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the volume 129

tuesday november 8, 2011

DakotaStudent issue 21

Art auction See Page 9

Reaching the students, faculty and staff of the University of North Dakota since 1888

UND senior crowned Nickname fight heats up Miss Eastern N.D.

PAGEANT Laura Harmon will move on to the Miss North Dakota competition.

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JAYE MILLSPAUGH The Dakota Student

Eleven local young women gathered in the Empire Theater in downtown Grand Forks on Saturday night for the chance to become Miss Grand Forks 2012, Miss Empire 2012 or Miss Eastern Dakota 2012. Three winners were crowned for 2012. The winner of Miss Eastern N.D is Laura Harmon,

who is a senior at UND and who is originally from Grand Forks. “It’s amazing and I’m so excited,” said Wilson who was wearing a sparkly red evening gown, “I’m going to expand my platform, practice my talent and prepare for state.” The second runner up for Miss Eastern Dakota was Abby McCauley, and the first runnerup was Megan Yahna. Miss Empire is Stephanie Erickson from Fargo, N.D. and Miss Grand Forks is Kate Wilson, who is a UND student originally from Rochester, MN.

CROWN > page

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Current slavery issues discussed AWARENESS Committee brings the issue of human trafficking into the spotlight.

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KAITLIN BEZDICEK The Dakota Student

The Civil War happened over a century ago, but human slavery is not just an event of the past. UND’s Dream Maker Action Committee (DMAC) is a group on campus that discusses current world injustices and chose to concentrate on human trafficking this month. Patrick Atkinson, founder of the Institute for Trafficked, Exploited, and Missing Persons (ITEMP), spoke about human trafficking in Gamble Hall last Thursday as a stop on his speaking tour throughout Minnesota and North Dakota. “We’re not talking about the branding of slaves in 1492 anymore, were talking about right

now,” said Atkinson. “Right now, 12.8 million women and children, and some young men, are trapped into labor or sexual slavery in the world. In the US, it’s sexual slavery.” Three types of human trafficking occur in the world today. There is forced labor that can include child soldiers and laborers. There is sex trafficking that can include prostitution, pornography and sexual tourism. Finally, there is selling of the body in cases such as organ harvesting. Atkinson didn’t hold anything back from an audience consisting mostly of students; he showed graphic video clips portraying the sex trafficking that goes on behind closed doors. “In the US alone, there are over 100,000 child prostitutes,” said Atkinson. “This happens because were letting this happen. You are going to walk out of here knowing more than 99 percent of

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Human trafficking: By the numbers

>More than 100,000 child prostitutes reside in the Unites States. >12.8 million men, women and children are trapped in labor or sexual slavery Source: Patrick Atkinson, founder of ITEMP PHOTO > MCT Camus

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Inside

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Lawsuit, bill add complexity to issue

CULLEN DONOHUE The Dakota Student

In support of the Fighting Sioux nickname, members of the Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe announced a lawsuit against the NCAA. On Nov. 1 tribal members of the Spirit Lake tribe announce a lawsuit against the NCAA. The lawsuit supports the Fighting Sioux nickname and focuses on accounts that the NCAA discriminates against the tribal members. The Minot attorney representing the tribe, Reed Soderstrom, is confident that the lawsuit will be successful. “This is a case we believe we can win,” he told The Grand Forks Herald last week. Others aren’t so sure. “It seems like a last desperate attempt,” Leigh Jeanotte, Director of UND American Indian Stu-

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dent Services, said. He does not think the lawsuit supporters have much of a chance at winning. The lawsuit is founded on several allegations including that both it and the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe were left out of negotiations leading to a 2007 settlement between North Dakota and the NCAA, violating the Indian Religious Freedom Act and defamation of the Sioux nation by calling the nickname “hostile and abusive.” Going to court The lawsuit announcement makes it appear that the tribe’s efforts are united. Not all members of the Spirit Lake Sioux Tribe are completely behind the lawsuit. “I already received information about a petition to stop the lawsuit,” Jeanotte said, refer-

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Class studies distracted driving

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UND PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING CLASS

One of the UND’s Public Health Nursing classes conducted a survey as part of an intervention project at the Memorial Union on Oct. 14, 2011. The intervention project included the North Dakota and Minnesota laws against the act of texting while driving. The group had 30 surveys completed. The surveys were filled

out by 24 females and six males. The survey showed that 26 out of the 30 people had admitted to being in a car when the driver was texting and driving at the same time. It also found that 2/3 of the participants admitted to texting while driving. Of those people none of them had received a citation for texting while driving. The nursing students also had the subjects play a game, which consisted of identifying shapes, colors and relevance of time.

The participants were asked to consider whether or not they were a good multitasker prior to playing the game. After they played the game, they revealed if the game changed their perception of texting while driving as most people who do text and drive consider themselves a good multitasker. Nearly all the participants who played the game stated that they

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Senate funds ski program ACTIVITY Money allocated by Senate will be used for Ski UND and Late Night Skate programs.

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KAITLIN BEZDICEK The Dakota Student

To promote outdoor activity for the inevitable North Dakota winter, Student Senate passed Bill 1112-18 to appropriate $6800 to continue funding the Ski UND program. As well as funding Ski

>Caption contest, see page 3. > ‘Senate Resolution Necessary’, see page 5. >P.H. Honey Badger, see page 6.

UND, this bill will also promote the Late Night Skate Program. “We have combined these two very similar programs into the same bill this year,” said Student Wellness Advisory Committee Chair Matt Schober. Schober saw a need for the Late Night Skate Program because many ice rinks close at 8:30 PM. Schober found this to be too early for many students. By teaming with Nightlife, Schober worked to extend ski rink hours to midnight on Friday and Saturday nights. In addition, Hockey World has

committed to donating 24 pairs of skates to UND for those who are new to skating or do not have skates at college. This is the third year Senate will be funding Ski UND. Due to administrative changes, the program has been able to cut back from last year’s need of $7000. The money appropriated pays for the grooming of ski trails, labor costs, and rental of skis. Overall Ski UND, highly sup-

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> “Puss and Boots” review, see page 12. >UND Football, see page 13. >UND Hockey, see page 14.


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DS datebook

tuesday november 8, 2011

DATEBOOK

today, november 8, 2011

> event: Celebrate Nontraditional Student Recognition Week. Today from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. stop by the Adult-Re-entry booth in the Memorial Union > film: Screening of “The Way of the Warrior” starting at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. Admission is free. > music: A lecture titled “Bach and Mozart on the Keyboard: Teaching the Styles of Foregone Times with Confidence” by Rachel Crooks will begin at 7 p.m. in room 202 of the Hughes Fine Arts Center. wednesday, november 9, 2011 > event: Today is BST and Maintenance Appreciation Day!

The Dakota Student editorial

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Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: dakotastudent.com > Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features

Thank you from the DS The Dakota Student would like to thank everyone who attended our open house yesterday. It was great meeting and speaking with members of the campus community. We appreciate your support and feedback and will continue to work hard to serve the campus.

> event: Receive help writing a cover letter from 2-3 p.m. in McCannel 280. > film: “Biutiful” will be playing in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl beginning at 7 p.m. A $1 donation is suggested. thursday, november 10, 2011 > academics: Last day to withdraw from term or drop a class with record. friday, november 11, 2011 > Veteran’s Day: No School Tell us what is happening on campus > Submit information via email to dakotastudentmedia@gmail.com or call 777-2677

Sincerely, The DS Staff

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We’ll be back on Friday Nov. 18.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

Features Editor Megan Sevigny > megan.sevigny@my.und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@my.und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@my.und.edu Web Editor Madi Whitman > madisson.whitman@my.und.edu

business Business Manager Rachael Stusynski > 777-2677 rachael.stusynski@email.und.edu Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Kyla Lindstrom > kyla.lindstrom@my.und.edu Alexandra McClaflin > alexandra.mcclaflin@my.und.edu Tyler Olson tyler.olson@my.und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677 All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

> The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

Have a great long weekend!

