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WELCOME BACK! We hope you’re ready for another great school year at UND! - The DS Staff

volume 129

Today

friday august 26, 2011

DakotaStudent issue 1

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Holy H.O.T. street dance, Batman! PARTY Hall Orientation Team hosts numerous Welcome Weekend events.

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BRANDI JEWETT

The Dakota Student

Thousands of students ended their Welcome Weekend celebration at a street dance held Sunday night behind the Memorial Union. The event, organized by the Hall Orientation Team (H.O.T.), attracted nearly 3,500 students, beating the attendance record set by last year’s dance. “I would definitely say it was a success,” said Stephanie Rosenthal, co-chair of H.O.T.’s central planning committee. Johnny Green and the Green-

men provided music for the dance. The band appeared in 27 episodes of the 1960s Batman TV show as the Joker’s henchmen according to its website. The Greenmen played covers of songs from multiple genres that spanned several decades. A unique opportunity was also presented to students when Johnny Green invited them to join the band on stage and provide vocals for several songs. In addition to music, the dance featured a mechanical bull, inflatable games, life-size Jenga and

DANCE > page

BRANDI JEWETT > The Dakota Student

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Turn to Page 13 for a review of the band and dance.

Sophomores Andy Landburg (left) and Patrick Crowe (right) join Johnny Green and the Greenmen on stage during the band’s performance.

University enrollment on the rise

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

RECORD Graduate School experiences the most growth, others follow.

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KATIE BACHMEIER The Dakota Student

Hundreds of students gather in front of the Memorial Union for the annual Fall Involvement Expo Wednesday.

Involvement expo draws crowd PARTICIPATION Students turn out to learn more about campus and community organizations

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BRANDI JEWETT

The Dakota Student

The opportunity to seek out involvement in organizations, the chance to win prizes and free stuff drew thousands of students the annual Fall Involvement Expo. Held Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of the Memorial Union, the expo featured booths manned by more than 175 organizations from the campus and sur-

rounding community. Radio stations and businesses were also present, giving away free samples, prizes and advertising their student discounts. Junior Bailee Vaughn spent her day at the Homecoming planning committee’s table. “Today’s been very successful,” she said. “We’ve had three pages of people sign up [for more information] so far.” The involvement expo is a great opportunity for the committee to get their information out there she said. “I’ve had a lot of people come up to me and ask me what homecoming is all about,” said Vaughn. Sophomores Cody Troop and

Jamison Wood had just arrived around noon and had yet to arm themselves with bags to collect free goodies given out by the booths. Troop said he was there to check things out but was unsure if he would find an organization to become involved in. Aisles between booths were packed with people, making moving from one end to another difficult. The Involvement Expo was organized by the Student Involvement Office. The office’s directors could not be reached for comment before press time.

EXPO > page

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Walking around the University of North Dakota’s campus, it may seem as though there are many more new faces than usual. A record numbers of students are currently attending the university as a result of marketing techniques and the positive economic environment in the state of North Dakota said Peter Johnson, UND spokeperson.

Many new students from all corners of the world are making UND their home for the 20112012 school year. According to Johnson, UND’s first day enrollment was 14,076, an increase of 645 over the past year’s initial day tally of 13,431. The UND Graduate School showed the best growth with 2,556 students, up seven percent over the past year’s tally. UND has 2,945 new undergraduate students, an increase over last year’s 2,925 students. Transfer students are up four percent, 841 compared to 812. UND also showed a two percent GROWTH

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UND graduate killed in air show accident

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STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

Stunt pilot and UND aviation graduate Bryan Jensen died in a plane crash during the Kansas City Aviation Expo. Jensen failed to pull out of a dive during his performance last Saturday, resulting in a fiery crash. Jensen, a captain for Delta Airlines with over 23,000 hours of flight time, flew a custom-built biplane in air shows across the

country. The Kansas City Air Show announced earlier this week that a scholarship will be established through the Mid-American Youth Aviation Association to honor Jensen. The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash. Sunday’s show was dedicated to Jensen. No further incidents occurred during the show.


DS datebook 02

today, august 26, 2011

> viewing: A public star party will be held at the UND Observatory at 9 p.m. Free snacks and drinks will be provided. saturday, august 27, 2010 > event: An inline skating marathon will begin at the Alerus Center. Its route will wind through the city streets. Rollin’ on the River will begin at 7:30 a.m. > shopping: Offering vegetables, fruits and crafts the Town Square Farmers Market will begin at 9 a.m. and end at 2 p.m. rain or shine. Located in downtown Grand Forks. sunday, august 28, 2010

> concert: History Rocks will feature music from Fallcreek and Kenny and the Classics. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is located at the Myra Museum 2405 Belmont Rd. Tell us what is happening on campus > Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

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friday august 26, 2011

DATEBOOK

The Dakota Student editorial Editor-in-Chief Brandi Jewett > brandi.jewett.1@my.und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Jon Hamlin > john.s.hamlin@my.und.edu News Editor Robb Jeffries > robert.jeffries@my.und.edu

>

Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: dakotastudent.com > Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features

Campus notes

Features Editor Megan Sevigny > megan.sevigny@my.und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@my.und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@my.und.edu Web Editor Madi Whitman > madisson.whitman@my.und.edu

>MIP/MIC: 18 instances >CS/ICS: 5 instances - 300 Hamline, 3251 5 Ave. N >Medical Assist: 5 instances - 2891 2nd Ave. N., 315 Hamline St., 3251 5th Ave. N., 3530 University Ave., 440 Stanford Ave. >Criminal Mischief: 4 instances - 3251 5th Ave. N., 450 Standford Rd., 3450 University Ave., 350 Princeton St. >Fire Call: 4 instances - 2510 University Ave., 4301 James Ray Dr., 2500 University Ave., 540 Carleton Ct. >Drug Paraphernalia: 3 instances - 300 Hamline, 3251 5th Ave. N. >Noisy Party: 2 instances - 2622 University Ave., 2808 University Ave. >Other Reports: Missing Person (448 Stanford Rd.), Menacing (1 City Limits). > The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

Want to improve your writing skills and create pieces you can use in a professional portfolio? Apply to become a Dakota Student reporter today. Pick up an application at McCannel Hall, room 170.

business

Business Manager Rachel Stusynski > 777-2677 rachel.stusynki@email.und.edu Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Kyla Lindstrom > lyla.lindstrom@my.und.edu Alexandra McClaflin > alexandra.mcclaflin@my.und.edu Tyler Olson tyler.olson@my.und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677

All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

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> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.

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DS

world news report

>Inside:

World Brief

SHIPPING LOCK CLOSURE REQUESTS DENIED BY FEDERAL PANEL

CHICAGO _ A federal appeals panel Wednesday rejected the request of five Great Lakes states to close Chicagoarea shipping locks. But the panel warned that if ongoing efforts to stop the advance of Asian carp halt or slow down the issue could be revisited. The ruling by the threejudge panel of the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals follows a district court decision in December that concluded the invasive species did not appear to be an imminent threat and closing the locks might not keep them from reaching Lake Michigan anyway. Locking gates were built into the Calumet-Sag Channel and the Chicago River to limit the amount of water releasing out of Lake Michigan when engineers reversed the flow of the Chicago River at the turn of the century. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District control the locks to limit flooding during heavy rains and to allow cargo ships and boats to pass. In July 2010, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin sued the federal government to force a temporary closure of the locks until other carp-control methods could be put in place. Critics, however, alleged that the effort was “politically motivated” and could devastate the regional shipping industry and put residents who live in flood-prone areas at risk. A native of China with no known predators in the U.S., Asian carp have overwhelmed native fish populations by out-competing them for food, jeopardizing the Great Lakes’ estimated $7 billion annual commercial and recreational fishing industry. Although the 7th Circuit of Appeals upheld the lower court’s ruling, it disagreed with U.S. District Judge Robert M. Dow’s opinion that the “plaintiffs cannot establish a showing of irreparable harm.” “We are less sanguine about the prospects of keeping the carp at bay,” the panel wrote. “If the invasion comes to pass, there is little doubt that the harm to the plaintiff states would be irreparable.”

friday august 26, 2011

Women’s soccer gears up.

Rebels swarm Gadhafi’s compound OVERRUN Chaos and violence continue as rebels move through Libyan capital.

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NANCY A. YOUSSEF HANNAH ALLAM

McClatchy Newspapers

CAIRO _ Even as images of gleeful rebels overrunning Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s main military compound saturated television screens Tuesday, questions still loomed over Gadhafi’s whereabouts, the status of pro-regime holdouts and NATO’s role in the effort to secure the country. Early Wednesday, Gadhafi, speaking on a local Tripoli radio station, which was reported by Al-Orouba television and Reuters, said that his withdrawal from Bab al Aziziya, the dictator’s main compound and a key symbol of his power, was a “tactical move.” The compound had been leveled by 64 NATO air strikes, he said. Gadhafi did not say where he was speaking from. He vowed “martyrdom” or victory in his fight against NATO. Al-Arabiya television reported early Wednesday that forces loyal to Gadhafi were attacking the city of Ajelat, west of Tripoli, with missiles and tanks, and that dozens of missiles had hit Tripoli near Bab al Aziziya. On Tuesday, in scenes reminiscent of the days after the fall of Saddam Hussein’s regime in Iraq, rebels looted Bab al Aziziya, clambering onto and giddily spraypainting iconic buildings and statues. “Oh my God. I was in Gad-

hafi’s room. Oh my God. I’m gonna take this,” said a man as he donned a hat and gold chain that purportedly belonged to Gadhafi, in images captured by Britain’s Sky News. The capital remained chaotic and violent, with rebels and proGadhafi forces claiming control amid ongoing fears of reprisal attacks. Rebels appeared to be consolidating their grip, but the surprise appearance of Gadhafi’s son and one-time heir, Saif al Islam, outside a Tripoli hotel early Tuesday morning raised skepticism of the claims of the rebels, who had said they’d captured the son. Libyan rebels told Al-Arabiya on Wednesday that more than 400 people were killed and at least 2,000 were injured in the fight for Tripoli. Briefing reporters in Naples, Italy, NATO spokesman Col. Roland Lavoie said that the alliance was unaware of any rebel attacks on civilians, saying it had “no signs that anti-Gadhafi forces are operating in a manner not consistent with the mandate,” a reference to the U.N. Security Council resolution authorizing NATO to protect Libyan civilians. But privately, NATO warned the rebel National Transitional Council that it would protect civilians from them if necessary, a NATO official told McClatchy, requesting anonymity because of the sensitivity of the ongoing operation. Relief groups reported that Tripoli residents were fleeing in greater numbers, and Amnesty International warned that prolonged fighting in the capital could create a humanitarian crisis. The U.N. humanitarian coordinator’s of-

fice in New York said that it had received reports that civilians had been forcibly displaced by fighting and prevented from moving from areas because of the hostilities. The International Organization for Migration, a U.N.-affiliated group, was forced to delay docking a boat that it had chartered to evacuate 300 migrant workers stranded by the violence because of “poor security conditions at the port” in Tripoli. “The risk to civilians increases with each day of violence in Tripoli, not just for people caught up in the fighting but also because conditions could become dire if residential areas are affected by the clashes, with food supplies, water and electricity all likely to be hit,” said Malcolm Smart, Amnesty International’s Middle East and North Africa director. NATO officials sought to make Gadhafi an afterthought, with

