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DakotaStudent issue 49

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Businesses’ outdoor options See Culture&Media Page 09

Efforts under way to clean coulee RESTORATION A student group that has pushed for support to improve UND’s landmark body of water is finally reaching their goal.

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BRENLEE LOEWEN

The Dakota Student

In 2005, a group of students began a project dedicated to designing and implementing a practical, inexpensive, and environmentally friendly city-wide plan to clean the English Coulee. Five years have passed since they began the English Coulee initiative, and they are now one step closer to achieving their goal. On April 25, 2010, the UND Student Senate passed a bill approving funding for the first steps of cleaning-up and maintaining the English Coulee initiated by the students and sponsored by several other senate members. “Everybody knows that the English Coulee is really dirty, but not many people understand the how the myriad of contributing factors work together to make it that way,” David Barta, Deputy Chief of Staff of UND Student Government, explained. Barta has been extremely involved in the Clean Coulee Project from the start. “First of all there’s the fact that the coulee has been diverted several times in extremely significant ways, largely to

photos by: NATHAN TWERBERG

prevent overland drainage from flooding the south western side of Grand Forks and UND. Secondly, the coulee receives a great deal of organic matter and other nutrients (like leaves, grass clippings, lawn fertilizers, storm water runoff, etc.) that the coulee doesn’t have the capacity to fully break down.” The English Coulee Bill, as passed by the UND Student Government, allocates $2,800 to Brian Kling, President of Clean-Flo International, to cover the costs of an on-site assessment of the English Coulee by Clean-Flo engineers. This on-site assessment will allow engineers to establish a more precise cost estimate for the system and a better understanding of how it will benefit the coulee. As stated in the bill, “The Clean-Flo International patented diffuser system can reduce the build-up of excess nutrients within the English Coulee and significantly reduce or eliminate the aforementioned impairments in question.” This system is the centerpiece for a three-

02 DHS head to address grads Petitions circulate, GF smoking ban has ballot potential > COMMENCEMENT US Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano to speak to this year’s group of outgoing students. ROBERT LUKES

The Dakota Student

United States Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano will be delivering next month’s general commencement address. The former Arizona governor will deliver a speech to Spring graduates at the Alerus Center at 1:30 p.m. on May 15, according to a UND press release. “We are extremely pleased that Secretary Janet Napolitano will deliver the commencement address at the University of North Dakota this May,” said UND President Robert Kelley.

COULEE > page

Janet Napolitano was sworn in as the third Secretary of Homeland Security in January 2009. Before joining the Obama Administration, Napolitano was serving her second term as Governor of Arizona. Napolitano was a popular Democrat in a state that typically favors Republican candidates. During her term as governor, Napolitano became the first woman to chair the National Governors Association, where she was instrumental in creating the Public Safety Task Force and the Homeland Security Advisors Council. She also chaired the Western Governors Association. Napolitano previously served as the Attorney General of Arizona and the U.S. Attorney for the District of Arizona. University officials tied Napolitano’s commencement

JANET > page

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Pursuit of sustainability HONDURAS A group of students is organizing a volunteer trip through the Languages department.

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RACHEL SMERER

The Dakota Student

University of North Dakota faculty and students are going to be looking outside of themselves and lending a helping hand for spring break next year. A group of students led by Paul Worley of the UND Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Sustainable Harvest

International (SHI) will be going to Honduras to assist rural peoples in their communities. The group will be spending four to five days in Honduras, living with local families and working on projects. Since the trip is still nearly a year away, the exact projects or location has not yet been determined, but two types of projects are commonly done through SHI in Honduras. First, students may aid in constructing and implementing chicken tractors. These are simple: a chicken pen with no floor, that is mobile. When farmers harvest their crops, often the plant residue left in fields

needs to be collected by farmers, a process that takes time and labor. A farmer can use a chicken tractor to move the chicken around the field so they will clean up and eat the plant residue and then leave manure right on the field to act as a rich fertilizer. This aids the local farmers in many ways. Since the chickens clean up the fields and produce fertilizer, farmers don’t need to labor over the fields as long. It also cuts down on costs, since purchasing chicken food or fertilizer is no longer necessary.

TRIP > page

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themselves. Tony Kvasager is the Manager of Big Daddy’s Lounge on Demers Avenue in Grand Forks. To him, it is important that voters throughout the city get the opportunity to voice their opinion on the issue. SHANE ZAHRT He doesn’t believe that the opinThe Dakota Student ion of the City Council on this Bar owners, patrons, and issue is representative of the city smokers all have the date August at large. “This issue affects more 15, 2010 marked on their calen- than four people,” he said, in referdar. That’s the day that a city-wide ence to the four “yes” votes the ban received within smoking ban, the Council. passed by the This issue affects the “This issue afGrand Forks City Council livelihood of over fects the livelihood of over in Early April, thirty independent thirty indepenis set to go into dent business effect. business owners. owners.” Howe ve r, Tony Kvasager In order to they may soon bar manager see the issue be marking placed on the November 2 in ballot, the petheir calendars as well. Those who have been fol- tition will need 3,815 signatures. lowing the story may know that a So far, Kvasager estimates that the petition is being circulated by bar group has gathered just over 2,000, owners and other opponents of though he has no way of providing the ban that would place the issue on the November ballot and allow BAN > page Grand Forks citizens to decide for

BARS Some businesses around Grand Forks are collecting signatures for a public vote.

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DS datebook 02

friday april 30, 2010

DATEBOOK

today, april 30, 2010

> workshop: International Programs is hosting a faculty-directed presentation on Study Abroad from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the International Centre.

The Dakota Student editorial

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Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: dakotastudent.com

saturday, may 1, 2010 > sale: Annual apartment community rummage sale from 9 a.m. to noon at the UND Apartment Community Center.