Editor-in-Chief Brandi Jewett > brandi.jewett.1@my.und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Jon Hamlin > jon.s.hamlin@my.und.edu News Editor Robb Jeffries > robert.jeffries@my.und.edu

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> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.

Want to work on your writing skills? Apply to be a writer for the DS...pick up an application in McCannel Hall room 170. www.TheDakotaStudent.com


the Dakota Student

CROWN >

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time college student within the state of North Dakota. OutFrom page of-state residents attending a This pageant was part of North Dakota college are welthe first preliminary round and come to participate too. There is no entry fee but all the three winners will be advancing on to the Miss North contestants must raise at least Dakota pageant, which will be $100 for the Children’s Miraheld sometime in 2012. The cle Network. A crystal “MirMiss Grand Forks Scholarship acle Maker” award was given Organization is a division of to contestant Kayla Weise for the Miss North Dakota and the raising the most money. The contestants this year Miss America Scholarship Orwere Gretchen Henningsen, ganizations. The event provided the Kate Wilson, Abby McCauley, Carlie Meeparticipants with a chance Working with the han, Allison Gunderson, to continue girls, encouraging C h r i s t i n a where Miss North Dathem and watching King, Laura Harmon, Kykota 2011, them grow is what I lie Vatthauer, Ariana WalkKayla Weise, er, will leave enjoy most. Stephanie off. “Pageants Judy Register E r i c k s o n , have really local pageant director and Megan helped me Yahna. with confiThe girls dence and also helped me a lot with public were judged in four areas: lifespeaking. That’s mostly what style and fitness, talent, eveI do as Miss North Dakota is ning gown, and one on-stage interview question. public speaking,” said Walker. The lifestyle and fitness Walker will be competing in the 101st annual Miss America portion featured the girls modpageant in Las Vegas, NV on eling swimsuits. The talent January 14 2012. Tickets are portion showcased the girls’ currently on sale and the event various talents, which included singing, playing musical inwill be aired live on ABC. The Miss Grand Forks pag- struments like the piano and eant is open to any women be- the flute, and cupcake decorattween the ages of 17-24 who ing. The evening gown portion is a high school senior or full-

NEWS featured the girls modeling formal dresses, which they remained in during their on-stage questions about their platforms. The platforms included preventing childhood obesity, raising awareness about the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) disease, and mentoring youth. The judges were Kathy Shellum, David Adams, Beth Carlson, Zac Daniels who is a disc jockey on Grand Forks’ Z94.7 top forty radio station, and Michelyn Butler who is Miss Wisconsin 2008 and now lives in Fargo, N.D., with her husband. “Working with the girls, encouraging them and watching them grow is what I enjoy the most,” said Judy Register, who was a local pageant director and judge for 25 years. The event also featured various other performances. Studio X from Minot N.D. performed two group dance routines and there were also solo dance routines from the Junior Teen Miss North Dakota, Miss North Dakota 2011, and Miss ND’s Outstanding Teen 2011. Miss Grand Forks 2011, Emily Burkland performed a classical piano solo.

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> Jaye Millspaugh is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at jaye.millspaugh.2@und. edu

DS Caption Contest

Campus Briefs

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Applications for ARH National Communications Coordinator due next week The Association of Residence Halls is seeking candidates for its National Communication Coordinator. Applications are due Nov. 15 in the ARH Office, room 25 in Wilkerson Hall. Applicants are required to attend the Nov. 17 ARH meeting where they will be interviewed by members of ARH Policy Board. The board will select the candidate they feel would best fulfill the position’s requirements. The duties of the NCC include but are not limited to: maintaining the school’s affiliation status, choosing delegations to go to conferences, serving as the ARH’s vote in conferences (if an affiliated member), and relaying information and networking opportunities to the ARH from the national headquarters.

Dakota Venture Group featured in national business magazine A student organization has been featured in a national magazine. The Dakota Venture Group, a student-run investment organization at the UND, is profiled in the latest issue of NBIA Review, the magazine of the National Business Incubation Association. NBIA profiles members who have found creative ways to better manage their entrepreneur programs and serve clients. The DVG program was developed by the UND Center for Innovation and considers itself the first completely student run venture capital fund in the United States.

UND dietetics program receives continued full accreditation The Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE) voted to continue full accreditation for the University of North Dakota’s Coordinated Program in Dietetics, during the board’s September meetings. The program is accredited at the baccalaureate level for an enrollment of 24 first- and second-year students and a Dietetic Practice in Rural Communities concentration. The program’s next review will be in 2016, the five-year midpoint of the ten-year accreditation period.

UND President Kelley to give State of the University Address in two weeks University of North Dakota President Robert Kelley will give his State of the University address at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 22, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The address will focus on The Exceptional UND, and will be in conjunction with the University Council meeting.

Sexual health event to be held tonight at the Loading Dock What’s going on in the picture above? Send us your best caption. Send submissions to dakotastudentmedia@gmail.com. Last week’s winning caption was submitted by Alex Knudson for the picture at right. “We don’t say yes, we say affirmative.”

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Did you know... More than 10 people a year are killed by vending machines. www.TheDakotaStudent.com

An event focusing on sexual health will be held today. Organizers consider this event, Sexual Fishbowl, a great educational opportunity for students to anonymously write down questions pertaining to sexual health and get them answered by the experts. This event will be held in the Memorial Union Loading Dock Tuesday, November, 8th at 7:30 PM. Free pizza and pop will be served.

Forum focusing on Grand Forks neighborhoods to be held this week A forum and workshop will be held this week in an effort to improve Grand Forks neighborhoods. It will be held Thursday, November 10 from 1:30 – 4 p.m. in the UND Memorial Union Ballroom. Jay Clark, Director of the Minnesota Center for Neighborhood Organizing, will lead a discussion about how Grand Forks might envision the community from its neighborhoods up. All students are encouraged to attend, especially those living off campus.


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commentary

tuesday november 8, 2011

DS View Hall Living

TRANSfER Students unable to move should take steps to make current arrangement bearable. Last week residence hall students who may have been ready to escape a terrible roommate or living situation received some bad news from the Housing office: because of high occupancy in the residence halls, the room transfer process for spring semester has been canceled. Though the high occupancy points to positives like a growing number of students on campus it puts stress on students’ current living situations. We understand that an immediate solution to this situation is not possible. Population trends are often unpredictable and a new residence hall is not fiscally feasible at this point in time. With no instant solution to high capacity we encourage the residence hall community to take a look at itself and determine what changes are necessary to keep its members happy. One suggestion is to make everyone is responsible for his or her end of the residence hall social contract. Residents are expected to follow rules and be courteous to one another. This means not running up and down the hallway screaming in the middle of the night or causing a minor earthquake with a sub woofer. Being responsible is a great way to improve the living conditions of any floor or wing. Not pulling fire alarms is a sure way to keep neighbors from each other’s throats. No one wants to stand outside in sub-zero temperatures because some joker thought pulling the fire alarm is funny. Believe us it’s not. Did we mention smearing poop on doors falls into this category? We’re in college and we’re all adults. Childish pranks like this shouldn’t be happening. It creates an environment people want to escape as opposed to learn and have fun in. On the other end of the spectrum, resident assistants are expected to enforce these rules. Keeping a floor under control is no easy task but as evidenced by student write-in to our advice column “Brilliant Advice by P.H. Honey Badger” it seems there are floors or wings out there that may have fallen into a state of anarchy if you will. We understand that RA’s are expected to be nice to students and they will often times develop friendships with their residents. This is a great part of community-building, but RA’s shouldn’t use this friendship as an excuse to not enforce the rules. Others living under the RA’s purview are well aware of favoritism and this may create feelings of animosity, especially if said favorites are parked in the RA’s room making lots of noise. Stepping up to an RA is hard for students who usually don’t stir the pot. But the fact is that no student should have to be put in that situation. RA’s are selected for the position because they are deemed capable adults who can work for and represent Housing in the most positive and professional way possible. When they can’t fulfill these requirements it doesn’t go unnoticed by their residents. So you may not be living where you want to be now or even next semester but talking to your RA, RHD, other hall staff and your hall government may make your current accommodations a little more bearable.

