Page 1

Customer Service Guarantee 2016 Report 2016 – ISSUE 2

CONNECTIONS TOP 5

OWNERSHIP TRANSITION MISTAKES THE KOHLER ADVANTAGE:

The plumbing powerhouse goes big at DSG

A NEW SPORT FROM THE OLD WEST


ON THE COVER |

6

TOP 5 OWNERSHIP TRANSITION MISTAKES As contractors explore an ownership transition, they should try to avoid making these business missteps (as identified by small-business experts and attorneys).

6

22

THE KOHLER ADVANTAGE Learn more about DSG’s new partnership with Kohler and how it’s giving contractors an edge in selection, style, quality and technology.

24

A NEW SPORT FROM THE OLD WEST Matt Lane, owner of Tri-County Mechanical and Electrical (along with his wife Kris Schermele-Lane), always had a love for the western lifestyle. Read how that passion was energized by the unique sport of ranch sorting.

22

39

CUSTOMER SERVICE GUARANTEE 2016 REPORT DSG is keeping our promises, and the numbers prove it.

PROFILES | HEADLINES

14

LIGHTS OUT FOR THE CFL CFL technology is going dark thanks to the bright light of LED

bulbs. Take a brief look at why the lighting world is saying goodbye to CFL bulbs.

14

16

A COMFORTABLE TRANSITION DSG recently expanded its partnership with Luxaire, a leading manufacturer of furnaces and air conditioners. Learn how this transition is benefiting contractors across DSG land.

19

TREND WATCH: U.S. HOUSING STARTS

Housing starts oftentimes provide a way to measure the health of the construction sector as well as the overall economy. See how housing starts have been trending in the last 12 months.

30

FINDING THEIR TRADE We checked in with a couple of past Education Connection

Fund scholarship winners to see what they were up to. Find out how they’re putting their scholarships to good use.

30 2

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


32

“WAIT” LOSS PRODUCTS

With the right tool or part, workers can finish projects faster (and better). Check out a few of the labor-saving products found in our “Wait” Loss online product guide.

34

KAMSTRUP METERS COME TO DSG After more than a year of research and evaluation, DSG has a new partner for metering water. Read about how Kamstrup and DSG are helping customers advance their metering capabilities.

32

FIXTURES | Editorial Trading Up – Tom Rosendahl .........................................................................4

The Power Of We At DSG In Quotations ...............................................................................................5 Much More Than Marketing ........................................................................ 27

Meet The DSG Team Mark Feeney – CFO .......................................................................................9

Job Site Positive Charge ........................................................................................... 10 Pros And Cons Of PTO ............................................................................... 20

News Wire DSG Introduces New After Hours Experts ........................................................ 17 DSG’s Metering Team Moves To Hopkins, MN ................................................ 44 DSG Donates HVAC Equipment To Madison Area Technical College .................. 44 Three DSG Employee Owners Named To NAED’s List Of “30 Under 35” ............. 45 DSG Now Offering Electrical Products In Western Twin Cities Area .................... 45 DSG Honored As One Of The 50 Best Places To Work ..................................... 46

Grow Your Business

37 Future

Next 3 Exits

Bidding Or Selling ...................................................................................... 28

Recommended Reading The M-Factor .............................................................................................. 18

State Of The Industry Plumbing – Darrin Walts ............................................................................. 13 HVAC/R – Greg Servais ............................................................................... 37

I Didn’t Know That DSG Did That! 3-D Lighting Design..................................................................................... 40 Pump Shop ................................................................................................. 42

20


EDITORIAL |

Trading Up I’m not much of a basketball fan, but even I segment. We didn’t take these decisions lightly. noticed when the NBA’s Cleveland Cavaliers fired As we routinely evaluated our product selection, coach David Blatt in the middle of last season. we decided that in a few instances, we could make The team was in first place – first place! – in their improvements. We searched out new partners conference and a lock for the playoffs. In fact, that shared our commitment to quality, reliability, they were favored to get all the way to productivity and new ideas. Our choices the NBA finals to face their rivals, were well researched and vetted, the Golden State Warriors (who ensuring that each transition had defeated them in the would benefit our customers finals a year before). The in the long run. Not only sports world was baffled are these outstanding as the Cavs added a new companies with proven, coach to an already innovative products – they successful formula. We simply fit better with our needn’t have worried, of customers and their needs. course, as LeBron James I’m excited about these and his crew brought home changes because they offer the first professional sports tremendous opportunities to championship to Cleveland in our friends in plumbing and Tom Rosendahl 52 years. It turns out that Blatt HVAC/R, as well as the cities DSG Director Of wasn’t a bad coach, but his and municipalities that count Customer Relations replacement, Tyronn Lue, was on smart metering to maximize simply a better fit for the team. their resources. I encourage you to read about What does this have to do with DSG? Like each of these new partners in this issue, then ask the Cavaliers, we’re making some changes to your DSG representative to show you firsthand our winning formula. Look through this issue what their exciting products can do to help your of Connections, and you’ll see that in the last few business succeed. You’re not content to rest on months, we’ve transitioned to Kohler in our your laurels, and so neither are we. Together, we’re plumbing segment, Luxaire in the HVAC/R going to trade up and improve our team so that segment and Kamstrup in our waterworks each season is a championship one.

4

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


THE POWER OF WE AT DSG |

... Since it first kicked off in 2010, DSG’s Power Of We ideology has continued to strengthen and evolve. Its premise is to create meaningful encounters between Amy Lyga customers and employee owners, and today The Power Of We is stronger than ever. The Power Of We has become so much a way of life at DSG that even the newest employee owners are inspired by it. “Part of the reason The Power Of We is so strong here is because of the culture,” says Amy Lyga, plumbing quotations specialist at the La Crosse, WI, branch (Lyga joined DSG in January 2016). “It’s open and honest, and that helps keep us all on the same page. Everyone believes that we’re in this business together, and that ‘business’ is to help our customers to succeed.” Open and honest communication is a vital part of making sure customer interactions are meaningful, and that’s no different in the quotations department. “We know how important strong, ongoing communication can be to a project,” says Lyga. “That’s why specifications and details are clearly spelled out on our quotes. If we use alternative products in order to get our customers more cost-effective pricing, we explain everything.” Accordingly to Lyga, there are additional

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

In Quotations ways that the quotations department contributes to The Power Of We, including fast response times and accurate quotes. “We use innovative software to produce submittal packages in a fast and organized manner,” Lyga says. “That allows contractors to present their own bids accurately and on time.” For a department that focuses much of its energy on pricing, The Power Of We in quotations isn’t always related to bids and costs. Many times, it involves actions that go beyond the sale to build connections for the benefit of DSG customers. Lyga recalls one particular example. “We helped a customer on a bid, and they got the job. Once the project was underway, I learned that the manufacturer rep for one of the main products involved was going to be in town, so I set up a lunch get-together for the two of them to answer any questions our customer may have had. It was a productive connection, and we were glad to help make it happen.” Making powerful connections such as the one above is the essence of The Power Of We, and that means connections with all of DSG’s business partners, not just customers. “The Power Of We is about making sure we maintain positive relationships with our vendor partners, too,” says Lyga. “Communication, pricing and responsiveness all improve when you have partners that respect each other and share a common focus on helping customers to succeed.”

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

5


GROW YOUR BUSINESS |

Remember when you started your business? Long hours, hard decisions, financial risks; if you were like many contractors, you got on-the-job training at the school of hard knocks. The last thing on your mind as you struggled to build your business was how you were going to sell it. Like most small- to medium-sized contractors, you remained a family-owned business (probably a sole proprietorship or a limited liability company [LLC]). Having one primary decision maker (you) worked out just fine for many years, but now you’re seeing some of your friends and competitors start to retire, either successfully or unsuccessfully. Instead of being something to look forward to, thoughts of retirement are becoming

stressful. There’s nobody to run the company except you. Don’t panic! The best way to address this situation is to treat it like all of the other challenges you have already overcome as a business owner: roll up your sleeves and get started. There is no “one size fits all” solution, but the good news is that many small-business owners have gone before you, and their experiences can serve to guide you as you make your plans. Specifically, here are five of the biggest mistakes you should avoid as you explore an ownership transition, as identified by small-business experts and attorneys.


It’s one thing to not have a long-term ownership transition plan; it’s another to be without a contingency for something catastrophic. If you were to have a heart attack and end up disabled or worse, who will be responsible for your business? Leaving a situation like this up to the “system” simply leaves too much to chance. Get started on a contingency plan today, and it can relieve a lot of the pressure on you and your family. This isn’t as much a retirement plan for you as it is a “stay in business” plan for your business and its staff. It is an important step for any owner to take. How to avoid this mistake: Work with an experienced accountant and a lawyer to spell out who will be responsible for decisions while the financials are being sorted out in the event of a tragedy. Even better, have plans in place for those financials as well.

Every day, we read about another technology entrepreneur selling his or her business for billions of dollars. Perhaps your own retirement plan is similar (but on a smaller scale, obviously): put your company up for sale, take the best offer, cash the check and head for the lake.

Unfortunately, every sale needs a buyer. How confident are you that someone will want to purchase your company? We only read about the successful tech deals in the news – the huge number of unsold companies goes unreported. Small to midrange companies will not attract Wall Street investors. For the most part, your buyer will need to be somebody who wants to work in the business. It’s also true that your company is only worth as much as a buyer is willing to pay. You may think that your business is worth more than your suitors do, and that can be hard on your retirement finances. How to avoid this mistake: Consider all of your options as you begin to make your plans, and that leads us to #3 on this list.

