Issuu on Google+

*the

THIS is the last issue of the school year! GOOD LUCK on finals and have a great summer! - The DS Staff

volume 128

tuesday may 3, 2011

DakotaStudent issue 49

Reaching the students, faculty and staff of the University of North Dakota since 1888

Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

65°/46 Wed. 56°/42 Thur. 54°/43 > Osama bin Laden killed Senate fails major bill UND DEFEATS JIMMIES

Local Weather Forecast

Provided by: UND Weather Update. www.atmos.und.edu

See Sports Page 15

Today

>

POSITION Bill aiming to rescind full time staffer funding for Stu. Gov. office defeated.

STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

President Barack Obama announced late Sunday night that Osama bin Laden had been killed in a United States military strike. Bin Laden was killed in a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, about 40 miles north of the Pakistani capitol of Islamabad. Bin Laden’s body was taken into custody of the U.S. military. There were no American casualties in the strike. The mastermind behind alQaida, the terrorist group that claimed responsibility for the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon that claimed over 3,000 lives, bin Laden had eluded capture since the beginning of the “War on Terror” in September, 2001. Al-Qaida also claimed responsiblity for the attacks on U.S. embassies in 1998, and the bombing of the U.S.S. Cole off of the coast of Yemen in 2000.

>

BRANDI JEWETT

The Dakota Student

Osama bin Laden is seen in this screen grab from Al-Jazeera's satellite channel a day before the second anniversary of the September 11 attacks. (Balkis Press/Abaca Press/MCT)

Residence hall leaders Ill. bound CONFERENCE Students to travel to national leadership conference in late May.

>

BRANDI JEWETT

The Dakota Student

A delegation of students are preparing programs to present at the National Association of College and University Residence Halls (NACURH) conference held May 25-30. The conference is a gathering of student leaders from the U.S. and Canada. According to its website, NACURH is the “leading national organization advocating for the in-

terests and welfare of residence hall students.” The delegates are members of UND’s Association of Residence Halls policy board (ARH), the governing body for the university’s residence hall community. ARH is composed of residence hall presidents, residence hall student senators, board chairs, and the president of the National Residence Hall Honorary. In preparation for the conference, the nine students submitted program proposals outlining their programs objectives. If accepted, the students will present their programs

NACURH > page

8

A bill causing a divide among the student body and Student Government met its defeat on Sunday. Failing 3-13-1, SB 1112-09 would have rescinded the establishment of a full time staffer position for the Student Government office and reallocate $1,000 to the salaries of student body president, vice president and treasurer. The bill would have also allocated $7,000 towards salaries of additional administrative assistants. Opponents of the bill believed the nearly $45,000 needed to fund the salary and benefits of the position should not come from student fees.

“Student Government fees should go directly toward students,” said Anna Gaspar, the chair of the Student Organization Funding Agency. Previous student body president Matt Bakke said student fees are paying for every position on campus. Bakke went on to say the staffer is needed because Student Government leaders are becoming overwhelmed with their positions and this work overload has caused several to resign. “Things in the office are piling up,” says Bakke. Off-Campus Senator Jacob Gapp asked Bakke why current staff members are not being utilized. Gapp said he has witnessed administrative assistants playing computer games on the job. Bakke believes this is one of the problems with students supervising students.

BILL > page

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

7

The 2011 Student Aviation Management Association held its annual conference and career fair in Clifford Hall April 28 and 29. Students were invited to to hear the presentations of several guest speakers and connect with future employers.

Students march for equal rights, treatment RACISM The African Student Union creates petition, holds protest to help crime victims.

>

THOMAS CARPENTER The Dakota Student

On July 6, 2008, Madina Ismail, an immigrant from Uganda, was brutally assaulted at Altru

Hospital by a North Dakota Lawyer. The lawyer verbally abused her, calling her racial slurs for over an hour before beating her unconscious. Ismail was totally disabled and was forced to use a wheelchair. So badly beaten, she had to use physical therapy to learn how to walk all over again. Meanwhile, the Assistant District Attorney dropped the criminal case against the assailant without a

reasonable investigation. All this is according to the Petition Against Racial Injustice currently being written by UND African students looking to shed light, and start a dialogue, on the problem of racism in Grand Forks. In the petition they demand, among other things; that Ismail be made whole and that the assailant be brought to justice, equal treatment for all, and that North Dakotans are sensitized to the fact that

minority immigrants are here to stay. Earlier this year Amoussa Koriko, a Graduate student at UND and immigrant from Togo, together with a friend established the African Student Union. The core of the union is simply to be there for one another: to help each other academically, socially, and culturally and to create a better learning environment for all. From one of the members of

the union, Koriko heard there was an issue going on in the community and was introduced to Ismail. Ismail told Koriko all the things she tried in order to make things right. According to the petition she talked with lawyers in the area, but they wouldn’t take her case, not because of its merits but because of a

MARCH > page

8


DS datebook 02

DATEBOOK

wednesday, may 4 2011

> lecture: Eric Poehler, assistant professor at University of Massachusetts, will present “Pompeii in the 21st Century” at 6 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Library East Asia Room. >film: The Global Visions Film Series will wrap up its year with “Terror’s Advocate”, a documentary about the French lawyer, Jacques Vergès, famous for defending war criminals. thursday, may 4, 2011 > food: The Wellness Center’s Culinary Corner invites everyone to get their Chinese food fix at 6 p.m. The cost is $9 for the stir-fry. Tell us what is happening on campus > Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

Campus notes > Fire Call - Three instances: 2620 University Ave., 315 Princeton St. and 440 Stanford Rd. > Terrorizing - Two instances: 3251 5th Ave N. and 350 Princeton St. > Criminal Trespass 3280 Davis Dr. > Criminal Mischief 3303 University Ave. > Controlled Substance - 3251 5th Ave. N. > Drug Paraphenalia/ Possession - 3251 5th Ave N. > Medical Assist - 3450 University Ave. > Endanger by fire 3251 5th Ave. > MIC/MIP - 409 Hamline St.

*

Interested in being a staff writer for the Dakota Student next year? Pick up an application at 170 McCannel hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. We look forward to hearing from you.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

tuesday may 3, 2011

The Dakota Student editorial Editor-in-Chief Brandi Jewett > brandi.jewett.1@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Jon Hamlin > jon.s.hamlin@und.edu News Editor Robb Jeffries > robert.jeffries@und.edu Features Editor Megan Sevigny > megan.sevigny@und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@und.edu Web Editor Madisson Whitman > madisson.whitman@und.edu

business

Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Natalie Cassell > natalie.cassell@und.edu Ryan Senn > ryan.senn@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677

All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

> The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

Join the conversation at

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

Comment Tell us what you think: Where are you studying for finals? > Library > The Union > My Room > Outside > Nowhere...who studies for finals?

>

> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.


DS World Brief Abbott cuts costs of AIDS drug for program

CHICAGO—Abbott Laboratories this week reduced the price of its popular AIDS drug Kaletra for some customers. The move, disclosed Friday during the company’s annual shareholders meeting, comes amid reductions in government spending on programs for lowincome Americans with HIV. Cash-strapped states such as Illinois have curtailed eligibility for people enrolled in AIDS drug assistance programs, which also receive federal funds. Meanwhile, there has been an influx of applicants for AIDS drug assistance programs as people have lost jobs and their ability to pay for HIV prescriptions. Starting in July, the Illinois Health Department will restrict the state’s AIDS Drug Assistance Program to “new applicants with incomes at or below 300 percent of the federal poverty level,” or $32,670 for a single individual. Currently, the qualification for the program is 500 percent of the federal poverty level, or $54,450 for a single person. North Chicago-based Abbott on Friday said it reduced the price most AIDS drug assistance programs will pay for Kaletra by 8 percent, to $5,037 per year. Kaletra is a protease inhibitor, a key ingredient in the so-called cocktails of medicines HIV patients take to keep the virus in check. House panel demands answers on data breach

LOS ANGELES—A congressional subcommittee has sent a letter to Sony Corp. seeking information about a security attack on PlayStation’s online network by hackers last week. The letter requested answers to a detailed list of questions regarding the breach, which exposed the personal information and possibly credit card data of 77 million customer accounts. The letter, written by the House Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing and Trade, addresses a number of security concerns, including when the breach occurred, how much data was stolen and why Sony waited a week before it notified customers. The letter demanded specifics on the kind of information the hackers stole and assurances that no credit card data were swiped. “Given the amount and nature of the personal information known to have been taken, the potential harm that could be caused if credit card information was also taken would be quite significant,” the letter said. The subcommittee set a May 6 deadline for a reply.

world news report tuesday may 3, 2011

> Inside:

The Final Hurrah to the School Year

Sudan elections ignite tensions FIGHTING A vote could revive old conflict pitting African tribes against their Arab neighbors.

>

ALAN BOSWELL

McClatchy Newspapers

KADUGLI, Sudan—In the heart of Sudan, there’s a land of rolling hills and lush plains where Arabia meets Africa, where one brother prays in a church and the other in a mosque, where peace hangs in the balance and war lurks in the shadows, and, over the next few weeks, where the future fates of two new nations might collide. Welcome to the Nuba Mountains, Sudan’s little-known crucible of roaming militias, oil fields and a bloody history that many fear could soon be repeated. During Sudan’s long civil war, this area saw some of the most brutal Darfur-style violence, as government-armed Arab militias ravaged their centuries-old Nuba neighbors, who in turn increasingly joined an armed rebellion raging in the nation’s south. Now, little-discussed elections in the state of South Kordofan, which begin Monday, are driving the bottlenecked tensions of a testy decadelong cease-fire to a dramatic head. “We are ready for fighting. Everyone is ready for fighting. Is that something new? We have been fighting for 20 years,” Ibrahim Mo-

hammed Balandia, the speaker of the state legislature and a member of the north’s ruling National Congress Party, told McClatchy Newspapers. Both sides remain heavily militarized, with tens of thousands of regular and irregular forces each. Already, the old violence has reared its head. On April 13, an Arab militia—probably armed by Sudan’s northern government—attacked the hometown of Abdelaziz al-Hilu, the state’s deputy governor and the gubernatorial candidate of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement, the southern rebel movement that will govern the new nation of Southern Sudan. The attack on Al-Faid village killed up to 29 people, including women and children, and burned more than 300 huts to the ground. Sudan’s pending split into two new countries in July seemingly might have resolved decades of north-south conflict, but the south’s secession has decidedly made a precarious situation here worse. The state elections in South Kordofan, which encompasses the Nuba Mountains, have been relatively ignored by an international community fatigued of intervening in Sudan’s myriad crises; first, a decades-long civil war and its devastating humanitarian situation, then the crisis in Darfur and now the breakup of the country. Although the U.S. special envoy to Sudan, Princeton Lyman, is flying in for the elections, the U.S.—which took the lead in brokering the 2002