Editorial board Brandi Jewett Editor-in-Chief Jon Hamlin Opinion Editor Robb Jeffries News Editor Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

Sioux nickname: Senate resolution necessary

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not shift depending on what name they play under. Whatever logo we The Dakota Student find at the end of this crazy road As we’ve all heard, and as has we’re being dragged down, it will be already been written in this paper, a logo we have the ability to crown the Student Senate at the Univer- with greatness. We may not be the sity of North Dakota has decided UND Fighting Sioux, but we’ll be to support the retiring of the Sioux UND all the same; whatever name name, and fight for the repeal of we’re under, in 10 years it will be a the bill passed by the state gov- name to be just as proud of. ernment concerning our ability to We’ll have the same academics change the name. and teams, our school just won’t Many people aren’t happy that be hung up on the bickering gothe Sioux name appears to be on ing on about the Sioux name. That its way to retirement, including means that University higher-ups myself. We love the logo and the can finally free up their schedname, and ules for things Student Senate need- like working find nothing but pride in ed to do what they on academics, being able to alumni reladid and support the tions or maybe call ourselves UND Fightchange of the name. even that resiing Sioux. And dence hall or why shouldn’t Caitlin Wildeman parking ramp we? It’s a proud we’re all shakcolumnist ing our heads name, one we’ve carried at not seeing. well for a long time. Freeing up time to make the UniBut, like so many things, it’s versity better and moving on with time for the name of the Fight- our lives is what we need to move ing Sioux to become a chapter in towards now, because it shouldn’t UND’s past. We have done almost be a discussion about preserving everything possible (and plausible) the Sioux legacy, it should be a disto save our name and logo. We have cussion of saving the UND legacy. been pushed and we have pushed Plenty of incoming students back, but now it comes to the point love the name, and there’s talk where our hands are tied. In the that the change will affect enrollname of preserving our school and ment negatively. Honestly, this issporting teams as a whole, we have sue has been on the horizon for a to give in, and I applaud Student long time, and we’ve surely seen Senate for recognizing this. this coming. Despite this, enrollUND Hockey will not be lost ment has been increasing at crazy when the name has been changed. rates, and the school can’t even fit Our players and their abilities do all the incoming freshmen in resi-

CAiTliN wilDEMAN

dence halls. A nickname does not make the school, nor does it make or break the enrollment. I could be wrong, but if a student comes here on the merits of the nickname alone, that student is here for the wrong reasons. Student Senate needed to do what they did and support the change of the name. We as a school have run out of options, and we can’t sacrifice our athletics for the sake of nickname pride. The NCAA has made its stance known, and they have not budged from where they stand. Nor, when you consider the political situation they’re in, could they. If they give us an exception, who else will they have to allow exception to? How much of a backlash and uproar would they feel from allowing such leniencies? UND failed to gain the approval of the Sioux tribes, and it has forced the NCAA’s hand. It’s time to move on, UND. This is a new chapter in the history of our school, and it’s a chance to show the nation the pride we have in our University, not just our nickname. We are stepping into a new legacy with a new name and logo, the only thing we can really influence at this point is if the nation is impressed when it sees UND coming out stronger than before, or if they scoff as they see us tear ourselves apart with bickering and in-fighting.

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> Caitlin Wildeman is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at caitlin.wildeman@und.edu


the Dakota Student

COMMENTARY

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Two actors to watch: Kend- ‘She Says’ prorik and Fassbender delight motes sterotypes > > enough that she wasn’t overshadowed by the always admirable The Dakota Student George Clooney in the film. More recently she was a supI love going to the movies. The smells, sights and sounds all porting actress in the film “50/50” make it an enjoyable experience, and “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World,” but what really gets me to see films and has numerous films in proare the actors. A good performer duction. My biggest hopes for her can sell me a ticket easily, while a are to take on leading roles and not to lose bad one can make me stay A good performer can that sexy and energy away. Here sell me a ticket easily, sweet she provides are two of my new favorite while a bad one can on screen. My secperformers me me stay away. ond new actor that can compel me to see Kirby Graff is currently on the path one of their columnist to stardom. movies just by Michael Fassbeing in it. Anna Kendrick is one of my bender was relatively unknown new favorite actors, and she is al- 5 years ago, and has slowly been ready on the path to big things in creeping into our consciousness. Hollywood. She got her start in Although he had a very small the “Twilight” series, but it wasn’t part in HBO’s outstanding “Band until her role in “Up in the Air” of Brothers” series ten years ago, that she sealed the deal for me. I Michael Fassbender’s career didn’t wasn’t the only one she impressed begin to take off until he appeared either, because she also won an in “300.” Shortly after the release of Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her work in that “300,” he began to receive more major roles in films like “Inglorifilm. In the film, she goes from na- ous Basterds” and “X-Men: First ïve and confident to downtrodden Class.” His performance in both and depressed and back again, all of those films takes each of them the while portraying a funny and to a higher level. Michael Fassbelievable character. Her comedic bender’s portrayal of Magneto timing and personality are strong actually made me understand the

Kirby graff

anger and determination to the point that I identified with the mutants that joined his cause. Furthermore, my favorite scene in “Inglorious Basterds” is the scene at the bar in which Michael Fassbender attempts to talk himself out of a corner. Although it was not a popular film in America, the 2007 film “Hunger” sold me on the acting chops of Fassbender. There is a continuous, non-edited scene in which Bobby Sands, played by Fassbender, is having a moral discussion with his priest. This heated scene is over 16 minutes long without stop. Just really great work. Fassbender is starring in a dark new film, “Shame,” which is to be released on December 2. Already being heralded as an Oscar-worthy film, Fassbender himself may be up for Best Actor for his performance. With his continued success as an actor, it is not a reach for me to say that Michael Fassbender is one of my favorites. Now it is time for the James Bond people to cast him as the title character, and my work here is complete.