Another potential problem with counting on an outside sale is that it can alienate your internal staff. Some of them may have even had designs on ownership. The only thing worse than trying to sell a company filled with disgruntled workers is having one of those employees quit and become a competitor. Not only did you create a business adversary, but you lost a potential buyer who was already on board! Mentor and share responsibility with your team, and you may find leaders that you did not expect. Show them how the business works and reward them for doing a good job. The more successful and experienced they are, the better Continued on page 8


Continued from page 7

they become as candidates. The more comfortable they are with the inner workings of your business, the more likely they are to buy it. Finally, keep an open mind about less common ways to involve employees. DSG is an employeeowned company (known as an ESOP), for example, and while that unique style of ownership isn’t right for every situation, it might work for you. For example, ESOPs aren’t a quick solution. They can take a decade or even longer to completely purchase a company. How to avoid this mistake: Set up systems to get your team involved with the day-to-day management of your company. These systems make all of your transition decisions easier.

That long-term tech who has always assumed he was going to be the first in line to buy your business? He might not be your best choice. That young woman who does the books and answers the phone (but has never pulled a wire or fixed a pipe)? She might be exactly what your company needs. It helps to look at the big picture when you start to plan for a transition. For example, you may have always assumed that your children would take over the family business. They may be wonderful at their jobs, but do they have what it takes to lead a team, make tough decisions and work long hours? Don’t get too caught up in tradition here. There are ways to keep your family in ownership while partnering with other qualified stakeholders (such as employees) who might be better suited to run the company’s day-to-day operations.

How to avoid this mistake: Hire an outside consultant (someone specialized in transition planning) who can offer objective advice on whether your kids are cut out to run the business or whether they need help.

This is the biggest mistake of them all. Many of the most flexible options that you will have for an ownership transition take years to implement. Plus, the longer you spend preparing your people, the more engaged they will be in the process. Finally, don’t forget about your customers. They want to feel secure that your company is in good hands, and seeing you prepare for the future puts their minds at ease. How to avoid this mistake: Start now. Many experts recommend that you start planning for your ownership transition the day you start your company. It’s part of creating a business instead of just creating a job. Implement systems and put them in writing. Hire good people and give them responsibility. Create a company that can run without you so that it eventually can. Don’t get tripped up by these mistakes. Get advice, make a plan and start thinking about your retirement today – even if it’s 20 years away. It may be extra work, but it is the best thing for you, your company and your family. Sources: http://www.di.net/articles/20-top-ownership-transitionplanning-mistakes/, http://www.ecmag.com/section/miscellaneous/ ownership-structure


MEET THE DSG TEAM |

AN INTERVIEW WITH MARK FEENEY, DSG’S NEW CFO DSG welcomed Mark Feeney to the team in July 2016. Before joining DSG, Feeney spent over 20 years in finance leadership roles within a variety of sectors, including technology, manufacturing and construction. Q – Why did you want to come work for DSG? A – I was looking for a new position that was more strategic and leadership driven. Everything I had ever heard about DSG was very positive. I knew that it would be a great company to work for, and the ESOP was something special. Q – From your background, what has prepared you the most to take on this role? A – Probably the time I spent with Microsoft. DSG is growing fast. Having worked for a successful company like Microsoft, I have a unique perspective that will help DSG improve processes and technology while we continue to grow. Q – As a CFO, you may not typically have a lot of direct contact with DSG customers, but how can you impact their success? A – A great customer experience is very important to our success. I’d like to help to ensure that we have the systems and technologies in place to optimize their experience.   Q – What do you think one of your biggest strengths is when it comes to working at DSG? A – Leadership and an appreciation for the power of teamwork. I like The Power Of We At DSG philosophy.

Q – How does being an ESOP change the way DSG operates? A – As an employee-owned company, we all have a responsibility to understand how we can affect our key objectives positively within our roles. It’s like a successful football play: you need to know your responsibility, then execute with perfection – I needed to get one sports analogy in here! Q – Are you from the Fargo area? A – I grew up in Bismarck, ND, but I’ve been in the Fargo area for 25 some years now. I’m a Moorhead State alumnus. Q – What’s something that people would be surprised to know about you? A – Well, I’m a former college football player. I played outside linebacker for the Dragons. What’s probably more surprising is that I practice yoga. It’s a great stress reliever. Q – DSG customers love the outdoors. What do you do to unwind? A – I like many outdoor activities. I golf, play tennis and cycle – meaning road biking. I usually do each of those during the summer weeks.


JOB SITE |

POSITIVE CHARGE New research shows that positive work cultures are more productive. As American business began to develop its own personality in the early 1900s, successful companies often used internal competition and even conflict to motivate their employees. By pitting coworkers against one another, managers felt that they got the best out of their workers. As the nation’s captains of industry leveraged this philosophy to become millionaires, most other companies sought to emulate their successful cultures.

10

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


Shift ahead a century, and many companies still take their cues from this “survival of the fittest” playbook. However, a good number of business leaders have started asking themselves, “Is this really the best way to succeed?” In fact, recent articles and research from no less than the Harvard Business Review, the Gallup Organization and the Queens School of Business indicate that these old-fashioned management strategies often result in a negative work culture, and that negativity is really bad for business.

The Price Of Negativity

While old-school thinking sought to test employees and reward those who thrive in spite of stress, more and more data shows that stress on human beings doesn’t just make them less productive, it makes them physically ill. Health care expenditures, for example, are 50 percent greater at high-pressure organizations. Research from The American Psychological Association suggests that the American economy loses more than $500 billion and 550 million workdays to job-related stress every year. Studies also show that while a corporate culture based on fear may result in short-term gains (“We needed a good kick in the pants!”), it inevitably leads to less employee engagement and loyalty. This disengagement is costly. Research shows that disengaged workers had 37 percent higher absenteeism, 49 percent more accidents and 60 percent more errors and defects. That’s not all – organizations with low engagement scores experienced 18 percent less productivity and 16 percent lower profitability. How important is a positive culture to workers? A study by the Association of Accounting Technicians in Great Britain showed that employees actually value workplace well-being over material benefits! Continued on page 12

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

DSG’S POSITIVE PRINCIPLES In the spring of 2016, DSG initiated a company-wide focus on positive thinking and a cultural shift toward enhanced teamwork. At its core, this initiative was based on six beliefs that employees shared with one

another in company-wide kickoff events. A few of the beliefs include “Get Engaged,” encouraging DSG employee owners to contribute their own ideas to the company; “Open Up,” which calls for healthy, two-way communication; and “Win Together,” urging a sense of collaboration throughout DSG. Want to know more about DSG’s positive culture initiative? Ask your DSG representative!

GET ENGAGED

OPEN UP

WIN TOGETHER

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

11


Continued from page 11

Changing The System

Now that we see how damaging a high-pressure approach to employee management can be, what can companies do to foster a positive culture for their workers? Experts agree that positive energy starts at the top. Here are some of the steps that good managers take to keep their teams engaged.

1. Encourage Open Communication

The only way a company can build trust is if the lines of communication go both directions. Managers should work to stay approachable, and policies should be in place that encourage feedback.

2. Be Social

Research shows that the chances of dying early are actually 70 percent higher for people with poor social relationships. That’s proof that social people are happier and healthier, and that’s good for business.

3. Treat Everyone With Respect And Insist That They Do The Same

Not only does this encourage productive workplace relationships, it helps to reduce instances of bullying – something that can disrupt an entire organization.

5. Plug Into A Positive Attitude

This may seem like common sense, but positive leaders inspire positive teammates. When happy, approachable managers engage their workforce, they get improved workforce engagement – and productivity.

A Positive Charge Is A Lot More Attractive

Companies that maintain a positive culture are much more attractive to employees. Not only are current employees more likely to stay loyal, new workers are much more likely to give your company a shot as they search for a job. With fewer tradespeople available nowadays, companies that can attract new talent are much more likely to succeed. Think positive! The numbers say that upbeat companies outperform those with negative business philosophies. A positive culture isn’t just good for your health, it’s good for business. Sources: https://hbr.org/2015/12/proof-that-positive-work-culturesare-more-productive; http://www.inc.com/jeremy-goldman/6-waysto-develop-a-more-positive-work-culture-in-2015.html

4. End The Blame Game

Finger pointing is fruitless. Instead, tell workers that it’s more important to take responsibility for their actions, forgive one another, then move on to developing solutions. That is the step where good teams become great.

12

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


State Of The

INDUSTRY PLUMBING

Working Smarter Plumbing Segment Manager Darrin Walts

2016 was a year of transitions for the plumbing industry, including our plumbing segment here at DSG. I became the plumbing segment manager in October 2016 after joining DSG in 2014, and every day I get more and more valuable feedback from our customers. As far as the industry goes, contractors tell us that they still haven’t really found a solid rhythm when it comes to the industry’s economic recovery, for example. There were many positive signs, but also some signs of uncertainty. I think we can say that the future WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

is once again looking good, but everybody is still finding their footing. At the same time, technology continues to drive innovation when it comes to the products and services that plumbing provides. There is no longer a default answer for a sink or faucet, for example. Now there are hundreds of options for builders to choose from, some requiring specialized plumbing in order to function. The sheer number of options available for bathrooms or kitchens has made plumbing more complex, to be sure, but also more profitable in many ways. Innovative, experienced plumbers have become invaluable. The modern “smart bathroom” relies on them. Digital, touchless faucets; self-cleaning toilets; standalone tubs (that don’t have surrounds); Bluetooth-enabled

showerheads; and more — these are not DIY projects that the average homeowner can manage or maintain. Instead of a one-size-fits-all bathroom or kitchen, these living spaces now rely heavily on customized plumbing, something that I believe will benefit all plumbers. The more complex plumbing gets to be, the more valuable a professional’s expertise becomes. DSG’s new partnership with Kohler really emphasizes this advantage for professional plumbers. Work with us, and we’ll keep you on the very edge of plumbing technology, ready to be the contractor that people talk about when they tour a new home or renovation. As plumbing evolves, we’ll solidify your success by working together.