Lavoie saying that the military alliance had no interest in searching for him because “he is not a key player anymore.” The comments seemed at odds, however, with the devastating blitz of airstrikes that NATO had launched in recent weeks on Bab al-Aziziya, a massive city-within-a-city complex of barracks, offices and Gadhafi’s living quarters, which sat in a bunker designed by West German engineers. Experts cautioned that Libya’s ability to form a new government could be hampered if Gadhafi isn’t found. “It’s not over until he is over. So long as Gadhafi is still free he can be a rallying point of resistance to the new government,” said Mark Perry, a Washington-based military expert. The rebels “made his overthrow the litmus test of success.”

caused considerable damage to the parks. The ministry plans to clean up debris left behind by the tsunami and lay out the recreational trails in the new park to revitalize tourism in the region. It also plans to build evacuation routes from the trails to higher ground as a precaution against a future disaster. Environment Minister Satsuki Eda has asked the Central Environment Council to study the plan. A panel will begin discussing the plan on Sept. 5, and the council is expected to compile an interim report in March. The ministry also plans to gather local opinions from a wide range of people by holding several meetings a year. This will be the first time the ministry has played such a role in planning a national park. The new park will be comprise Rikuchu Kaigan National Park in Iwate and Miyagi prefectures;

Tanesashi Kaigan-Hashikamidake prefectural natural park in Aomori Prefecture; and four parks in Miyagi Prefecture _ Minami-SanrikuKinkasan quasi-national park, Kesennuma prefectural natural park, Kenjosan-Mangokuura prefectural natural park and Matsushima prefectural natural park. Under the law, the government has designated 29 national parks as special areas of natural beauty. In certain areas within these parks, which are managed by the ministry, cutting down trees and modifying landscapes are prohibited. Quasi-national parks have a status similar to that of national parks. They are designated by the ministry and managed by prefectural governments. According to the ministry’s plan, the trails will start in Matsukawaura prefectural natural park in Soma, Fukushima Prefecture, which is south of the planned new national park. The trails will stretch north to

reach the Tanesashi Kaigan coast in Hachinohe, Aomori Prefecture, and utilize existing roads and trails along the coast. “We’ll promote ecotourism so visitors can enjoy the natural beauty of the seashore. We also hope to encourage tourism industries in the disaster-hit areas,” a ministry official said. The ministry will collaborate with local fishing ports to arrange for visitors to view rock formations at sea aboard small fishing boats and visit fisheries facilities. Along the new trails, shops selling marine products and other local specialties of the Sanriku coast will be set up to assist reconstruction and create jobs in the region. In preparation for future tsunami, leisure parks will be built in forests on high ground so they can be used as evacuation areas. These evacuation areas will be connected not only to the trails but also to residential areas along the coast.

PHOTO BY RICK LOOMIS > MCT Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi enters the Rixos Hotel in Tripoli, Libya on March 8, 2011.

Japan to repair, reorganize parks RENNOVATION Japan will rework park layouts as tsunami cleanup continues.

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THE YOMIURI SHIMBUN McClatchy Newspapers

TOKYO _ Six national, quasinational and prefectural natural parks in the disaster-hit Tohoku region in Japan will be reorganized into a single national park with trails totaling 350 kilometers (217.5 miles) in length, according to government sources. The Environment Ministry will rebuild or repair the six natural parks along the Sanriku coast of Miyagi, Iwate and Aomori prefectures and combine them to form the new national park, tentatively named Sanriku reconstruction national park. The Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent tsunami


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commentary

friday august 26, 2011

DS View Common Sense

CHOiCE Students should start the school year off right by using reason. While recent temperatures may lead you to believe that it is still summer, a quick glance at the calendar would show that we have, in fact, reached the beginning of the fall semester at UND. As you all pack away your shorts and flip-flops in preparation for yet another chilling North Dakota winter, please take some time to consider a few pearls of wisdom from your friends at the Dakota Student. We are mostly concerned with one simple problem: every year, without fail, a fair number of students abandon common sense. When you have the ability to choose, for example, between congregating in the middle of a busy hallway for a conversation and moving to the side of the hallway for a conversation, please choice the latter. When walking or biking accross the street, look both ways before crossing. One student has already been struck by a vehicle this school year. When you have a choice, for example, of wearing a jacket to class in November or not wearing a jacket to class in November, please zip up that outer layer. We cannot begin to count the number of classmates that we have seen on a Monday walking to class in the snow with a long sleeve T-shirt on that fall sick at the end of the week. This applies to the lower body as well. Long underwear exists for the twenty-below temperatures that are all too common in Grand Forks. When you eat at the dining centers, don’t squirt an entire bottle of ketchup onto your tray for the dishwashing staff to clean up. These are just a few examples of using that sometimes hidden gem called common sense. But reclaiming it won’t happen overnight. We cannot positively stamp out senselessness on our campus without teamwork. It is just not enough for you to be content with containing your own behavior. Stupidity breeds in environments where it is unchallenged. If you notice someone doing something senseless, call him or her out on it. While it remains up to you exactly how you call the offender out (this is a free country, after all), we believe that the louder and more public the condemnation is, the more effective said condemnation will be in preventing future stupid behavior. Similarly, be kind and courteous to those who exhibit acceptable behavior. Thank the person that covers their mouth and nose when they sneeze. Give the person that cleans out the sink in your residence hall’s kitchenette a pat on the back. With a little positive reinforcement, we may be able to reclaim lost common sense and make the UND campus a more pleasant place to live and learn.

Editorial Board Brandi Jewett Editor-in-Chief Jon Hamlin Opinion Editor Robb Jeffries News Editor

Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

Letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

Debate around Sioux nickname disappointing

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JON HAMLiN

ready heated discussion about the nickname and logo changed into As an “outsider” at UND, I’ve had a mudslinging match with stua different experience around the nick- dents shouting derogatory terms name and logo change than most. Now, and threatening one another from by using the term “outsider” I don’t across the room. mean to insinuate that I consider myself And there I sat, literally in the alienated within the UND community. middle of the classroom… and I simply believe that, around this partic- that’s pretty much where I sit toular issue of the mascot and nickname day. Over the last several years I’ve change, one needs to have some sort of come to a realization: There have established history here at UND in or- actually been very few intelligent, der to be considered an “insider”… you respectful conversations about the know, your parents went to UND, you logo and nickname. It seems that regularly attend hockey games and you such discussions start with the best own more than one of intentions; piece of Fighting it doesn’t The decision has yet, Sioux memorabiltake long for ia. None of those been made, and by the discussion are true for me. I devolve all indicators it is to suppose you could into a war of say that, in a way, the final decision. words, where I don’t feel that I levelheadedJon Hamlin ness and conam entitled to an Opinion Editor sideration take opinion; so, I’ve always considered a back seat myself more of an to anger and observer than anything else. frustration. Passions often flare in I’ve had the chance to observe the the worst of ways and soon people UND campus community react to the are saying things with the aim of pitches and oscillations that have accom- hurting others. panied the logo and nickname controIt seems to me that the issue versy. My first introduction to the con- – the same issue that has elicited troversy was in an intro class two years such passionate and strong reacago. The professor had invited a guest tions from both sides – has gotten speaker to give a presentation on the lost in and amongst the chaos, a logo and nickname. The speaker hadn’t classic case of “anger getting the got ten minutes into her presentation best of you.” before she was stopped by one classmate Recently, President Kelly and and told that she “didn’t know what she other school administration offiwas talking about.” Soon, a rather bois- cials met with NCAA representaterous majority had risen up in defense tives regarding the logo and nickof the logo and nickname. The profes- name change. After the meeting, sor was never able to finish her presen- President Kelly announced UND tation. After she had left another view- planned to move forward in tranpoint was expressed by several other sitioning out the Fighting Sioux classmates, arguing that the nickname logo and nickname. All across and logo were offensive and needed to North Dakota an uproar went be changed. It wasn’t long before an al- out, some cheers and some jeers. The Dakota Student

The simple fact of the matter is, however, that the transition is happening. This is another phase of the entire controversy surrounding the University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux logo and nickname and I hope that people on both sides of the aisle will react to this phase in a different manner than has been normal thus far. That is not to say that I do not understand the anger of those who have personal connections to the Fighting Sioux nickname and feel that it is an integral part of the UND experience, because I certainly do. I completely understand the anger you feel. However, there is a whole other group of people who feel differently and I also understand how they may feel that the logo is offensive or has been used inappropriately in years past. Neither side has the right to demand of the other that they relinquish their grasp on their viewpoint, that’s part of the idea in being able to have an opinion. However, that also means that no side is right or wrong. The decision has been made, and by all indicators it is the final decision. Everyone in the UND community should do what they can to bring themselves to be at peace with the fact that the Fighting Sioux logo and nickname is in the process of being retired. In the future, I hope the UND community is able to approach the issue of the transition in a way that speaks to the respectful and considerate nature that is so distinctive of North Dakotans.

