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Results from the Germany Pay Survey 2014 The aim of this article is to provide a broad overview of the data collected in a pay survey conducted between June and August 2014 across Germany. The desired outcome of the survey and the dissemination of the results is that the trainer, equipped with more information about the market, will be able to make more informed decisions about where to work and how much to charge for their services. This article will provide an brief overview of the rates according to which city a trainer is based in and which type of work the trainer is contracted to do. For the purpose of the survey, I have used the cities that have an ELTA organisation as a framework, which explains the use of ‘Rhine’ instead of any city in the Rhine area. The overriding focus is on the freelance market (information was collected concerning full-time and part-time work but the sample was too small to extract any trends). The types of work focused on are: 1. Direct contract work (I.e. a contract with a company which does not involve an agency or language school) 2. Private language school 3. University work 4. Volkshochshule 5. Private student (I.e a contract with an individual for language training which does not involve a company or language school). I also make regular reference to CELTA and DELTA in the article. For the former, all qualifications were included in the survey and I use CELTA as the term for preservice Training involving an observed teaching practice element. DELTA is only in reference to the Diploma in English Language Teaching to Adults. When asked about an MA, respondents were asked to differentiate between MA TESOL or applied linguistics and an MBA or MA in unrelated topic. Direct contract wages. I wanted to give a name to the jobs you have directly with companies rather than through a language school or any middle man. I took the highest and lowest rates per 45 for each city and averaged them. I then took the average of the resulting numbers, which gives the numbers you can see in the graph.


Ulm

31.56

Stuttgart

35.37

Frankfurt

40.35

Berlin

40.80

Rhine

40.64

0.00

10.00

20.00

30.00

40.00

50.00

What you might find quite surprising is that the top three cities for direct contract work surveyed all reported back with around the same rate per forty-five minutes. One explanation for this could be that this type of work is what might be considered somewhat of a luxury good in the ELT market, and so can command higher prices. What's more, there are high barriers to entry into this market. To speculate on a few: experience, contacts, higher qualifications, marketing (website, brand). What does this mean? In short, prices can remain high not only because there is no middle man, but also because competition is lower than in, say, the private language school market. Notable exclusions from this survey are Munich and Hamburg. Not enough data was collected in these cities to justify publishing the results. Language school remuneration In contrast to the private contract market, there are lower barriers to entry for a trainer who wants to work for a private language school. Experience and qualifications remain the two most notable, but these will likely vary from school to school. As you can see from the chart, the rate is lower than private contract work (as many would have expected).


Ulm

24.22

Stuttgart

23.05

Frankfurt

22.82 19.42

Berlin Rhine

29.15

0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 30.00 35.00 University work The results here show that working with universities yields a higher hourly remuneration than private language schools. It is difficult however to put a monetary value on the amount of work outside of the classroom that is involved and this was not included in the figure per 45 min. It appears that the figure for Stuttgart could be an anomaly due to how much lower it is.

37.82

Ulm Stuttgart Frankfurt Berlin Rhine

31.96 32.81 36.25 37.23

28.00 30.00 32.00 34.00 36.00 38.00 40.00


Private student

Ulm

23.96

Stuttgart

29.98

Frankfurt

29.21

Berlin

36.13

Rhine

35.99

0.00

10.00

20.00

30.00

40.00

VHS What is most interesting is the variance between average rates at the Volkshochshule across Germany. The information is shown below:

Ulm

23.00

Stuttgart

21.47

Frankfurt

23.02

Berlin

23.38

Rhine 0.00

28.42 5.00

10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 30.00

92% of all of freelance trainers surveyed work with more than one of these types of institution. Monthly Earnings One part of the survey was aimed at finding out trainers’ average gross monthly income. As you can see below, trainers in Stuttgart are topping the tables in this respect. What might come as a surprise is that Berlin, a city in which average wages lag behind the other major cities of Germany, is represented well in the totals.


This graph appears to reveal that wherever you go in Germany, you can expect to earn between €1850-2000 per month pre tax as an average. What you pay after that in insurance, tax and social security contributions will undoubtedly bring that figure down further.

2000.00 1975.00

1980.00 1960.00 1940.00 1920.00

1904.31

1925.50

1915.27

1900.00 1880.00

1867.17

1860.00 1840.00 1820.00 1800.00 Rhine

Berlin

Frankfurt

Stuttgart

Ulm

DELTA or MA? When considering further education in the field of language teaching, one question that comes up is likely to be: will this mean I make more money? While it's not the driving force behind further development, it does play a part in the decision making process. To shed a little bit of light on this matter, I looked at average gross monthly earnings of freelance trainers across Germany with a DELTA or an MA and then mapped each group according to gross monthly freelance income. The resulting information shows that DELTA qualified trainers on average make up a higher proportion of the highest earning trainers surveyed. Who do they earn more according to this data? Is it access to higher hourly remuneration? Better teaching skills? More 'clout' with clients? More experience (DELTA qualified trainers usually have more than four years' experience)?


DELTA Qualified Trainers

3501-4000

3001-3500

2501-3000

Trainers with an MA (TESOL, Applied Linguistics or related)

2501 -­‐   3000  

3501 -­‐   4000  

The numbers here indicate gross € per month Industry Profile


The next line of inquiry was to find out what the highest earner's secret sauce is. What makes their earning potential higher? Taking the same gross monthly income brackets, I decided to profile each 25% of earners in terms of age, experience in ESP and Business English and qualifications. Below are the profiles that came out of the search: A) Bottom 25% (€01500)

B) 25-50% (€15012500)

C) 50-75% (€25013500)

D) 75%-100 (€30014000+)

Average age 55 53% CELTA 4% DELTA 8% MA TESOL 6.5 years BE 8.8 years ESP 4.4 years EAP

Average age 49 38% CELTA qualified 7% DELTA qualified 4% MA TESOL 10 years BE 9.5 years ESP 7.1 years EAP

Average age 53 25% CELTA 8% DELTA 3% MA TESOL 11.5 years BE 10 years ESP 9.4 years EAP

Average age 47 33% CELTA 16.7% DELTA 1% MA TESOL 13.1 years BE 13.1 years ESP 10.8 years EAP

47 respondents

42 respondents

20 respondents

12 respondents

The highest earners (D)are twice as likely to have a DELTA than their lower earning counterparts (C) and FOUR times more likely than the lowest earners in the industry (A). Age is a factor but not a decisive one. The average age of those surveyed differs only slightly from the variances in profile average age. It appears from the data that experience is the most decisive factor in how much a freelance ELT trainer in Germany earns. Highest earners have on average 1.7 more years’ experience than their next highest earning colleagues and 5.7 more than the lowest 25% of earners. Time to put it into development The feedback received and information provided by this survey is proof enough that the journey does not end here. It begins here. The aim was to provide information on which trainers can make informed decisions on their rates and I feel this aim has been achieved. The next tasks are to disseminate this information further and widen the scope of the survey.

Germany pay survey  
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