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

13


T U O S LIGHT

L F C E H T R O F

Some innovative technologies change the world permanently. Others initiate change and then step aside quickly for their successors, paving the way for the future but never becoming part of it. That seems to be the fate of the compact fluorescent lightbulb, better known as the CFL. Just as Betamax, HD DVD and the Palm Pilot all helped to start revolutions but then faded quietly into obscurity, CFL technology seems to be going dark thanks to the bright light of LED bulbs. The CFL’s ride into the sunset will begin by the close of 2016. That’s when manufacturing giant GE is scheduled to have ended its production and sales of the tiny fluorescent lamps in the United

14

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

States. It’s hard to imagine that Phillips and Sylvania won’t follow suit shortly thereafter. A decade ago, CFL technology was at the cutting edge of the lighting industry. Just as energy-efficiency experts began to look hard at the classic incandescent lamp, innovative suppliers suggested that a miniaturized fluorescent bulb might be exactly what the world needed. There were trade-offs, of course, and they never really went away. CFL bulbs were hard to dim, took longer to reach maximum brightness, produced a less-than-ideal light and were a challenge to dispose of. They weren’t perfect, but for a time they were the best choice available.

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


GE’s Love Letter To LED GE announced its breakup with the CFL bulb in early February 2016 with a “Dear John” letter on its website. It was a unique way to announce the transition, but don’t let its romantic theme fool you. This is GE telling the world that the future of lighting is in LED. Taken from: http://www.gelighting.com/LightingWeb/na/ consumer/campaigns/breaking-up-with-cfl.jsp

The light at the end of the tunnel, however, turned out to be an LED lamp. LED – short for light-emitting diode – technology has been around since the 1960s, but didn’t make it into a widely available lamp until 2010 or so. Even then, costs were high, so CFL lamps continued to sell well. In the six or so years since, LED bulbs have quickly improved in quality at the same time that they have decreased significantly in cost. Today, LED lamps cost only slightly more than CFLs, but manage to produce significantly better light, cost far less to operate and last eight to 10 times longer. Add in the rise in popularity of improvedefficiency halogen incandescent bulbs, and there

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

is little room for the CFL in the modern lighting marketplace. GE plans to sell out its current stock of CFL bulbs, a process which will likely last into 2017. Plans in countries other than the United States may differ. To learn more about how DSG can help you to sell and install more LED fixtures and lamps – saving your customers money and making projects more profitable at the same time – contact your DSG representative today. Sources: http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2016/02/01/ ge_will_phase_out_cfl_light_bulbs_in_favor_of_led.html, http://www. cnet.com/news/see-ya-cfl-ge-moves-on-from-fluorescent-lightbulbs/

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

15


A COMFORTABLE

TRANSITION

DSG recently expanded its partnership with Luxaire and reinforced its commitment to offering only the highest-quality, best-performing furnaces and air conditioners to its HVAC/R customers. Luxaire started out in the late 1930s manufacturing coal and gas furnaces and quickly became a top 10 producer by the early 1940s. During World War II, it designed and produced special warm-air heating equipment for army barracks, and it was estimated that more than 60 percent of all army barracks were heated with Luxaire equipment. Not long after, the company started manufacturing yearround air conditioning units. In the 1980s, the brand was acquired by Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI), a global leader in intelligent buildings, integrated infrastructure and next-generation transportation systems. (Fittingly, JCI got its start back in 1885 with the invention of the first electric room thermostat.) Luxaire’s connection to Johnson Controls is one of the reasons DSG is excited about its new future with Luxaire. “JCI has an incredible attention to detail and dedication to quality,” says Greg

Servais, DSG’s HVAC/R segment manager. “Their investments in research and development have been substantial, and their rigorous testing leaves no doubt that Luxaire products are made to last.” Today, Luxaire manufactures furnaces and air conditioning units for both residential and commercial applications. It hangs its hat on the fact that its products are designed, engineered and assembled in the United States at its two facilities, located in Kansas and Oklahoma. “It’s important to us to avoid manufacturing and supply issues in the best interest of our customers,” says Servais. “By building the units in the U.S., Luxaire is able to closely monitor and improve processes that directly affect quality.” According to Servais, there is a lot to look forward to with Luxaire, especially with the redesign of its outdoor condensing units and heat pumps. For instance, the units

feature a louvered grill that’s rounded on the inside, adding strength to the cabinet. They also utilize an access panel that swings out for easy serviceability. Although changes in installation and maintenance procedures are expected to be minimal, DSG is offering training opportunities and dealer meetings to support contractors while they get more familiar with Luxaire products. “With change, there is always the potential to feel a little anxious,” says Servais, “but our team here at DSG is invigorated. We’re excited about the potential that Luxaire offers, and we’re encouraged that our customers are feeling the same way.” To learn more about DSG’s partnership with Luxaire, contact your DSG HVAC/R representative.


NEWS WIRE |


The M-Factor

How The Millennial Generation Is Rocking The Workplace

By Lynne C. Lancaster And David Stillman By now, we’ve all heard the word “millennial” used to describe those in the workforce who were born between 1982 and 2000. You’ve likely read a lot about how distinct this group is, but are they really that different than their coworkers from generation X or the baby boom? The generational experts at BridgeWorks think so. The company’s founders, Lynne Lancaster and David Stillman, authored the book When Generations Collide in 2003, then followed it up with The M-Factor: How The Millennial Generation Is Rocking The Workplace in 2010. Their second book made quite an impression on employers all over the world, and it is a short read that may very well help you to better integrate these young workers into your team. The M-Factor highlights several characteristics that set millennials apart from older workers. For example, these individuals tend to maintain much stronger relationships with their parents than those

18

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

generations before them. Dealing with a millennial can sometimes mean dealing with his or her parents as well, either indirectly or – in extreme circumstances – even directly. This is definitely uncharted territory for most employers. Another distinguishing feature of the latest generation of workers is their desire to do work that has value. Many aspire to change the world, something that their parents and teachers have been encouraging them to do their entire lives. This can lead to frustration when a job seems like nothing more than a task. Millennials expect their careers to be fulfilling. In addition, the book focuses on the obvious technological aptitude of this new generation of workers. Not only have they grown up with technology as part of their everyday lives, they’ve evolved a unique way of viewing its effects. Millennials are more “connected” than any generation before them, and that comes with both challenges

and opportunities. In fact, “challenges and opportunities” is a good way of looking at millennials as a whole, according to the consultants at BridgeWorks. The M-Factor spells out many ways for employers to make the most of the unique characteristics of millennials. There is a focus on coaching, for example, and how it can help millennials and their coworkers to connect. Parts of this book may seem like an anthropological study of some new species, but in the end, it becomes clear that millennials are more similar to their coworkers than they are different. We are all people, after all, and this book can help managers to highlight the value that each generation brings to the workforce. Want some powerful advice for getting the different generational parts of your company to fit together into a cohesive unit that makes the most of everyone’s strengths? This quick read is a great place to start.

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


TRENDWATCH:

U.S. Housing Starts

In the United States, economists use “housing starts” as a key economic indicator. Generally speaking, this term represents the number of new houses that began construction during a particular period. If people have enough money to build a new home, experts believe, then they must feel economically sound. For the trade industries, “housing starts” provide a measuring stick for the health of the construction sector as a whole, something that is profoundly important to virtually all of the trades. On the right you will find two graphs. The first represents the national trend for new residential housing units authorized by building permits and started; the second shows the same metric but narrowed to the Midwestern United States. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

Housing Starts (U.S. in millions) 1,220.00

Year 2014-2015 2015-2016

1,133.75

1,047.50

961.25

875.00

OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY

JUN

JUL AUG SEP

Housing Starts (Midwest in millions) 215.00

Year 2014-2015 2015-2016

183.75

152.50

121.25

90.00

OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY

JUN

JUL AUG SEP

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

19


JOB SITE |

The PROS And CONS Of PTO

Is paid time off the right benefit strategy for your company? Ironically, calling in sick for work can be a real headache – and not just for the employee. Days lost to illness are challenging for the employer as well. Not only does it cost the company productivity, but a system of compensated time off that uses sick days can be tricky to manage. Some workers take advantage of the benefit, using sick leave when they should really be taking vacation. Others fret over whether they are really sick enough to take the day off at all. The goal, it would seem, is to find a system that gives workers the flexibility to more easily and honestly manage the time away from their job that they are paid for. On the surface, paid time off (generally known as PTO for short) helps with this issue. At its core, a PTO system is simple: employees earn a certain amount of time off for each hour they work. This time is banked and can be used for either sickness or vacation (total time off is usually the same as if you offered vacation and sick days separately). Workers are rewarded for staying healthy, because their pool of time off can then be used for vacation instead of sick leave. On the other hand, if a serious illness occurs, employees have access to more time off while still being paid.

PTO is not a perfect system, however, and it may not be right for every company. If you are considering a change – or if you don’t currently offer time off as a benefit – here are some of the pros and cons you should take into account when you consider implementing PTO.

The PROS Of PTO • PTO is often popular with employees. They like the idea of taking more vacation if they stay healthy. • Employees feel better about calling in sick even if they don’t need to see a doctor. With PTO, they don’t need to make up excuses to stay home. • PTO can be a valuable tool in recruiting. • It can be easier to administer PTO up front. This can lead to administrative cost savings. • You may reduce employee burnout. Most PTO systems include caps on the number of hours that can be banked, and that encourages workers to use this time off. • Employees feel more in control of the time off since they no longer have to justify it.