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> Kirby Graff is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at kirby.graff@gmail.com

The N. D. time machine > sean lee

The Dakota Student

It’s opening week here in sunny North Dakota. The sun is shining and snow has yet to grace our flatlands. In this last week, thousands of sportsmen are heading out to accomplish one thing: hunt deer. Deer hunting is one of the most prestigious activities any North Dakotan can partake in. In fact, our state’s “Legendary” TV campaign focuses exclusively on the outdoors (as if there is anything else to do here). So, hunters of all shapes and sizes suit up in bright orange (I’m assuming deer are either colorblind or not fashionable enough to realize that orange flannel is terrible fashion) and trek around the woods to find Bambi. I’ve declined several chances to go hunting. Why? Because the thought of waking up at 5 in the morning, spraying deer piss on my boots and walking around the woods for hours with several other men wielding high-powered rifles does not align with my idea of fun. But more power to you. But what happens when winter sets in and the deer go into hibernation (that’s what they do, right)? North Dakotans have a

solution for that, and it’s called things. We all are united in the ice fishing. fact that when we want “someYou see, sport fishing isn’t thing to do,” we will always end challenging enough for the aver- up with the conclusion that there age Midwesterner. The fact that is never “something to do.” We one has to sit on a boat all day, end up outside on the lake in rocking back and forth and bait the dead of winter ice fishing or hooks with the flesh of dead crea- shooting a deer with a bow and tures while waiting for walleye arrow. to bite while blasting some kind Before you send me hate of Garth mail, realize B r o o k s Perhaps our state is the this: I’m not soundtrack here. last place in the coun- from on their I’ve been boomboxes try where someone can bombarded isn’t torture the have a good old time... with enough. busy lifeInstead style of city Sean Lee life, they do it trafcolumnist fic, crime in the wintertime. But and having instead of a to keep up boat, they drill a hole though the with the latest smartphone (or get ice. ridiculed by your friends). No, if I’ll confess that I haven’t tried you say iPhone to many people ice fishing yet, but the idea of in North Dakota, they will look sitting in the small plastic house at you like you are some wizard with five other men around a from the future. slushy ice hole in the dead of In some respects, it’s better winter does not appeal to me. here. Things aren’t as fast paced Have I missed the memo and life moves on like it did in somewhere? the years past. North Dakota is a Perhaps our state is the last time machine. place in the country where some  one can have a good old time without spending a fortune. We > Sean Lee is a columnist for The still enjoy each other’s company Dakota Student. He can be reached while partaking in the simple at sean.lee@my.und.edu

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reporting due to the heavy stereotypes and overall lack of news. One The Dakota Student of She Says’ columnists responded It’s time to critique the Fargo that women should be banding Forum again. I realize it’s distrib- together and that women are their uted some seventy miles down the own worst enemies, which is rather interstate and that we have our frustrating. I dislike the notion own city paper here, but let’s be that identifying as a woman is this honest. We only have a handful of shared experience that all women news sources in the state, and the can relate to, and that by being Bismarck Tribune’s website is a to- critical of these supposed women’s tal eyesore. That really just leaves interest sections, we’re only hurting us the Grand Forks Herald and our united cause. I will note that I am critical of the Fargo Forum. Both are fine, although the Forum has deemed it- all women’s sections and not just self the number one regional news the Forum’s, although some of the other news sources seem to be betsite. The Forum recently unveiled ter. The Huffington Post’s women’s its newest section, She Says. She section, while containing a lot of Says is the women’s interest section sex advice and product reviews, of the newspaper. I don’t subscribe does have information actually relto the Forum, so I don’t know how evant to women with a nice mix often the She Says section appears of opinion writers. So, some good, some bad. We in print, but have evit seems to be I dislike the notion can’t erything. I just updated onthat identifying as a think it’s worth line every day. that To be woman is this shared noting it’s possible to honest, I experience. cater to more don’t underlifestyles than stand why the Madi Whitman She Says does, Forum thinks columnist and I wish She it needs She Says would diSays. While versify a bit to the news may be gendered, as certain events could reflect the wide array of interpretabe more relevant to women in cer- tions of identifying as a woman. I tain contexts, this is not what She realize that She Says is only in its Says contains. Instead, She Says is first or second month of operation, essentially a home and garden sec- so things could change. One of my other problems tion that plays into gender stereotypes. Have two X chromosomes? with women’s interest sections is Therefore you must like baking, or that the implication exists that so She Says suggests. You might as women’s interests are not relevant well read the gardening tips while to non-female readers and that you’re at it. Apparently articles like topics like home and garden main“Coupon Queen: Be careful out tenance are in the women’s section there, super-couponers,” “Fond for a reason. I don’t know what the thoughts for onion soup,” and Forum’s intentions were in creating “Sensible Home: Windows, shade, She Says. I doubt it wanted to perfilm can improve efficiency” are petuate sexism, but certain stereorelevant to my life simply because types are validated by the existence I have lady parts. Indeed, She Says’ of She Says, or at least by the consubsections consist of the follow- tent She Says chooses to promote. In an ideal world, The Forum ing: Books, Family, Food, Fundraisers, Garden, Health, Home, wouldn’t feel the need to have a women’s interest section, or if it Pets, and Reviews. To be fair, She Says does con- did, it would be more diverse. A tain semi-interesting articles about lot of the topics that appear on She book clubs and paranormal activ- Says seem to be better suited to a ity, but these are few and far be- specific “home and garden” section tween. When it launched, it offered or a generic “living” section. In an book recommendations. One such ideal world, we would have better suggestion was Twilight, which local news sources. I get that the Forum is small has enjoyed startling amounts of popularity in the last several years, compared to other news sources although it is one of the most and that we have our own paper destructive pieces of contempo- in Grand Forks. However, the Forary literature marketed toward rum is probably the leading news women. This is very troubling, source in North Dakota, and it given the values the text promotes. does set norms depending on what However, most of the articles on it reports and how that content is She Says of any real substance are distributed. By confirming stereoopinion based, so I suppose it isn’t types that women should primarily as though the Forum is advocating be concerned with domestic activities, She Says isn’t helping anyone. for sparkly stalker boyfriends. I have to give the Forum some credit, though, because it did post some of the letters of dissent it received, which were delightfully scathing. The general consensus > Madi Whitman is a columnist for seemed to be that She Says is a The Dakota Student. She can be huge step backward for women and reached at madi.whitman@und.edu

Madi whitman

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SLAVE > From page

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the people on this campus.” President of DMAC, Anna Bury, was involved in organizing this event. “We advertised, hung posters, talked to professors to give students extra credit for attending, and made a Facebook event,” said Bury. “We want to raise awareness about the issues prevalent today that people often overlook.” Junior, Chris Arnold is an RA on campus and hoped the event would give him the tools to run a program in the residence halls about the topic. Arnold brought sophomores Anna Peterson and Zack Cheslog with him on Thursday. “We need to become more aware of what goes on, we always worry about what is happening in other countries but we must take care of the motherland first,” said Cheslog. “To become peaceful we must become peaceful within first.” Peterson saw how this information could be applicable to her profession as a nurse. “In nursing there are a lot of STDs that we will be dealing with,” said Peterson. Senior, Erin Stohler, was also drawn to the event because it could enhance her profession as well as the extra credit opportunity her professor offered for any student attending. “I’d just like to learn more, I don’t know much about this topic and it will give me a background for my studies,” said Stohler. “I think it could relate to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.” Atkinson also tailored some of his talk directly to college students. “Be careful of date rape drugs, it’s been used by losers who can’t pick up women any other way,” said Atkinson. “If you know someone who has been physically or sexually abused, get them help. Deal with it, resolve it, don’t just pretend it didn’t happen, because it will come up again and again.” For students interested in participating in DMAC, the group typically meets every other Thursday in the Memorial Union at 7 p.m. and more information can be found on their Facebook page.

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tuesday november 8, 2011

> Kaitlin Bezdicek is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at kaitlin.bezdicek@my.und.edu

Brilliant advice from P.H. Honey Badger Dear P. H. Honey Badger, Recently, I was called a hipster by a friend. What should I do? Yours, It Hurts Too Much

Students listen to a presentation given by Patrick Atkinson, founder of the Institute for Trafficked, Exploited, and Missing Persons (ITEMP), in Gamble Hall last Thursday. Atkinson works to raise awareness about human trafficking. Photos by Keisuke Yoshimura.