ALAN BOSWELL> MCT

CARL JUSTE > Miami Herald Supporters of the African-centric Sudan People’s Liberation Movement rally before key state elections in the Nuba Mountains of South Sudan, Friday, April 29, 2011.

cease-fire in the Nuba Mountains —has shown little engagement, as Washington focuses its diplomatic capital on normalizing battered relations with Sudan’s northern regime and bolstering the nascent government in the south. This trade-off approach could prove a mistake, as few places have the potential to unravel Sudan’s frail stability and shaky north-south peace more quickly than renewed conflict in South Kordofan, at Sudan’s geographical and symbolic center. For the people here, many of whom feel betrayed by a seceding Southern Sudan and let down by an absent international community,

the polls hold both promises of hope and premonitions of peril. They’re tired of war, but they won’t accept iron-fisted rule under the Arabist and Islamist polices of the government, which declared a jihad against their land in the 1990s. “War is not preferred. We want dialogue,” 30-year-old Carlo Karaka said in the market of Kauda, a small outpost that served as the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement rebel base during the war. “But if the NCP wishes to go back to war, then there is no option.” And if these rock-strewn hills nestled in Sudan’s center explode, so might the rest of Sudan.

there in the house, with other friends and relatives.” A senior NATO officer flatly denied the strike was an attempt to kill Gadhafi or members of his family. “We have never target individuals. It’s not in our mandate,” he said. “We hit a building known to be a command-and-control facility involved in coordinating attacks on civilians.” There also appeared to be conflicting versions on the exact location of the strike. NATO officials said a compound in an area of Tripoli called Bab alAzizya, which has been bombed previously, was the target. Libyan officials, meanwhile, took journalists to a destroyed house in a different, wealthy residential area of Tripoli, Reuters news agency reported. At least three missiles hit that house. State television showed scenes of heavy damage to a structure. Webs of reinforcing metal were seen hanging inside the damaged building, poking through chunks of concrete. Journalists and others were seen walking through the rubble and, at one point, handling what appeared to be a missile half-covered in dust and debris.

NATO airstrikes have been aiding Libyan rebels who have seized large chunks of Libyan territory on several fronts, including much of the nation’s eastern coastal zone. Gadhafi retains control of much of western Libya, including Tripoli. Although NATO and U.S. officials refute suggestions that there is any effort to assassinate Gadhafi, the Libyan government’s assertion that Gadhafi was in the targeted house could feed speculation that NATO may have had information about the leader’s whereabouts. The NATO official would not discuss the intelligence that led to the attack or whether the alliance knew Gadhafi was in the building when it was attacked. He said the alliance had not confirmed that members of Gadhafi’s family had been killed, other than through news reports, because NATO has no personnel on the ground. But he did not deny that members of Gadhafi’s family might have been killed, and suggested that the Libyan leader may have surrounded himself with members of his family even as he was communicating with his military forces.

NATO airstrike kills Gadhafi’s son the U.S. began flying armed Preda-

BOMBING Death of Liby- tor drones over Libya. Administration officials firmly an leader’s family memdenied they were trying to hit Gadbers raises questions of hafi specifically in the attack, which assassinate attempt.

>

PATRICK MCDONNEL Los Angeles Times

BENGHAZI, Libya—A NATO airstrike that the Libyan government says narrowly missed Moammar Gadhafi but killed one of his sons and three grandchildren has raised anew the specter of whether the Western alliance is trying to assassinate the Libyan leader. NATO has said its airstrikes focus on command-and-control centers that the Tripoli government uses in its attempt to suppress rebels fighting to end four decades of Gadhafi rule, although the assaults often target civilian-populated areas. Yet Saturday’s strike in the Libyan capital occurred only days after NATO and Obama administration officials signaled they would be stepping up attacks on facilities known to be used by Gadhafi and members of his inner circle to coordinate their attacks. It also comes shortly after

Libyan government spokesman Moussa Ibrahim said killed Gadhafi’s sixth son, Seif al-Arab Gadhafi, and three grandchildren. Gadhafi and his wife were in the house at the time of the strike but both survived the bombing, Ibrahim said on state television. “The leader himself is in good health,” Ibrahim said. “He was not harmed. The wife is also in good health.” The dead son identified by Ibrahim was among the least-known of Gadhafi’s eight children—seven sons and a daughter. He did not maintain the high profile of some of Gadhafi’s other offspring, especially his elder brothers Saadi and Seif al-Islam. He was described on state television as a student in Germany. “Western nation crusader aggression against the Libyan nation continued and proved again that it has no moral foundation, no legal foundation and no political foundation,” Ibrahim told his television audience. “The leader with his wife was


04

>

commentary

COMMENTARY

DS View

Bin Laden dead

WAR ON TERROR Al-Qaida leader killed in U.S.-led military operation.

The Dakota Student Editorial Board was readying itself to wrap up the night when news suddenly broke that Osama bin Laden was dead. Per news reports now circling the globe, bin Laden was killed in a U.S. led operation. It has been reported that the operation took place at a mansion outside the Pakistani capital of Islamabad. Osama bin Laden has been the United States’ most wanted since the terrorist attacks of 9/11.There is so much that comes along with news such as this… the questions literally swirl around ones head…. First and foremost on the DS Editorial Board’s minds are the American soldiers who have served in Afghanistan since the War on Terror began. As our, and indeed the entire country’s, deepest gratitude is expressed, know that we are ever aware of the sacrifices that you made in bringing this man to justice. Your tireless and heroic efforts are a testament to your courage. The Editorial Board also wishes to express our gratitude to the families of the soldiers, for there too sacrifices have been made. However, it is also important to realize, among all the celebration, that the death of Osama bin Laden does not mean the end of the War on Terror. Yes, the death of Osama bin Laden is a major victory for the United States in the War on Terror; but, as the President pointed out in his address late Sunday night, it is imperative that we remain ever vigilant in seeking out terrorist activities around the globe. There is, however, an incredible emotional weight to this news for most Americans. The sight of the Twin Towers coming has been burned in the collective conscience of the American public. The day Osama bin Laden was declared dead is a day many of us will remember. The day is also a day that many of us have wanted for years. There has always been the sense that “someone must pay for this.” However, we must be careful not to let our jubilation turn to arrogance and barbarism. Celebration should not be conducted in a way that paints a picture of the American public victoriously standing over the body of their decade-long foe. No, instead let us celebrate by commemorating the efforts of our men and women in uniform; let us celebrate by commemorating the lives that were lost on 9/11; and, let us do this solemnly and with respect. As the members of the Dakota Student Editorial Board frantically checked their Facebook pages the night of the announcement, there were many statuses that asked one question: Can we come home now? Well, the answer to that question is yet to be determined. However, let us not forget—let us not get caught up in the moment of victory—that the men and women serving in the United States Armed Forces are still in Afghanistan, and still need our support.

Editorial Board Brandi Jewett Editor-in-Chief Jon Hamlin Opinion Editor

Robb Jeffries News Editor Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

Letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

On departures, DS future

>

ALEX CAVANAUGH

cember, Megan Sevigny and Madi Whitman. Almost every year, some editors stay on, changing sections, but nevertheless carry their experiIt’s been a long year; one of late ence on to the next production year; nights, endless emails and phone for us, it was a complete reboot. The calls and many moments of stress prior staff trained us over several issues and helped and pride. When our transition, I took the posi... the readers are but the learntion of Editor-incurve was Chief last spring, what have made ing steep. We made I was posed with a unique task: I had this paper so pride- our fair share of mistakes and to build the ediful for me... had our fare torial staff almost share of discompletely from Alex Cavanaugh agreements and the ground up. columnist miscommunicaAll of the editors tions, but I can but the web edisay we gave it tor graduated last year, so I put out applications and our all and I couldn’t be happier with hired the staff that ran the paper over the group that I brought together to the last two semesters—Erin Lord, run the paper. We turned into a sort Rachel Smerer, Joel Adrian, Nathan of family, and bonded in a way that Twerberg, Josh Brorby and as of De- is rare for a workplace. The Dakota Student

As such, it is bittersweet to leave my position. Looking at page two, you can see that the current Editorin-Chief is Brandi Jewett; next year’s Dakota Student readers will also see the work of a new News Editor and Opinions Editor. I’m confident next year’s staff has a great deal to bring to the table, and with the experience Brandi brings from her coursework as a Communications major and the experience of the editors that are staying on, I can see the paper only getting better. In leaving, though, I am forced to reflect on my work and how I served my goals. Coming into the job, I thought long and hard about what I wanted the role of the paper to be on campus. Of course, The Dakota Student is a news source—

ALEX > page

8

Finding a fulfilling work experience

>

ERIN LORD

The Dakota Student

Most jobs that we have in college are strictly practical—they pay the bills, and that’s the extent of their usefulness. As we become juniors, seniors or even grad students, we start choosing jobs that are more fitting for our careers. Future nurses become CNAs; tomorrow’s social workers find employment at HIT or other community service jobs. These jobs help us get our foot in the door, but they aren’t what we see ourselves doing for the rest of our lives. At the end of the day, they are still just very practical. As an English graduate student, I have also sought employment that I thought would benefit me in the future. I worked as a writing center consultant for two years, and this past year I taught College Compo-

sition for the English Department. one more year, until I was hired as My longest run of employment at the Managing/Opinion Editor for UND, though, has been right here at the 2010-2011 school year. Happy with my previous experiences with the Dakota Student. When Alison Kelly hired me as a the Dakota Student, I looked forfeatures writer during my junior year ward to the year, thinking that this of undergrad, I was ecstatic. I felt would be another chance to do what I loved. Little did very grateful and I know, this job excited to make A lot of people go by would be even my writing public. I told her I the “I work to live, more rewarding than just workinspired to evennot live to work” ing with my tually be a columlife’s passion— nist, and she said mantra. writing. I’d have to prove Erin Lord When I myself first. Afcolumnist started on staff, ter a couple stoI only mildly ries about Sober knew four of Driver and the Women’s Center, I got the chance to the fellow editors. I was acquaininterview a UND alum in the White tances with the Features Editor, and House. Again, I was ecstatic. The I only knew of the Editor-in-Chief, story went well, and I upgraded to being a columnist. ERIN > page I kept my position as a writer for

8


the Dakota Student

tuesday may 3, 2011

Realizations: Identity politics

>

When I started to re-think identity politics, I reflected on how much I called The Dakota Student out men on male privilege. Usually, I wasn’t responded to with many answers. In some ways, I can understand why. What do I reThe past couple of years I have ques- ally say to someone who tells me “you have tioned identity politics. The ideology has privilege!” out of anger and frustration? I gaps. I would see parts of the ideas go so can understand the anger and frustration far and extreme, that there was no way out. (yes, it angers me off that men make more For example, I could discuss each identity than women, for example). But when I tell a man this, what of mine (gender, can he say? That he’s mother, sexuality, One creates a way sorry? Can he make his race, ability, so on) privilege disappear? Not and call out for into deal with the our society and culclusion into society pain, they create an in ture, unfortunately. As and culture of each. external scapegoate. a white person, I know I Basically, identity have privilege, but I also politics theorizes Heather Jackson know that simply bethat identities reflect one’s politics. Uncolumnist cause of my awareness, I can’t get rid of it. It’s a fortunately, inclustructural issue. sion does not change When I started looking at the underlystructural problems. Another person who has more oppres- ing issue of why I was constantly calling sion (based on gender, sexuality, race, so men out for their privilege, I realized I had on) than me could call me out for not a lot of anger toward men. Mostly it was including them in one of my ideas and/ based on past experiences I had with a couor arguments. Thus, the central focus of ple of men. I also realized that I was jealidentity politics is focused on the margin- ous and resentful toward men. I wish I had what they had. I wish I wasn’t treated difalized person whoever that is. This may sound like a favorable way to ferently because I was a woman. I wish my approach things. However, I think it be- gender didn’t experience more violence. I comes so convoluted that nothing makes wish there weren’t policies and ideologies sense anymore. New identities are con- based on my gender. Recently, in my feminist theory class, stantly being added. Of course, I recognize that everyone has different experiences, we were talking about the idea of resentnot everyone is white or male and so on. ment, that philosophers like Soren KiBut when do the identities stop? Is there erkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche first wrote about. Slavoj Zizek has expanded an ending if I simply focus on identities?