DS

> Jon Hamlin is the Managing/Opinion Editor for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at jon.s.hamlin@ my.und.edu


the Dakota Student

COMMENTARY

05

New, used or rent: Textbooks hassle for most > Madi Whitman

The Dakota Student

As I often do prior to writing opinions, I recently browsed student-related news media websites looking for something about which to write. Of particular interest was one of those image lists the Huffington Post is fond of producing, and this specific list suggests that there are twenty-three items in existence that I, as a student, simply must have. Supposedly, my academic performance and my overall satisfaction with life might improve should I pick these up. Among the recommended products are noise-cancelling headphones, Netflix, a coffee maker, iPad apps, a camera, a flash drive (not a bad idea), and a reading device of some sort, like a Kindle or an iPad. I’m not totally sure what to make of this list, as I own only two or three items on the list, and said items include Netflix and a webcam, neither of which are overly conducive to my academic success. As much as I love Netflix and its bizarre algorithms and recommendations, I have wasted unspeakable amounts of time watching terrible horror movies that in no way contribute to my learning. In fact, many of HuffPo’s suggestions are probably detrimental to my learning. That being said, I want to reconsider the eReader. Right before I began writing this, I

opened a syllabus for the first time to discover that I needed another textbook. I generally do not mind purchasing books for school because I am at the point where I get to take classes that interest me, and so the corresponding books follow suit. I don’t end up with many massive books that exist in more than one edition, so I can usually escape without spending exorbitant sums of money on textbooks. However, this particular book is a seventh edition book about social science research, so I bit the bullet, reluctantly accepted that I needed to purchase yet another textbook, and clicked the “Place My Order” button on Amazon; all in all, a painful experience. Despite this unwelcome expense, I still think I consistently manage to avoid shelling out my savings on books because I spend most of my time in social science and humanities courses that utilize readers and lots of fiction, which leads me to wonder what the students in other areas of study do. According to our local bookstores, the Anatomy 204 textbook ranges from just over $100 to 200-some dollars, depending on whether or not one is willing to rent, which doesn’t really appeal to me because I tend to reference my books even after the course is over. Moving on. The

Biology 150 bundle is not cheap, nor are pretty much any textbooks for introductory courses. I’m not blaming departments, because I’m well aware these ridiculous fees are not their fault. I’m not advocating for

I love books. I love holding them and writing on the pages. Madi Whitman Columnist

blaming anyone, but I do think that we have a problem on our hands. Back to HuffPo’s list: a potential solution. They suggest that students get some form of eReader. It would appear that using a portable device to store and read electronic copies of documents might relieve some of the expenses associated with textbooks. I don’t think that this is a bad idea, but I am troubled by the implications it holds for reading and researching. I love books. I love holding them and writing on the pages. I like penning in strange annotations and the occasional outburst of rage. I enjoy the process of

searching for books in a library and tracking them down through endless shelves. I relish those moments when I take a step back and realize that I am surrounded by relevant works, and I delight in the stream of consciousness that results from my mind taking a leap through the discovery of something else that satiates my scholarly endeavors. I don’t really get this from electronic documents. I mean, sure, I can skim the references and run them through my preferred databases and libraries, but it isn’t the same. I know that electronic documents are environmentally friendly and could significantly cut down costs, but I can’t quite rid myself of my dependence on paper. That being said, I don’t have to put up with buying several new editions of large hardcover textbooks ever semester. Regardless, if HuffPo is any signifier, the eReader revolution is at hand, so keep it in mind when spring rolls around. I will be sticking with my hardcopies, but exploring alternative options might prove fruitful.

DS

> Madi Whitman is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at madisson.whitman@ my.und.edu

Motorcycle safety for the UND biker

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ALEX CAVANAUGH The Dakota Student

It was 11:30 p.m. and I was returning to the campground after a visit to the Full Throttle Saloon on the outskirts of Sturgis, S.D. I was trying to make it back before the light rain that had dampened the highway turned into a downpour, which is what the intention of the long line of thunderclouds that spanned the hills to the southwest seemed to be. That night was the official kickoff of the Black Hills Rally, and the city and surrounding areas were full of motorcycles and people from all over the country and world. I had noticed coming out of the gravel parking lot of the Full Throttle that the highway was slick and the fresh rain loosened the oil and dirt that had been packed into the pavement throughout the day after some 250,000 bikes had rumbled through. It was only Sunday—day one of the week-long rally—and already the roads were near-packed, as traffic coming in and out of the city the next day would be backed up for two miles. After a short three-mile ride, I made it safely to the campground entrance, and as I made the turn off the highway and into the approach, I heard the all-to-familiar sound of a Harley-Davidson coming over the hill from the opposite direction. From the two seconds it took me to turn off the highway and into the parking lot, I remember most what I heard: the roar of the other bike, squeal of the back tire breaking loose from the pavement, and crunch and grind as the rider laid the motorcycle over. By the time I looked over, I saw the rider and his passenger sliding be-

hind the bike, sparks visible as the stead, I held the clutch in as we foot pegs and highway bars grindwalked it sixty feet down into the ed on the pavement as the motorcampground. My bike was still cycle slid across two lanes. running up by the highway, turn The bike and riders came to a signal still blinking. Parking the stop on the shoulder of the highHarley by the tables, I went back way on the edge of the campsite for my bike and left the rider and turnoff, barely ten feet from where his passenger, both shaken, to asI had just pulled in. I stopped my sess the damage to their motorbike, turn signal still flashing in cycle and make it to their beds the wet, misty air and watched as on their own. the rider stood up, his passenger At the end of it all, my best near hysterics, and attempted to guess was that the rider mispick the bike up. Clearly shaken judged the slick road condition, and, I assumed, fairly drunk, he the exact location of the campdropped it on the opposite side. ground entrance and how much I shifted my bike into neutral, pressure he should put on his put my kickstand down and left rear brake, and he consequently it running on the corner of the locked up his back wheel and slid approach. I walked over to the the machine sideways at 15 miles two riders, and the guy checking per hour. Neither riders were wristbands at the campground wearing helmets, but both defientrance followed. I could immenitely suffered minor abrasions diately smell from the alcohol on road surface, A wreck at 20 MPH the riders’ not to menon a bike is likely tion some breaths, but neither was death. The pavement degree of inebriated to injury from is merciless... the point of hitting the unintelligiAlex Cavanaugh p a v e m e n t . bility—both, Columnist While, as I however, were said before, clearly shaken the riders and frightened. were not very drunk, it was clear I and the campground emthey had been drinking, which ployee picked up the crumpled may or may not have played a Harley Sportster and told the ridrole. ers that we would walk it down Within twelve hours— to the campground office, where the next morning, on the way large outdoor lights illuminated through Sturgis to the local Mcseveral picnic tables outside. The Donald’s where we had breakbike’s oil cap had fallen out, and fast—I witnessed another acciabout a quart of oil had spilled dent. At a four-way-stop, which onto the road and all over the side is what most intersections on the of the bike. I had gotten some of main drag of Sturgis are during the oil on my hands as we picked bike week, a rider dropped his the bike up, so it was difficult to bike in front of oncoming trafshift the bike into neutral. Infic and another rider, failing to

notice, locked up his wheels and slid into the downed motorcycle. Again, the sounds were what made the accident linger in my memory—screeching tires, the grinding of metal on the pavement and the final sick crunch of collision. My return to Grand Forks was one that I welcomed, and I was happy that I made it back safely, not because I doubt my own skill as a rider, but because it is impossible for a rider to account for their environment. This includes road condition, weather situation and whomever you share the road with and what capacity they are in. Every year the group of motorcyclists in the Black Hills is a diverse one—from the many dedicated, lifelong riders who know how to operate a motorcycle probably better than they do a car—to the “fresh” riders who buy a brandnew Harley-Davidson, trailer it to the Black Hills, strap on a dorag and take to the open road, thinking that riding a motorcycle in the Black Hills takes the same skill set as riding a bicycle down the street. It’s not—with or without the 500,000 bikes that the rally draws at its peak. All things considered, what disappoints me is not what I have seen at Sturgis in the seven years I have gone, but that I see many of the same mistakes made here in Grand Forks. I see many students in the fall and spring that ride motorcycle to class and through campus, which I think is awesome. I am one of those students. Many of these riders are safe—wearing helmets and exercising caution as they make their way down University Av-

enue. I also, however, see far too many—and this is where the ornery old man in me comes out— riding their crotch rockets in first gear, wearing baseball caps, shorts and sandals, popping wheelies and trying to impress God-knows who by the Chester Fritz or Archive’s. Here’s a query for those “bikers.” What’s cooler: the outfit and carelessness you ride with, or the towel they tie around your neck to collect your drool when you’re spending the rest of your life a vegetable in an assisted living home? A wreck at 20 MPH in a car is a fender-bender. A wreck at 20 MPH on a bike is likely death. The pavement is merciless, as is the bumper of a semi-truck. In my seven years on a motorcycle, I’ve seen both the best and worst of it—the freedom of the open highway and the unforgiving nature of concrete. On my bike, I’ve seen mountains and open skies as far as I can see—I’ve seen the true beauty of this country. But I’ve also seen the South Dakota highway patrol respond to a rider twitching in a pool of his own blood on the side of the road after hitting a deer at 30 MPH. Neither the unconscious rider on the ground nor his passenger, who was screaming at him to wake up, were wearing helmets. One of the lessons that I’ve learned from the lifestyle of being a motorcyclist— what doesn’t matter is if you will crash, but when. All I can say is wear a helmet, ride defensively, and ride responsibly. Be prepared for the when.