Dear Hurts, Firstly, allow me to offer you my deepest sympathy. I know how difficult a time like this must be for you. I once had an acquaintance who was called a hipster: three days after the terrible incidence he was found wearing tight pants and a graphic t-shirt with a logo in the form of a 1980s pop culture reference on the front. Several days after that, he announced that he was going “on the road.” No one has heard from him since. In other words, this is a rather serious offence that has been committed by your so-called friend. I would encourage you to enact the most fiendish and exacting revenge upon this abomination of honey badger-kind. Most affectionately,

P.H. Honey Badger

Have questions for P.H. Honey Badger? Email them to dakotastudentmedia@gmail.com.


the Dakota Student

SKI >

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ported by both President and First Lady Kelley, has been a success in encouraging exercise in the winter months and appreciating the snow. Last year skis were used 270 times and survey results showed many students planned to ski a second time or purchase their own skis in the future. “This is about turning something viewed as negative thing into a positive thing,” said Schober. “We want to get people outside and enjoying the snow.” In the future, Senate plans to create a resolution to fund the Ski UND and Late Night Skate Program through a different means,

NEWS

LOGO >

NATHAN TWERBERG> The Dakota Student

From page

Student Senate hears executive reports.

but on Sunday, Senators unanimously voted to continue the program as is for another year. “This is an additional program compared to any other program offered, to pay for this through the Wellness Center we would have to take away from a program or charge a fee,” said Director of Operations of the Wellness Center Yvette Halverson. Senators also approved two

new Student Communications Funding Committee liaisons on Sunday, Jackie DeMolee and Arthina Selchow. This Committee serves students by providing funds for media groups on campus that provide students with relevant information. One more liaison is still needed for the board to be complete. Also important to note, Student Body President Kylie Oversen

and Government Affairs Coordinator Shane Gerbert will be attending North Dakota’s Congressional Special Session in Bismark this week. They plan to attend the joint session of the education committee to represent UND.

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> Kaitlin Bezdicek is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at kaitlin.bezdicek@my.und. edu

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encing a flood of e-mails that he already received. The Higher Board of Education has already announced that they intend to go through with the nickname retirement, regardless of the lawsuit’s turn out. “The NCAA is a private corporation, and they are allowed to not allow names and logos if they want. The nickname is a state issue now, and the NCAA has stayed out of it since it became a state issue,” Jeanotte said. Sonderstrom told The Grand Forks Herald that he didn’t expect to see a court date until 2013. History One source of contention between nickname proponents and opponents dates back decades. In 1969, the Grand Forks Herald printed an article discussing a naming ceremony held by Spirit Lake tribal members. Some have taken this ceremony to be a ceremony giving the school a right to use the Fighting Sioux nickname. “People often misinterpret what this ceremony meant. A naming ceremony is a ceremony which gives an American Indian name to someone in order to recognize their accomplishments,” Jeanotte said. The naming ceremony in 1969 was for President George Starcher, those in support of the nickname have extrapolated that this was multi-purposed to include the logo. “There has never been an official ceremony giving UND the right to the name,” Jeanotte said. A desire to be right drives the confusion about this issue, confusion leading to higher tension he said. Money talks The money funding the lawsuit is something that troubles Jeanotte. He does not believe that volunteers fund the costs. “The money has to be coming from somewhere, and it should be going somewhere else,” Jeanotte said. The reservation is not perfect and the money for a lawsuit could create many positive changes in that community. The debate over the Fighting Sioux nickname takes away attention from the areas that need change, preventing people from seeing the things that are truly worth worrying about he said. Meanwhile a bill intended to repeal the law designating that UND must remain the Fighting Sioux” and makes any attempt to retire the nickname illegal is scheduled to be heard by the North Dakota State Legislature this week. The special session began on Monday.

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> Cullen Donohue is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at cullen.donohue@my.und. edu


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tuesday november 8, 2011

NEWS

TEXT>

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Class releases findings

From page

developed a different perception of texting while driving. All of the participants of the game stated that they would think twice before texting and driving again. The nursing group members say they wanted to inform the campus about not only the laws of texting while driving, but also explore perceptions from several subjects. They say they also wanted to raise awareness of how dangerous the act really is. Texting while driving is against the law in North Dakota and Minnesota. A $100 fine would be issued in the state of North Dakota and a fine as high as $300 in Minnesota. Texting while driving will increase your chances of an accident by 23 times (2300%) the group says. They note the easiest way to avoid an accident is don’t text and drive and remind other family and friends who are texting and driving about the dangers and consequences. If you do so, you could save your life and better yet, someone else’s they say and encourage students, faculty and staff to keep campus safe by refraining from texting while driving.

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> This story was submitted by the Public Health Nursing class. Any questions or comments can be directed to group through emails to Brandi Jewett at brandi.jewett.1@my.und.edu.


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culture&media >

tuesday november 8, 2011

Inside: What we editors actually do, a review of the new Decemberists EP and “Puss in Boots” review

Art collecters, assemble! story by Nicholas Gowan

Coming up on Saturday, November 13, the North Dakota Museum of Art will be holding their thirteenth annual Autumn Art Auction. Pieces from local, national and international artists will be put up for sale; for serious art collectors in the region, this is a show not to be missed. With 52 different pieces being auctioned, there is sure to be something there for everyone. Some of the pieces I found especially interesting are by artist Helgi Thorgils Fridjonsson. “Man and Giraffe” and “Three Angels” are both surreal and have interesting subject matter. “Man and Giraffe” features a nude male standing behind a giraffe, with his arms up over the giraffe’s back. Both man and giraffe are sullen, accepting their positions in life; for the man to be extremely tall, or for the giraffe to be extremely short, or some mix of the two. They can see their entwined eternity together, and they are ready to face it. The “Three Angels” are thumb-sized men leaning on olives. One of the angels would look out of place, but together they are excellent examples of how surrealism can change what is normal or accepted. With their wings emoting as much as their tiny postures and facial expressions, these tiny angels need to find a home. Assistant to the Director, Brian Lofthus, said, “The Auction was started with the purpose of creating and developing a buying audience for artists. The intent was to be sure the artists benefited before the Museum. From the beginning, the Museum has never asked artists to donate work, although some do. Instead, we allow them to establish their minimum price, an amount the Museum guarantees.” The division of profits between artist and art house is an even split, if not in favor of the artists. “Division

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NDMOA > page CONOR KNUTESON > The Dakota Student


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CULTURE&MEDIA

A day in the life of a DS editor PRODUCTION A summary of the work that goes into putting together an issue of the DS.

>

Megan sevigny

The Dakota Student

You, dear reader, are holding in your hands a publication that owes its creation to dozens of people. Of course, there are the writers—the ones whose names appear under the headlines, who conduct the interviews and write the stories and who get most of the love. There are also the photographers, who attend events all over campus and town to get the pictures that grace this paper. The work of the ad staff is displayed prominently across most pages. Finally, there are the editors—the behind-the-scenes workers who piece together the pages themselves and prepare the paper for your viewing pleasure. It seems safe to say that most people typically don’t give a second thought to a publication’s editors and therefore don’t understand what an editor’s role is. I am here today to give you a brief preview of a day in the life of a Dakota Student editor and hopefully clear up any misconceptions of what it is that we’re doing.