Comment the new DS Tell us what you think:

> dance: The Organization of Latino Americans will host a Margarita Dance Party to celebrate Cinco de Mayo from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Union Loading Dock. sunday, may 2, 2010

> Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features

What should we do with the

coulee on UND’s campus?

> picnic:The Honors Program and Global Friends Coalition is hosting a picnic for refugees and the Grand Forks community from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at University Park. monday, september 29, 2008 Tell us what is happening on campus > Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

COULEE> From page

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part plan designed to clean up the coulee and restore it to a more natural state. The plan would involve a public information campaign designed to inform Grand Forks residents about the coulee’s problems and their causes, a student led effort to remove physical trash and debris and installing the Clean-Flo system to reduce the overload of nutrients in the coulee. Initial cost estimates based upon a preliminary design by Clean-Flo consisting of 28 diffusers located throughout the coulee are projected to cost between $240,000 - $260,000. “Ideally, I would love to see the City of Grand Forks, the Student Senate and UND Administration share the costs of implementing the system while working together to create a cooperative policy for cleaning and maintaining the coulee,” Barta explained. “When you consider the fact that the Clean-Flo system would greatly reduce the need to treat the coulee for mosquitoes [Grand Forks spent $30,000 in 2007 on mosquito larva control in the coulee] it pays for itself in city budget savings over 10 years. The projected additional budget savings over the lifetime of the system make it very economical.” The English Coulee has long been known as a unique and essential characteristic of UND and the City of Grand Forks. For almost as long, the coulee has been

the source of unpleasant odors and an unappealing appearance. Much trash and other undesirable objects end up in the coulee, which is a threat to the local wildlife. According to the North Dakota Department of Health, the English Coulee is approximately 5.53 miles long and is “unable to support wildlife and recreational uses due to sedimentation, dissolved solids, organic enrichment and fecal coli form pollution of the water.” The bill passed by the Senate also explains that the English Coulee has been “listed on the federal 303(d) list of Impaired Recreational Bodies of Water.” In fact, the issue of cleaning the English Coulee has been around since the 1880s: “In 1886, the President of UND went to the territorial legislature to ask them to fund an artesian well in order to deal with the stagnation problems resulting from a lack of flow and eliminate the risk it posed as a source of disease [at the time the coulee was used to dispose UND waste],” Barta described. “They denied him funding, and the next year UND had to be evacuated because it was the source of a particularly bad outbreak of cholera. He wasn’t nearly as polite when he went back to the legislature the next year.” “There is a great deal that the university and students can do if they focus on a different aspect every year,” Barta elaborated. “It’s a wonderful opportunity for students to take part in.”

DS

> Brenlee Loewen is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brenlee.loewen@und.edu

> Leave it alone > It needs to be cleaned > There are more important issues > It makes no difference to me Vote now on our website as well as leave feedback on what you think of our new facelift. > The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

Editor-in-Chief Alex Cavanaugh > alex.cavanaugh@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Erin Lord > erin.lord@und.edu News Editor Rachel Smerer > rachel.smerer@und.edu Features Editor Josh Brorby > joshua.brorby@und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@und.edu Web Editor Luke Johnson > luke.m.johnson@und.edu

business

Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Natalie Cassell > natalie.cassell@und.edu Ryan Senn > ryan.senn@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677 All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

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> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.


DS World Brief

Hewlett Packard to buy Palm, Inc for $1.2 billion

SAN FRANCISCO—Hewlett-Packard Inc. said Wednesday afternoon that it will acquire Palm Inc. in a deal worth $1.2 billion— ending months of speculation about the fate of the troubled wireless handset maker. In a statement, Hewlett-Packard said it will pay $5.70 per share in cash for Palm, representing a premium of 23 percent over the closing price of Palm’s shares on Wednesday. The transaction has been approved by the boards of directors of both companies. Palm has been the subject of takeover rumors for weeks, as slow sales of the company’s latest smart phones have depressed the stock’s value and made analysts question the company’s future. Palm developed its own mobile operating system called webOS and has launched two handsets—the Pre and the Pixi—on the new platform. Hewlett-Packard was one of several companies rumored to have an interest, as PC makers see growth in the mobile device market outpace that of traditional computers. “Palm’s innovative operating system provides an ideal platform to expand H-P’s mobility strategy and create a unique H-P experience spanning multiple mobile connected devices,” said Todd Bradley, executive vice president of Hewlett-Packard’s personal systems group, in the statement.

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author’s name

The Dakota Student

world news report > Inside:

friday april 30, 2010

Coke machines on campus turn off lights

Mexico City provides bicycles

PROGRAM The once smoggy urban community implements bikes to improve air quality.

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Tim Johnson

McClatchy Newspapers

MEXICO CITY—Once the smoggiest city on the planet, Mexico City has cleaned itself up and is coaxing residents to commute on bicycles. Taking cues from European cities in the vanguard of the green movement, such as Copenhagen, Paris and Barcelona, Mexico City has set up an urban bike-sharing system, moving faster and with greater ambition than most U.S. metropolises have. The city has docked 1,114 red aluminum bicycles at 85 stations in four districts of the urban core. Residents who pay an annual fee equivalent to about $24.50 can ride the bikes for half-hour periods as many times as they wish. Plans are for sixfold growth in the shared bicycle fleet by 2012. The bike-share scheme is part of a progressive makeover of the Mexican capital, once a sprawling muddle of problems. The city is revitalizing its historic downtown, skies are clearing of smog and city leaders are taking on trend-setting social issues. In early March, Mexico City legalized same-sex marriage, the first city in Latin America to do so. Still, riding a bicycle in congested Mexico City has its chal-

TIM JOHNSON > MCT At 85 docking stations in four downtown Mexico City districts, commuters can use shared bicycles to move around.