DS

> Alex Cavanaugh is a columnist for the Dakota Student. He can be reached at alex.cavanaugh@my.und. edu


06

friday august 26, 2011

NEWS

World Briefs Finland wins phone throwing contest

HELSINKI, Finland –– Finnish nationals dominated the 2011 Mobile Phone Throwing World Championships held Saturday near the Finnish town of Savonlinna. Oskari Heinonen won the men’s category with a 76-meter (about an 83-yard) throw, edging Antti Aiko by 1 meter. Netta Karvinen of Finland won the women’s event with a 48-meter (almost 52.5-yard) throw, 12 meters further than compatriot Marja Olli. Muusa Makkonen won the junior class for competitors up to age 12 with a 35-meter (about a 38.3-yard) toss. Elaine Jung of Australia won the freestyle event, where judges award “style and aesthetics,” ahead of Russians Mia Zarring and Sergei Mukhamedov. A Finnish team from Ostrobothnia won the team event. About 50 contestants from Australia, Finland, Russia, Ukraine and the United States took part. According to the championship rules, the devices are provided by the organizers, who collect them from mobile phone dealers. Christine Lund, who created the event in 2000, said that about 600 spectators watched the competition.

Two Americans sentenced to 8 years in Iranian prison BEIRUT, Lebanon –– Iranian authorities sentenced two Americans arrested and detained along the Iran-Iraq border to eight years in prison, state television cited an unnamed judicial source as saying on Saturday. The men, who have already been held in prison for more than two years in Iran, have 20 days to appeal their convictions on charges of illegal entry onto Iranian territory and espionage. Shane Bauer and Joshua Fattal, both 28, were arrested in July 2009 along the Iran-Iraq border during what they insist was an ill-fated hiking trip in the scenic mountains of Iraqi Kurdistan. Iranian officials allege that the two men are spies but have yet to publicly present any evidence. A third hiker, Sarah Shourd, was released on bail last year and has been campaigning for her friends’ release. All three are graduates of the University of California at Berkeley. Their case was tried by a branch of the country’s politically charged Revolutionary Court, which handles national security cases and has been accused of failing to abide by international or even Iranian standards of jurisprudence, especially when it comes to defendants’ rights. The two men’s lawyer, Massoud Shafei, said he had not been officially informed of any sentence for his clients. He and the men’s supporters had hoped the men would be freed as a gesture of goodwill during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

Governments considered lax on smugglers TRAFFICKING US, Mexican officials accused of being soft with the Sinaloa Cartel.

>

TIM JOHNSON

McClatchy Newspapers

MEXICO CITY –– As the U.S. and Mexican governments increasingly target the brutal criminal gang known as Los Zetas, questions are being asked about why law enforcement officials don’t seem to be paying equal attention to an older and larger cartel that’s the largest provider of illegal drugs smuggled into the United States. Public security analysts say a view has spread among some Mexicans that President Felipe Calderon is soft on the Sinaloa Cartel.

And now a court filing by an accused kingpin in U.S. federal court has suggested that the Obama administration, too, is negotiating with the Sinaloa Cartel even as it ratchets up pressure on the rival Zetas. Experts in Mexico City and Washington say the issue is as much about public opinion in the run-up to Mexico’s 2012 presidential elections as it is about efforts to reduce the violence that’s killed some 40,000 people in Mexico since 2006. “The perception that people have of the government not going after the Sinaloa Cartel is undermining its credibility,” said Alberto Islas, a security analyst with Risk Evaluation Ltd., noting that the group’s leaders “are the biggest smugglers of cocaine, meth and heroin into the U.S.” The Zetas, led by deserters

from the Mexican army, got their start in the late 1990s as an enforcement arm of the Gulf Cartel along Mexico’s border with Texas. They’ve since struck out on their own, dismembering their rivals, sometimes literally, and engaging in extortion, kidnapping and human trafficking as well as narcotics smuggling. In contrast, the Sinaloa Cartel, which U.S. officials say provides about 25 percent of the illegal drugs smuggled into the United States, generally favors bribing high government officials over the brutality Los Zetas employ to protect their smuggling routes, experts say. On July 25, the White House issued an executive order naming four groups around the world as transnational criminal threats. Along with Los Zetas, the order named the Yakuza of Japan, the

Camorra of Italy and the Brothers’ Circle, which operates from countries that once composed the Soviet Union. The order said the four groups were involved in a “wide variety” of criminal activity that included weapons trafficking, piracy and complex financial fraud. Rafael Lemaitre, a spokesman for the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, said the order didn’t include the Sinaloa Cartel because its activities were limited primarily to drug trafficking, while the Zetas had branched into a “variety” of other crimes. “We already have a robust sanction regime that targets organized (criminal groups) that engage mostly in drug trafficking, such as Sinaloa,” he said.

Afghan parliment members removed REPLACED Nine members of Afghan were removed from office Sunday.

>

HASHIM SHUKOOR

McClatchy Newspapers

KABUL, Afghanistan –– After months of controversy over the last year's tainted elections, an independent Afghan commission announced Sunday that nine members of the National Assembly will lose their seats and be replaced by new members. In December, President Hamid Karzai created a separate tribunal to sort out the allegations of fraud that dogged elections to the lower house of parliament since they were held in September. Karzai had sought to invalidate the fraudulent election of 62 MPs. But critics alleged that many, if not most, of those 62 members were opponents of Karzai and that his action was an illicit attempt to remake the elections. In recent weeks, the United Nations intervened, hoping to influence the outcome of the commission's deliberations. The U.N. had sought to overturn 17 results. In making the announcement Sunday, Fazel Ahamd Manawi, the head of Independent Elections Commission, noted the pressure said it played no role in its decision. "Today we have taken a very difficult and tough decision in order to end the election dispute though there was pressure from certain circles within the government," Manawi said at a news conference. The new National Assembly members MPs include eight men and one woman from different provinces across Afghanistan, including the volatile southern province of Helmand. Some believe that the commission's decision is the result of

a compromise made among representatives of the president, IEC and international community. Ahmad Zia Rafat, who was spokesman for the Electoral Complaint Commission, said Sunday's decision violated Afghan election law. "Once the results are announced, no organization has the authority to change it," said Rafat, who is a law lecturer at Kabul university. "It is not believed that this decision of the election commission will end the crisis; indeed we are entering another phase of crisis."

Only about two weeks ago, Karzai in a decree gave full authority to the elections panel IEC to announce the final decision and put end to the electoral dispute. "I am happy about the announcement, but our national process has been damaged. I was winner, but the Electoral Complaints Commission delisted me, without any evidence," said Ashoqullah Wafa, a newly announced winner from the northern province of Baghlan. Another member of the parliament, who lost his seat, called

Sunday's announcement illegal. "This is absolutely illegal decision, no one has the authority to bring changes in the result once it is announced, I don't think this announcement will be enforced," said Shaker Kargar, who was elected from the northwestern province of Faryab. "It is based on a political deal between IEC chairman and the palace," said Kargar, who is in his second term. Gul Mohammad Pahlawan will replace Kargar if the decision of IEC is enforced.


the Dakota Student

Restaurant scene to change in Grand Forks FOOD Dining establishments moving and out of the Grand Forks community.

>

Katie Bachmeier The Dakota Student

As the 2011-2012 school year begins, many new businesses and students alike are once again adjusting themselves to the Grand Forks community. New commerce in the Grand Forks area includes exciting venues like JL Beers, Olive Garden, and the re-opening of the renowned Whitey’s café. With new places opening, also comes the closing of the East Grand Forks Applebee’s. JL Beers, a bar located at 2531 South Columbia Road, offers a selection of 40 beers on tap, along with countless imported bottles from all over the world from Germany to China. You can enjoy a brew or a “beertail,” a drink with a blend of beers, with a few friends. One such beertail includes what JL Beers calls the “Dirty Red Hoe,” which is made with the combination of Breckenridge Vanilla Porter and a splash of Lindeman’s Framboise (Raspberry) Lambic. The fun atmosphere also offers nine different burgers on the menu all under $5, with an option of homemade chips and French fries. Another location that has made word it’s heading to Grand Forks is the ever popular

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Olive Garden. Rumors of Olive Garden opening in the area have been buzzing around for a few years, but it is finally official. The company itself said that earlier this year, in April, the company was in the process of gaining all of the appropriate permits. Olive Garden will be located at the northeast corner of the intersection of 32nd Avenue South and South 31st Street in Grand Forks, which is where the nowclosed Columbia 4 Theater, used to be located. Olive Garden said it will employ about 120 people in Grand Forks. The chain includes more than 700 other restaurants and more than 86,000 employees. Ruby Tuesday, another favorite chain restaurant, is said to open in Grand Forks by the end of the year. It will be located on 32nd Avenue South. They are most known for the vast array of options on their salad bar, as well as the funky atmosphere sometimes lost in chain restaurants. Their menu also includes a variety of $5 cocktails, perfect for the college student on a budget. An exciting, but not completely new restaurant coming to Grand Forks sometime with the year is the re-opening of Whitey’s. This locally owned restaurant used to be a popular location for college students to spend their time with good friends and classic American food. Whitey’s, now under new management, will once again be an option for students and the rest of the Grand Forks community

to hang out, drink a brew or just enjoy the company of those you like to spend your time with. It will be located at 121 Demers Avenue, in East Grand Forks. After trying out one of the new restaurants in Grand Forks, you might be craving something on the sweeter side. Riding the frozen yogurt craze, Grand Forks will also be home to a Cherry Berry, offering a variety of flavors of fro-yo and toppings. It is said to open sometime in September of 2011, at 3321 32nd Avenue South, in the same strip mall as the recently opened Five Guys Burgers and Fries. Twelve different Frozen Yogurt flavors will be available as well as over 50 topping choices. The location will employ 15 to 20 employees. It will include both outdoor and indoor seating with four big-screen TVs, as well as a party room for events. With the opening of many new and exciting locations, also comes the closing of an ever popular chain. The Applebee’s in East Grand Forks announced earlier this summer that they will be shutting their doors forever in the coming months. The Applebee’s located on Columbia Road will still be open for business. The coming year provides Grand Forks residents with a great opportunity to try out new places and meet new faces.

