley Carol Barnett Davis Judy Pollock, Chair Phillip Collins (At Large) Olga Lydia Santiago (At Large) Gail Marcia Sachson, Vice Chair (At Large)

City Manager’s Office

City Manager, Mary K. Suhm First Assistant City Manager, Ryan S. Evans Assistant City Manager, A. C. Gonzalez Assistant City Manager, Jill A. Jordan, P.E. Assistant City Manager, Ramon Miguez Assistant City Manager, Forest E. Turner

Office of Cultural Affairs Staff

Maria Muñoz-Blanco, Director David Fisher, Assistant Director

Becky Adamietz-Deo Paul Adams Lynn Addington Melanie Armstrong Pat Barrett Adriana Bate M. Graeme Bice Amy Bishop Thomas Ed Blaylock Brandon Bowman George Bridges Gary Calvert Enrique Fernández Cervantes Drema Chavez

Tisha Crear Kevin Curry Debra Daniel Gregory T. Davis Alejandrina Drew Kristina Elizondo Matthew Erikson Kendall Ferguson Bianca Ferrer Christopher Hackett Chris Head Heath Gage Karl Hartford David Hunter Gary Isaacs Grace Johnson Kay Kallos Linda Kirk Lisa Little

Lamar Livingston Greg MacPherson Vicki Meek Leza Mesiah Karen Moyer Mark Mullaney Kerry Musick Yesenia Olide Nellie Ortez Karen Pence David Pucek John Kevin Pytcher Charlene Rathburn Tommy Reyna Patsy R. Rhodes Laura Roland Irasema Romero Sondra Roney Kurt Rongey

2009 Report to the Community | City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs | dallasculture.org

Hortencia Rubalcava Nelda Russell Samuel Saenz Brent Sanderson Charla Sanderson Ed Schmitt Mary Sefzik Harold Steward Les Studdard Gwendolyn Taylor Marty Van Kleeck Jose Vargas Sally Villarruel Charlie Weber Rector David Whitfield Bennie Wilcox Sharon Williams David Zepeda

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1925 Elm Street, Suite 400, Dallas, TX 75201 214-670-3687 phone ● 214-670-1404 fax ● dallasculture.org Publication #09/10-37

THANK YOU TO OUR SUPPORTERS

Adorno Yoss White & Wiggins, LLP Akznobel LLC Intuit Corp. employees Matthews Southwest Van’s Shoe Service Williams Chicken Thank you to the Friends of the LCC and South Dallas Cultural Center Association and to all the community members who support their fundraising efforts.

Rendering of City Performance Hall (Phases I & II)

2009 Report to the Community  

The City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs 2009 Report to the Community.

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