The CONS Of PTO • If you are switching from a system that uses sick days, some employees may feel like they are being penalized for taking sick time (because it now “costs” them vacation time). Usually, this happens only when the previous system was not closely monitored. • PTO is treated almost exactly like vacation time by the law in most jurisdictions. If your particular jurisdiction calls for your business to pay out unused vacation time when an employee leaves, PTO can cause you to pay out more (compared to a system that uses sick days, which are generally not required to be paid for when an employee leaves). • For the most part, employees look at PTO as vacation (even though it is meant as both vacation and sick leave). This means that a healthy worker will have the ability to take more time off, because some of those days are no longer set aside specifically for illness. • Ironically, PTO can also lead to employees being reluctant to take time off for sickness, because they want to conserve their time for vacations. For some, this means coming into work sick when they should be staying home. To get started or to make a transition, you may want to consult a human resources professional. He or she can help you to create a benefit program that is right for your business, ensuring that it is a strong selling point for your company with prospective employees, no matter which system you choose. Source: http://hrdailyadvisor.blr.com/2015/01/12/pros-and-cons-ofusing-a-pto-bank-instead-of-vacation-and-sick-time/

TEN SILLIEST

Excuses For Calling In Sick (But Actually Used)

CareerBuilder.com recently took a survey of reasons for taking the day off, and Business Insider reported the results. True or not, here are 10 of the wackiest responses. • Employee claims to have broken arm reaching to grab a falling sandwich. • Employee was stuck under the bed. • Employee was poisoned by grandmother’s ham. • Employee was poked in the eye while combing their hair. • All of the employee’s underwear was in the washer. • Employee was going to the beach because the doctor recommended more vitamin D. • Employee’s cat was stuck inside the dashboard of the car. • Employee chugged a bottle of mouthwash thinking it was Powerade. • Employee was kicked by a llama and suffered a broken leg. • Employee’s mate threw a pan of hot grits in their face. Source: http://www. businessinsider.com/funnyexcuses-people-have-used-tocall-in-sick-2015-10


THE KOHLER ADVANTAGE

DSG partners with Kohler to give contractors an edge in selection, style, quality and technology.


Ask Americans to list the world’s best plumbing manufacturers, and it’s likely that the first name you will hear will be Kohler. Now DSG is bringing Kohler’s innovative products to all of its plumbing locations. Kohler and DSG have had a relationship for many years, but this new partnership gives DSG customers expanded access

speakers and spa-like multisensory shower systems that include an amazing digital interface capable of targeting different water temperatures to different parts of the body. Homebuilders appreciate the opportunity to include these amenities in their living spaces, while commercial builders value Kohler’s attention to practical design that makes cleaning and maintenance faster, easier and more sanitary. In any situation, plumbing contractors benefit by having a massive array of solutions to offer on every project, ensuring that end users can virtually always find what they are looking for. Best of all, the strength of the Kohler brand and the buzz surrounding Kohler’s designs

“I am excited about Kohler’s increased role here at DSG.” – Darrin Walts to Kohler’s massive selection of products, parts and solutions. Plumbing contractors will now have the advantage of offering their customers many of the industry’s most talked about products and fixtures, backed by the combined support of two of the nation’s most respected names in plumbing. Kohler got its start in Wisconsin in the late 1800s, making it roughly the same age as DSG. John Michael Kohler’s products have been an integral part of the world’s bathrooms and kitchens ever since. In particular, the Kohler name has become synonymous with style (its tagline has long been “The Bold Look Of Kohler”), and more recently, cutting-edge technology. It’s a rare company that can innovate and maintain a reputation for quality at the same time, but Kohler has done just that.

MAKING A SPLASH

combine to make it easier for contractors to win bids and secure projects. Once complete, the quality of these products ensures fewer callbacks, superior long-term performance and the kind of word-of-mouth advertising for plumbers that few brands can match. “I am excited about Kohler’s increased role here at DSG,” says Darrin Walts, DSG’s plumbing segment manager. “This expands our horizons significantly and provides our customers the unique ability to compete with almost anyone. It’s not every day that you can partner with a company with Kohler’s pedigree, and I can’t wait to see how we work together to help plumbing contractors succeed.” To learn more about how DSG and Kohler can make your bids better, your jobs easier and your projects more productive, contact your DSG plumbing representative.

Take, for example, Kohler’s work with touchless faucets and toilets that improve user hygiene, showerheads that rock out by including Bluetooth

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

23


A NEW SPORT FROM

THE OLD WEST Growing up on a Montana cattle ranch, Matt Lane always loved the western lifestyle. However, it wasn’t until he took a day off from running Tri-County Mechanical and Electrical with his wife, Kris Schermele-Lane, to try the unique sport of ranch sorting that he realized just how much it was in his blood. Ranch sorting is an equestrian event that evolved from the traditional ranch work of separating cattle into pens, oftentimes in order to be branded, treated for a medical issue or transported. Starting out as most cowboy competitions do, the sport began with local ranchers pitting their ranch hands against other cowboys. It really only became an organized sport in 2007, but it’s already one of the fastest-growing equestrian events in the United States. For the unfamiliar, ranch sorting requires a team of two riders on horseback to move a herd of ten cattle from one pen to another. Sounds easy enough, right? Try doing it by moving the cattle

24

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

one by one, and in numerical order, starting with a random number called by a judge. And try doing it in only 60 seconds. To be successful in this sport, you need speed, precision, some strategic planning and, above all else, teamwork. As a points-driven competition, the more cattle you get through to the other pen correctly, the more points you get. If any cattle go through the gate out of order or if any cattle that have been previously sorted come back through the gate, you receive what’s called a “no-time” disqualification for the team, resulting in zero points. Top points earners can win everything from cash to belt buckles. Other competitions award headstalls (the part of a bridle or halter that fits around a horse’s head) and even custom saddles that can cost more than $2,500. To keep things competitive, events are broken into classes, and riders compete only in classes that are appropriate for their skill level.

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


On-The-Horse Training The Lanes learned about ranch sorting firsthand when they attended a beginners clinic in 2010. Despite growing up on a ranch in Montana, Matt had spent very little time on horseback. Nonetheless, the Lanes saddled up and immediately fell in love with the sport. Despite presenting a good amount of challenge, one of the most appealing aspects of ranch sorting is that almost anyone can give it a try. “Men and women, at any age and any ability on any horse can compete,” says Kris SchermeleLane. “I’ve seen kids as young as four and riders as old as 76. And you don’t need a $30,000 horse.” Ranch sorting also has a sister sport called team penning. This competition involves a team of riders (usually three) on horseback working to separate three cattle from a herd and put them into a single pen. Unfortunately, the Lanes were uncertain as to where to go next. “We wanted to learn more, but there was a significant communication barrier in our state,” says Schermele-Lane. “We didn’t know where to get more information or how to get more involved. We became so passionate about this sport so quickly that I told myself I was going to do something about it.”

Organizing The Herd

In 2011, Schermele-Lane launched a website called www.montanateampenning.com. This site communicates about all ranch sorting and team penning events in Montana, as well as club information throughout the state. Then in 2014, Kris, along with a friend, established Big Sky Sorting, a non-profit organization that aims to promote the sport of ranch sorting in the state of Montana. All proceeds of the organization go to sponsoring ranch sorting competitions and paying out the winners of those events. “We’re not interested

in making money,” says Schermele-Lane. “We do what we do for the betterment of the sport that we love.” For his part, not only did Matt master horsemanship very quickly, but he also contacted Tri-County’s suppliers for support. He raised money from folks like DSG, promoted a saddle series with six shows and paid out more than $65,000 in cash, prizes and saddles. By 2016 – with the help of DSG and other sponsors – Big Sky Sorting had held more than a half dozen events and awarded more than $75,000 in cash and prizes. “It’s a lot of work, but we love it,” says Schermele-Lane. “Anything worth doing right is going to take effort.” Big Sky Sorting competitions regularly see more than 800 teams during a competition, with riders coming from as far as New Mexico. Matt is president of the organization, and Kris is the secretary/treasurer. They not only run the events, but they also take part in the competitions as well. In fact, Matt earned the title of 2016 Saddle Series Winner, scoring the most cumulative points in Big Sky Sorting competitions for the year. Continued on page 26 Kris SchermeleLane is a 4-rated rider and has competed with her husband, Matt, at ranch sorting competitions all over the country.


Continued from page 25

A Little Help From Their Friends

With their busy lifestyles, the Lanes value having a partner like DSG. “They do a great job servicing our account,” says Schermele-Lane, According to the Lanes, the success of Big Sky “but what we love about working with them is Sorting wouldn’t be possible without the help of that it’s more than a business relationship. For its supporters. “If we didn’t have contributions like them to show an interest in something that we are those from DSG, we wouldn’t be able to put these passionate about, when it has nothing to do with shows on,” Kris says. “I can’t tell you how much we parts or products, is incredibly special.” appreciate the help we get from Dan Kunnary and Looking ahead, the Lanes are excited to see Jerry Miller at DSG. They’re awesome.” the continued growth of ranch sorting. Their Tri-County Mechanical and Electrical has most recent contributions involve a software maintained a long-lasting relationship with DSG, program called Sort Arena (www.sortarena.com), a dating back more than 20 years. The company digital platform that makes running ranch sorting is a highly successful mechanical and electrical competitions much easier and allows competitors construction management firm headquartered in to track results and share videos. “It’s really helped Helena, MT, with two additional offices in Butte to legitimize our events,” Schermele-Lane says. and Great Falls. Schermele-Lane also operates a “I assisted the developers while building this real estate company called Millennium Real Estate program, and am very proud of the work they did. and Property Management. Their creation has been a wonderful addition to our sport and the producers of our shows.” If you’re interested in learning more about ranch sorting and team penning in Montana, you can visit the Lanes’ website at www.montanateampenning.com or Big Sky Sorting’s Facebook page (search for Big Sky Ranch Sorting). For those interested in breaking into the sport, you can learn more at the United States Team Penning Association’s website at www.ustpa.com.