DS

> Katie Bachmeier is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at katie.bachmeier@my.und. edu

NEWS

07

Campus Briefs

Scholarship avaiable for those interested in public service

Juniors interested in a career in public service are encouraged to apply for the 2012 Harry S. Truman Scholarship. The scholarship covers eligible educational expenses up to $30,000 for the senior year and up to three years of graduate study. Disciplines that lead to careers in public service include political science, social sciences, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, computer science, and foreign languages. Interested students should contact Professor Mark Jendrysik at 265 Gamble Hall or mark_jendrysik@und.nodak.edu.

UND reminds pedestrians to exercise caution

Pedestrians on campus are reminded that pedestrians have the right of way only in crosswalks on city streets such as University Ave. and Columbia Road. On campus property pedestrians always have the right of way. Pedestrians are encouraged to take their safety into their own hands by remaining aware of their surroundings at all times.

Minnesota Twins and UND pair up for baseball game

UND and the Minnesota Twins are teaming up for the third annual “UND on Target with the Twins” day at Target Field in Minneapolis. Fans of UND, students, alumni and friends are invited to cheer on the Twins as they play the Cleveland Indians on September 17 at 12:10 p.m. A pre-game gathering begins at 9:30 a.m. that day. Tickets for the event are $10, and include food, activities, and a T-shirt. Tickets for the game cost $19, and can be ordered at 1-800-33-TWINS.

Quiet zones to be implemented in Grand Forks

--Several railroad intersections in Grand Forks have become Quiet Zones. Trains will not be required to blow their whistles when approaching a Quiet Zone. These zones include Downtown, Demers Ave., and North 42nd St. The City of Grand Forks urges all residents to use extra caution when approaching a railroad crossing in these zones.

Greek recruitment to begin

Fraternity recruitment begins Friday, August 26, and runs through September 2. Male students that are interested should fill out a registration form at the Student Involvement Office in the Memorial Union.

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Have an opinion? Apply to be a writer for the opinion section of the Dakota Student. Pick up an application at the Dakota Student Office in McCannel Hall, room 170.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com


08

friday august 26, 2011

NEWS

DANCE>

From page

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plenty of free food. “We went through 110 pizzas during the dance,” said Rosenthal. She said about 45 of the pizzas were eaten in the first half hour. More than 100 volunteers from H.O.T. and Nightlife assisted with the dance, doing everything from serving food, picking up trash, and providing stage security to tearing down the stage after the dance was over. Other activities Hosting a sub feed, carnival, bonfire, outdoor movie, and picnic for students and their families was also on H.O.T’s agenda this past weekend. On Friday the movie “Pirates of the Caribbean 4: On Stranger Tides” was shown on the lawn near Wilkerson Hall. The film’s start time was moved up because of the cancellation of the Student Ambassadors’ illusionist program. Raffle tickets were distribut-

Left: Johnny Green eats fire following the street dance. Above: Two H.O.T. volunteers blow off some steam during the dance on the joust inflatable. Right: Jody Trandem attempts to stay on the mechanical bull for the required eight seconds. >Photos by Brandi Jewett.

ed to the audience and the winners of prizes, such as a brand new flat screen TV, were announced following the film. H.O.T. also fed thousands through a sub feed, carnival and picnic. It was comparable to providing food for a small town, said Rosenthal. Moving in

H.O.T also used their volunteers to help residence hall students unload their vehicles, move possessions into rooms and set up bed lofts Friday and Saturday. Friday alone the group moved in 2,286 students, or 75 percent of the on-campus population, said Casey Weaver, advisor for H.O.T. and an assistant director for Housing.

Twelve “stop drop & go” zones were established for arriving students and their families to drive into. Once in the zone, volunteers from H.O.T., ROTC, faculty, staff and athletics unloaded vehicles. Alex Bata, a member of H.O.T’s central planning committee, said the group’s presence is a significant part of move-in. “For most freshmen, we

[H.O.T.] are the first impression they get of UND,” he said. “Without H.O.T., moving would be chaotic,” he added.

DS

> Brandi Jewett is the editor-inchief for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@ my.und.edu

Alumni center under construction

>

STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

Constuction is underway on the new Gorecki Alumni Center. Groundbreaking for the center occurred May 6 and is expected to be completed next year.. The 30,000 square-foot building will be located west of the Chester Fritz Auditorium. The building costs total $12 million. Funds for the construction were provided by donations, including $4 million from the cenNATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

EXPO >

From page

1

Student Involvement implemented a new tool this year in recruiting organizations for the expo. The office used CollegiateLink to advertise the event and sign up participating or-

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The Dakota Student is currently hiring reporters for all sections. Stop by our office in McCannel Hall room 170 and pick up an application today.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

ganizations. CollegiateLink is a communication platform for UND’s student organizations. Student Involvement’s Cassie Gerhardt, assistant director of leadership, and Missy Burgess, assessment and assistant program director, brought the proposal for the program to Student Senate in

February. Senate approved the bill entering the office into a three-year contract with the company.

DS

> Brandi Jewett is the editor-in-chief for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@my.und. edu

ter’s namesake Ben and Dorothy Gorecki of Milaca, Minn. Upon completion it will be the first LEED Platinum certified building in the state. LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental design. According to the Alumni Association, the benefits of a LEED certified building will likely include energy savings of about 30 to 40 percent over traditional buildings, more efficient use of water, cleaner interior air and lower maintenance costs.


10

friday august 26, 2011

NEWS

Education Building’s rennovation nears completion

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

>

STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

GROWTH >

From page

1

increase in professional students (medicine and law), 504 compared to 496. The number of returning undergraduate students is up six percent, 8,071 compared to 7,610. Many more students are attending UND than ever before, for many reasons. One reason being that the economy in North Dakota is in positive numbers, therefore making the University of North Dakota a smart investment when it comes to the price of tuition and cost of living. “We have an excellent university,� Johnson said, “More parents and students are understanding that, and the fact that it is a logical place for students to go to school.� The marketing department that works toward enrollment has also upped its game. They have worked much harder at reaching prospective students through many different mediums. More strategic approaches at getting more potential students interested in attending UND have been implemented than in prior years. Along with the marketing team,

word of mouth has also been a crucial asset to the rise of enrollment at the university, Johnson said. “It really has to do with marketing efforts and students who talk to each other when they go home about what UND has to offer,� Johnson said. Although the rise in enrollment includes on-campus and distance education students, a shortage of housing has created small but apparent issues, none of which were not previously anticipated by university officials. Over the last few years UND has seen enrollment rise, this year being the largest rise yet. With enrollment continually on the upswing, university officials have had the chance to create all the necessary precautions in order to guarantee the best experience for each student. “We’ve been experiencing managed growth throughout the years,� Johnson said, “So we’ve kind of known what to expect. We’ve been doing a good job with the housing, classes, and faculty [situations].� According to Johnson, not only are there many new-to-UND students, but also the retention

rate of students is on the rise, with six percent more returning undergraduates than in the previous semester. More students are staying at the University of North Dakota than ever before.

DS

> Katie Bachmeier is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at katie.bachmeier@ my.und.edu.

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The rennovation of the Education Building is almost complete. The exterior of the building is finished and only a few more interior projects remain before the building repairs are finished. According to the project’s website, 12 new classrooms have been added to the building. Seminar rooms, conference rooms, a reading room, a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) room, a development and research lab, and additional faculty offices have been added or updated as a part of the rennovation.

Did you know that these classic movies never won an Oscar? -Reservoir Dogs (1992) -King Kong (1933) -Oliver Twist (1948) -Dirty Harry (1971

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culture&media >

friday august 26, 2011

Inside: War on Drugs and Red Hot Chili Peppers albums, Welcome Weekend street dance and JL Beers review

Tips for Saving Money in College Story by Megan Sevigny Welcome back to the Dakota Student Features section! The new school year is here, and with it comes new classes, homework, catching up with friends and, of course, plenty of expenses. Textbooks, food, clothing, gas and entertainment all cost money, and sometimes quite a bit of it. It’s possible, however, to avoid the “poor college student” situation if you remember to live thriftily and spend money wisely. Here are a few tips to help you get started. 1. Utilize your meal plan or learn how to cook. Sure, it’s easy to say, “I’ll just buy lunch today.” However, campus food courts can be expensive and the $5 per day that you spend on lunch adds up to $50 in less than two weeks. A meal plan is required for all students who live in dorms and is already paid for, so why not take advantage of it? Online menus for each dining center with nutrition information can be found at nutrition.und.edu/foodpro/. If you live off campus and don’t have a meal plan, learning to cook is crucial. Not only will it save you a ton of money in the long run, but it is a skill that will remain useful for your entire life. Cooks of any skill level can find countless recipes online and hundreds of books have been written solely for beginning cooks. In addition, food can be prepared in large quantities and frozen for later, creating microwavable meals much tastier and healthier than what you’d find in the freezer section of the local supermarket. 2. Save money on gas. With gas at nearly $4 per gallon, it only makes sense to cut back on this expense. UND offers free city bus passes and maps of the city bus routes can be located on grandforksgov.com/bus. If you’re uncertain about taking the bus, another option is to carpool and cut the cost of gas in half. During the warmer months, walking or riding a bicycle has the double benefit of erasing the cost of gas and helping you stay in shape. 3. Shop around and try buying used. It pays to shop around to get the best deals, and this includes online shopping. Websites like ebay.com, half.com and amazon.com often offer used or overstocked goods at greatly discounted prices. College students can sign up for Amazon Student, which offers free shipping on textbooks and a year of Amazon Prime with free two-day shipping. With a little caution, craigslist.com can be an invaluable resource for both buying and selling. UND Underground, or underground.und.edu, is a great way to find books, furniture or even roommates locally.