HEATHER JACKSON

on the idea, more recently. Honestly, I thought the realization of my idea of my resentment toward men was a new idea. Nobody ever discusses resentment when discussing identity politics and privilege. Basically, the idea of resentment is creating an illusion of an outside evil or an enemy. This evil or enemy is what to be blamed for one’s inferiority. There is clearly pain associated with being oppressed (I would argue that all of us, in this culture and society, is oppressed on some level and yes, even straight, white men). One creates a way to deal with the pain, they create an external scapegoat. When I was dealing with the pain, my scapegoat was straight, white men. There are many other scapegoats. I can be considered a scapegoat for others. I could tell everyone that I acknowledge my many privileges, however, as an individual, I cannot escape this privilege. If I could, I would. Oppression needs to be looked at from a structural standpoint. Once I realized that I had resentment toward men, most of my anger disappeared. My energy was focused on structural issues, instead of individual men. I accepted that I am a woman in a sexist culture and radical structural changes need to occur in order for sexism to disappear. Lastly, I don’t have an answer on how to change these things, but I think these issues need to be re-directed in more constructive conversations.

DS

> Heather Jackson is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at heather. jackson@und.edu

A farewell: The America: In search for Truth perspective > > DAVID BARTA

effort, but rather from an inability to capture with words the true depth of my feelings. Exactly three years and five I don’t think any person who days ago today I published the has benefited as much as I have very last column I would ever can ever hope to adequately write for the Dakota Student. I thank the people that made it went off into the world, learned possible in the first place. a great deal While about this there are They help us dis- m a n y thing we call life, cover the abilities things and found an people for we need to become which I am intense interest in grateful, good people. science, the most David Barta i m p o r t a n t and when all was said I columnist thing and done, gained at found myUND was self back at UND working on the understanding that we are my Master’s Degree and writ- here to search for Truth. The ing more columns. As I write purpose of a university is to my final farewell to my Alma train people to think critically Mater once again, I can’t help in order to develop the intelbut smile at the fact that I’m lectual capacity and moral at2/3rd of the way to Brett Favre. titudes an individual needs to If I retire one more time maybe pursue Truth and become a they’ll hire me to play for the free and productive member of Vikings. I hear they need a new society. This is not a platitude. quarterback. Not only does an education When I last wrote this col- help us understand and better umn, I tried to say all of the perceive how we are inherently things I had not yet said, to connected to those we share those who deserved to hear the planet with; it also provides them. As so often is the case, us the tools needed to break my attempt to articulately con- free of the restraints we place vey my gratitude for all those who have made UND a home DAVID > page for me failed. Not for lack of The Dakota Student

18

JON HAMLIN

America today suffers from a stunning lack of perspective… we know so little of ourselves as a country, as a modern For the past two weeks I nation. Do we have priorities? have been busy in a number of Do we really? Allow me to put different ways. I have not had to you a few observations. In a much time to think of anything, country that supposedly values much less the greater questions education the cost of attenof life and all that jazz. How- dance at our universities and ever, over the course of the last colleges rises every year and as several days–between classes, a result over the last 25 years final papers/projects, and extra- American institutions have curricular activities-I’ve some- raised their cost of attendance how managed to find the time an average of 150%, with the to simply think… and so think highest rates topping 400%. I did. The topic of discussion On a yearly average, 17% of in my little head? America. Or, all college students in the U.S. rather, the state thereof: The have to drop out due to the state of America. The more rising cost of attendance, with I thought about it I realized the highest state rate at 24% in that there is something terribly California. Do we really value wrong with education? this country, In a America today sufisn’t there? country fers from a stun- that esDon’t worry, I am ning lack of per- pouses the not going importance spective... to turn this of family into some Jon Hamlin and family radical Tea values we managing editor have a diParty rant, nor am I vorce rate going to espouse an ultra-lib- that is among the highest in eral political agenda. In fact, I the world. Over 40% (some would plea with my reader to statistics point to a rate of simply lay aside their political over 50%) of all child-bearing biases for a moment and consider what I have to say as an American. JON > page The Dakota Student

10

05

Redefining what ‘green’ is

>

AARON WENTZ

The Dakota Student

Talk of environmental sustainability is no longer relegated to the ranks of cranks and tree huggers bemoaning the wasteful and pollutant industrial society that provides the fabric of our life-world. Over the last five years there has been a substantial shift in public perception and discussion regarding environmental issues of all stripes. From a resurgence in recycling efforts to reusable grocery bags and water bottles, as well as retrofitted low-flow toilets, the daily lived experience of the American citizen has been overrun with “eco-friendly” and “green” alternatives to our resource vacuum of a society. But it doesn’t stop there; I can purchase Raw Water™ from Summit Spring Water that claims to be “Gravity fed, Unfiltered, and Untouched” (for a price, of course). I can get an MBA in Sustainable (“Green”) business. Even the oil companies (at least for a while) were jumping aboard the “Green” gravy train, BP rebranding itself as “Beyond Petroleum.” There’s “Green” motor oil, “Green” bullets, “Green” bleach, and so on, and so on. On paper, this sounds like a good idea; everyone from the US military to Corporate America is finally coming to their senses and taking environmental sustainability seriously. Upon further inspection, the cracks begin to show. The first question to ask is why? Why now? Why not in the 70’s? Why wait until the icecaps are gone? Why wait until the weather is killing people on an (almost) weekly basis? The reason has less to do with some singular event that snapped the entire social body out of their collective slumber around the issue of ecological collapse (sorry Al Gore), but rather the opposite, that is, the difficulty of facing the reality of the situation that we are all collectively in. What am I talking about here? Timothy Morton, (theorist of “Dark Ecology”) in his 2007 book Ecology Without Nature observes, “it is very hard to get used to the idea that the [ecological] catastrophe, far from being imminent, has already taken place.” If we shift our perspective and look at the problem of climate change from the perspective of something that has already occurred (or is occurring), rather than something that is yet to come, the situation looks radically different. If we are in a situation that is shifting the very fabric upon which life (in its current form) has up until now existed, that can’t be prevented because it is already happening, then what, effectively, can be done? In a lecture (available on YouTube) Morton notes that in coming to grips with where we are, with the situation we’re in, the word to describe this process is grief. It is from this perspective that it becomes possible to understand the flaccidity of the reaction, the utter impotence in the movement toward “Green” products as some sort of solution. The desperation with which one is solicited in the marketplace corresponds directly to how desperate the situation itself is. By looking at the situation through this lens, it becomes clear that these “Green” products, this “Green” lifestyle, this “Ecofriendly” consumer model are so many attempts to perform an operation Ed Ayers outlined in 1999, “A general pattern of behavior among threatened human societies is to become more blindered, rather than more focused on the crisis, as they fall.” With this understanding as a back-

10

AARON > page


06

tuesday may 3, 2011

NEWS

Gamma Phi Beta Destination: China hosts Grill-Out tendance, but Stokes said they saw a lot of people from different organizations on campus such as the Army, ROTC and athletes. “It’s a lot of fun because it brings campus together,” said Stokes. They served hamburgers, hot MEGAN TALLEY dogs, chips, beans and cookies. The Dakota Student Molbert said they were able to get picnic tables from the park Gamma Phi Beta raised district and five gallons of High$2,220, a record high for the C donated by McDonald’s; and chapter, for their sponsored char- purchased 500 hamburgers, with ity. They hosted an all-you-can- 80 more donated. Claudia Daveat grill out at their sorority, the enport, a family friend of Moldistinct pink house on the corner bert’s, spent an entire day baking of University Avenue. The money 600 cookies for the event. Molwent to two diabetes charities, bert said they had a pretty nice one local and the other national. day for the event, especially conThey sponsor Camp Sioux and In- sidering it snowed the next day. ternational Camp Fire USA. The The next event will be a Wing sorority does Fling in the two fundraisfall, where they It’s a great way to will serve variers a year, one in the spring meet new people or ous types of and one in the buffalo wings, see people you don’t Molbert said. fall. The event took place on Proceeds from see very often. April 14 and this event will Kimberly Stokes also go to 454 people were in attenVP of public relations Camp Sioux dance. and InternaKimberly tional Camp Stokes, the public relations vice Fire USA. Camp Sioux is held at president at Gamma Phi Beta, Park River Bible Camp in Park said last year they raised a total of River, ND and is a residential $3,000 and also raised the most camping program for children money than all six sororities on ages 8-14 living with diabetes, campus. “We are hoping we will sponsored by the American Diabe first again this year,” Stokes betes Association. said. “The best part about our The Gamma Phi Beta Founphilanthropic events is they are dation has given virtually $2.45 casual and fun. It’s a great way million in total grants for campto meet new people or see people ing-related causes since 1959. you don’t see very often,” said Gamma Phi Beta Chapters will Stokes. continue to donate to help proElle Molbert planned, orga- vide experiences and resources nized and ran the event. “She just that will help build resiliency in joined this year and she put to- girls by supporting camping for gether a super successful philan- girls through our international thropy event,” Stokes said. Mol- philanthropic events. bert said it was stressful in the beginning to plan the event as she had only a $300 budget to work > Megan Talley is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be with. She said she began planning reached at megan.talley@und.edu for the event in February. The sorority hung a banner across their house the week before the event for publicity. Stokes said they also utilized Facebook, having each of their 64 sorority members change their profile picture to a picture of the banner. She added that every member was given five tickets to sell and members of other houses get “member house points” if they attend other sorority house events. This helped boost their number of at-

PHILANTHROPY UND sorority raises record high amount for local charity.