Here at the DS we have seven editors—an editor-in-chief, a news editor, an opinions/managing editor, a features editor, a sports editor, a photo editor and a web editor. Each of the section editors puts together the pages of his or her section and handles a small staff of regular writers. Production days fall on Wednesdays and Sundays. Here’s a breakdown of what we do on the job. 1. We assign stories. This involves a lot of browsing calendars, reading through involvement pages, reading bulletin boards and, on occasion, brainstorming story topics when there’s nothing going on—and trust me, there are weeks when nothing’s going on. Stories are usually assigned on the night of production and due the next production day. 2. Obviously, we edit. Writers email their stories to us; we read through the stories to correct for any errors. We check for the obvious things such as spelling (you’d be surprised at how infrequently some writers use spell check) and grammar (which can be tricky, since the DS house style disallows things like double spaces after sentences and that pesky Oxford comma). We reword sentences that are unclear, poorly written or just make no sense. We add information when stories are too short or don’t contain enough. We fact-check when we think it’s necessary.

3. We write. Sometimes we don’t have enough writers to get to all the events we want or sometimes we just have something we really want to write about. Sometimes we need a story to fill extra space (see “A Day in the Life of a DS editor”). Either way, most of us write for our sections on a fairly regular basis. One of the definite pros to being an editor in addition to a writer is that we get to pick and choose the stories we assign to ourselves. 4. We put together the pages. When we get to the office on production days and open our InDesign files, the only things on the pages are the ads. It is our responsibility to fit our stories into the open spaces. We come up with a title for the story and give credit to the writer. Putting the product together involves playing around with the spacing between the words so that the story fits nicely into the space we’ve reserved for it and making sure that the lines of text in each column line up properly with the lines of text in the columns next to it. 5. We hold meetings. Yes, that’s right, we have a meeting every single production day. Basically, this time is used to comment on the previous issue, bring up concerns and discuss what is going into the next paper. These are the basic duties of the DS editors. Of course, not all of the editors deal with words.

We also have a photo editor in command of a (very) small fleet of photographers. In addition to giving us photos, he also provides graphics (mostly for the news and sports sections), charts, sudokus and crossword puzzles. The web editor is in charge of our website, www.dakotastudent.com, where the reader can find both current and old stories and more photos. She is also in charge of our Facebook and Twitter accounts. A typical production day will last anywhere from three to eight hours, ruled over by the editorin-chief with a foam baseball bat and frequently broken up by Youtube viewing, reciting of colors and shapes and food runs. Once the pages are done, they are printed out and handed over to our managing and opinions editor, who gives them a final readthrough and corrects any errors he finds. As you can see, a lot of work goes into producing each issue of the paper. Keep this in mind, and next time you read a copy of the paper, remember that there is more to making a paper than interviewing people, writing stories and taking pictures.

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> Megan Sevigny is the Features

Editor for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at megan.sevigny@ my.und.edu

NDMOA > From page

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of money between the artist and the North Dakota Museum of Art on a work sold in the Auction: The artist is guaranteed to receive the amount of the reserve bid. If work does not reach minimum bid, it will be bought in by the Museum and returned to artist. Any amount over the reserve bid and the Museum’s equal match is split 50/50 between the artist and the Museum.” In the press release for the Autumn Art Auction, Museum Director Laural Reuter states: “Remember, when you buy through the Autumn Art Auction, the price includes framing or presentation. Frames are often custom made by the artists or the Museum staff who use archival materials. This alone adds significant value to most of the auction sales.” Bring your credit cards and prepare for a fun evening! Wine and hors d’ouevres will be served at 6:30 p.m., with live music by Jazz on Tap. The auction will follow, beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets are $30 for museum members and $35 for non-members in advance, $40 at the door. The art up for auction can be checked out at the North Dakota Museum of Art, which is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on the weekends, or online at www.ndmoa.com.

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> Nicholas Gowan is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at nicholas.gowan@my.und. edu


the Dakota Student

CULTURE&MEDIA

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Decemberists EP features “King is Dead” cuts

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MUSIC REVIEW

‘Long Live the King’

*****

>

Matthew roy

The Dakota Student

Earlier this year, The Decemberists released “The King is Dead,” a ten-track folk album

that focused on single folk-pop songs instead of being a concept album like their prior release, “The Hazards of Love.” “The King is Dead” is an album that definitely grows on the listener with each repeated listen, and now The Decemberists are ending the year and kicking off their hiatus with the “Long Live the King EP,” a six-track release that features four tracks cut from “The King is Dead,” along with a cover of The Grateful Dead’s “Row Jimmy” and a musical retelling of Dante’s “Sonnet.” Given that these tracks were

recorded at the same time as “The King is Dead,” the songs here are very similar in style to the original album. It would be safe to say that if you are a fan of “The King is Dead,” “Long Live the King” is definitely something that you will want to check out. The albums first track, “E. Watson,” is understandably a throw-away track from “The King is Dead.” The opening guitar riff is very similar to “Rox in the Box,” which is the better song. Lyrically the song is derivative, focusing on the death of the titled Edgar Watson out at sea. This is a much darker track than those featured on “The King is Dead,” and this feel carries throughout the album. “Foregone” is probably the best track on the album. It features the light-hearted folk sound that was found heavily on “The King is Dead” and would have fit perfectly on the album. The country twang of the guitar solo in the chorus fits the song per-

fectly, and after the gloomy “E. Watson,” it really stands out more than it would have if it had been on its own. “Burying Davy” is the darkest and heaviest track on the album, and it’s hard to believe that it came from the same recording sessions as the rest of the tracks on “The King is Dead.” It’s not so much that it’s a bad track; it’s definitely more effective than “E. Watson,” but it’s easy to see why this one was left on the cutting room floor. There is a real sense of dread here, and it’s kind of creepy. The bluesy guitar riff adds to the haunted house feel, and chances are that after a few listens you won’t be able to get the chorus, “we’re burying Davy,” out of your head. Continuing the pattern of light-hearted tracks following darker ones, the poorly titled “I 4 U & U 4 Me (Home Demo)” lightens things up a bit. As mentioned in the title, this is a home recorded demo, so it doesn’t quite

Courtesy of stereogum.com

have all the polish of a studio-recorded track like the other songs on the album, although in this case the lack of polish is quite helpful. The “1-2-3-4” intro and the laid-back folk guitar and drums give a live music feel to the track and it’s easy to imagine Colin Meloy and company playing the song right in front of you. The album closes with a cover of The Grateful Dead’s “Row Jimmy” and an instrumental retelling of Dante’s “Sonnet”. They are both good tracks, but “Row Jimmy” doesn’t fit with the other tracks as well as “Sonnet” does. The horn section at the end of “Sonnet” has a Neutral Milk Hotel feel to it and is one of my favorite parts of the album. Overall, “Long Live the King” is a decent enough follow-up to this year’s “The King is Dead.” While “The King is Dead” is definitely an album that gets better with time, it’s understandable why these tracks were cut. Only time will tell if “Long Live the King” will help fill the void during the band’s hiatus, but if it doesn’t, “The King is Dead” definitely will.