lenges, and experts say that cultural factors are a major obstacle to the program’s success. Four million vehicles ply the streets of the capital, and bike lanes haven’t yet been set up to any extent. “Drivers think that cyclists shouldn’t be on the road. They think that bikes should go on the sidewalk. This is a widespread perception that has to change,” said Martha Delgado, the secretary of the environment for the municipal government and an architect of the program. She said Mexico City lent itself

to more cyclists. The center of the city is largely flat, and the weather is good year-round. To promote a culture more suited to cyclists, the city enacted regulations in mid-February—at the same time the bike-sharing program launched—that require motorists to yield to cyclists and pedestrians on city streets. Delgado said the city government had trained 450 police officers to watch for traffic infractions against cyclists in the four districts where the program was active. Even proponents of the pro-

gram say public perceptions need to change for urban cycling to take off. “A lot of people say it’s too dangerous. You’ll get hit, or you’ll get robbed,” said Areli Carreon, the head of a cycling advocacy group, Bicitekas. Advocates of the bike-sharing system, however, say that an expanding number of cyclists in urban areas inevitably changes the way motorists perceive them. “If there’s one cyclist on the street, the motorist may not even see you. But if there are five or 10, then the motorist won’t miss you,” said Paul DeMaio, the head of MetroBike, a bike-sharing consultancy in Washington. For a metropolis such as Mexico City, where commuters often take several forms of transportation to get to distant jobs, switching from bus to subway or vice versa, the bike-share program lets them avert walking the final stretch. “Bike-sharing is really good for that first-mile, last-mile connectivity to mass transit,” DeMaio said.

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commentary

friday april 30, 2010

DS View Immigration

LAWS Arizona has taken a severe approach to dealing with illegal aliens.

The recent passage of the controversial immigration laws in Arizona has created heated debates and countless protests around the country. Many Americans feel that these laws are necessary, as there have been some connections between illegal immigrants and an increase in crime, and specifically drug trafficking. The United States has been put in a tough situation that has invokes deep emotional responses. Of course, people who enter our country illegally for disingenuous purposes should not receive the benefits our Democratic society offers. But how should we handle the grossly underprivileged human beings who are crossing the border in an effort simply to stay alive; those who speak no English and do not have the education or the means to obtain citizenship through a legal but time-consuming process? Our statue of liberty reads, “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me. I lift my lamp beside the golden door.” Our nation was founded on immigrants coming from around the world to build a nation that values freedom and a chance to create your own future. And in that sentiment, we cannot turn away those who come to America for the reasons in which our nation was founded. Our emotional response to the needy, however, does not solve the problem of those criminals who come to the states and cause problems in local communities. Due to this issue, Arizona has chosen to pass heavy immigration laws which allows police officers to stop anyone who is “reasonably suspicious”—a purposely vague statement with a subtext that speaks to racial profiling. Those against the laws fear that the rights of Latin Americans living legally in Arizona will be trampled over during this crusade to find illegal aliens in the states. Essentially, anyone with dark skin can be harassed and be forced to show their papers proving their citizenship. Besides the abhorrent perspective toward those of colored skin that has put this law into practice, it is doomed to be ineffective. The laws are only a band-aid covering the real problem—which is the employers who are knowingly hiring undocumented workers and paying them far below the minimum wage. Until these employers are dealt with, there is no doubt that immigrants will still come over illegally and not bother to get actual citizenship. There is no reason to if work is easy to find without having to go through a bunch of red tape. We need to deal with illegal immigration appropriately and reasonably. A lack of legislation should not be answered with overbearing laws that infringe on the rights of Arizonian citizens. A balance needs to be struck between the two, where problematic aliens are dealt with and where those with humble and good intentions are given support in order to come to the country safely and legally.

Editorial Board Alex Cavanaugh Editor-in-Chief Erin Lord Opinion Editor

Rachel Smerer News Editor

Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

Letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

Men, lessons, and a furby

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Sara tezel

The Dakota Student

During my time spent at UND, I have taken my fair share of classes, some good and some very, very bad. This semester, I found a class that makes me laugh and stimulates my imagination. That class is Creative Nonfiction. The thing that is special about this class is not the topic, nor the professor, but the people who suffer through the mundane in-and-out with me. We’ve had topics ranging from religion to cannibalism to favorite childhood toys (and by topics, I mean off-track ramblings). This past week, we got into a rather humorous conversation about Furbies that led me to think about how this toy sensation of the 90s prepared me for dating at the collegiate level. Now, those children of the 80s and 90s will remember that Furby spoke a combination of English and “Furbish.” Common catch phrases included “I love you,” “feed me,” and a purring sort of sound. Those fuzzy little guys with their huge, bug eyes were the “it” toy of the late nineties.

Maybe comparing boys to furbies is a bit offensive, and if you think you’ll find that to be the case, I suggest you stop reading immediately because I’m about to go into detail. One of the things that’s a similarity is when you stick your finger in Furby’s mouth and it lets out a satisfying “Yummmmmm” sound. My mother always told me that the way to a boy’s heart is through his stomach (and you probably thought I was going to talk about sticking random body parts into people’s mouths, you sick freak). Furby taught me that if you can elicit a satisfied “yum” from a fellow, you’ll have his love, or, as Furby would say, his “may may.” Another thing I learned is that, like Furbies, boys cry when you hold them by their feet and let them dangle. I wish I could say this is a metaphor for being the dominant one in the relationship and “holding them by their feet” meant that I tend to grab the reins of a situation and take control. But, honestly, I just like picking boys up and hanging them upside down. The terrified look in their eyes as you swing them from side to side makes my week.