Matt Lane is a 3-rated rider and was the top overall points earner in Big Sky Sorting competitions for 2016. Photos by Mark LaRowe Photography.


THE POWER OF WE AT DSG |

MUCH MORE THAN MARKETING Marketing is sometimes defined as “the process of communicating a message to one’s customers,” but at DSG, marketing is viewed a little differently – and it’s this small distinction that has a big impact on how DSG interacts with its customers. You see, at DSG, the main focus of the marketing team isn’t just to speak to customers, but also to understand them. This improved understanding allows DSG employee owners to provide more value while engaging their customers. This focus on partnership is the foundation of what DSG calls The Power Of We. The Power Of We at DSG is a companywide philosophy that, at its core, is about making sure that customer interactions are meaningful. In other words, it’s transforming an ordinary sales transaction into an encounter that is worthwhile for everyone involved. “We’re not just selling the parts and products on our shelves or in our warehouses,” says DSG’s Director of Marketing and Analytics Todd Eber. “We’re selling the added value of our interactions to keep bringing our customers back. We want them to partner with us based on the overall DSG experience, not solely because of what products we’re supplying to them.” DSG’s marketing department aims to reinforce The Power Of We with what Eber refers to as bringing the outside in. “To truly understand how we can best help make every encounter meaningful for our customers, we need to be great listeners,” he says. “We need to look through our customers’ eyes and walk in their shoes. We then use that insight to develop resources, programs, tools, etc., that create value in addition to the products we sell.”

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

Eber uses DSG’s Customer Service Guarantee as a prime example. “The promises included in this guarantee – 100% order accuracy, 2 business day stock credit and top 200 Todd Eber products always in stock – came as a direct result of customer feedback,” explains Eber. “We didn’t assume that we knew what our customers wanted us to do better; we listened to what they actually wanted. As a result, we have a guarantee in place that has created a positive, more profitable experience for our customers and has made us better in the process.” DSG’s marketing team’s “customer-curious” focus becomes even more important when you combine it with the company’s business structure. “When you add in the fact that we’re an ESOP, The Power Of We takes on an even stronger meaning,” says Eber. “Every worthwhile encounter that we try so intensely to create is done with an owner of the company . . . and that’s a powerful combination.”

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

27


GROW YOUR BUSINESS |

BIDDING OR SELLING? Written by small-business expert and author Michael Stone

Are you bidding on jobs, or are you selling them? There’s a difference. Bidding is a race to the bottom. He who has the lowest price wins, or maybe he who has the lowest responsible price wins. Either way, the bidding process is all about price. In my opinion, getting involved in the bidding game is a bad idea. There isn’t any way you can win unless you’re the only bidder, and yes, that includes commercial work. Selling, on the other hand, is showing a client that you can provide a service that meets their need. It’s primarily about the service you’ll provide, not the price of the job.

28

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

Many experts promote the idea of bidding jobs. Pick up any industry publication, and you will find articles about how to win bids, how to “sharpen your pencil” or how to cut your overhead so you can be more competitive. Architects and designers frequently talk about getting three bids and encourage their clients to do just that. Why do they believe it’s in their customer’s best interest to pay the lowest possible price to either build or improve what is usually their biggest investment?

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


If you were facing a knee replacement, would you ask three doctors to bid on the surgery? I know, we don’t worry about price because the insurance company handles it all, but just imagine if payment came out of your pocket. Would you go with the lowest bid, or would you be more concerned with your surgeon’s competence and whether he or she will follow correct procedures, operate using the best equipment and have a high-quality support staff to help get the job done, even if the price is higher? Since we expect all other professionals to focus on quality, value and service, why do we think we have to focus on being the lowest bid? If you look at every lead as an opportunity to make a bid, your mind-set is going to be focused on price, and you’ll say or do things that keep your potential client focused on price. If you look at every lead as an opportunity to make a sale, your mind-set will be focused on what you have to offer to meet their need. “Winning” a bid is seldom a win, especially if you then have to figure out how to build the job without losing money. Resolve today to focus on selling your jobs, not bidding them.

SALES TIPS FOR CONTRACTORS

Here are a few tips that contractors can use to win – and make the most of – more projects Don’t project your own feelings about money onto your customers. If you come to a final number for your quote and you think that it is higher than expected, don’t assume that your customer will feel the same way. Make the process more about value and less about dollars and cents.

Talk about money early on in the conversation. Have a straightforward, up-front conversation with your customers about what it’s going to take to get the job done right – along with a price range. This will help to get customers comfortable with your price from the beginning.

Be proud of your price. You’ve earned your knowledge and experience, and it’s worth a lot. Don’t devalue all of your hard work by selling yourself short on a bid. Source: Sales Tips For Contractors, https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=6oDPnWapDZM

MICHAEL STONE Michael Stone, author of Markup & Profit: A Contractor’s Guide, Revisited, Profitable Sales: A Contractor’s Guide; and the DVD class “Profitable Estimating,” has more than five decades of experience in the building and remodeling industry. Stone offers business management assistance to constructionrelated companies in the U.S. and Canada with books and training programs available on his website, as well as coaching and consulting services. He can be found on the web at www.markupandprofit.com and can be reached by email at michael@markupandprofit.com or by phone at 1-888-944-0044.

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

29


Deciding what you want to do after high school is a tough decision, possibly one of the toughest (and most important) that a young man or woman in high school has to make. Faced with the burden of impending student loans, the desire to expand their horizons, the uncertainty of whether or not they’ll find a job and the anticipation of adulthood, every year high school students choose a path, and many take a leap into postsecondary education. Unfortunately for the trade industries, not enough kids are choosing the career path of an electrician, plumber, lineman or HVAC/R technician when they go to college, and the impending labor shortage has become a well-known issue. The good news is that trade professionals, tech schools, trade organizations and companies like DSG are developing programs to support students who realize how great a career in the trades can be. In 2009, DSG introduced its Education Connection Fund to provide scholarships to high school and college students who want to train for a career in the trades. Since its inception, the fund has provided nearly $50,000 in scholarships. We checked in with a couple of past winners to see what they were up to, and here are a few of their stories.

To make a donation or to find out more about the DSG Education Connection Fund, visit www.findingmytrade.com.

Mark Wibe 2013 Recipient Mark Wibe learned the benefits of a trade career early on. His father, Gary, owns Wibe Electric & Communication in his hometown of Rollete, ND, and he often helped his father out as a young man. “Even at a young age, I realized that this line of work was a great way to help people,” says Wibe. “Being there to provide them with their electricity and in some cases save the day for them was something that really appealed to me. It’s not always easy work, but it is rewarding.” Wibe used his Education Connection Fund scholarship to attend Minnesota State Community and Technical College in Moorhead, MN, and is currently working as an apprentice for Laughlin Electric in Fargo, ND. “The scholarship meant a lot to me,” says Wibe. “School can be so expensive, especially when you have to pay for it yourself, so scholarship opportunities like these are really important.” In the next five to 10 years, Wibe sees himself getting his journeyman’s license and then becoming a master electrician. He’s already looking forward to bringing some new ideas to the electrical industry. “I think that PLCs could make a move into more residential projects,” says Wibe. “They’re mostly used in commercial jobs, but I could see how they could be used in homes to work with advanced electronic systems.”


Education

CONNECTION Fund Bryton Ciesynski

Hunter Vezina

2014 & 2015 Recipient

2014 Recipient

Bryton Ciesynski is from Gwinner, ND. For those who aren’t familiar with Gwinner, it’s the home of the inventor of the Bobcat, Cyril Keller, who just so happens to also be Ciesynski’s greatgrandfather. Just like his great-grandfather, Ciesynski has an entrepreneurial spirit. “I’d like to maybe own my own business one day,” he says. “I saw the trades as a great place to do that.” Ciesynski used his Education Connection Fund scholarships to attend North Dakota State College of Science in Wahpeton, ND, from which he plans to graduate this fall. He is also apprenticing at Grotberg Electric, where his dad also works as an electrician. “I always wanted to be an electrician,” says Ciesynski. “The scholarships from DSG helped me to pay for my schooling so I could be that much closer to having a job where I get to do what I like to do.” In the future, Ciesynski plans to work toward his journeyman’s license and hopes to one day run his own crew and then eventually even own his own electrical contracting company. “This line of work is just so much fun for me,” says Ciesynski. “You get to see a lot of different things, learn how things work, and I don’t have to wear a suit and tie. I couldn’t see myself doing anything else.”

Education Hunter Vezina didn’t always

CONNECTION aspire to be an electrician. Fund

His isights were initially set on an electrical engineering degree and a job designing advanced electrical systems. But after two years at a fouryear college, he realized that it wasn’t the best fit for him. “I didn’t want to be stuck at a desk in a classroom,” Vezina says. “I wanted to be in a lab doing hands-on learning. That’s what I love best about being an electrician – I’m never in the same place. I get to go somewhere new every day.” Consequently, Vezina changed direction and enrolled at Fox Valley Technical College in Appleton, WI. At the same time, he went to work as an apprentice for his father, Rod, at Gauge Electric in Almond, WI. Thanks to a DSG Education Connection Fund scholarship, that transition wasn’t as hard. “Getting the scholarship from DSG was pretty awesome,” says Vezina. “Technical school is a lot cheaper than a four-year university, but there aren’t as many loan programs available. Opportunities like the DSG scholarship are important because they let you focus more on school and less on how you’re going to pay for it.” Vezina will wrap up his schooling in December of 2017, earning his journeyman’s license. He plans to continue to partner with his dad, and one day, take over the reins of Gauge Electric himself.