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> Matthew Roy is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at matthew.roy.2@und.edu

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Need a job? Like to write? Pick up a DS writer application at our office, 170 McCannel Hall, today!

www.TheDakotaStudent.com


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Classifieds

tuesday november 8, 2011 HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services

The swashbuckling feline is back

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MOVIE REVIEW ‘Puss in Boots’

*****

>

Megan Sevigny

The Dakota Student

Puss in Boots, one of the most beloved characters in the “Shrek” movie series, is back, this time starring in a movie all his own. Puss (Antonio Banderas) has been charming moviegoers since “Shrek 2” with his fiery personality, adorable kitty tricks and the “ladies’ man” swagger Banderas’s voice lends to his character. “Puss in Boots” has all the hilarity of the first and second “Shrek” movies, as well as the capability to win over both child and adult audience members. This time, the swashbuckling feline in Corsican leather boots is on a quest to clear his name and aid his struggling hometown, the village of San Ricardo. With his friend-turned-enemy Humpty Dumpty (Zach Galifianakis) and the svelte master thief Kitty Softpaws (Salma Hayek), Puss embarks on a quest to find the castle at the top of the clouds and steal the goose that lays the golden eggs. Standing in their way are the notorious Jack and Jill (Billy Bob Thorton and Amy Sedaris), who have found the magic beans necessary to reach the castle and want the eggs for themselves. Fans of Puss will most likely enjoy this glimpse into Puss’s life outside of his role in the “Shrek” series. In “Puss in Boots,” Puss reveals his origins, which began with his arrival at the door of an orphanage. He speaks fondly of

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Got something on your mind? Send a letter to the editor! Or, if you have questions that you’d like answered, email P.H. Honey Badger at dakotastudentmedia@gmail. com.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

“Mama,” the woman who took him in, and tells the story of how he and Humpty Dumpty, another child in the orphanage, spent most of their time looking for magic beans and dreaming of a future in which they are rich. As they grew older, Humpty turned to a life of crime, eventually tricking Puss into participating in a bank heist that went wrong and resulted in a price on Puss’s head. The movie bears many similarities to the “Shrek” series, including the familiar mash-up of characters from many fairy tales into one epic story. Audience members of all ages will find the movie enjoyable with its combination of childish humor and, of course, the more adult-appropriate jokes that fly right over the kids’ heads. This time, however, Dreamworks avoids falling into the web of pop-culture references that it’s been stuck in since “Shrek 2,” trading Farbucks for an old-world flavor with a distinctly western feel. While the movie isn’t as bizarre as the first two “Shrek” titles, it still contains plenty of memorable scenes. Particularly notable are the dance-fight scene that occurs briefly before Puss is

introduced to Kitty and Puss and Humpty’s never-ending childhood quest for magic beans. What is more interesting than the plot, however, is the interaction between the main characters. The audience cannot help but wonder at the motives behind Humpty and Kitty, as well as be drawn in by the would-be romance between Kitty and Puss. It is here that the movie also feels most disappointing, because as a character Kitty falls a bit flat. Galifianakis does a decent enough role of portraying Humpty Dumpty, but the character feels annoying at times. It’s easy to see why Dreamworks chose to give Puss his own movie instead of any of the other “Shrek” sidekicks: he’s got a personality large enough to stand on its own and is just so darn lovable! Despite a few flaws in the characterization, “Puss in Boots” is a solid picture and is definitely worth a watch for fans of the first two “Shrek” movies.

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> Megan Sevigny is the Features Editor for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at megan.sevigny@ und.edu

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tuesday november 8, 2011

>

scores & schedules

Volleyball

> Inside:

sports

Sioux suffer Gopher wrath, Women’s hockey strikes big against SCSU, Volleyball thriller in the GWC

vs. Utah Valley 11/11 @ 7 p.m. Orem, Utah

WBB

vs. Creighton 11/12 @ 3 p.m. Betty Engelstad Sioux Center

MBB

vs. Waldorf College 11/11 @ 7 p.m. Betty Engelstad Sioux Center

Sioux defeat Cougars as time expires

File Photos > The Dakota Student

TRADITION The win became commemorative as UND said goodbye to coach Gene Murphy.

>

Brandon Becker The Dakota Student

For the second consecutive week Zeb Miller kicked the Fighting Sioux to a victory. This time he did it over Sioux Falls, a team that shocked the Sioux back in 2009, but Miller made sure there would be no upset this time in the Alerus Center. “I feel confident in my kicking to where I don’t make myself nervous,” said Miller. I just go out and clear my head and I know I’m going

to put it between the pipes.” Miller drilled a 29-yard field goal as time expired to guarantee the Sioux a winning season and moved UND to 6-3 on the year, while the Cougars dropped to 5-4. UND’s sixth win of the season was in doubt through much of the afternoon. The Cougars weren’t intimidated by the 25th ranked Sioux, and for a while it looked as though they might pull off a second straight win over UND. That all changed with under six minutes remaining in fourth quarter on a Brett Cameron punt that bounced near the 10-yard line but took a couple of friendly hops before being downed at the one-yard line. Two plays later defensive end

Jay Nelson came up with a big stop as he tripped up USF running back Jordan Taylor in the end zone, which resulted in a safety giving UND two much-needed points and the ball back. Said UND coach Chris Mussman of the safety: “[It was] huge. Gives you a chance to win a football game and gives you field position as well.” On the ensuing possession the Sioux would take the ball down and kick a game-winning field goal. The drive wasn’t always pretty though, except for one play in particular. Facing a 3rd-and-24, quarterback Brent Goska lined up in the pistol formation, play-faked to the running back, spun his head to the left and found Tyhre Ivery, who made a circus catch to give the Sioux a huge first down. The Sioux then pounded the rock the rest of the drive milking the clock until they no longer could. Mitch Sutton, who has been plagued by injuries much of the season, was

given an opportunity in the fourth quarter to shine, and he did just that. On the game-winning drive, Sutton carried the ball nine times for 25 yards and picked up a big first down on a 3rd-and-5. “I was just waiting for my time. When I got in there I ran hard,” said Sutton. It was tough sledding for Sioux running backs on Saturday. Jake Miller and Goska combined for 35 rushing attempts were able to gain just 56 yards. “As for the other side of the ball, I give Sioux Falls credit. They got after us and were better than us up front. But, I thought Mitch gave us a spark. He’s a bigger back, has a bigger body. We had been leaning on them all game and finally got some things to break,” said Mussman. USF took a 13-7 lead into the half behind two touchdown passes from quarterback Taylor Perkins, but it could have been much worse had it not been for a pair of blocked field goal kicks by the Sioux.

Shea Walker knocked down Braden Wieking’s first attempt from 45 yards out, and Weiking’s second was deflected by Cordero Finley from 37 yards out. The win proved to be extra special for the Sioux. The game commemorated the honor of the late Gene Murphy (1939-2011), who passed away two weekends ago. Murphy was a former coach and quarterback for the Sioux. “We are sending the [game-winning] ball to the Murphy family,” Mussman said. “It’s going from one Sioux to another and that is special to think about. I’m glad we found a way to win this game.” The Sioux will conclude the season with a pair of Great West Conference games, with the second being at home against border-rival South Dakota.

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> Brandon Becker is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. He can be reached at brandon.becker2@my.und.edu


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tuesday november 8, 2011

SPORTS

What is and what Women’s hockey puts should never be 11 in goal for series win DEGRADING North Dakota hockey suffered a painful sweep in Minneapolis last weekend.