If you’re planning on living in an apartment or renting a house off campus, it makes a good deal of sense to buy furniture used. After all, who’s to say you’ll need that furniture in a year or two? Used furniture can also be resold at the same value for which you bought it, should you decide that you don’t want it. Garage sales, thrift stores and websites like the ones mentioned in the last paragraph are all great sources of used furniture. Just use caution when buying things like couches and mattresses. Stores like GameStop and Rock 30 Games sell used videogames, videogame consoles and DVDs. Used clothing boutiques are a good source of affordable brand name clothing. With a little bit of searching, thrift stores and garage sales can yield unexpected treasures. 4. Don’t empty your pockets on entertainment. Sure, we all need to unwind every now and then. But going to the movies every weekend and eating out can empty your pockets quickly. This being said, cutting entertainment entirely from your life is completely unnecessary. Browse the campus calendar for free entertainment offered by UND. Plan movie nights with friends. Borrowing books and movies from the library will save on rental and late fees. If you’re dead set on going out, look into student discounts. Many places will offer student rates, but these rates may not be listed. Do a little research and find when the local theaters play their matinees. Sign up for coupons at your favorite restaurants—many will send coupons via email. 5. Don’t hang out with big spenders. If your friends are shelling out a ton of cash on food and entertainment, chances are that you will, too.

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> Megan Sevigny is the Features Editor for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at megan.sevigny@ und.edu


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the Dakota Student

CULTURE&MEDIA

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‘Slave Ambient’ shines Welcome Weekend

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MUSIC REVIEW

***** > ‘Slave Ambient’

Mattew roy

The Dakota Student

The War on Drugs’ 2008 fulllength debut Wagonwheel Blues is an exceptional album. When I first heard it, it sounded like nothing I have ever heard before. The unique blend of acoustic folk music with beautiful ambient guitars made it an album that I was playing over and over to uncover all the little details that multiple listening offered. Their follow up, Slave Ambient, is no different, and when listened to as a whole it’s a more cohesive album than their first, with each song wonderfully transitioning into the next. This is an album that you will want accompanying you on your next road trip.

The album opens with “Best Night,” which sets the mood for the entire album with its sprawling riffs doubling over a simple two chord acoustic guitar progression and Adam Granduciel’s Bob Dylan-styled voice. Granduciel’s rambling lyrics fit perfectly with instrumentation, and although newcomers may be turned off by the lack of song structure, the rambling nature of the songs adds to the cohesiveness of the album, as “Best Night” seamlessly blends into the next track, “Brothers.” “Brothers” originally appeared on last year’s Future Weather EP, and while it was the best track on the EP, the little extra polish that has been given to it for this release that makes it even better than before, and it’s here that the album really hits its stride. A few songs later, the album picks up a bit with “Your Love Is Calling My Name,” definitely much more upbeat than the songs before it. Drummer Mike Zanghi speeds things up a little and fans of Wagonwheel Blues will definitely

agree that it’s a nice throwback to “Arms Like Boulders,” the opening track off of that album. It’s clear that The War on Drugs know what it is that they are good at, crafting beautiful ambient music (it really isn’t a surprise that “ambient” is in the title), and on “The Animator,” “City Reprise #12,” and “Original Slave” Granduciel steps away from the microphone and the listener is treated to some truly exceptional instrumental tracks that really serve as the glue that holds the album together. Having three three-minute instrumental tracks seems like something that few bands could get away with, but it feels natural on Slave Ambient. At forty-seven minutes, Slave Ambient is the longest release from The War on Drugs yet, but it feels like the shortest thanks to the seamless transitions that make it the kind of album that can only be truly appreciated when listening to all of the way through. As it is, it’s one of the best albums of the year. It’s a little puzzling why two tracks from last year’s EP are on here, but since they’re the best tracks from that release it doesn’t feel like they were added to artificially extend the length of the album. If you want something that sounds like nothing out there today, pick up Slave Ambient. The War on Drugs are just one of those bands you recognize as soon as you hear them. Not to mention, it is just a great album, one that is worth revisiting multiple times, as there is so much going on that it’s impossible to be able to pick up on all of the nuances of the instrumentation and pay attention to the lyrics on the first listen. Because of this, it is one of the best releases I’ve listened to this year.

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> Matthew Roy is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at matthew.roy.2@und.edu

dance breaks the ice H.O.T Saturday night kicked off the school year for both new and former students.

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Nicholas Gowan The Dakota Student

To help kick off the start of the 2011 Fall semester, UND, with the help of H.O.T., the Hall Orientation Team, hosted a night of games, food and music Sunday night. With Second Avenue blocked off from the Memorial Union to the law library, spirits were high among the largely freshman crowd, which was taking advantage of one of the great offerings college life has to offer: free pizza and nachos. Johnny Green and the Greenmen performed live music for the crowd, covering hits from Aerosmiths’ “Dude Looks Like A Lady” and Lynyrd Skynyrd’s “Sweet Home Alabama” to Johnny Cash reboots. While musical, the band seemed to come off as one of the low points of the night. Johnny Green and the Greenmen may not have really been up to most students’ level of expectation for live entertainment. Although a dozen students or so went up on stage to sing and play with the band, many expressed the opinion that a DJ would have been appreciated. Students were able to break the ice in a number of ways. A gladiatorial joust was set up in an inflatable ring, as well as a mechanical bull ride that constantly had a long waiting line. Leyu Wang, who is attending UND for the semester as part of

an exchange program from Shanghai, was enjoying the music and free food. When asked how she liked campus, she said, “I think it is beautiful here. I heard in December it is like heaven here.” One of the highlights of the street dance was the kindness shown by all who attended. Over the course of the night, three different groups of people came up and asked me if I was having fun or just doing “OK.” I had mistakenly brought my backpack with me, but I was assured it would be safe by the gate, and it was. Officer Thorpe, one of the police patrolling the perimeter and in the crowd, said, “The kids were good this year… Last year we

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

had two minors at this event, but they weren’t even students. Threefourths of the minors we have aren’t even students.” When asked about the music, Thorpe replied, “The music really scared some of the kids off.”

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> Nicholas Gowan is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at nicholas.gowan@und.edu


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friday august 26 2011 HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT

Classifieds

COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services

EMPLOYMENT

RED PEPPER is now hiring young, energetic capitalists looking for full and part time work. Don’t miss this opportunity to enjoy flexible scheduling, a fun work atmosphere and competitive pay plus tips and bonuses. Apply in person at either Grand Forks Red Pepper locations.

THE BRONZE BOOT is now hiring for part-time evening bus persons, hostess/cashier and servers. Apply in person at 1804 North Washington or call Linda at 746-5433. AVON representatives needed in Grand Forks/East Grand Forks area Work from home, set your own hours, no boss. 125-year old company. Call 701-215-2954 (local). PART-TIME FRONT OFFICE

HELP NEEDED. Hours vary between Monday-Saturday. Email resume to office.rrvg@midconetwork. com or stop by Red River Valley Gymnastics at 1602 32nd Avenue South to fill out an application. PART TIME CUSTODIANHELP NEEDED. Must be able to lift 75 lbs. and be able to work without direct supervision. Email resume to office@rrvg@midconetwork.com

or stop by Red River Valley Gymnastics at 1602 32nd Avenue South to fill out an application. PRESCHOOL, RECREATIONAL, RHYTHMIC, ANDACRO COACHES NEEDED. Hours vary between Monday-Saturday. Email resume to office.rrvg@ midconetwork.com or stop by Red River Valley Gymnastics at 1602 32nd Avenue South to fill out an ap-

plication. KING’S WALK GOLF COURSE MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT is looking for maintenance workers from now thru November 15. Please apply at the Park District Office, 1210 7th Avenue South, Grand Forks. Great job for students, you’ll be done before finals start.

RHCP takes JL Beers offers great dining new direction

DS

MUSIC REVIEW

***** > ‘I’m With You’

ALEX CAVANAUGH The Dakota Student

It’s been five long years since the Red Hot Chili Peppers released Stadium Arcadium, and on August 30, the listening world will experience quite a new direction for the band as they release their new record, I’m With You. On Monday, the band hosted a worldwide listening party as they streamed the new album on their website. There is a clear change reflected in this album, and the new direction is not only present in the sound of the record but also in the lineup of the band itself, as this is the first record since the departure of guitarist John Frusciante. Replacing Frusciante full-time is Josh Klinghoffer, who previously joined the Peppers as a back-up guitarist on the Peppers’ tour for Stadium Arcadium. In some ways, “I’m With You” shows the maturity and development of the band, who in numerous interviews expressed a sense of new beginning with this record. The disc starts out with a fairly complicated, heavily produced track called “Monarchy of Roses.” It’s new. It’s groovy. But it doesn’t feel like the Peppers fans know and love. This track seems like it could have come off

FOOD New restaurant in town showcases tasty of Stadium Arcadium, or even By burgers and a variety of the Way. It’s definitely a departure unique beers. from earlier style and is an attempt to bridge the gap between old and new listeners—not a bad way to start the record. Following “Monarchy of Roses” is “Factory of Faith” (could the similarity in titles be intentional?). Unfortunately, it is nothing special, and seems to be a typical RHCP b-side not unlike the less-notable tracks from Stadium Arcadium. At this point, the listener has had little chance to assess the new guitarist’s ability beyond his ability to use a flange pedal. After a rocky start, the album presents its pearl: “Brendan’s Death Song.” The song starts with Klinghoffer and Keidis on a vocal/acoustic guitar duet, with the electric guitar track joining and the song steadily growing into a full-band ballad. It’s very mature, yet seems to fit in well with Californication-era songs like “Parallel Universe” or “Otherside.” As Keidis sings, “Like I said, you know I’m almost dead, you know I’m almost gone. And when the boatman comes to ferry me away to where we all belong,” it shows that the Peppers still have heart. In comparison to newer material, the song is similar to “Snow” or “Wet Sand”—not overly funkdriven, but very instrumental and very well rounded. Unfortunately, this is the high point of the album. “The Adventures of Rain Dance Mag-