“Wait” Loss Products Save 25 Seconds Per Installation

Non-Metallic QuickLATCH™ From Arlington Industries • Works just like a pipe hanger • Installation is fast and easy – snap the conduit into QuickLATCH and it locks automatically • Horizontal or vertical mounting • Integral slot prevents nut from spinning

25% Faster FC Connections Than Traditional Boxes, Without Extra Connectors STAB-iT From RACO

• For any job where flexible armored cable is being used • Locks the cable in place quickly and easily • Each STAB-iT connector accommodates two cables • 4" square boxes available with “M” brackets for stud mounting (perfect for prefab) • Preinstalled 8" solid #12 pigtail for faster installation • Easy to uninstall

Built-In Coupling Saves Installation Time In Tight Spaces

Kwik-Couple® Elbows From Allied Tube & Conduit • No separate couplings to purchase, store, carry or install • Elbows have corrosion-resistant exterior and interior finishes • Listed to Safety Standard UL 6. Manufactured in accordance with ANSI C80.1

32

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


It’s hard to find help nowadays, which makes it even more important for your team to be as efficient and productive as possible. The key is finding products that can help you to optimize tasks, speed up jobs and minimize downtime. With the right tool or part, workers can finish projects faster and better, and that’s good for your bottom line. Here are just a few.

“This Virtually Cut The Pulling Crew Required In Half.” – Andy Brown, Job Site Foreman, Fisk Electric

ServicePLEX From ServiceWire • 50-70% labor savings over conventional pulls • Conductors are tightly twisted together on one reel • Pulls like a single cable, with a uniform pulling tension • Available with pulling eyes

Punch Holes In Enclosures 3X Faster SPEED PUNCH™ From Greenlee • Cuts labor costs with every hole • Punches conduit-sized holes in mild steel, aluminum, fiberglass and plastic • Up to 3X faster setup and disassembly • No-thread punch design eliminates cross-threading • No loose pieces

Check out these products and more in our online “Wait” Loss product guide at www.dsgwaitloss.com.

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

33


Kamstrup Meters

Come To DSG After more than a year of research and evaluation, DSG has a new partner at its side for metering. DSG is now offering Kamstrup meters to water and wastewater utility markets throughout South Dakota, Wisconsin, most of Minnesota and northern Iowa, helping its customers to reduce the challenges associated with non-revenue water and advance their metering capabilities. Kamstrup has been manufacturing meters for more than 70 years, getting its start in Aarhus, Denmark, in 1946. In 1991, it launched a groundbreaking ultrasonic meter that set the precedent for the rest of the metering world. Ultrasonic meters use sound waves to communicate water usage. Unlike mechanical meters, there are no moving parts to interfere with the water flow and readings. It’s Kamstrup’s expertise in ultrasonic metering that made them so appealing to DSG. “Kamstrup has more experience in ultrasonic meters than anyone else in the United States,” says Malcolm Macdonald, DSG’s waterworks segment manager. “One of our main goals is to help our customers reduce the volume of non-revenue water that goes through their system, and we feel that Kamstrup is the best partner to help us do that. These meters are the most accurate we’ve ever seen.” Not only is Kamstrup’s meter solution highly precise, but it’s also user-friendly. Its Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) system – known as READy – can be used with an Android smartphone or


tablet (plans are in the works for the application to be compatible with Apple devices as well). Once set up, the READy app uses Google Maps to show all nearby meter locations and statuses. As metering personnel drive through the system, the smartphone automatically displays the nearby meters, which meters are being read and which meters remain to be read. It even keeps reading during phone calls. Meter readers can then send collected data to the billing department from the field, and consumption data can be exported to billing programs for easy invoicing. By utilizing smartphone technology, Kamstrup has eliminated the burdensome equipment investments associated with deployment hardware that can cost a utility thousands of dollars over and above the cost of the actual system. “For a few hundred dollars for a tablet or smartphone, you have everything you need,” says Macdonald. “This system is so easy to use, we can train our customers in a couple of hours. With other systems, it might’ve taken us two days.” The Kamstrup system includes some unique monitoring features as well. In addition to the ability to set up major burst warnings and flag issues like leaks, Kamstrup technology tracks both the ambient operating temperature and the fluid temperature, providing a valuable early warning system for frozen pipes. Finally, Kamstrup encoded meters are extremely versatile, compatible with virtually all other metering software. This is a great option for utilities, municipalities or rural water systems that aren’t ready to switch out their entire system but need to replace outdated meters with a more accurate option. Furthermore, all of the programming for the meters is done in-house by DSG. With other solutions, meters have to be ordered pre-programmed, making them hard

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

to stock and requiring long lead times. Now, DSG can stock the meters and program them as needed. “We’ve probably cut out six weeks of lead time with Kamstrup,” says Macdonald. “The feasibility of the system for a utility is unlike anything out there.” DSG is now educating customers about Kamstrup’s AMR technology (“It’s the closest thing you can get to an AMI system without actually having to install one,” says Macdonald), but it will also offer Kamstrup AMI systems beginning in 2017. As the partnership continues to grow, DSG plans to put more and more of Kamstrup’s innovative ideas to work for its customers. Since DSG initiated its partnership with Kamstrup in the spring of 2016, it has deployed several systems. Results thus far have been outstanding, with zero failures and no problems. To learn more about DSG’s partnership with Kamstrup, contact your DSG metering technology or waterworks representative.

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

35


FUNDING THE FUTURE BY FUNDING STUDENTS The world will always need skilled tradespeople, and a scholarship from the DSG Education Connection Fund could help someone you know to join them.

Every spring, DSG gives away thousands of dollars in scholarships to high school seniors and current college students who are going to college to learn a trade. These scholarships are funded by DSG’s employee owners, customers and business partners to help today’s youth become tomorrow’s tradespeople.

DEADLINE IS FEBRUARY 28, 2017 Learn more at www.findingmytrade.com

Education

CONNECTION Fund


State Of The

INDUSTRY HVAC/R

Taking Charge

Future

Next 3 Exits

Of Change HVAC/R Segment Manager Greg Servais

The HVAC/R industry as a whole is thriving. This past summer was a hot one, and that’s always good news for our line of work. In addition, building codes are helping to drive business for contractors, especially when it comes to ventilation. With its indoor air quality and efficiency benefits, balanced ventilation is increasingly becoming the right choice for homes and commercial buildings alike. The Department of Energy

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

(DOE) continues to change the way we’re looking at efficiency. As the demand for more-efficient products grows, we’ve seen great advancements in modulating compressors, higher SEER ratings on mini splits and more variable refrigeration flow (VRF) products in our market. In addition, we’re saying goodbye to R22 refrigerant. After 2020, R22 will be off the market, and it will be important for HVAC/R contractors and techs to get on board with alternatives like R422D now. As more government regulation continues to present new challenges for those in the HVAC/R industry, we’ll make it our job here at DSG to carry the torch of information so that our customers aren’t blindsided by

these new regulations. As an active member of the HARDI organization, we will help to make sure that our industry has a positive voice on Capitol Hill and a say in what regulations look like before they become mandates. Finally, looking forward, we’re on the cusp of the smart home, where the thermostat is evolving into a whole-house connection point tied to lighting, communications and security. And I expect big things for mini splits, VRF products and IAQ solutions. All of these point to a greater need for all of us in the HVAC/R industry to look at homes and other buildings as complete systems rather than individual bits and pieces.

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

37


S H A R E YO U R O W N

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES Upload your photos, videos and stories at www.dsgoutdoors.com.

4

2 1

3

5

7

7.

ith w na ta on M s n hi er ith st w ea T) n )i M N ll, M pe s ji, is hi id al (K ith em s w (B ie . D, lit ric ar ia ,S ct be ec le ity s C Sp hi rE d d te nt pi ith ite ia Pa w Ra ad lim T, m n . i , R d e. M T fro . , G ik an m M l a p er er , ll, DS ic fro en at de l e gs y rn bl e p m u in s t P le st he H o i t r p f et u al T. ok in de or n K Br s m ro ar n en o G in , M H d (B gr ck 1. hi DS c n G nty c. ar ou om bu m In . DS ou lo n M -p ro s ND o ’ 2. 29 red B eas ens f from ke C sier us, y. b a s s ke k d L Ja teTe um in tur ic ar n G ng 3. la ke P tew se i rom Col f i e DS pri S e p in M s g m rs lk m na n 4. fro he ho s e i Jo t o er h Sc h ffl it h 5. ou ad wit ue , w Th D) r K ND ife n, 6. S nn to Je illis W

6


KEEPING OUR

PROMISES

100% Order Accuracy • 2 Business Day Stock Credit • Top 200 Items Always In Stock DSG has spent the last few years rolling DSG COMPANY OVERVIEW out our Customer Service Guarantee (CSG) program in order to prove just how committed we are to the success of our partners. This CSG program is built on three promises: 100% order accuracy, a 2 day stock credit on returns and keeping our top 200 most popular items always in stock. If we fall short on any of these promises, we issue a $25 certificate to be redeemed on a future purchase. We take these promises seriously, tracking our Top 200 Stock success on each of them and making it available on our website. In fact, we keep track of our performance on each promise as it relates to individual customers. In other words, we don’t just keep score on how we are doing as a company, we keep score on how we are doing specifically serving you and 100% Order Accuracy 2-Day Credits your needs. To give you an idea of how we go 2012 2014 2016 2013 2015 about this, included to the right are some ABC CONTRACTORS YTD graphics describing our progress since Top 200 Stock 99.99% NA 99.97% 100% 99.99% the Customer Service Guarantee was 99.97% 100% Order Accuracy NA 99.96% 100% 99.87% introduced, as well as a chart showing how we track progress for each customer (using 100% 2-Day Credits 100% 100% 99.25% NA a fictitious contractor as an example). 11,128 Total Lines Shipped 640 9,744 11,021 5,346 Want to learn more about the Customer Service Guarantee? Just ask Total Orders Shipped 3,099 168 2,658 2,951 1,251 your DSG representative. Total Returns

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

11

264

274

279

134

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

39


I DIDN’T KNOW DSG DID THAT! 3-D LIGHTING Design

3-D computer renderings like those pictured above allow DSG Corporate Lighting Solutions Specialist, Aaron Keil, to utilize his engineering expertise to simulate real-life lighting environments.