Hasbro said that you could teach your Furby up to 800 phrases and words, but mine must not have been the pick of the litter. My Furby was lazy and told the same joke over and over again (I knew that I never should have laughed the first time he told it). He had a horrible sleeping schedule and enjoyed belching in my ear. Now that I’ve dated hundreds of thousands of college guys, I find that they too tell lame jokes repeatedly, burp and keep odd hours. Thank you Furby for teaching me how to lower my expectations for someone, or something, that I love. As I finish writing this article and get ready to turn out the light, I hear my boyfriend crying from the closet, “Feed me.” Why do they always try to start a conversation just as you’re ready to turn in for the night? So I do the only logical thing; I walk over, shove him in the corner, throw a few blankets on top of him, and try to fall asleep while listening to the sound of crying. If only I could just take the batteries out.

DS

> Sara Tezel is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at sara.tezel@und.edu

Merrifield needs reading room > Alex Cavanaugh The Dakota Student

Those UND students that wind up wandering the halls of Merrifield have inevitably seen students crawled up in the hallway windowsills, surrounded by three hole-punched sheets of literary criticism, writing in used copies of novels and ponderous tomes of Norton anthologies of literature. For those wandering students, Merrifield may be a onesemester class building, and as they progress through their exciting years in their respective departments, those cramped English majors will continue to contain their workspace to those small spaces or commute between classes to Archives or the library, and while these locations may seem convenient enough, walking

any distance in the middle of January is a hassle. The problem of a lack of space for English students to spend their time between classes is as old as Merrifield Hall itself, there is a solution in the form of a reading room. I have spent the last eight semesters and am staring my ninth in the face, and have developed during each an ongoing relationship with those windowsills. Not only is it distracting and inconvenient to study in this space, but smoking my elbow on the window is no fun either for me or the poor student dozing on the other side of the glass. I understand the restrictions regarding size and room allocation, but with the recent shifting in Merrifield, particularly on the second floor, and the fact that almost every department at this university has a study area for its students, includ-

ing such a space for the communications students in the floor above. Many of these spaces are in the form of a computer lounge, but for English majors, the expense of computers is omitted, as all we need are couches, bookshelves, and tables. These items could be purchased at a thrift store, and would be greatly appreciated. A conversation with an individual in the English department had me thinking about the opportunities that would accompany a reading room. Say each professor donated five books to the room to be stored on the shelves, as well as any donations students or others may contribute, so that students can use the space to relax and catch up on either assigned

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Alex > page


the Dakota Student

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COMMENTARY

‘Fun list’ eases finals week Progress > finds GF > Emily Hill

The Dakota Student

It is that time of year again where my attention span dwindles to the size of a pea. But luckily I’m in about the same pod with most everyone on this campus. The campus has gotten quieter. Those of us who still attend class, many have given up, look more like walking zombies than students. General motor skills are questionable for most these days. And as I stare at the pile of student papers I have to grade and the mounting final papers I need to write, I keep my motivation up by making lists. However, I really have two lists going: Stuff to Accomplish Before School Ends and Stuff to Think about that Serves as Obstacles/Distractions from My End of the Semester Work. So far, the latter of the two is winning. 1.) Simon and Garfunkel: Ah yes. I am going to hear my two favorite hippies sing at the Fargo Dome. I’ve listened to their greatest hits album at least three times in the last week. And all I can think about is whether Art will still have his ridiculous fro and whether I really should someday name my future daughter Cecilia despite the fact that the song is about a randy and cheating mistress. 2.) California: Thanks to Allegiant Air’s $69 ticket deal, my sister and I are going to LA after school ends. This is particularly distracting since I know in a few weeks my biggest worry for five straight days in a row will be laying on a beach reading while becoming a bronze goddess. 3.) YouTube: Probably one of the most popular distractions for college students after Facebook. However, yesterday I watched a clip of Bart Simpson making fun of grad students. He held up a faux

ponytail behind his head and in a mocking voice said, “Hey, look! I’m a grad student and I only make $600 a year.” Marge soon came to rescue and told him not to make fun of my kind anymore because we just made a bad choice. The collective reaction from the grad students in my department seemed to be initially laughing and then sighing immediately with slumped shoulders. So yesterday, YouTube’s humor kick me in the face with some sad but somewhat true reality. 4.) Calling my Parents: During finals

... having the finals schedule [list] can drive a person a little off their rocker.

Emily columnist

time, I always tend to call the rents more often than I would normally. Not because I feel emotionally and mentally drained (well, maybe just a little), but because my mom, especially, is a good “talker.” If there was a filibuster contest and my mom was competing against Strom Thurmond, she’d beat his 24 hours and 18 minute record tenfold. 5.) Cute Baby Pictures on Facebook: Lately, I can suck up a lot of my study time by perusing adorable pictures of my cousins’ and friends’ babies until my ovaries hurt. However, once that happens, I remind myself that babies poop and cry because they can’t use their words. Then quickly, I close out of the Facebook window, thinking that my 44 student papers seem much more manageable.

6.) The Reality Show “Pretty Wild”: When taking study and procrastination breaks, I have been increasingly drawn to the E! Network. I’m sad to say this, because it is pretty terrible programming, however it is television that is never stress inducing, until I discovered one of their newest shows. “Pretty Wild” is pretty obnoxious and is yet again another show following sexy, young, wealthy, angst driven girls around LA. I watch this until I want to punch one of the girls in the neck who is usually having some temper tantrum about not getting her nails done at the same salon as Paris Hilton. 7.) Norway: A lot of my time lately is spent thinking about the Land of Lefse. I will be spending next semester in Moss, Norway, teaching Norwegian and American students what I know about writing, literature, and film. So beyond course planning, I also think about my first time experience in Europe-—how I will get to eat potatoes all the time (my favorite food group) and be surrounded by people that all look like they could be members from the band A-Ha. 8.) And lastly, retail therapy: Enough said. So I hope I have been helpful to all of you procrastinators out there who are feeling guilty about your current end of the year predicament. It may seem a little counterproductive, however it is important to have the two lists, because only having the finals schedule one can drive a person a little off their rocker. Whatever kind of end of the semester therapy you need, do it, but do it sparingly.