>

DS

*

Good luck with finals. We at the Dakota Student hope you have a successful last week.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

ABROAD Student, faculty group to participate in summer study program overseas.

>

ALEX CAVANAUGH The Dakota Student

While many students take summer vacation at home or summer school, one group will see China as their summer destination. This year, 12 students will participate in the 2011 China Summer Study Program, which is sponsored by the College of Business and Public Administration and organized by Colleen Berry of the Chinese Studies program. The group, which is made up of undergraduates and MBA students, will take two “classes” while in China; one is a course called “China Then and Now,” in which students will visit interesting and important sites that are either designated by the program

or chosen by the student. The nervous because they all speak other required course is a field- Chinese and I don’t speak it that work project in Shanghai that well.” Kusler is just completing is designed individually by each her second semester of Chinese. student. “I think it’s “I’m alinterways excited I’m...kind of ner- really esting,” she about the group and vous...they all speak e x p l a i n e d . studied China,” said Chinese and I don’t “I Spanish in Berry. “This high school, group really speak it that well. and I like seems to have Kari Kusler Chinese a lot bonded espeUND student more.” cially well.” Kusler Several of the explained students met in Berry’s Chinese language class- that right now she is consideres and found a growing interest in ing a minor in Chinese Studies, and Berry explained that it China by studying the language. One of these students is fresh- is common for students to seek man Kari Kusler, a Chemistry a major or minor in Chinese major who will be a part of this Studies after the trip. “About summer’s group. Kusler’s inde- half are interested before going pendent project is on Buddhism on the trip,” she said, “and a lot in China, and she will be visiting become interested after going temples and museums and going on a meditation retreat. “I’m CHINA > page excited,” she said, “and kind of

16

Lecture revisits Lewis and Clark HISTORY Guest speaker discusses exploration and perceptions of Native Americans.

>

EMILY JUKICH

The Dakota Student

Dr. Steven Aron from the University of California, Los Angeles was the featured speaker of the annual Robert Wilkins Lecture, on Thursday April 28. His presentation, titled “The Lessons of Lewis and Clark: What the Bicentennial taught about them and us,” explored not the adventure of Lewis and Clark, but the way their journey has been perceived by the public, even after 200 years. The Robert Wilkins Lecture series is in dedication of late tenured professor who taught in the

History Department at UND compared two movies, which are for 33 years. The lecture series both products of their respective opens the platform to speakers periods. The first movie, “The Far and experts to share their insight Horizons” was a 1950’s attempt at and ideas on historical moments telling the Lewis and Clark story. A product of while hopeWhat we need...are the Cold War, fully diluting explains the line drawn not histories that Aron that Lewis and between acaare feel good or feel Clark were demic and portrayed as, public views guilty... “agents of of history. In the spirSteven Aron America.” As it of this sentiprofessor, UCLA it reflects on the public of ment, Aron that time, spoke on the Aron believes, “it seems to matters of the Lewis and Clark be about a longing to venture adventure. The Lewis and Clark journey west.” His next example used the has been received very differently blockbuster movie “Avatar,” and by the public as time has passed, explained that the history of exand Aron argues that this percep- pansionism now has been altered, tion is what effects our portrayal “from feel good to feel guilty hisof how the journey really happened. To explain this point, Aron TALK > page

6


the Dakota Student

BILL >

From page

1

“The executive office managers are students too,” he said. “They can’t always be in the office.” Bakke noted Student Government is treated as a department on campus and every department has at least one fulltime staff member. Off-Campus Brenden Jehlicka wondred why the issue was not brought forward years ago. Bakke said no previous administrations wanted to take the time to research the position and create a plan for making it possible. Cassie Gerhardt, Program Director for Student Involvement, agreed with Bakke. “I have been an advocate for this position for a number of years,” she said. Gerhardt believes Student Government’s growth “necessitates this position.” College of Business and Public Administration Senator Remington Zacher, the bill’s author, said he brought the bill forward at the request of constituents. “I’ve never had someone come

CHINA >

From page

6

The China Summer Study Program was founded by Victoria Beard of the College of Business and Public Administration before the Chinese Studies program and Chinese language classes were offered. The college still has an active role in the program, as it sponsors the trip and has three MBA students participating this year. Berry explained the program, which is now in its eleventh year, typically gets 10-20 applications each year, with as many as 18 students and as few as eight going on the trip. “I’d like more people to know about it,” she added. While the program is built for the students to participate, several UND faculty

NEWS up to me without me saying something first,” he says. “A lot of students told me they did not like this bill,” referring to the bill creating the position. Vice President of Student Affairs Lori Reesor came out to support the position of a fulltime staff member. “I was surprised there wasn’t one,” she said. Reesor noted that all the schools she had worked at previously had fulltime staffers in their student government offices. She also pledged her office’s assistance in making the position a successful one. “You are the employer,” she told Student Government members. “And we could work with you.” A bill providing funding for the position during the summer months was failed on April 10. Student Government will search for potential employees during the summer and hire for the fall semester.

DS

> Brandi Jewett is the Editor-in-Chief for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu

members tag along, as well. Along with organizers Colleen Berry and Victoria Beard, Professors Michael Beard, Rebecca Weaver-Hightower and Marcus Weaver-Hightower will join the group. Berry welcomes this faculty interest, explaining that the faculty members “get to learn about China and the program and usually become very supportive.” With a growing interest among students in China and Chinese Studies, it seems the China Summer Study Program is a study abroad staple at UND. “It’s the highlight of my year,” Berry said with a smile. “I never get tired of it.”

DS

> Alex Cavanaugh is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at alex.cavanaugh@und.edu

07

NATHAN TWERBERG> The Dakota Student

President Robert Kelley addresses Student Senate. Kelly took questions regarding the “Fighting Sioux” nickname legislation.

TALK >

From page

6

expansionism now has been altered, “from feel-good to feel -guilty history.” In the public eye, the reception of the Lewis and Clark event has gone beyond a geographical expansion, but is also very telling of human interactions and the change in the way they are seen. Some North Dakota residents or university students feel there is a strong connection with the Native Americans and the history of the school. The Sioux logo is a disputed symbol of pride, and is also relevant to Aron’s presentation. He explains that the Lewis

and Clark journey has also aided in shifting the perceptions of Native Americans. He summed up an example of how one or two decades ago, the iconic examples of Native Americans to the majority public would have been people like Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, both “militant and male” Aron said. But in recent years, views have changed, and if asked to describe a ‘typical’ Native American, the majority would describe Pocahontas and Sacagawea. For all the similarities between the two, Aron drove home the idea that “both gained fame for procreating intercultural peace.” The stories of Sacagawea and the slave named York have emerged to the front lines of the

Lewis and Clark adventure in the Bicentennial as examples of equality and ethnic tolerance in a time when it was rare. Yet, for all these “feel-good” stories, Aron claims that was not necessarily the case. These new portrayals of the adventure reflect today’s society’s views on racial tolerance and democratic equality, but not on the true history of the event. To dispel this notion, Aron explains, “What we need, I think, are not histories that are feel good or feel guilty, but histories told in their own terms.” He says comparing the tendencies of the past to the standards of the present is not a good way to understand our history and in order to be satisfied with who they were, we must be satisfied with how far we have come, and not judge them harshly for the behaviors of their time. Aron believes no society is perfect, but our history is the foundation for the present and should not be altered for the benefit of a “feel-good” story.

DS

> Emily Jukich is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at emily.jukich@und.edu


08

NEWS

ERIN>

From page

4

Web Editor and News Editor from other English and Anthropology things. I had never even seen the Photo or Sports Editor before. It’s amazing what working long hours in a five-foot radius will do to a group of people. Before I knew it, I found myself with these people all the time. We started hanging out outside of work hours, spending time together when it was no longer required. We got sick of each other sometimes, but we were so family-like that we would just yell at each other briefly and then quickly get over it. We started to actually enjoy our close quarters, and I found myself looking forward to work like I never had before. We even moved Nathan, the Photo Editor from his normal office across the room to the closest cubicle near the rest of the editors. I can’t relate most our good times, because the conversations are probably not suited for the newspaper. But I can say that I’ve never regularly been with such a fun group of people, and it pains me to think that it’s coming to an

ALEX >

From page

4

we do not run on a daily basis, our staff is made up of student writers and our readership is not the general Grand Forks community. As such, the philosophy I approached the paper with was a bit different—I wanted it to be academically minded and academically aware. Moreover,

end. The most important thing I learned from this experience is how important it is to love your work. A lot of people go by the “I work to live, not live to work” mantra, but the hard truth is that you spend a good portion of your life at your job. Whether you like it or not, what you do for work does indeed define you to some extent. And if you’re not happy at that work, you’re in general a less happy person. This column may have been a bit of personal didacticism, but it feels necessary after a year of blood, sweat and tears (mostly, but not completely figurative). I will miss my fellow editors dearly. I’d also like to thank my writers, who put in a weekly effort to share their thoughts and give me a job to do. I believe next year will have a lot of strengths, and I am excited to see what Jon, our next Managing/Opinion Editor, has in store for the DS. I’ll still be around next year in print, just with a different last name. I guess all that’s left to say is so long, readers! Thanks for a great year.

DS

> Erin Lord is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at erin.lord@und.edu

I wanted to take newspaper beyond the typical coverage of current events into a discussion—I wanted to reflect the academic environment that is based around open thought and discourse in the paper itself through editorials, features stories and columns. I wanted to show the readers that there is more to campus than the hot topic issues—and while the developments of these issues are important to report on, they are not

MARCH >

From page

1

conflict of interest as it was against the well-connected Altru Hospital. She also tried to sue the assailant as a Litigant Pro Se but the petition states the judge arbitrarily and captiously dismissed the case. She was also interviewed by the Grand Forks Herald, which never published the story. Ismail, like a lot of new immigrants who are new to this country, doesn’t know who to talk to when they are wronged and can sometimes feel like nobody is going to protect them. Many can start to feel like nobody is going to listen; nobody is on their side. Shocked by Ismail’s story Koriko said he is going to help people like Ismail find those people in the community that are able to help people like her. Knowing some people, Koriko took Ismail’s story and spread the word. Koriko and his friends decided that it is their right to march and write a petition in hopes to let the Grand Forks community know that there is something wrong going on. On Wednesday, April 20, 2011, they marched in downtown Grand Forks starting from the city counsel and ending at the courthouse. They handed out the petition and read a what makes UND great. Our university stands out because of the individual work and achievement that goes on on a department-todepartment level. This is what I felt was most important to write and report on—to show the achievement and hard work of our university’s students—to make it a paper about its readers. And the readers are what have made this paper the most prideful for me; each time I saw

tuesday may 3, 2011 motion about why they are doing it. “It was really simple,” Koriko said. “The march was about telling the community ‘this is what’s happening to us, is that right?’” Koriko said the city counsel showed a serious interest in the problem and is willing to listen to them, and help. “We need to get together to talk about things, then we can find a solution. It is not right to keep silent,” explained Koriko. He wants to make Grand Forks his home and he wants to make sure he engages himself in all discourse that will better this place. He doesn’t see any difference between going out sandbagging to fight the flood and going out to fight for human rights, both are fights to protect his community. Many people from Grand Forks and North Dakota might not believe that racism is a problem or at least not as bad as this petition says. To this Koriko replies, “It is like somebody who believes in God, but doesn’t realize the power of the devil. You cannot expect to live any place on this earth without racism, so we just need to learn to cope with it, and work together to solve it. We can not do that by keeping silent.”