For many people, it’s hard to visualize an idea or concept without actually seeing it. When it comes to lighting, it can be especially hard to know how fixtures will illuminate an environment. Thankfully, DSG’s 3-D lighting design capabilities help contractors, architects, engineers and building owners clearly see a lighting layout – and how it will interact with the space that houses it – before it is ever installed. DSG’s 3-D lighting designs are highly accurate renderings that show how light will act in certain rooms or buildings, taking into account objects, reflectances, color, etc. The renderings come with documentation that includes a number of unique assessments, such as lighting levels, point40

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

by-point calculations (how much light is received at a particular point in the space) and lighting power density (LPD), a compliance measure that confirms whether or not a project meets the watts per square foot regulation set forth by the federal government. For exterior projects, these designs can also include light trespass calculations (how much light spills onto a neighboring property). “One of the biggest benefits of these 3-D lighting designs is that they allow customers to see exactly how the light will behave,” says Aaron Keil, DSG’s corporate lighting solutions specialist. “Customers are then able to make adjustments before any products are purchased or installed. I’ve provided renderings where customers were WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


DSG does more than supply products. We also offer services and expertise that may not be as visible as our warehouses or our trucks. Here are a couple of our capabilities that might surprise you.

GENERAL NOTES:

Eiko 110W

Eiko 110W

Eiko 110W

Eiko 110W

DRAWING SHOWING LOCATIONS OF EQUIPMENT, GEAR, LIGHTING, PIPING, ETC. ARE DIAGRAMMATIC AND MAY NOT ALWAYS REFLECT ACTUAL INSTALLATION CONDITIONS. DRAWINGS SHOW THE GENERAL ARRANGEMENT OF ALL EQUIPMENT, GEAR, LIGHTING, AND PIPING AND MAY NOT INCLUDE ALL OFFSETS AND FITTINGS AS REQUIRED. DRAWINGS SHALL BE FOLLOWED AS CLOSELY AS ACTUAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTION AND THE WORK OF OTHERS WILL PERMIT. CONTRACTOR TO FIELD VERIFY ALL CONDITIONS.

Eiko 110W

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR SHALL COORDINATE ALL GEAR, LIGHTING, PIPING AND EQUIPMENT WITH WORK OF OTHER TRADES PRIOR TO COMMENCEMENT OF WORK. FINISH AND INSTALL ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS IN COMPLIANCE WITH LOCAL BUILDING CODES AND THE AUTHORITY HAVING JURISDICTION AND IN ACCORDANCE WITH GENERALLY ACCEPTED INDUSTRY STANDARDS AND PRACTICES AND MANUFACTURER'S WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS.

47.5

Eiko 110W

58.4

60.2

Eiko 110W

61.1

Eiko 110W

56.5

Eiko 110W

47.9

Eiko 110W

43.0

CALCULATIONS HAVE BEEN PERFORMED ACCORDING TO IES STANDARDS AND GOOD PRACTICE. SOME OF THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE MEASURED VALUES AND CALCULATED RESULTS MAY OCCUR DUE TO TOLERANCES IN CALCULATION METHODS, TESTING PROCEDURES, COMPONENT PERFORMANCE, MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES AND FIELD CONDITIONS. INPUT DATA USED TO GENERATE THE ATTACHED CALCULATIONS SUCH AS ROOM DIMENSIONS, REFLECTANCE, FURNITURE, AND ARCHITECTURAL ELEMENTS SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE LIGHTING CALCULATIONS, IF THE REAL ENVIRONMENT CONDITIONS DO NOT MATCH THE INPUT DATA, DIFFERENCES, WILL OCCUR BETWEEN THE MEASURED VALUES AND CALCULATED VALUES.

ELECTRICAL NOTES:

50.7

Eiko 110W

61.7

64.2

Eiko 110W

65.2

Eiko 110W

60.0

Eiko 110W

51.1

Eiko 110W

45.4

1. ALL WORK SHALL COMPLY WITH ALL FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL BUILDING CODES AND ORDINANCES, NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION (NFPA), NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE (NEC), AND THE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION (OSHA). 2. INSTALL ALL EQUIPMENT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LATEST EDITION OF THE MANUFACTURER'S PUBLISHED RECOMMENDATION. MAINTAIN ALL RECOMMENDED CLEARANCES AROUND EQUIPMENT. 3. COORDINATE ALL EQUIPMENT WITH HVAC, PLUMBING, STRUCTURAL MEMBERS, DOORS, AND OTHER POTENTIAL CONFLICTS. COORDINATE WORK WITH ALL OTHER TRADES.

50.7

Eiko 110W

47.5

Eiko 110W

61.7 58.3

64.1

Eiko 110W

60.1

Eiko 110W

65.3

Eiko 110W

61.3

Eiko 110W

60.1

Eiko 110W

56.5

Eiko 110W

50.9

Eiko 110W

48.0

Eiko 110W

45.5 43.2

4. ALL WIRING, INCLUDING CONTROL WIRING WILL BE PROVIDED BY THE ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR. THE ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR SHALL PROVIDE CONTROLS, AND ALL MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT TO MAKE THE ELECTRICAL POWER/LIGHTING/DATA/FIRE ALARM/SECUTRITY SYSTEM COMPLETELY OPERATIONAL, READY FOR THE OWNER'S USE. 5. THE ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR SHALL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR TESTING, ADJUSTING AND CALIBRATION OF CONTROL SYSTEMS UNLESS SPECIFIED OTHERWISE. 6. THE ELECTICAL CONTRACTOR SHALL PROVIDE AN OPERATING AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL, CODE COMPLIANCE REPORT AND COPY OF THE STATE APPROVED ELECTICAL PLAN TO THE BUILDING OWNER OR OPERATOR. THE OPERATING AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL SHALL INCLUDE BASIC DATA RELATINGTO THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT. REQUIRED ROUTINE MAINTENANCE ACTIONS SHALL BE CLEARLY IDENTIFIED. WHERE APPLICABLE, ELECTRICAL CONTROLS INFORMATION SUCH AS DIAGRAMS, SCHEMATICS, CONTROL SEQUENCE DESCRIPTIONS, AND MAINTENANCE AND CALIBRATION INFORMATION SHALL BE INCLUDED. 7. THE ELECTICAL DRAWINGS ARE DIAGRAMMATIC IN NATURE AND ARE INTENDED TO INDICATE CAPACITY, SIZE, APPROXIMATE LOCATION AND GENERAL ARRANGEMENT, NOT THE SPECIFIC DETAILS OF CONSTRUCTION. ADDITIONAL OFFSETS, FITTINGS, ACCESSORIES, AND COORDINATION THAT MAY BE NEEDED FOR PROPER INSTALLATION AND ARE THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE ELECTICAL CONTRACTOR. 8. ANY ERRORS OR AMBIGUITIES IN THE PLANS AND/OR SPECIFICATIONS THAT ARE DISCOVERED BY THE CONTRACTOR SHALL BE REPORTED TO THE ENGINEER BEFORE WORK IS STARTED. OMISSION OF PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO ANY ITEM NECESSARY FOR COMPLETE INSTALLATION AND PROPER OPERATION THEREOF SHALL NOT RELIEVE THE CONTRACTOR OF THE RESPONSIBILITY OF FURNISHING THE SAME AT NO EXTRA COST. THE CONTRACTOR IS RESPONSIBLE FOR REVIEWING ALL PROJECT DOCUMENTS FOR INFORMATION PRIOR TO BID.

Eiko 110W

Eiko 110W

Eiko 110W

Eiko 110W

Eiko 110W

9. ALL WORKMANSHIP, MATERIALS, EQUIPMENT, AND ANY OTHER COMPONENTS REQUIRED FOR JOB COMPLETION SHALL COMPLY WITH ALL APPLICABLE CODES AND PROJECT SPECIFICATIONS. 10. ANY CHANGES TO MATERIALS SPECIFIED ON PLAN MUST BE APPROVED BY THE ELECTRICAL ENGINEER.

surprised to see how different the lighting looked compared to what they imagined in their heads. They were grateful they got the chance to change it before putting too much work into it.” Keil, who works out of DSG’s La Crosse, WI, branch, has been providing 3-D lighting services to local customers for about three years, and now DSG is ready to offer it all across DSG country. Keil has a degree in architectural engineering, which provides a unique and valuable perspective when it comes to this type of service. In fact, he is often the first person to get involved on a customer’s lighting project. “Most people with my degree work for an engineering firm or an architect,” says Keil. “But I also used to work for a large contractor WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

11. LIGHTING EQUIPMENT IS NOT TO BE USED FOR TEMPORARY LIGHTING DURING CONSTRUCTION.

in the Twin Cities before coming to DSG. With my background, I know what lighting options benefit our customers best so I can make good suggestions. And when they explain their lighting challenges, I understand what they’re talking about.” DSG’s 3-D lighting designs can be used for both new construction and retrofit projects, adding lighting to existing spaces. Time frame and other considerations are determined on a projectby-project basis. To learn more, contact your local DSG electrical representative. 12. POWER EQUIPMENT IS NOT TO BE USED FOR TEMPORARY POWER DURING CONSTRUCTION.