DS

> Emily is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at emily.hill@und.edu

Veganism in Grand Forks doable > Heather jackson The Dakota Student

I decided to go vegetarian when I was 14, then when I was 23, I decided to go vegan. Some of the reasons for making this choice were that I could not eat a dead animal. I could not imagine, anymore, eating a once living thing and having it be on my plate to eat. The meat industry is so awful on so many levels (see the movie: Fast Food Nation in which I actually balled my head off in the end). Also, it is the muscle (an organ!) of a creature. The muscles that once moved the animal around; it literally grossed me out. I remember I started dabbling with the idea when I was 12, but my step-dad said to me, “you’re not going to do that—you’ll eat meat again!” Slowly, I took meat completely out of my diet and was vegetarian by age 14. I felt healthier and felt this choice also made a political stance against the abuse of animals in the meat industry. I decided to raise my daughter vegetarian when I got pregnant. I could not imagine feeding my baby dead animals. Now at eight and a half years old, she is still a vegetarian today. She is a healthy eater (no soda and not much junk food, lots of vegetables, fruit, and whole grains), of ideal weight, and understands the complexities of the meat industry. Kids in her class make fun of her because she eats a lot of vegetables. She usually responds with, “well, you eat meat.” The normalization of eating meat is very inscribed on people (especially in the Midwest, from my experience), so for kids to ask her about not eating meat—it is not a surprise. How is it being a vegan in Grand Forks? It is actually not that hard. In 2008, the Dakota

Student printed an article about this (though I wasn’t able to find it because of the new website). Since I am not able to re-read the article, from my understanding the author described what it was like being vegan for a week in Grand Forks. As I remember, I think it was somewhat hard for them; there are hardly any vegan-friendly restaurants in Grand Forks and many people do not know what veganism and vegetarianism is. Since I have been a vegan for 4 years (and vegetarian 9 years before that), it has actually been somewhat easy in this town. There are places that I can eat and create vegan food. I

... I do feel better that I am not putting dead animals in my body ...

Heather columnist

substitute beans for meat (however, sometimes the beans have lard—just ask!), I have ordered pizza without cheese, get sandwiches with only vegetables, and so on. There are also a few places that are explicit about their vegetarian and vegan options, like Amazing Grains, Dakota Harvest Bakery, Rhombus Guys, Pita Pit and I am sure a few more. Some places are also friendly about making their foods vegan or vegetarian, like Al’s, Toasted Frog, Mike’s Pizza and a few others. However, being vegan is not just about eating out. I cannot really afford the fancy vegan foods I can order online (so expensive!), but

I can bake and cook my own. I am saving money by not eating out or purchasing foods online, as well. Besides, I’d rather cook my own food, anyway (healthier and cheaper). There are plenty of websites online where I can look up recipes for free. One of my favorites sites is vegweb. com. Users can post their own recipes and share with others. This website also has raw vegan recipes and household product recipes for items like cleaners and toothpaste. I have made many foods that may appeal to the cheese-lover, such as raw vegan cashew cheese and nutritional yeast “cheez” dip. Being a vegan is political: the politics of food. While I do not necessarily think my choice to be vegan and to raise my daughter vegetarian will end the exploitation of animals in the meat industry, personally, I do feel better that I am not putting dead animals in my body (or hers) that have been killed in awful, awful conditions. It is also a healthier choice—I have good cholesterol levels, and my diet is low fat. My vegan and daughter’s vegetarian choice perhaps can impact what other people eat. I know talking about the meat industry has turned a few people vegetarian and while that certainly is not my aim (to judge or convert), my honesty has made people rethink about their own diets. Veganism and vegetarianism is possible in Grand Forks. While I cannot go to an amazing vegan or vegetarian restaurant like they have in Minneapolis, I can still find the places that will have the options, or I can stay home, save money, and cook my own.

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> Heather is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at heather.jackson@ und.edu

Martin rottler

The Dakota Student

Another school year has come to a close. As we say goodbye to semesters 1010 and 1030 (as coded by the Registrar’s Office), the University of North Dakota finds itself in a precarious, yet hopeful position moving forward. Moving forward…a concept that, although somewhat alien to much of Small Town America, will hopefully provide the students, faculty, staff and administration of the school with a positive experience in the future. To forget one’s past is to almost certainly guarantee that you will repeat yourself. As such, I’d like to take a look back at the people and things that have made a huge difference in our lives at this fine University. There are no greater events during the past year that have greater foreboding on the University and the larger Grand Forks community than decisions that were made in March and April of this past year. A board was convened, decisions were voted upon and ultimate statements were made: the editorial board of the Grand Forks Herald decided to publish a restaurant review of McDonalds, written by (previously mentioned in past articles) the Grand Forks Grandma. Whether extolling on the philosophical virtues of the profit margins on soda or remarking how instead of a Mocha Frappe that she should “stick to the plain coffee,” the Grand Forks Grandma continued to place the Grand Forks restaurant scene on the cutting edge of journalism in the city. While on the topic of journalism and things that make people laugh, the Twamley Shuffle made its published debut on campus. Featuring satirical articles about the people and places at UND, this newspaper is everything the Student Journal (the one-time “competitor” to the Dakota Student) was, but without the serious mission statement and fiscal mismanagement. Sean Lee and his team get mad props from this opinion columnist for the hilarious photo/article combo on the student search for Upson Hall. I, for one, wish them the best of luck next year. In aviation news, the merger between Northwest Airlines and Delta Airlines was finalized in January, thereby giving travelers flying out of Grand Forks (like myself) something new to complain about. This merger has been a mixed blessing for the city and its people: we still haven’t found our unicorn (westbound flights), but can now find ourselves crammed into a sub-human existence onboard one of six (!) Delta Connection Canadair Regional Jet flights to Minneapolis each day. The airport and business community considered this a major victory. They obviously haven’t flown on these airplanes before. Speaking of things that get up and fly away, this year was yet another banner year of travel for me, much of which, unfortunately, was on Delta Airlines. Bushwhackers on St. John, USVI; Guinness in Dublin; Pilsner Urquell in Prague—I made sure to leave just a small part of my liver in each location around the world. Thanks in large part to the experiences I’ve had and people I’ve met on these journeys, I will continue to lobby readers of the Dakota Student to get the hell out of this sometimes cold, often windy part of the country. Far and away, the biggest news of the year from the campus of the University of North Dakota was the recently announced retirement of the Fighting Sioux nickname and logo. Nothing has stirred the emotions and opinions of the community in the past several