DS

> Thomas Carpenter is s staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at thomas.carpenter@und.edu

the paper being read by a student in the halls I feel proud that I had a part in creating that. I’m sure my fellow editors share the pride. And so, now, as I hand the role over to Brandi, I wish her and next year’s staff the best of luck, and I’m confident they will produce a quality publication. As a final farewell, I can’t express enough my deep thanks to my editorial staff, who have made my life a lot easier—thanks to Joel, Erin,

NACURH >

From page

1

at the conference for all delegates. Four award bids were also submitted at the regional conference earlier this year. Each of these bids notes the achievments of a student leader in a specific category. Of these bids, three were chosen as winners and will advance to the national conference where they will be . Stephanie Rosenthal, ARH president and author of one of the bids, is thrilled to see it go to nationals. “It’s extremely exciting,” she says. “I’m hoping for the best.” Winning awards and presenting programs are not the only goals of the conference. Rosenthal says NACURH gives students a chance to improve their leadership skills. “It supplies student leaders with opportunities they cannot find anywhere else.” The workshops and programs featured at the conference cover various topics including cooperation, tolerance, communication and diversity. The conference will be held on the campus of Western Illinois University.

DS

>Brandi Jewett is the Editor-in-Chief

of The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu

Rachel, Nate, Megan, Madi, Josh and Luke; thanks to all our writers; and a big thanks to Sue Litzinger, who has held down the fort for the last thirty years. I’m excited to pick up the paper next year and see what the next staff ’s got—and I recommend you do, too.

DS

> Alex Cavanaugh is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at alex.cavanaugh@und.edu


CASH IN

YOUR TEXTBOOKS

Visit www.undbookstore.com for additional buyback hours and locations.

CHECK IN YOUR RENTALS

Rented textbooks are due back by May 13, 2011

UND Bookstore 775 Hamline Street 1120SBB11


10

NEWS

JON >

From page

Brandi Jewett > The Dakota Student Slackliners show off their skills in the quad near Merrifield Hall and the Chester Fritz Library. Slacklining is a balance sport requiring a nylon webbing line to be secured between two anchored points. The user, or slacker, then jumps onto the line and begins their routine of walking, standing or even flipping. A webbed line differs from a rope in that it lies flat when the slacker puts their foot upon it. The height of the line can be adjusted to the slacker’s preference. These lines can be special-ordered from local sports stores.

AARON > From page

5

ground, the question of what is to be done about ecology may yield conclusions that are devastating perhaps beyond comprehension. At the very least we may be faced with a situation that cannot be reversed, that will continue whether we act or not. Regardless of the extent and extremity of the situation, what is clear is that a new conception of the problem is required. Before the question can even legitimately be raised about what a solution may (or

not) look like, a requisite disruption of our conception of the problem, beyond what is offered up by the marketplace is the absolutely crucial first step. Without such a step, the clouds that are descending may not lift and by then it will have been too late. This change, this loss, since it is already happening, must be endured, rather than prevented, and must be faced honestly. From this perspective we can find a place to start.

DS

> Aaron Wentz is a coulmnist for The

Dakota Student. He can be reached at aaron.wentz@und.edu

5

households will end in divorce, with the divorce rate increasing by 15% for each marriage the divorced couple enters after their first. And that, of course, is assuming that it’s even legal for you to marry in the first place. So, I ask, do we really value family? In a country that prides itself on the openness of its political system and a place where political aspirations can become a reality we have a horrible mess of a political system. In fact, our political system is so “open” that you have to align yourself with one of

two parties in order to be seen as a politically viable candidate. The fact that political scientists say that to even think about running for president a prospective candidate needs at least $50 million is absolutely ridiculous. My point is that we, as a country, seem to have a lost perspective. We are more unaware of the inherent hypocrisies in our nation than we have ever been before, and this is a dangerous thing. There is a disconnect between what we say we value and how we act. I am simply calling for us to take several steps back and reevaluate what we, as a nation, value and what our priorities are. As far as I am concerned

tuesday may 3, 2011

we are not “America the Beautiful” or “America The Land of the Free,” because I am not entirely convinced even American’s know what America is. I think we need to start an intelligent, rational, and realistic conversation about what we as a country believe in, what we would fight for… talk about things like equality, political campaign finance, race, religion, sexual orientation. I think we, as a nation, have forgotten the importance of discussion. So, let’s start one, so that we no longer have to be “America the…?”.

DS

> Jon Hamlin is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at jon.s.hamlin@und.edu

Mark Your Calendars! NORTH DAKOTA MEN’S HOCKEY STUDENT SEASON TICKETS

MY GREEN &

WHITE ACCOUNT

The exclusive online ticket manager for UND students available at FightingSioux.com on the tickets page.

No more waiting in line at the box office! Purchase, transfer and sell your tickets online.

Sept. 12 - Seniors & above (9 - 9:30 p.m.) Sept. 13 - Juniors (9 - 9:30 p.m.) Sept. 14 - Sophomores (9 - 9:30 p.m.) Sept. 15 - Freshmen (9 - 9:30 p.m.) Single-game tickets go on-sale Sept. 18 at noon Questions? Contact tickets@theralph.com or 701.777.4TIX


DS

culture&media >

tuesday may 3, 2011

Inside: ‘Fast Five,’ Dance of Life, piano recital and ArtSee

The Year’s Last Hurrah story by Nicholas Gowan With a sordid past that tries to continue year after year, Springfest has been blooming under a new leaf the last few years as Rhombus Guys have taken the reigns to prevent the tradition from dying out. Used as a cure to alleviate the post-Reading and Review Day headache many students suffer from, Springfest offers an opportunity for students and faculty alike to let loose and party down. This coming Saturday, May 7, Springfest will descend on University Park. A $5 cover charge will get you in the gates to see a variety of live music and good times. Running (historically) from 2 to 6 p.m., live music will also be played. Drinks will be $5 each. Can this be the year that UND students are able to responsibly drink and party, or is that an oxymoron? For the past two years, Springfest has been plagued by less than stellar weather. Cold winds and rain have helped dissuade trouble-makers from starting fires when they would be most welcome. Rhombus plans to bring in fifteen servers from their restaurant to serve an estimated ten kegs of beer. With flavors ranging from Bud Light to Coors Light, you should be able to find your favorite. Cab Crawler is always an exceptional idea when faced with post-partying decisions; remember to pick a card up from the Student Government office while it is still open for safe rides this summer. Live music and responsible partying shouldn’t get in the way of having a good time.

19

SPRING > page


12

SPORTS

tuesday may 3, 2011


the Dakota Student

CULTURE&MEDIA

13

Spring concert celebrates life ArtSee shows off local talent DANCE The North Dakota Ballet Company ends year with reflection on society.

>

Patrick Evans

The Dakota Student

On May 7, the North Dakota Ballet Company’s spring concert, “Dance of Life” will be held at the Empire Arts Center in downtown Grand Forks. This performance is set to be an interesting blend of dancing styles. The concert will feature dances that focus on how life, in all its forms, influences society. The group will perform a variety of works ranging from classical ballet to modern and jazz dance. The company will also be recreating some classic ballet pieces, including “Giselle,” “Pas de Quatre,” “Paquita Variation,” and “Swan Variation from Carnival of the Animals.” The concert

could be intense for some people; it expresses, through dance, many thought-provoking subjects. The performance will feature effects of domestic violence, teenage bullying and heartbreak, but will also feature some lighter dances such as crowd-pleasing jazz and classical ballet variations. The North Dakota Ballet Company has been a member of the Grand Forks community for nearly 50 years and has been bringing ballet to the region since it was founded in 1962. The North Dakota Ballet Company is the official ballet company of North Dakota and is a non-profit organization committed to promoting classical ballet and other dance forms in the region. The company is supported by its cast of pre-professional dancers, all women with varied backgrounds, many who are students from the University of North Dakota. The company allows these dancers-intraining to perfect their art and gives them an opportunity to rise to a more advanced level of

art. As the North Dakota Ballet Company is nonprofit, its cast is donating their talents to the community. Laura Dvorak is the director of the North Dakota Ballet Company and has nothing but respect for her dancers. “The dancers are an amazing group of women. We are very lucky to have this type of talent in our community. We are limited in the amount of professional dance that comes to Grand Forks, but these dancers provide a gift to us all in sharing their talent to bring dance to another level in our community.” As Laura said, professional dance organizations often skip over Grand Forks because of its size, and we need to support the groups that stick with us. The performers for this concert will include: Nikki Anderson, Lindsay Hudson Baez, Katya, Bryleva, Emily Burkland, Brooke Erickson, Lauren Fischer,

14

DANCE > page

FEATURED Established Grand Forks artists to display and demonstrate their unique works.

>

Matthew roy

The Dakota Student

The Greater Grand Forks Young Professionals will be hosting the ArtSee event on Thursday, May 12 from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the North Dakota Museum of Art. ArtSee features established local artists who have laid

ArtSee allows local artists to show off their skills. Photo courtesy of Shannon Noack.

the groundwork for a growing arts landscape in the Grand Forks region, as well as featuring the work of upand-coming artists in the community. ArtSee is a Greater Grand Forks Young Professionals opportunity and a way to provide support for the arts in the Grand Forks community and engage local citizens. The event is free and will be open to the entire Grand Forks community. The GGFYP invites both art enthusiasts and newcomers to enjoy paintings, pottery, glasswork, photography and digital media art in a unique and lively atmosphere. Not only will those attending get a chance to view the artists’ works on display, but they will also get a chance to see the artists in action as they create work of art live throughout the evening. Some of the artists that will be

14

ART > page

Pianist demonstrates her skill PERFORMANCE Masters candidate proves her qualifications in graduate piano recital.

>

Alex Cavanaugh The Dakota Student

As Grand Forks witnessed April’s snowy departure, the audience of the Campbell Recital Hall at the Hughes Fine Arts Center witnessed one of the musical highlights of the year—the graduate piano recital of Yoonjeong (Julie) Kim. The Saturday evening recital was part of Kim’s degree requirements for a Masters Degree in Piano Performance.