13. CLEAN FIXTURES AND EQUIPMENT AND LEAVE IN PROPER WORKING CONDITION AT THE TIME OF FINAL CLEAN-UP.

PLAN NOTES:

Luminaire Schedule Symbol Tag Qty Eiko 110 30

Label LLH-2C-U

Arrangement SINGLE

Calculation Summary Label Gym_Floor_1

CalcType Illuminance

LPD Area Summary Label LPDArea_1

Area 8624

Units Fc

Total Watts 3169.499

LLF 1.000

Avg 55.22

Description LLH-2C-U

Max 65.3

Min 43.0

Avg/Min Max/Min 1.28 1.52

LPD 0.368

Continued on page 42 -COPYRIGHT NOTICEUNAUTHORIZED COPYING OF OR BUILDING FROM PLAN IS VIOLATION OF U.S. COPYRIGHT LAWS, CONSTITUTING CRIMINAL THEFT.

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

41


Continued from page 41

PUMP SHOP Subfactory

The Pump Shop has been around since 1983. Pictured (left to right) are Mike Schwebach, Pump Shop manager, and Pat Bangasser, inside salesman for DSG’s waterworks segment.

There’s nothing worse than completing a project only to find out that some part of it is malfunctioning. When it comes to waterworks, that can cost you a lot of time and labor. DSG’s Pump Shop Subfactory takes the uncertainty out of the equation, adding confidence into each and every pump it sells. The DSG Pump Shop builds, tests, repairs and provides maintenance for pumps for all kinds of water systems. Starting with either factory-built pumps, or pumps that it has custom-built, DSG installs the right motor for the pump’s particular job. Then, using a unique 16-foot underground water tank, DSG tests each pump to make sure it performs as it should – before it goes into the ground. “We can recreate the same conditions that the pumps will be used in, including depth, flow condition and head pressure, in our testing tank,” says Malcolm Macdonald, DSG’s waterworks segment manager. “When you get a pump from us, we’ve proven that it works properly.”

42

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

In addition to its turnkey building and testing capabilities, the Pump Shop has a wide variety of inventory, including some of the most trusted names in pumps, such as Grundfos. “Our ability to keep a good stock of pumps and components on hand speeds things up for everyone,” says Macdonald. “Our customers are able to be more responsive to the needs of water users, especially when it comes to emergency situations. No one wants to be out of water. Many times we have the pumps and parts on hand to keep water flowing, even if it is a temporary fix until a permanent solution can be installed.” Headed up by Mike Schwebach (DSG’s pump expert for more than 25 years), the Pump Shop is located in Sioux Falls, SD. However, customers from anywhere in DSG’s service territory can take advantage of its services. For questions about DSG’s Pump Shop, contact your local DSG waterworks representative.

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


BOLD MEETS GUARANTEES Dakota Supply Group is proud to be the newest KOHLER® distributor in the Midwest, bringing together BOLD plumbing products with our distinctive Customer Service Guarantee.

information@dsginc.biz | www.dakotasupplygroup.com


NEWS WIRE |

DSG’s Metering Team Moves To Hopkins, MN

A new address means new capabilities for DSG Metering. In July 2016, DSG relocated its Twin Cities metering technology team from its Burnsville, MN, location to its office in Hopkins, MN, located at 620 16th Avenue South. This move gives DSG’s current metering support team more access to the company’s full range of products and expertise in the plumbing, waterworks, electrical and utility industries. “We moved to Hopkins to serve our customers better,” says Jon Bradley, metering product specialist. “We’re providing the same selection of innovative products, but with improved synergy when it comes to related DSG parts, tools, materials and support.” DSG’s Twin Cities metering team has retained its same phone numbers: 800-325-0514 and 952-890-3811.

7

61

169

494

Jon Bradley Metering Product Specialist

Brad Simms Metering Account Manager

62

Chet Bente Metering Account Manager

DSG Donates $22,000 Worth Of HVAC

Equipment To Madison Area Technical College In early July 2016, DSG donated $22,000 worth of Goodman HVAC equipment, including two 12.5-ton rooftop units and four modulating furnaces, to the Industrial Mechanical–HVAC program at Madison Area Technical College in Madison, WI. The equipment will help the college expand its training for aspiring HVAC technicians. “Supporting the trade industries is very important to us here at DSG,” says Laura Potter, branch manager at Madison Area Technical College’s Brian Moore (left) shakes hands with Ryan Wiesensel, DSG delivery driver (right). DSG in Madison, WI. “This donation will help MATC’s program continue to turn out well-rounded HVAC professionals who are well versed in both commercial and residential HVAC work.”

44

CONNECTIONS | 2016 – ISSUE 2

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM


Three DSG Employee Owners Named To NAED’s List Of “30 Under 35” Award Winners

Three employee owners from DSG were honored this past summer as “30 Under 35” award winners by the National Association of Electrical Distributors (NAED)’s tED magazine. The winners are Bryan Gohn, an insides sales associate at DSG’s St. Paul, MN, branch; Chad Baumgartner, a quotations specialist from the company’s Fargo, ND, branch; and Cameron Pederson, an account manager who is also from the Fargo branch. This award is given to 30 NAED members aged 34 and younger who represent the top emerging leaders in the electrical industry and who possess the initiative, drive, integrity and creativity to propel the industry forward. “This award is given to some of the brightest young minds in the electrical industry,” says Todd Kumm, DSG CEO. “We couldn’t be prouder of these three young men, and we’re excited for what they will do in the future to help our customers succeed.”

Bryan Gohn Inside Sales St. Paul, MN

Chad Baumgartner Quotations Specialist Fargo, ND

Cameron Pederson Account Manager Fargo, ND

DSG Now Offering Electrical Products In Western Twin Cities Area

This past summer, DSG opened a new city desk location in Hopkins, MN, that provides electrical products to contractors and other trade professionals in the Twin Jordan Anderson Cities’ western metro area. This new city desk is located at 1515 6th Street South, in the same building as Pipeline Supply (a division of DSG). Prior to this, DSG primarily Clark Marshall offered plumbing and HVAC/R products to this area. Product offerings at this new city desk now include many of the electrical industry’s top brands, including Eaton (Cutler-

WWW.DAKOTASUPPLYGROUP.COM

Hammer), Eaton Lighting (Cooper Lighting), Pass & Seymour, Lutron, RACO, RAB Lighting and GE. The DSG team at this location is headed up by Jordan Anderson, who can be ELECTRICAL reached at 952-351-2500. “We’re constantly looking for opportunities to better serve our customers,” says Clark Marshall, branch manager at DSG’s St. Paul office. “With this addition, our customers in the Twin Cities benefit from improved access to the best names in electrical products from a partner that they know and trust.”

2016 – ISSUE 2 | CONNECTIONS

45


NEWS WIRE |

DSG Honored As One Of The 50 Best Places To Work DSG was recently named to Prairie Business magazine’s annual list of the 50 best companies to work for in Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota. This is the second time in three years that DSG has been named to this list. DSG employs nearly 800 people throughout Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. The company operates via an employee stock ownership plan (ESOP), which means that every employee is considered part owner of the company. “We’re proud to have been named one of the 50 best places to work,” says Todd Kumm, DSG CEO, “and it’s especially important that the nomination came from our employee owners. They are what make this company great.” Companies were nominated to Prairie Business magazine’s 50 Best Places To Work through an anonymous employee engagement and satisfaction survey, and workplaces were rated in areas including work environment, employee benefits and employee happiness. According to Prairie Business, companies named to the list have succeeded in creating work environments that foster collaboration and fun, provide opportunities for growth and implement corporate structures that allow input from all team members.

ENERGIZE

Your Business In Early 2017 With Powerful Training Opportunities From DSG! POWER TOOLS WORKSHOPS Get long-term results in a short period of time. In less than eight hours, this unique training session will add value to your business and power up your profits. P4 LEARNING LABS Two days that will change everything: Through presentations and hands-on workshops, this training event teaches small-business owners and managers real-life ways to improve productivity, cash flow, profitability and more.

Look for more information coming soon!


Ballard’s Resort Minnesota’s Lake Of The Woods

Housekeeping Cabins Ice Fishing Charter Fishing Full-Service Bar And Restaurant

Mention this ad and receive FREE breakfast and lunch with your lodging and fishing package. Offer valid during the 2017 seasons. Offer based on regular package rates. Not valid with Walleye Connections or any other promotion.

ballardsresort.com 218.634.1849


North Dakota: Bismarck (800) 363-7112 Bismarck Waterworks (855) 337-9258 Dickinson (855) 245-2098 Fargo (800) 437-4702 Fargo Waterworks (800) 342-4676 Grand Forks (800) 633-2211 Minot (800) 472-2145 Williston (800) 637-0170

P.O. Box 13573 Grand Forks, ND 58208-3573

South Dakota: Aberdeen (800) 660-5532 Mitchell (800) 660-5534 Pierre (800) 660-5537 Rapid City (800) 660-5538 Sioux Falls (800) 540-8215 Sioux Falls Waterworks (800) 660-5531

Minnesota: Alexandria (800) 345-0094 Austin (800) 521-6747 Bemidji (866) 506-0280 Grand Rapids (877) 327-1454 Ham Lake (763) 784-4478 Hopkins (800) 328-3976 Monticello (888) 295-9355 Oakdale (651) 777-1044 Rochester (800) 562-1784 St. Paul (800) 652-9784 Winona (800) 237-0470

Wisconsin: La Crosse (800) 279-2726 Plover (800) 472-1661 Rice Lake (800) 962-2759

Montana: Billings (844) 753-9120 Bozeman (800) 416-0005 Helena (800) 697-0005 Kalispell (800) 949-0005 Missoula (888) 865-0005

Minot Williston Grand Forks Dickinson

Kalispell Missoula

Helena Bozeman

Bismarck Billings

FARGO

Aberdeen Rapid City

Pierre Mitchell Sioux Falls

Bemidji Grand Rapids Alexandria Twin Cities

Rice Lake

Plover Winona La Crosse Rochester Austin

www.dakotasupplygroup.com

Ham Lake Hopkins Monticello Oakdale St. Paul

Connections 2016 - Issue 2  

Connections magazine is a full-color magazine that publishes twice a year.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you