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friday april 30, 2010

NEWS

Greener machines at UND Use cells less,

ENVIRONMENT CocaCola and Dining Services make vending on campus energy-efficient.

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YASIN MOHAMUD

The Dakota Student

Well, it’s safe to say that this academic school year at UND has been one of many changes. And while some changes have been embraced, others have rubbed many the wrong way to put it mildly. As the school year winds down and summer introduces itself once again, there is one more change UND students can look forward to for next year. But, I promise you won’t mind this one. On the eve of the 40th annual celebration of Earth Day, UND has taken another step to go more green. Last week, UND teamed up with Coca-Cola Enterprises on a project that would make all vending machines on campus more energy efficient. The Coca-Cola Enterprises Sales and Distribution Facility, which is based out of Grand Forks, sent a team to disconnect lighting, program timers, and install Energy Management devices. With these changes, the university can save 30 to 40 percent in energy consumption. The Energy Management Systems (EMS-55) is a proprietary device that activates lights and adjusts cooling power based on usage signals and traffic patterns. EMS-55 devices were installed on 25 vending machines and will improve energy efficiency by up to 35 percent. Since lights consume the most energy in the machines, specific, non-essential lighting was

permanently disconnected and will save approximately 35 percent in energy use. One last thing the device will do is program machines to limit the refrigeration usage from 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m., and this will also help reduce energy usage. Talks of changes to the vending machines first began during Coca-Cola’s most recent annual review with Orlynn Rosaasen, UND Dining Services Director, and the Dining Services team. “We are proud to partner with Coca-Cola Enterprises to ensure our university achieves our optimal energy efficiency goals,” said Rosaasen. “UND is doing its part to meet the needs of today without comprising the ability of future generations NATHAN TWERBERG> The Dakota Student to meet their needs.” ergy conservation initiatives such Being the world’s largest maras high bay T-8 fluorescent lighting keter, distributor, and producer of in the warehouse with motion senbottles and cans, Coca-Cola Entersors; motion activated light fixtures prises has also committed itself to in the office area, electric hand drymany energy conservation initiaers in the restrooms and large waretives. “The Coca-Cola Company house fans for heat de-stratification has a goal to improve the efficiency in the winter. of their coolers, vending machines, Recently, Grand Forks Mayor and fountain equipment and reduce Brown chose CCE in Grand Forks greenhouse gas emissions produced as the inaugural recipient of the by this equipment,” stated Janelle “Green Business Showcase” during Tummel, Public Affairs and Comthe annual state of the state. The munications director for CCE. mayor commended the work the The company’s commitment company did on campus. to the environment can be seen firsthand inside their sales and > Yasin Mohamud is a staff writer distribution facility as well. Their for The Dakota Student. He can be building incorporates many en- reached at yasin.mohamud@und.edu

DS

save more lives source states that “While these numbers are significant, they may not state the true size of the problem, since the identification of distraction and its role in a crash can be very difficult to determine using only police-reported data.” BRENLEE LOEWEN A study done by Carnegie The Dakota Student Mellon used brain imaging to document that listening alone This Friday, April 30, marks reduces brain activity while drivthe first national “No Phone Zone ing by 37 percent. This number Day” initiated by Oprah and is equal to having a blood alcohol picked up by the U.S. Departconcentration at the legal limit of ment of Transportation. Ameri.08 percent. cans are urgMarcel Just, ing drivers to If you think you can director of put down their call, text and drive the Center phones and end for Cognitive distracted drivat the same time, Brain Imaging. ing, explains you cannot. “If you think that handsyou can call, text Oprah free or voiceand drive at the television host a c t i v a t e d same time, you features do cannot,” Oprah not elimisays. “That message you can’t wait nate the distraction of talking to send could kill. Distracted drivwhile driving. He warns drivers ing is an epidemic that is sweepto “keep not only their hands on ing through our country, claiming the wheel; but also to keep their lives and destroying families.” brains on the road.” According to the National “The clear implication is that Highway Traffic Safety Adminengaging in a demanding converistration, in the year 2008, there sation could jeopardize judgment were a total of 34,017 fatal crashand reaction time if an atypical or es in which 37,261 individuals were killed. Out of that number, 5,870 of those fatalities were due CELL > page to driver distraction. This same

SAFETY Oprah initiates a “No Phone Zone Day” to combat phone use related vehicle accidents.