It became clear early on that Kim takes her playing very seriously, as the opening applause was followed by a solid ten seconds of silence before she broke into Beethoven’s sonata “Waldstein,” a lengthy, stylistically diverse threepart piece that set the tone for the rest of the recital. In this first piece, Kim demonstrated her great skill, ambidextrously maneuvering complex finger melodies and flawlessly communicating the simultaneous elegance and intensity of the sonata. She followed this difficult opener with Schumann’s “Widmung” (as arranged by Liszt) and concluded the first half of the performance with two Korean pieces arranged and improvised by Kim

herself. These pieces, “Namchon” and “Arirang,” are traditional Korean folk songs; “Namchon” about the beauty of spring in Southern Korea and “Arirang” expressing “our ancients’ suffering and hardships in the past.” By including these pieces, Kim was able to share her own adaptations and cultural background with the audience. After a brief intermission, Kim played a lengthy eleven-part piece by Legeti, called “Musica Ricercata,” which is an exploration of what can be developed from a single note—each of the eleven parts grows in tonal complexity, as the first piece has two notes, and each piece thereafter adds another note, until the final part, which has 12 notes. This experimental piece was delivered masterfully by Kim, who used its stylistic complexity to express numerous emotions in the music, with sudden changes in rhythm, volume and pitch throughout. Kim concluded the recital with Prokofiev’s first piano sonata, bringing the evening to an elegant close. After the end of the last piece and Kim’s standing ovation, I thought about the significance of what I had watched; the performance that was the culmination of Kim’s many years of studying the piano, and I was amazed by it all. I find it hard to imagine building such a relationship with an instrument that is clear in watching Kim play—she seems to make the piano an extension of herself, and make the performance a two-way interaction, giving and taking, making herself a part of the piano and making the piano a part of her, allowing for true musical expression. Kim truly takes the study of an instrument to a new level, and through her recital the audience was allowed a rare glimpse into the workings of an up-and-coming master pianist.

DS

> Alex Cavanaugh is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at alex.cavanaugh@und.edu


>

14

DS

Classifieds

tuesday may 3, 2011

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services

EMPLOYMENT

PART-TIME SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHER. WDAZTV in Grand Forks, ND has an immediate opening for a parttime sports photographer. Duties include sports photography, editing, assisting in production of various sports programs. May also include some reporting and overnight travel. Must have good sports knowledge and a valid driver’s license with driving record that is insurable by the company. Must be available nights and weekends. Send resume and DVD to: Sports Director, WDAZ-TV, P.O. Box 12639, Grand Forks, ND 58208-3639 or email to psweeney@wdaz.com. WDAZ is a Division of Forum Communications Company and supports a drug-free work environment. EOE WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE. Receive/unload/check-in products, deliveries, prepare orders, and warehouse upkeep. Requires driver’s license with a clean driving record, computer experience, and ability to lift 50 lbs. Part-time position 20+ daytime hours, Mon-Fri, with rotating Sats. Applications onsite or at www.acmetools.com. Submit to: Acme Tools HR, 1603 12th Ave. N., GF. Fax: 701-746-2894, Email: jobs@acme1948.com. EOE. SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: Counselors, speech and occupational therapists and aides, reading instructors, recreation, crafts and waterfront personnel needed for a summer camp in North Dakota. Working with children with special needs. Salary plus room and board. Contact: Dan Mimnaugh, Camp Grassick, Box F,

Dawson, ND 58428. 701-3274251, email grasbek@bektel.com SPRING/SUMMER SWIM INSTRUCTORS-spring Parttime evenings & summer fulltime. At the YMCA. Flexible schedule, free membership, fun work. Apply at 215 North 7th Street. Corner of North 7th and University Ave. or visit www. gfymca.org.

NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER SEASONAL EMPLOYMENT with the Grand Forks Park District. Applications and job descriptions can be obtained at www.gfparks. org or 1210 7th Avenue South. KATIE LIEN SCHOOL OF DANCE needs dance instructors for the 2011-2012 school year. $20-$40, depending on qualifications. Call 218-791-4357.

SERVICES HAD SEX? HAVE QUSTIONS? PREGNANT? NEED HELP? We are here for you. FREE and 100% confidential. Pregnancy test, first trimester ultrasound, options counseling. Education on pregnancy, abortion, STD’s. Women’s Pregnancy Center, 11 South 4th Street, Suite 210, Grand Forks. 746-8866. Hours: Mon-Thurs, 9-4:00. Please call for appointment. Visit our website at: http: www.gfwpc. org.

*

Like writing? Need a job next school year? The DS will be hiring writers next fall, so be sure to apply!

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

DANCE > From page

13

Allison Hocking, Nicole Mahanna, Kayla Narum, Erin Porter, Molly Des Roches and Emily Theurer. There will also be guest artists such as Andy Tanem and the Studio X Next Generation Dance Company. The company

is grateful to have the talented efforts of their choreographers to help them. The choreographers are Laura Dvorak, Molly Des Roches, Lindsay Hudson Baez, Joshua Wise, Maggie Bergeron and Katya Bryleva. The doors will open at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday and the concert starts at 8 p.m. Tickets will only be available an hour before the performance starts. Tickets are

‘Fast and Furious’ No. 5 hits theaters

DS

MOVIE REVIEW

***** > ‘Fast Five’

Alex cavanaugh The Dakota Student

Last weekend, the new installment of the Fast and the Furious series premiered, starting the summer off with quite a bang— and a lot of gasoline. It’s been ten years since the first film came out, inspired by a short story by Kenneth Li Rafael titled “Racer X.” Over the years, the film series has been based around the same thematic elements of fast cars and fast living, with the first film (The Fast and the Furious), the second film (2 Fast 2 Furious) and fourth

film (Fast & Furious) following the character Brian O’Conner, a former FBI agent, as he becomes attached to a group of fast-driving, law-breaking street racers and is pulled into their culture. The third film, The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift, departs from the main storyline and follows a teenage American troublemaker who is relocated to Japan and translates his background in American muscle to drift racing. Fast Five brings all of the plotlines together, pulling characters from each film to Rio de Janiero, Brazil to pull off a $100 million heist. The group has to simultaneously plan this heist and evade a large-scale manhunt from both a ruthless American DEA bounty hunter and a crime boss that runs the city. Meanwhile, the

$15 for adults and $12 for students. Laura Dvorak said of the performance and ballet, “One of the most amazing things to me is how we can utilize our art to express not only ourselves but to share messages that are based on social influence.”

DS

> Patrick Evans is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. He can be reached at patrick.evans@und.edu

ART >

From page

at the 2011 ArtSee include UND graduates Adam Kemp (painting), Michelle Brusegaard (screenprint, painting and photography), Jessica Christy (collage and painting) and Kelly Thompson (painting), as well as many more from cities around the area, including Crookston. The art of the evening will be accompanied by music presented by Jarrod Schell and Matt Strand on piano and guitar. Attendees will be provided with free beer, wine and hors d’oeuvres courtesy of Happy Harry’s Bottle Shop, who also sponsors the event. Other supporters include the North Dakota Museum of Art and North Dakota Council on the Arts. Anyone looking for more information on the event can check out the ArtSee’s facebook page at www. facebook.com/YPArtSee as well as Greater Grand Forks Young Professionals website at www.ggfyp.com/ artsee. It’s sure to be a great night for Grand Forks’s art enthusiasts.

18 DS

CARS > page

13

> Matthew Roy is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. He can be reached at matthew.roy.2@und.edu


DS

tuesay may 3, 2011

scores & schedules

sports

Rule changes for the better, > Inside: Track and Field competes at Drake

> Jimmies ousted in Grand Forks SWEEP North Dakota plays smart baseball and swings well in Friday’s double header.

>

Tadd POwers

The Dakota Student

The University of North Dakota softball team swept Jamestown College in a double-header last Friday at home, improving UND’s home record to 4-0 on the season and 14-32 overall. UND has been on a six game losing streak which was snapped with the 5-1, 3-1 sweep over Jamestown. Caralyn Chewning was the notable star and was one of the

@ American Sky Championships

MGLF Scottsdale, Ariz.

5/03-04 @ 8 a.m.

key factors in the sweep. She went 2-for-5, with a double, home run, a couple walks, four runs, and a winning decision in the circle. UND 5, Jamestown 1 The big story in the win for UND was the pitching from Michelle Frank, who was dominant, earning a complete game victory and only allowing one run off of two hits. Frank flirted with a nohitter deep into the sixth inning before surrendering the two hits and lone run. UND started the first inning off the right way, with three hits and a run. The lone RBI in the first inning, from Kenna Olsen, was a deep single to centerfield. There wasn’t much action for both teams in the middle in-

Infielder Kendra Wright watches as the opponent rounds the base.

SB vs Valley City St. 5/03 @ 4 p.m.

nings. Brittany Baker ended the silence in the fifth inning with a two-run RBI down the line in left field to take a 3-0 lead. Frank’s no-hit bid would end in the sixth inning with two hits and an RBI by Jamestown to cut the lead to 3-1. UND would answer in the bottom of the sixth inning with a lead off home run from D Jantzer; her fourth of the year. The 5-1 lead would hold up and seal the win. Baker and Olsen each had two RBIs in the game. Six UND players recorded hits. Kendra Wright was the only UND player to get more than one hit as she went 3-for-4 with a run. UND 3, Jamestown 1 UND came out with an early

@ NDSU

BSB Fargo, N.D.

@ NDSU Dual

5/04 @ 6:30 p.m.

lead in the second inning with an RBI from Jantzer. UND worked two walks in the inning and Janzter came up big with the single that grabbed the 1-0 lead. Jamestown answered right back in the third having a three-hit inning and scoring a run to tie the game at 1-1. UND wouldn’t be tied for long; in the first at bat in the third inning, Chewning would help her own cause belting a big fly to take a 2-1 lead. It was Chewning’s 10th home run of the season. With the 2-1 lead in the bottom of the sixth inning, UND would get an insurance run with a lead off home run from Baker to head into the final inning with some breathing room for the

T&F Fargo, ND

5/06 @ 5 p.m.

UND pitchers. Emma Gronseth relieved Chewning in the seventh, striking out two batters, preserving the lead and earning her second save of the season. Despite being out hit 7-3, North Dakota earned their 14th win of the season. All of UND’s hits resulted in RBIs. UND was clutch in this game as UND batters got the RBIs when needed and won the game as a result. UND is set to resume action at home on Tuesday with a double-header against Valley City State. The first game starts at 2:00 pm.

DS

> Tadd Powers is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at tadd.powers@und.edu

Pitcher Emma Gronseth hurls a pitch against Jamestown.

D Jantzer attempts to field a ball. photos by NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student


16

tuesday may 3, 2011

SPORTS

Exercising proper Series win for baseball gratitude with style SUMMARY North Dakota athletics has propagated a grand slew of topics for this year.