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RHCP > page

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JOSH BRORBY

The Dakota Student

It’s a small miracle that the average college student in America consumes 34 gallons of alcoholic beverages per year (source: SADD), a number not miraculous in its surprising nature (surprising this fact isn’t) but in its obvious, mundane reality. Did I really expect, in a quick google search, to find that students drank any less? Of course not. 34 gallons split over a year’s 365 days comes out to just under 12 fluid ounces of booze a day, which doesn’t seem all that bad, considering the

adages about a-glass-of-red-wine- do drink on these two days proba-day or a-glass-of-stout-a-day, ably consume a lot more than and we can our origiprobably be nal estipresumptumate of ous about 11.923 the nature f l u i d of college ounces of students and booze a assume that day. This a) their (our) leads me drinking is to a simlimited to ple cononly a few clusion that has days a week, and b) they already (we) don’t all NATHAN TWERBERG> The Dakota Student b e e n drink. So let’s reached say only 3/4 of college students by anyone who knows anything drink (a fair estimate? I don’t about college: there’s a lot of know), and the drinks are con- binge drinking going on. That sumed on weekends (Fridays and being said, if you’re going to Saturdays) only. The numbers spike pretty sharply, I suppose, BREWS > page and we find that the students who

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DS scores & schedules

friday august 26, 2011

sports

NFL alternate dimensions, UND > Inside: soccer’s hot start, student forewarning

> UND gears up for Big Sky teams vs. Western Michigan

Soccer 8/26 @ 1:30 p.m. @ Dekalb, Ill.

Green Bay Country Inn Tourney

Volleyball 8/26-27

Green Bay, Wisc.

Football

vs. Drake 9/01 @ 7 p.m. Alerus Center

photos by NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

PROMISE Coach Chris Mussmann leads his team into another level of competition.

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Brandon Becker The Dakota Student

In six days, the Fighting Sioux football team will open the 20112012 season against Drake. It will be UND’s fourth and final year in the transition phase since moving from DII to DI. For those who were around when the Sioux were playing wildly entertaining DII games against legitimate rivals, it has been a long three years for Sioux football fans. This is spoken from a resident of Grand Forks from my first day on this Earth. I remember going to Memorial Stadium and freezing my ass off with my Dad and Grandpa. I remember attending the first game ever at the Alerus Center and enjoying the confines

of an indoor stadium. But most importantly, I remember being at games when fans packed the place full and were passionate from the opening kickoff till the final snap. Football hasn’t been the same in the Alerus Center since UND has become a DI program. The decision to move up to a higher level of competition was a longterm move, in which fans have had to endure short-term pains. To be frank: UND football hasn’t been interesting since the transition period started taking place. In UND’s best years in DII, the program’s popularity rivaled the hockey team which isn’t an easy thing in an area where it seems like everyone played hockey, grew up watching hockey or wished they had the ability to play hockey. Now, the hockey team holds the stage and spotlight to itself. If UND sports were a kingdom, the hockey team would reign over it. There are three reasons why hockey is No. 1 in this town: 1) As already

stated North Dakota loves hockey gram based on its win-loss record. and so do our neighbors to the east It is going to be important for the in Minnesota, 2) The hockey team Sioux to start compounding wins, plays meaningful games and has as the coaching staff has had plenty built significant rivalries against of time to gather DI talent over much of the WCHA, 3) Duh, the past three years. And with the winning! (Yes I’m aware all Char- impending move to the Big Sky lie Sheen jokes became old five Conference after this season, the minutes after his Today Show in- Sioux need to build momentum terview). All kidding aside, we live on the field to get top recruits to in a society that loves winners. It’s come here. There’s no questioning that a simple premise: win and people the passion for will show up football to watch. Win It is going to be Sioux has died down and people will important for the the past few talk about you. and it’s Win and peoSioux to start com- years understandple care. pounding wins. able. A move In its fourth year as Brandon Becker to a legitimate confera DI school, staff writer ence should the Sioux has compiled a ignite fans modest 15-17 record. Considering interest—no offense to the Great the team has had to make a leap in West Conference but there aren’t competition and has had to travel exactly a lot of people clamoring to farther distances, it wouldn’t be fair see the Sioux host the likes of Cal to judge the progress of the pro- Poly, Southern Utah and UC Da-

vis. South Dakota is UND’s only true rival right now and it pales in comparison to the rivalry the Sioux once had with NDSU. I’m not trying to dismiss the last three years of hard work the Sioux football team has put in and am definitely not trying to take away from all the hours coaches put in, but from a student and fan’s perspective, it’s been hard to get excited about games that lack the intensity that future Big Sky games will offer. Nevertheless, this is the most important year in UND’s transition phase, as it will be key to get younger players game experience to be ready for next year when the games will truly count. The groundwork has been laid; now it’s time for the Sioux to start to build something to reengage the fans and maximize its dome-field advantage.

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> Brandon Becker is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at brandon.becker2@und. edu


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SPORTS

Rules implement new sports rado College, U-Miami, U-Neb. Omaha, UND). This means for the 2013-14 season, UND will not face the UM Gophers or the UW Badgers. It is grim news for all who hold these rivalry fires deep within their heart; but, the guarantee for now is that there is Joel Adrian going to be a 2013-14 season and The Dakota Student also the possibility of expanding the NCHC to eight teams. For To begin the school year this now we can only support our week is an understatement and team as legislation and new rules completely false. For the year be- are being formed. gan sometime in August after the After a 130-day ordeal and high school celebrations or the contradictions, the NFL is poised self-served lobotomy that there is to return to the gridiron and deyet another year of education for liver what America wants: action. others. Thankfully for UND and The league and players seem to the entire nation, there are sports. be working together as the chase Sports that define us, shape us— for the Lombardi trophy is set to use and abuse—for the regional resume on Sept. 8 2011 when the identity each fan desperately New Orleans Saints will travel wants. Yes, the championship is and attempt to dethrone the the ultimate reigning chamgoal but The game of colle- pion Green Bay the road to Packers. Are you giate football is now ready for some glory in every sport has a strategic battle for football? Now taken some if only the NBA money and fame. time and could resolve weathered their issues. Joel Adrian a seemingly The unoffiSports Editor cial hometown endless battle against legal hero Brock Lesdocuments, changing conference nar, UFC heavyweight fighter, is landscapes and the waning for- seeking to make his return somegiveness of America for the un- time in the New Year’s mainnecessary migraines late at night. card. UFC President seems very First off, for the incoming optimistic and is encouraged by freshman: these competitions Lesnar’s health and stamina after and sports are not standard farm- overcoming a second bout of Difield-shinanigan athletics, but verticulitis. rather a high intensity, hard hitThe heavyweight has been ting, bruising culture that will on a nearly-year-long hiatus and self-impose its will onto your lust to be back in the octagon. virgin educational values. As ad- Although, after an excruciatingly vice, join the team. The almost painful loss for Lesnar and fans, 15,000-student population takes it would be in best interest to be pride in athletics (especially ice completely healthy and not “like events) and there is not a col- 85-percent” as he said after his vilege experience more exhilarating cious TKO loss to present chamthan chanting with your peers at pion Cain Velasquez. the disgruntled foe in the Alerus The Minnesota Twins have center or Ralph Engelstad Arena. reason to celebrate and it’s not Welcome to the big house of the caused by their poor performance. NCAA. Designated hitter Jim Thome reTo America: The landscape cently belted his 600th home run in collegiate athletics has brought off Detroit Tiger reliever Danvast changes that nobody could have foretold in the past. Legendary Big 10 football coaches Bo Schemblecher or Woody Hayes would be catatonically stricken if they discovered Nebraska had joined the Mid-West conference, or even that Ohio St. and Michigan have brought NCAA penalties that resemble the SEC conference’s baggage. The game of collegiate football is now a strategic battle of money and fame. And who is to say that the NCAA catches every act of infidelity and unlawfulness in every division of competition? At least Bo and Woody still can look forward to their rivalry game, right? The Fighting Sioux men’s hockey team is now a member of a six-team pool comprised to form the National Collegiate Hockey Conference (NCHC). Yes, I’m sorry to all UND supporters for the blasphemous news. The NCHC is now equipped with five members of the WCHA and one from the CCHA conference (UM-Duluth, U-Denver, Colo-

BEGINNINGS The academic year begins with unforeseen menace for athletic fans.

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iel Schlereth at Comerica Park in Detroit. The entire crowd cheered for the opposing team member as only eight men have ever completed the feat. A chivalrous showing for a true gentleman was well worth the wait for baseball fans worldwide. With all the confusion—legal and illegal—that taints the work of great athletes and organizations, it is a humbling feeling to know that winning is still accomplished with dexterity and patience. Finally, as this up-to-speed article hopefully enlightened the few, there is still one team that anyone can be on. North Dakota. Waves of green and songs of pride are remarkably catchy and do entail a camaraderie that is dear to most students. Buckle up UND; it’s going to be a bumpy ride.

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> Joel Adrian is the Sports Editor for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joel.adrian@und.edu

friday august 26, 2011

Captains named for volleyball LEADERSHIP Taylor Bohannon and Annika Smed to uphold high team roles.