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BAN >

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an exact total at this point, since so many petitions are circulating around the city. The May 5 deadline to submit the signatures is fast approaching, but Kvasager says they will likely aim for as many as 6,000. Around thirty bar owners and their employees have been circulating the petitions, asking patrons if they would like to have a say in the issue, and encouraging all Grand Forks residents to sign on. They are stressing that signing the petition does not necessarily mean that you support repealing the ban in any way, simply that you think it should be left up to the citizens to decide. “Whether you are for or against the smoking ordinance, the petition ensures that [Grand Forks residents] will get to exercise their democratic right to vote,” said Kvasager. Eliot Glassheim is a member of the Grand Forks City Council. He voted in favor of the ordinance. “They have every right to petition for a public vote,” he said. Glassheim says that he would naturally prefer to have the debate settled, but makes it clear that he sees the value in turning the decision over to the public. “I thought we had gotten a pretty decent compromise that protected workers and patrons from the hazards of smoking and allowed smokers to be outside either on patios or in what they call ‘butt-huts’ protected from the elements. So I thought we had a pretty good compromise, but they certainly have the right to see if the public agrees,” he said. Both sides of the issue are very confident that the public will

ultimately see things their way. Kvasager thinks that the estimates made by supporters of the ban that the proportion of smokers among Grand Forks citizens is 20 percent and shrinking are inaccurate, and that even non-smokers may vote against the ban out of concern for the effect it may have on local business owners. Glassheim, on the other hand, is confident that citizens will reinforce the City Council’s decision. “One of the advantages of having a public vote is that I think more and more people who think it’s very dangerous behavior to have indoor smoke will get a chance to make that case,” he said. He admits that he has no exact data on the subject, but estimates that close to two thirds of Grand Forks residents may uphold the ordinance. Another issue may be timing. If the petition is submitted and approved, the requirement is that it be placed on the ballot during the next city-wide election. As of now, it is scheduled to be November 2, when voters will head to the polls to decide a number of races. However, the city’s library commission is considering holding a vote in September to seek approval for a sales tax to help fund a new facility. Kvasager is not positive whether or not the addition of this special election would require that their issue be placed on the September ballot, but says that he thinks the turnout to overturn the ordinance would receive higher support if it were voted on in November, in conjunction with the general election.

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> Shane Zahrt is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at shane.zahrt@und.edu

JANET > From page

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speech with the growing prominence of UND’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) program. “This is an ideal fit for us, given our rapidly growing expertise and programming in Unmanned Aerial Systems and our strong working relationship with the Grand Forks Air Force Base and the U.S. Border Patrol,” Kelley said. “We thank Senators Kent Conrad and Byron Dorgan and Representative Earl Pomeroy for their efforts to secure Secretary Napolitano as our speaker,” Kelley said. “We look forward to having her on campus and showing her firsthand the important work we are doing that connects to her Department of Homeland Security.”

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> Robert Lukes is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at robert.lukes@und.edu

TRIP>

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A second possible project is providing the families with high efficiency ovens. “No one talks about it much since it is seems silly,” said Worley. However, there is a huge issue here. Families are unable to afford wood for their cooking; propane is often cheaper than wood. Another concern is with the women who cook for many hours a day from a young age. Hondurans cook in a thatched hut with little ventilation, meaning women are often subjected to smoke-filled areas. This has left many women with severe lung damage. “It is really a women’s rights and health issue; many women are still cooking like this is Mesoamerica,” said Worley. Providing high efficiency ovens will both help families who

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OLIVIER DOULIERY > MCT Campus Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano speaks to the media on the H1N1 flu outbreak and the U.S. government’s response at FEMA headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Monday, May 4, 2009. Napolitano will address UND graduates on May 15.

struggle to find wood and provide a aren’t sufficiently compensated for safer working environment for the their crops or products when they women of these rural communities. aren’t full trade. Worley argues this The main thing students will is one cause of the massive amounts of immigrants hopefully come away with is We don’t solve the in the United a sense of the problem by just States. “We don’t world outside of themselves dropping them off solve the problem by just and to think at the border ... dropping them about the choices people Paul Worley off at the border make everyday. assistant professor, Spanish [of Mexico],” says Worley. “I want stuThere is no dents to gain not just a sense of what they can do, exact price worked out for the trip but also what the effect of buying yet, but the estimate is between fair trade [products] or not has on $2,220-$2,500 per student. Part of that is the cost paid to SHI, which is other people,” stated Worley. This, Worley says, even affects tax-deductible since they are a nonthe immigration issues that America profit organization. Worley says he’d like to “get the is facing now. Rural peoples in many countries like Honduras are unable community as involved as possible.” to support themselves because they He hopes to raise awareness of these issues throughout the community and to raise funds for the students to alleviate the costs. Students who are interested in the trip do not need experience with the Spanish language. There is a language course associated with the trip that will be offered in the spring of 2011, but Worley says the focus of the class is on immigration issues and sustainability. To learn more go to the informational meeting on Wednesday, May 5 at 5 p.m. in Merrifield 313.

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> Rachel Smerer is the News Editor for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at rachel.smerer@und.edu


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NEWS photos by NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

BIKE >

From page

The Honors Program held their 12th annual Undergraduate Research Conference in the Memorial Union on Monday. Students in the Honors Program complete a thesis their senior year to receive a degree in Honors. Students defended their theses in the Lecture Bowl to their committees as well as the public. University President Robert Kelley also attended several of the presentations. Awards were given for best thesis, best presentation, Forum submissions and service learning at the Honors Banquet Monday evening. ABOVE: Michael Jundt, a senior in Biology and Honors, presents his thesis “Tools For Transition: A Look at the Factors and Forces that Prevent People from Escaping Homelessness.” Jundt won the best overall thesis award for his work. LEFT: Amy Jordan, a senior in Mathematics and Honors, speaks on “Effects of the 2007-2009 Economic Crisis on Chinese Migrant Workers” Monday afternoon.