>

Joel Adrian

The Dakota Student

Taking the mantle of Sports Editor was an opportunity that has all but deterred my love for print media. To to be associated with UND athletics is a gift itself, even if it’s just writing, reviewing and revising. As acting Editor, I have been entwined and downloaded within UND and all sporting teams. While following these talented athletes, we (the Dakota Student staff) have been able to provide an ample amount of topics and personal testimonials that put the reader within the competitive field. For that reason alone—Reader, I thank you. Watching, reading and actually covering an athletic team has provided satisfaction only other media outlets can vouch for. But it is not always a fluid ride, as favorite teams lose and unfamiliar teams streak towards victory. Aside from UND, national news, professional athletics and opinionated coverage has been boasted in this section of the Dakota Student (see Roehrich’s column), where every obscure and reasonable outcome and objective view is taken and published for your pleasure. That being said, I must—to do justice—acknowledge my writers. Returning back to being a first-year editor, thanking them publicly must be pushed. They have put up with my sometimes-tyrannical deadlines, stayed up late, dealt with technology busts and my lack of clarity through prodding e-mail—where a simple phone call would have sufficed. The writers majoring, minoring and triumphing in about everything else have truly preserved and maintained the quality of the Dakota Student. I realize I can be rather irate at times or choose to don on a quelling quiet voice at others, but the writers, patient writers, have failed to disappoint. Picking up the paper, Reader, and enjoying the work of your collective peers really validates the reason why we produce two papers a week. So once again, I thank the

in Grand Forks. 236 people got to see the action, with many students among them. The early game yielded a 10-4 victory for North Dakota. After allowing 4 runs to start the day in the very first inning, UND Timothy Boger responded with a consistent ofThe Dakota Student fensive attack. They scored in the next four innings to take a Kraft Field finally hosted a 7-4 lead, thanks in part to home runs in back-to-back innings by full home series this weekend. After two entire series—a full first baseman Jake Magner. Magmonth ago against North Da- ner went 3-for-4 on the day with kota State and later against Utah three RBIs all coming on his two Valley—were erased due to snow home runs. Josh Ray, also 3-for-4, had and UND’s baseball team finally played all four games on their another home run.Sam Anderson got the win for UND; he is now schedule this past weekend. 1-4. It was also The seca successful Kris Kwak’s walk- ond game weekend, as North Dakota off home runin the of Friday’s doubleheader took three out ninth inning would went, strangeof four from ly, to defense. the visiting be the difference. North DakoChicago State Timothy Boger ta’s bats were Cougars. Origistaff writer quieted, but Chicago State’s nally schedbats didn’t uled for just a single doubleheader with the fare much better. North Dakota series stretching from Friday to brought around two runs in the Sunday, the teams agreed to get second and one in the fifth to in four before Saturday night’s take a 3-0 lead, but the Cougars snow. It worked out quite well, would jump right back and tie as a seven-minute rain delay was the game on a three-run home the only hiccup in what ended up run from William Hill. The two teams were unable being a very successful weekend to break the 3-3 tie and the game for UND. North Dakota improved to went into extra innings, the first 6-23 on the season and 4-8 in the such game for North Dakota this season. The Cougars finally the Great West Conference. Friday, two very different broke the tie on an RBI single games unfolded on a spectacu- from Jeremy Rataczyk, and UND lar—if not a little windy—day went down in order in the bot-

HEROICS UND’s Kris Kwak hits a home run in the ninth inning on Saturwriters as they truly are the driving day for the victory. force of our media and will accomplish great feats after UND. Fellow editors, those who mind my work, it has been a privilege to work beside you on the office bench for 49 memorable issues. It might have been the tight, stuffy office that has caused us to be friends, or maybe we had no other choice but to assimilate our personas. I feel the Dakota Student in a way reflects our cohesiveness and personalities in a positive manner. I realize some of you are leaving for more glorious work, school, families, futures or just to get away from my charming swagger, but I do wish you the best in the world. If this sounds mushy, well, it is. Dressing up in scandalous attire, singing ourselves hoarse at random karaoke nights and just enjoying each-other’s company is something I value dearly, as each one of you has carved your initials on my beating heart in one way or another. But as geological time moves on, I have the complete faith next year is in capable hands; I’m not being completely narcissistic because of my own hands, maybe a little. I will be here sitting and staring at the glowing box in front of my eyes, and I’m hoping Reader (if you’re still reading) that you will be picking up our work. The final acknowledgement I will give is to UND. Thank you! It has been an absolute privilege to work for you. The correcting, somewhat brash emails by readers have been boomeranged by positive, reaffirming messages that keep me from turning my back on the paper. Next year UND, expect grand in Grand Forks (pun grossly intended).

DS

> Joel Adrian is the Sports Editor for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joel.adrian@und.edu

>

*

tom of the 11th, failing to sweep the doubleheader. A pair of ten run efforts on a much chillier Saturday doubleheader would be enough to sweep Saturday’s twin bill, though. In the early game, North Dakota pecked away at Chicago State pitcher Albert Carpen, scoring in six of the nine innings to defeat the Cougars 10-6. There weren’t any home runs in the game, but every North Dakota batter had a hit and five drove in runs. Leading the way was Ray, who had three RBIs in the game and went 12-for-18 on the weekend. A back-and-forth game ensued in the second game Saturday, but the result was another victory for North Dakota, doubling their season victories in just two days. North Dakota put up six runs in the second inning, but they’d allow the Cougars to claw back and tie the game at eight heading into the final frame. But this time, Kris Kwak’s walk-off home run in the ninth inning would be the difference. Kwak had misplayed a ball earlier that allowed CSU to tie it, but he’d redeem himself on a two-run blast that put the game away. North Dakota travels down to play North Dakota State Wednesday night in a single game in Fargo before traveling to Greeley, Colorado to take on Northern Colorado in a four game set beginning Friday.

DS

> Timothy Boger is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@und.edu

Be sure to catch the softball games today at 4 and 6 p.m. UND takes on Valley City State University for Senior Day. Take a break from studying and enjoy the weather! www.TheDakotaStudent.com


the Dakota Student

SPORTS

17

UND takes second Let’s fix what we can fix in GWC tourney VOLLEY North Dakota shows promise after falling to NJIT in pursuit of conference title.

>

Brandon Becker The Dakota Student

The North Dakota tennis team took part in the Great West Conference season-ending tournament this past weekend. UND made it to the championship last year but came up short and going into the weekend were looking to end the season on a high note. Entering the tournament, North Dakota came in with a 10-9 record and would need at least one win to preserver a .500 season. UND 4, South Dakota 1 A first round match-up against border-rival South Dakota wasn’t going to be an easy task for North Dakota. But behind a deep team, UND was able to outlast the Jackrabbits 4-1. Freshmen Callie Ronkowski and Stephanie Biehn came up with big performances, taking down their respective opponents in straight sets. Sophomore Chelsey Galipeau also defeated her opponent in straight sets to clinch the victory for UND. In doubles, Ronkowski teamed up with Erin Kappers for an 8-4 win, while teammates Stephanie Petsis and Biehn came away with a 9-7 victory. UND 4, Texas-Pan American 0 If a spot in the championship

match wasn’t motivation enough for North Dakota going into their second round match, then they got it when Texas-Pan American advanced to the semi-finals. The Broncs in last year’s championship defeated North Dakota, so there was plenty of motivation for UND going into the match. Biehn, Petsis and Ronkowski all took down their opponents in straight-sets to give North Dakota a big advantage. UND gained a pair of doubles victories from sophomores Hallie Welk and Megan Sween, and Petsis and Biehn also won their respective match. It was an impressive performance from North Dakota and it was good enough to send them to the GWC championship for the second consecutive year. NJIT 4, UND 2 North Dakota fell short [for the second year in a row] in the GWC championship. It was a tough loss for UND, but they fielded a young team all year long with three sophomores and three freshmen. Their top players carried the Highlanders, as their Nos. 1-3 singles players all earned straight-sets victories. UND finished the season with a 12-10 mark and will have a promising future with a young cast of players returning next year. It was another tough ending to the season for North Dakota, but they will be in the running to win a championship next season.

DS

>Brandon Becker is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at brandon.becker@und.edu

RENOVATION These five rule-proposals will change professional sports for the better.

>

Devon Roehrich The Dakota Student

We as human beings should always strive to leave something in a better condition than we originally found it, and sports should be no different. The sports universe will never be perfect, but that doesn’t mean we should ever be fully satisfied with what the major sports teams in our country present to us. The following is a quick list of one simple thing each professional sport should change immediately; no more talking about it, making excuses for its eventual spot on the sport’s agenda. The time is now—someday is not a day of the week. As we head off into summer, here are immediate and direct changes that five major sports in North America can make that would have meaningful and beneficial effects. NFL—drastically reduce the Rookie pay scale. The current setup makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. The owners want to save money, and the amount of money these guys have to pay unproven 21 and 22 year-olds is simply stupid. In what other line of work do firstyear employees get the highest amount of guaranteed money in their entire industry? Do firstyear secretaries make more than the other office administrators that have proven themselves for 15 years? Do first-year lecturers get more guaranteed dollars than the teaching veterans? Hell no. I am with the players on most of the lockout issues, but the current rookie pay scale is the most unjust financial system I have ever seen, period. This needs to end now. NBA—reseed after the 1st round of the playoffs. So the Lakers are the #2 seed in the West. The Spurs have just