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Staff Report

The Dakota Student

Head volleyball coach Ashley Hardee has formally acknowledged seniors Taylor Bohannon (Inver Grove Height, MN) and Annika Smed (Albert Lea, MN) to the role of captain for the UND team. “Coming into two-a-days there has been leadership from those two when we need players to step up. Us as coaches can do it, and sometimes maybe we do it too much, but when the players step up and get people’s attention, that’s a big deal,” stated Hardee. With the responsibility of being ambassadors between coaches

and players, the position is highly prized among the team. “It is an honor. If there is a question, they can come to us instead of having to ask the coaches. If we are having a down practice, we can bring the team together. We pick the team up, on and off the court,” according to Smed. The senior captains will also be assisted by assistant captain Ronni Munkeby, a sophomore from Lisbon, North Dakota. After winning back-to-back GWC titles, the UND team will surely be poised to make another championship season as the year commences. The Fighting Sioux will begin this season in Green Bay, Wis. for the Green Bay Country Inn tournament. The home opener for UND will be on Sept. 2 and host Green Bay, Montana and Southern Utah.


the Dakota Student

SPORTS

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Strong start for UND Football: To view another dimension

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Timothy Boger

The Dakota Student

Rachael Loomis eludes a USD defender

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

BRILLIANT The UND soccer team initiated the new season with promising victories.

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Tadd Powers

The Dakota Student

The North Dakota women’s soccer team started off the season where they ended last season, winning. Despite having a losing record (4-12) while heading into last years Great West Conference Tournament, UND battled their way to the championship game. North Dakota ended up losing in the championship in double overtime. Being so close to achieving GWC championship status has instilled a hunger and drive for this season early on. UND defeated their arch rivals from University of South Dakota 3-2, to open up this season and GWC play. However, it wasn’t a walk in the park for UND. The Coyotes took an early 1-0 lead at the 4:36 mark and UND battled but couldn’t get on the board until the second half at 49:05. Senior Veronika Zischka topped off a great pass from Rachael Loomis, with a highlight reel goal. The lead would only last 10 minutes before USD striker Jenny Teslow scored again to take back

the lead, 2-1. UND had been in control throughout most of the game, leading in shots (17-9, 9-4 on goal) and being the team with more ball control. South Dakota had over 16 fouls compared to UND’s nine. Also USD committed eight offside whistles to UND’s zero, but the Coyotes got away with a possible off-side on their second goal, when Teslow snuck behind the UND defender and went in on a breakaway goal to take the lead. With less than 20 minutes remaining, USD took another foul this time in the penalty kick area, giving North Dakota a clear shot at the tie. Rhaya Ballon was allotted the penalty kicked with authority she put it past the USD goalie to tie the game 2-2, getting the 320 spectators excited on their feet. Time was ticking down and both teams were hitting the metal frame of the net, making for an exciting finish. The competition was ripe as two rivals opening up their season against each other both teams were looking for that heroine. For UND, that striker would be senior Rachael Loomis. Time and time again she has been there for UND as she currently ranked fourth in points all-time for the program. Loomis started her final season off with a game-winning goal in the final minutes to seal the victory.

A great start to the season for UND as the first games are always difficult, but to play a fierce foe on the first game is even more grinding. UND then played a nice friendly match-up after a mentally and emotionally tough game against the former players of UND. The Alumni Team wanted to take advantage of a tired UND, as they were just coming off the USD match. The most important game for some of the former players is the alumni game. As serious as they came, the Alumni hardly stood a chance. UND pounded them 6-0, sending a catchy message to the Alumni, “Go back to your day jobs.” But sportsmanship and tradition were clearly defined in this friendly match between friends. North Dakota could be on that roll that they didn’t see until late in the season last year. A couple wins this weekend could build some confidence that UND seemed to lack last year in some games. This Friday, North Dakota will be on the road against Western Michigan and Saturday they face off against Northern Illinois. Both games will be played in Dekalb, Ill.

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> Tadd Powers is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at tadd.powers@und.edu

There are few things as important to the average American Man than Sunday football. And it’s coming soon, gents (and ladies). Soon, preseason will be over. The Joe Webbs, Graham Harrells, and Charlie Whitehursts of the National Football League will soon be put back on the shelves and will return to their respective spots along the sidelines. We’ll soon finally know who’s starting under center in Denver. Andy Reid will soon be in regular season shape (round is a shape). The fantasy drafts are almost done. It’s almost time for the real deal. But earlier this summer the owners and players, unable to agree on a new contract for almost four months, nearly left us with nothing to hope for this season. An eighteen week lockout wiped out mini-camps, part of training camp and the preseason’s Hall of Fame Game on August 7. The dispute was feared to be one that could have wiped out this entire season. That disaster was mercifully averted when players and owners finally struck a deal on July 21, restoring order across the nation and leaving the question – “What would a year without [professional] football look like?” – for only our imaginations to answer. Let’s see if we can try and imagine it: A year without football would be a year without the epitome of time wasting across the nation - fantasy football. Yes, a full year without those afternoons spent fishing for the perfect trade that the other players in your office pool will have to approve, without the agony of starting the wrong running back every week and without the end-of-the-year regret of picking the Vikings’ defense. A year without football would

RHCP >

From page

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gie,” which is the album’s first single, has a thumping bass line and typical swelling chorus that is characteristic of earlier hits like “Dani California” or “By the Way.” Notable is the different guitar style; the guitar is not the main instrument of this song, but is reminiscent of a Nirvana-esque guitar track, both heavily distorted and harmonic-conscious. The song is direct and catchy, but doesn’t pack the punch of earlier material, as it seems to seek some of the emotion of “Across the World” with a slower funky rhythm a la “Snow,” but it falls short on both ends. The rest of the record had few high points—“Did I Let You Know” offered a Santanastyle verse riff and a cool solo that blends the rest of the instrumentation together, rooting the song in a sixties rock style that has heart—reminiscent of Hendrix in some places and Sublime

be a year without an extra six-hour homework reprieve on those lazy Sunday afternoons. A year without football would be a year without Monday Night Football, leaving us college students with only our homework and our fermented beverages to keep us company on cold, lazy Monday nights. A year without football would be a year without ending your Thanksgiving festivities with a family gathering around the television to watch the Lions get stomped on. A year without football would be a year without yelling at your favorite team. Or you’re least-favorite broadcaster. A year without football would be a year without flea flickers, double reverses, pick-sixes and Wildcat formations that give us that extra adrenaline rush even though we’re in our underwear watching it happen from a thousand miles away. A year without football would be a year without the Super Bowl, without endless beer, Mountain Dew, pizza and chips and without annoying halftime shows. Is that even possible? To an extent, I wanted to try it for a few reasons. There was a small part of me that would have accepted “The Packers are World Champs for another year!!!!” as a consolation prize, for starters. And then there is the idealist within me that sees all of the time and money wasted on football and thinks: Don’t have something better to do with our lives? And maybe there is. But now that we have football back, we may never know. But I think I speak for most men when I say: That’s more than okay, right?

DS

> Timothy Boger is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@und.edu

in others. “Even You Brutus?” is musically a very unique track, with Keidis combining spoken word and singing to a piano and guitar-driven track similar to Gym Class Heroes or a funky Saul Williams. These are the notable songs, with the rest failing to impress. However, the album is worth a listen just for “Brendan’s Death Song” and “The Adventures of Rain Dance Maggie.” It certainly is a new direction for the Red Hot Chili Peppers, so those looking to relive the first time they heard “Scar Tissue” or “Under the Bridge” will be disappointed, but fans of Stadium Arcadium or dedicated fans will find “I’m With You” a worthy addition to their record collections, even if they will mourn Frusciante’s absence. As of now, it seems Klinghoffer is here to stay, and he seems to fit the band’s new style well.

DS

> Alex Cavanaugh is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at alex.cavanaugh@und. edu


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friday august 26, 2011

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SUDOKU

BREWS > From page

drink (and this writer definitely takes no sides on issues concerning alcohol), you should drink something that tastes good, and, in that regard, the drinks at the newly-opened JL Beers certainly hit the mark. JL Beers, a restaurant that carries the sub-name “Great American Burgers,” recently opened for business here in Grand Forks on Columbia Rd (South) down by the Panda Buffet. The burger joint boasts seating for 1000 (and clarifies that, after an ellipsis, that’s only so long as they’re seating 47 at a time), and has both indoor and outdoor tables. The indoor seating is high and bar-like, with stools wrapping around the taps/flat-top grill and a few tables to the side. This layout replicates an earlier JL Beers incarnation (and the first one I ever visited) that sits in downtown Fargo. That JL Beers (still open and one of several locations in the FM area) is in an old brick building, and the narrowness of its dining area is out of necessity, probably—not stylistic choice. The Grand Forks location, though, is in an all-new building with red-brick-style and narrowness returning, and it works. There are a few tables in a patio-type area, and it was there that I sat with a few friends for dinner. The burger I ordered (which would have been cooked in front of me had I sat inside) was topped with pepperjack cheese and onions (my choice) and was only one of nine or ten different types of burgers available on the menu. I enjoyed it, being a person who enjoys classic American food like burgers and fries, but the real star of the show was the beer. JL Beers (unsurprisingly, with such a name) has 40 brews on tap at its Grand Forks location, and they aren’t all your run-of-the-mill draughts. Unable to choose between a Deschute’s Inversion IPA and an Old Rasputin Imperial Stout, I went with one of several “flights” offered by the restaurant: a series of five beers served for your tasting pleasure in glasses only a few ounces deep. I chose the “Tastes of the Season” flight, which included the Inversion IPA, Redhook Wit, and three other summery brews, and the beers did not disappoint. Overall, the atmosphere and food added up to a terrific experience. If you’re of age (no minors allowed!), and you’ve got no beef with chowing down on a great burger from time to time, JL Beers brings the goods. Just be sure to bring ID and an appetite and, if you’re anything like me, leave the drinking statistics at home.

DS

> Josh Brorby is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joshua.brorby@und.edu

* photos by NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

We the Dakota Student wish you the best of luck this school year. Be sure to pick us up for up-to-date UND news and notes!

www.TheDakotaStudent.com


the Dakota Student

The North Dakota football team practices and waits for their home opener against Drake on Thursday, Sept. 1. UND takes the Alerus center at 7 p.m. for their inagural game. The game is also being played on Military Appreciation day.

photos by NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

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August 26, 2011