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Timothy Boger

The Dakota Student

The Fighting Sioux will have to grow through the pain of another road sweep, this time to their most hated rival: the Minnesota Golden Gophers. North Dakota couldn’t get anything going in a 2-0 shutout loss Friday. The Golden Gophers then came back Saturday from a 2-1 deficit with two goals in the final 6:04 to sweep the Sioux, dropping them to 1-5 in conference play for the season and 3-6-1 overall. It was the first Gophers regular season sweep of the Sioux at Mariucci Arena since 1996, and an exceptionally frustrating one at that. “It’s extremely tough,” said freshman forward Rocco Grimaldi. “I don’t even know what to say. It’s tough, especially when it’s your rival.” The Gophers outshot the Sioux both nights and showed off both their depth and playmaking ability throughout. But despite that, North Dakota hung around, staying well within reach of the victory both nights and coming up short. “We’ve definitely built some key areas of our game,” Brock Nelson said. “We just have to take it how it is and try and keep building from here on out.” Gopher goaltender Kent Patterson was nearly flawless both nights. He turned all 24 of UND’s shots away Friday night in a shutout victory—his fifth shutout of the year in just his ninth game. Nick Bjugstad and Tom Serratore scored for the Gophers in another physical and sometimes dirty game that has come to define the Sioux-Gophers rivalry. Friday night had 69 combined penalty minutes and at one point five Sioux and

four Gophers were in the penalty box. For North Dakota, it was their second consecutive Friday night in which they failed to score. “We’re really pressing offensively,” said head coach Dave Hakstol. “That’s natural for guys that want to be leaders and difference makers in the game. Sometimes you have to step back and loosen up a little bit.” Nick Bjugstad scored once more in the opening minutes of the first period Saturday night. But Nelson responded for North Dakota, scoring his fifth goal of the season and first for the Sioux of the weekend at 9:46 of the first period Saturday. Grimaldi then gave the Sioux a second period lead with great individual effort. He skated into the Minnesota zone, cut across and fired a slick wrist shot over Patterson’s shoulder for his first career goal at a huge time. To Hakstol, Grimaldi’s play was a sign of things to come. “We gotta give him an opportunity here over the next ten days to get back to a full 100 percent health and start building some chemistry with some linemates,” he said. But two late goals in the third period sent the packed house at Mariucci into a frenzy. Nick Larson got one to go at 13:56 to tie it, and with 45 seconds left, the Gophers struck again. Kyle Rau got his stick on a

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GOLDY > page

GOAL ORIENTED The Sioux skated to two easy victories against a scrappy WCHA foe.

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Mariah Holland The Dakota Student

The Fighting Sioux Women’s hockey team traveled to St. Cloud State University this past weekend to take on the Huskies in a Friday/Saturday series at the National Hockey Center. UND came into the weekend with a record of 6-4-1 and SCSU had a record of 1 9-1. UND got off to an early start on Friday when Monique Lamoureux-Kolls scored a power play goal to give the Fighting Sioux a one goal lead six minutes into the opening period. Seconds later SCSU tied it up with a goal scored by Callie Dahl. The game remained tied until late in the first period when Jocelyne Lamoureux scored on the power play for UND with under a minute left to play. Close to the halfway point of the second period Michelle

Karvinen scored for UND to extend the lead to two goals. A short time later, still in the second period, Alyssa Wiebe scored for UND, making the score 4-1. The second period ended with the score at 4-1 and the beginning of the third remained the same. Midway through the third, Abby Ness scored for SCSU to make it 4-2. With less than five minutes left in the game UND’s Michelle Karvinen scored her second goal and gave the Fighting Sioux a three-goal lead. About two minutes later Monique Lamoureux-Kolls scored her second goal for UND, and the lead was four goals. The game finished with UND winning 6-2. The shot total for the game was 44-22 in favor of UND. Saturday’s game started fast paced with Jocelyne Lamoureux scoring the first goal of the game for the Fighting Sioux, 55 seconds into the first period on the power play. Monique Weber scored for UND a short time later and the Fighting Sioux were off with an early two-goal lead. The score remained the same until the beginning of the second period when Candace Molle

scored for UND; That was also Molle’s first goal of the season. Five minutes later, UND’s Allison Parizek scored to increase the lead to four goals. The second period ended with the score at 4-0. Around the midway point of the third period SCSU got on the scoreboard when Molli Mott scored on the power play making it 4-1. Late in the game, UND’s Mary Loken scored on the power play, making the score 5-1, which also turned out to be the final score. The shots were 32-20 in favor of UND. Penalties were almost even with UND’s six and SCSU’s five. Next weekend is an offweekend for the Fighting Sioux and they will not return to play until November 18 and 19 , when they are back home to take on the Minnesota State Mankato Mavericks. Those games will be at the Ralph Engelstad Arena and will start at 7:07 p.m. both Friday and Saturday night.

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> Mariah Holland is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at marholl99@hotmail. com


the Dakota Student

SPORTS

SUDOKU

UND escapes USD spikers FIERCE North Dakota survived a volleyball match against border rivals in a 5 set thriller.

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Namara Kibira

The Dakota Student The North Dakota volleyball team traveled to Vermillion, S.D. to play against the University of South Dakota on Tuesday and won in 3-2 in 5 sets. UND is now 24-4 and 8-1 in the Great West Conference. South Dakota fell to a 13-15 record and 6-9 in the Great West Conference. The first set was a see-saw battle with 15 ties and five lead changes. It was tied up 19-19, but the Sioux scored six straight points to make it 25-21 for the win. UND let the Coyotes get ahead on an 11-3 run in the second set. South Dakota had four separate three-point runs. After the Sioux tied the match at 24 apiece, a kill from USD and a hitting error from UND gave the Coyotes a 26-24 win.

UND clinched the third set easily and won 25-15. North Dakota came back in the fourth set with a 9-1 lead over USD. The Coyotes brought the score to a 24-24 tie and finished the match on top with a score of 26-24. This pushed the match to a fifth and final set. The Sioux won the final set 1511. “This was a very competitive rivalry match-up,” said head coach Ashlee Hardee. “In sets two and four, we had a couple of stretches where we didn’t play solid, fundamental volleyball. We made a few too many errors and that allowed South Dakota to build some confidence. But we never backed down, and that’s the key.” Red shirt freshman setter Nikki Husfeldt finished Tuesday’s match with a career high of 58 assists to tie this season’s Great West single-match record set by Houston Baptist’s Victoria Weatherly. Husfeldt has recorded seven of the top 11 assist performances in the Great West Conference this season. Husfeldt also recorded four

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blocks and 10 digs against the Coyotes. Sophomore middle blocker Ronni Munkeby finished with five blocks and a pair of solo stops. “Ronni led us at the net in the final set,” said Coach Hardee. “She landed some critical blocks at the beginning, and that really fired the team up for the win.” Senior outside hitter Devin Trefz was named the Great West Conference Offensive Player of the Week. Trefz was the second Sioux player to register 20-plus kills in a single match this season. She holds the league’s top single-match hitting percentage at .588 and ranks second in the conference in kills and third in aces. Defensively, senior libero Taylor Bohannon led the Sioux with 22 digs. Freshman outside hitter Lexi Robinson tallied a career high of 16 digs. Sophomore defensive specialist Erica Turner recorded 12 digs.

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> Namara Kibira is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at namara30@aol.com

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Support Sioux Basketball by attending the Men’s and Women’s game this weekend! Have a safe break! www.TheDakotaStudent.com

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GOLDY > From page

loose rebound off the pad of North Dakota goaltender Aaron Dell and buried the Sioux with it, sending UND home with their second sweep of the season after only being swept once all of last season. North Dakota gets a week to reboot and attempt to solve their scoring problems. They’ll make the short trip to Bemidji State in two weeks and that series will reflect the character of a team and a program not recently conditioned to handle these kinds of struggles. “How we handle adversity is going to tell how our team is in the end,” Grimaldi said. “It’s the beginning of the season, it’s nothing to be worried about. By the end of the season, we’re going to be right there. I know it.” “It’s hard to take,” Hakstol said. “But it’s what you do from here.”

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> Timothy Boger is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@my.und. edu


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SPORTS

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November 8, 2011