lost to the 8th seeded Grizzlies, matter. The thought of having leaving L.A. as the best remain- another perfect game ruined by ing seed. Logic would say, as the extreme human error is repulsive, NHL and NFL also believe, that and we should expect to use techthe Lakers should be able to play nology to help all sports operate the worst team remaining, not in more efficient and fair manthe 3rd seeded Mavericks. But nerisms. No more blown calls on the NBA bases Round 2 match- the base paths, outfield or homeups purely on the original brack- run lines. et set-up, with ideally the round PGA Tour—No more DQs having the 1-4 and 2-3 semifinal as a result of TV viewers calling matchups. The only downside of in. Think about it—can you call this proposed change is that the David Stern in the 4th quarter NBA would have to wait until of the Heat-Celtics game, telling all of the series are complete to him of a video clip that shows a potentially reseed, thus wreak- clear push-off by LeBron or a blaing havoc with TV scheduling on tant hand-check by Pierce? This ABC and TNT. But with a little type of behavior has occurred nuflexibility, it could easily happen, merous times over the past couand the 4th seed would no longer ple of years on Tour, and it is the get to play the 8th seed while the most unfair thing I can think of 2nd battles the 3rd. in sports, because not every playNHL—Eliminate shoot- er in the tournament has cameras outs. focused in on his every shot. In Deciding fact, most games in this The thought of hav- of the playmanner really ers have ing another perfect a majormakes no sense. Games should be game ruined by an ity of their decided in similar shots never extreme human er- shown on manners in how they are played— TV, negatror is repulsive... hence the reason ing a large Devon Roehrich pool of pofor overtime excolumnist tential rules isting. Do NBA games go into 1-on-1 after five violations. The rules of golf clearminutes of overtime? No, because ly needed to be modernized, but teams (not individuals) should fans using TV footage to actually decide the game. Bring back the affect the outcome of professional tie in the regular season, and tournaments is taking this idea in eliminate the silly rule of giving the wrong direction. teams extra points for losing in P.S…..My sign-off: It’s unbeovertime. The shootout is excit- lievable how fast three and a half ing, but the NHL has regained years can go by—it seemed like enough popularity where they just yesterday I was walking into no longer have to just make deci- McCannel Hall to the Dakota sions based purely on entertain- Student Office wing, turning in ment. Restore merit to the team my application to be a regular game—let’s not play 1-on-1. contributor of our fine student MLB—Implement full re- publication. It’s been quite a replay on everything but balls warding ride since October 2007, and strikes. and it all ends today; This will be One of the main themes of my last issue as I wrap up my colthis column over the years has legiate writing career. been the need to overcome traI am so thankful to all of the ditional rules that exist only for Dakota Student staff and support the sake of tradition itself. This services, especially my sports ediwhole argument of the ‘human tors of the past eight semesters, element’ in sports is BS. Get the Alison Kelly and Joel Adrian. I call right—nothing else should have really grown as both a writer and a person over the past three and a half years, and I believe my writing style and effectiveness reflects that. I hope that one day everyone is able to experience the thrill of being able to express one’s feelings in a public medium—it is a refreshing and necessary function of a healthy and democratic society. I wish all of the readers of the DS the best in all future endeavors for the foreseeable future, and I hope that at least once over the past few years I have given your homework-crammed mind a nice and respectable sports reprieve. God Bless!

DS

> Devon Roehrich is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at devon.roehrich@und.edu

*

Be sure to have a safe and exhilerating Summer break to refresh for next Fall!

www.TheDakotaStudent.com


18

SPORTS

CARS >

From page

14

group has its own dramatic ups and downs and the group finds itself growing into a family—putting a wholesome sheen on the rough-andtumble attitude of the series. Don’t think this means that Fast Five has gone soft, though, as it has even more action and intense driving sequences than any of the other films—let’s just say the producers had a lot of money to burn on this flick. While the movie is largely driven by the fast cars the characters drive, Fast Five is also heavily nostalgic. Some of the characters that reprise their roles are only featured in one of the other films; including Vinny, who was one of the main characters of the first installment. As such, fans of the series will appreciate this film, but newcomers can also enjoy themselves if they like unrealistically cool cars. The screen writing of this film slips a bit, but that isn’t really the focus of the film; so, while Fast Five seems more like a kid’s box of hotwheels cars than Million Dollar Baby, it’s still worth a watch—preferably on the big screen.

DS

> Alex Cavanaugh is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at alex.cavanaugh@und.edu

DAVID >

From page

5

on ourselves. It is our education that teaches us the importance of keeping our bodies and minds healthy, our training that gives us the skills needed to secure our financial independence, and our pursuit of Truth and ultimate happiness that will one day allow us to hopefully claim a life well lived. All of that starts right here at UND. They help us discover the abilities we need to become good people. How can one individual ever truly express an appreciation for something that will benefit them and their children in perpetuity? I know I certainly can’t. All I know is that after all of my time here, I know more than at any point in my life, and paradoxically, have never felt as dumb as I do now. I hope this is wisdom. I can’t speak for everybody, but I can’t think of many times when I considered the advancement of wisdom to be a chief benefit of a university education. Yet, now I do. I don’t know what I’m going to do after I leave UND. I know that I will eventually find a fellowship or another short-term job doing something I’m passionate about (hopefully working on energy or environmental issues in D.C.) to gain a little more life experience before I apply for my Ph.D. One day I hope to make my mark on policies that improve the lives and maximize the Liberty of my fellow citizens. Of course, the future being uncertain as it is, what I want to happen is likely quite different than what will happen. This is unavoidable. The complexity and beauty of our existence is such that the best we can do is follow Abraham Lincoln’s ad-

tuesday may 3, 2011

Obstacle course ADVENTURE TRSP will host the 25 mile race to challenge all who dare attempt it.

>

Staff report

The Dakota Student

Turtle River State Park, located 22 miles west of Grand Forks on Highway 2, is hosting the 2011 Extreme North Dakota Spring Primer Adventure Race on Sunday, May 8. The race features a number of challenging events and is open to either single gender or coed teams of two or three; a three person coed team is considered the premier category. Teams will collect a point for each checkpoint they reach during the course. A few checkpoints are optional so that newer teams or teams with less experience can elect to opt out and still finish the race. The overall rankings are based on score. Contestants will be expected to participate in running or trekking up to three to four miles in some sections. Mountain biking is also part of the event; the tracks include a dirt road, vice, to paraphrase, and prepare ourselves for the chance that will come. This institution is designed to prepare us for our chances, and indeed, provide opportunities we never would have received otherwise. I began this article describing my desire to leave this place better than it was before. While I cannot say that my efforts made UND better, I know that I am better because of UND and the efforts of the people that make

doubletrack and singletrack, and will total 15 to 25 miles depending on the course chosen. Other events include map and compass navigation, climbing (all of the gear is provided and only one participant is expected to climb), optional one to two mile packrafting and mystery challenges. Registration for the race is $45 per person and closes at midnight on Thursday, May 5. The registration fees include refreshments, insurance for the racers and the Turtle River State Park entry fee. There will also be raffle prizes. The course will most likely be muddy. In addition, North Dakota weather can include heat, rain and snow even in May. It is therefore advised to prepare for all weather conditions and dress appropriately. For more information on the 2011 Extreme North Dakota Spring Primer Adventure Race, contact Andy Magness at (701) 330-0709. More information can also be found at endracing. com/p/end-spar.html. Registration can be completed online; in addition, links to last year’s results and videos can also be found on their website. it the wonderful place it is. The education we receive here is the most important investment we will ever make and the greatest gift we will ever receive. Do yourself a favor and show a little appreciation to those who make it possible. Take some time to thank the folks in Twamley, administrative assistants in your departmental offices, and the professors with whom you are communally engaged with in the act of learning. Most of

Jake Swift winds up for a pitch last weekend.

photo by TIMOTHY BOGER > The Dakota Student

all, strive to make UND a better place for everyone who calls it home, because I can say with certainty that even if you do not improve UND, you will at least improve yourself. Finally, as was true three years ago, so it is true today. It has been one of the greatest privileges of my life to know and learn with the staff, faculty, and students of this school. And to those who will proudly call yourselves Alumni on May 14,

always remember that we are the future of this entire nation. We will take positions of leadership the world over, using the skills we learned right here at our beloved alma mater. And no matter where life takes you, always remember that we are graduates of the University of North Dakota, and we can change the world.

DS

> David Barta is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at david.barta@und.edu


the Dakota Student

SPORTS

UND competes at Drake relays IOWA Des Moines provides fast competition as UND holds their own against other teams.

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

11

SPRING > From page

The forecast for Springfest this year is looking sketchy a week out. Rain showers with a high of 64 isn’t unexpected in May this far north, so bring an umbrella. It should be a fun time with the drinking, live music, lack of fires and what-not. With that, I would like to offer some alternatives to Springfest: 1.) Continue studying; your ed-

19

The Pi Mile race started at 3:14 p.m. The annual event was hosted by Tau Beta Pi.

ucation is important and expensive. 2.) Binge drink alone with the lights off and the Smiths on. 3.) Face the realities of Graduation, a.k.a. “The Real World,” by contemplating graduate school at UND. Having fun out in the sun is one thing, but it is good to have a positive alternative to any plans made for debauchery. If you do make it to Springfest this year, try to remain gracious. Bernard Kauk, a Masters student and

bartender at Rhombus Guys, would like to remind patrons of Springfest, “Remember to tip your bartenders! They work really hard.” Just because you’re paying $5 per beer doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take some time to show your good intentions. As an alternative, Mason Olson, a Rhombus Guys Regular suggests, “I’d just bring in my own fifth.

DS

> Nicholas Gowan is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at nicholas.gowan@und.edu

>

Kyle Rosseau

The Dakota Student

A few athletes from the University of North Dakota track and field team competed at the 102nd Drake Relays. The relays were held on the campus of Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa with races on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The meet is held every year and brings in some great competition from all levels, including past Olympic gold medalists. UND sent two relays down to Iowa. The women and men had a distance medley relay, where the women raced on Friday and the men went on Sat-

urday. On the women’s side, UND finished their relay in 13th place out of 15 total teams. This was the first time all season North Dakota had an outdoor distance medley. Starting off for the relay was junior Emily Emerson who ran the 1200 meter leg. She then handed off to freshman Brittney Bolstad, who ran the shortest leg of the relay, which was 400 meters. Running the 800 meters was freshman Savana Weller and the anchor leg was junior Lindsay Anderson. Anderson, the top distance runner in the Great West Conference, closed out the relay running the mile. She put the team four seconds ahead of Indiana State, finishing in an excellent time of 12:16.43. The winning team in the women’s distance medley was Utah, who finished with a time of 11:17.09. The University of Minnesota also competed in the race, placing 3rd in a time of 11:29. The UND men also competed against some tough competition in their distance medley relay. This field consisted of division I All-Americans with plenty of National Championship experience. Of course, North Dakota is new to Division I so they definitely had their work cut out for them. Racing against 18 teams, North Dakota took 15th in the Jim Wheelock distance medley relay. Leading off for the team was junior Tyler Rose in the 1200. Next up in the 400 was junior Chris Stoks who then handed off to freshman Jesse Fenstermacher for the 800. Closing the relay was 10k school record holder Josh LaBlanc. LaBlanc crossed the finish line after running the mile and giving UND a final time of 10:07.63. Taking the victory in the men’s DMR was the University of Minnesota. They finished in a time of 9:38.09 just ahead of Wisconsin who finished with a 9:38.39. On a side note, the meet included some great elite competition with 3 time Olympic gold medalist Jeremy Wariner. He competed in the 400 meters and finished with a U.S #1 time of 45.19 seconds. His time also ranks 6th in the world this year. Coming up next for the track and field teams is a dual meet with North Dakota State. The meet will take place this Friday, May 6th on the campus of NDSU. There is also an open 5k which is open to the public, so if you feel like racing drive on down and lace up your running shoes! Once the NDSU dual is over, UND will have a few days to prepare for the Great West Conference outdoor track and field championships. The meet will take place at Utah Valley on May 12-14th.

DS

> Kyle Rosseau is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at kyle.rosseau@und.edu


20

SPORTS

tuesday may 3, 2011 photos by PETER BOTTINI > The Dakota Student


May 3, 2011