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Bike sharing flourishes in Europe, where cities such as Barcelona already have 6,000 public bikes in use. Paris has 20,600 public bicycles, the most successful large program to date. Copenhagen, Stockholm and Milan are among other European cities with large schemes. The success of European bike sharing has triggered a rush to create programs all over the world, including cities such as Tehran, London and Shanghai. The number of bike-sharing programs leaped from 92 at the end of 2008 to about 160 at the end of 2009, according to DeMaio’s blog on the issue. In North America, Montreal’s Bixi program uses 5,000 bikes spread among 400 depots, though it functions only in the warmer months. U.S. metropolitan areas have lagged in launching bike-share programs, partly over infrastructure and liability concerns. Washington began its small-scale SmartBike in 2008, and will expand it later this year. Denver, Minneapolis and Boston are to launch bike-sharing programs as soon as this summer. As many bike-share programs do, Mexico City engaged in a public-private partnership, contracting with Clear Channel Communications, a media and outdoor advertising giant based in San Antonio, to build and operate the system. In its first two months, Ecobici signed up 4,000 users. The goal is 24,000 by the end of the first year, Delgado said. Interest is high. In one 24-hour period, half a million people surfed the Spanish-language website, www.ecobici.df.gob.mx, said Monica Mejia, the program’s customer service coordinator. In 1992, the United Nations said Mexico City had the worst air quality of any city in the world. Since then, Mexico City has enforced tough vehicle-emission rules, banned cars from circulating one day a week and improved its mass transit system. Today, Mexico City has fallen out of the U.N.’s listing of the world’s 20 most polluted cities.

friday april 30, 2010

CELL >

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unusual driving situation arose,” Just explained. “Heavy traffic is no place for an involved personal or business discussion, let alone texting.” According to the Governor’s Highway Safety Association (GHSA), only six states prohibit all drivers from using hand-held phones while driving; included in these are California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, Oregon and Washington. Twenty-three of the fifty states prohibit text messaging for all drivers. However, no state bans all cell phone use completely. In 2009, Rep. Lawrence Klemin tried to pass legislation in North Dakota to ban text messaging while driving but was defeated by a vote of 60-34. The law would have included a fine up to $100 and a license penalty of two points. However, Minnesota has placed texting bans on all drivers with a fine up to $300 for those caught text-messaging or accessing the Web while driving. In the year 2008, Minnesota saw the lowest annual traffic death count since 1945; Minnesota issued the texting ban August of 2008. Oprah has issued a plea to all Americans, saying “Let it be the end, the end of you using a cell phone or sending a text message when you are behind the wheel of a moving vehicle. And until we as a nation decide we’re going to change that, those numbers are only going to go up.” The U.S Department of Transportation has recently launched its first nonprofit organization to end distracted driving. To learn more, visit Distraction.gov. If you wish to take part in Oprah’s challenge, visit http:// www.oprah.com/oprahshow/EndDistracted-Driving and sign the “No Phone Zone Day” pledge to encourage drivers to put down their cell phones.

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> Brenlee Loewen is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brenlee.loewen@und.edu

Summer Session at UND is a great time to add a minor, stay on track for graduation, take additional Essential Studies courses or re-take a class. There are hundreds of classes to choose from, evening and weekend too!

Early registration for Summer Session starts April 5. 701-777-6284 • summer@und.edu • www.summer.und.edu


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culture&media >

friday april 30, 2010

Inside: An interview with Minneapolis band Roster McCabe

p u n o ' n i

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photos by: ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student

DOWNTOWN Outdoor eating, events and more as the skies clear and the semester closes.

>

Josh Brorby

The Dakota Student

With the weather warming up, classes nearly ending, and summer fast on its way, students who aren’t a part of the UND diaspora—those sticking around in good old Grand Forks for the summer—are probably interested in the goings-on of certain downtown businesses. The Grand Cities ArtFest will be hitting the streets; Porpourra, the Urban, Dakota Harvest—all those places will be open and serving; Amazing Grains will keep cranking out that homemade peanut butter that always hits the spot. What would a

summer without classes (and just enough work to pay the bills) be, though, without a stop by the local watering holes? With the arrival of warm weather comes the arrival of pewter-like chairs and tables dotting the sidewalks of downtown Grand Forks. Students of legal age can soon relax outside their favorite pubs and drinking establishments—all one needs is a valid ID and a taste for the finer things. So long as the kids consume safely and responsibly, the outdoor service will continue. Bar owners, operators, and managers aren’t necessarily expecting business to slow down for the summer, but they are expecting a

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CULTURE&MEDIA

Jam bands to visit Crosstown lounge

questions. Dakota Student: You’ve been talking on Twitter and Facebook a lot about your new album, but for anyone who hasn’t heard, when is it coming out? Roster McCabe: Our new reDerek scott cord should be out early fall 2010. The Dakota Student We should have some preview tracks up online mid-late sumThe Crosstown Lounge will mer. DS: What’s going to be on the host two area bands tonight. Roster McCabe will be stopping new album? Will you be playing through on their Funky Reggae anything from it when you come Dance Rock tour, and they will to Grand Forks? RM: The album is going to be joined by another area favorite, the always entertaining Jon have ten songs, most of which we Wayne and the Pain. Avid Dakota have been playing live for the past Student readers might remember few months. We thought it was our interview with JWTP earlier important to “road test” the songs before we recorded them. With this semester. Both of the bands are based all that being said, yes, we will be playing some out of Minthe album neapolis, and It’s our job to bring of tracks when we each have a the party and energy come to Grand large local following. Rosto every show. We Forks. DS: You’ve ter McCabe is give 100 percent. been using comprised of the internet a five members Roster McCabe lot to interact and have a rewith your fans, ally diverse getting them sound. If you missed Roster McCabe playing involved on Facebook, and even at the Loading Dock in March or streaming some live stuff from the haven’t heard them at all, check studio. How beneficial is social out RosterMcCabe.com to stream media to your music? RM: All those media outlets a couple tracks. If you like things like dancing, drinking, music help us get in contact with our and fun, you’ll probably like this fans and potential fans and lets them be engaged in what we are band. Fans of Roster McCabe are doing. It is extremely important likely already aware of the entire for the band to offer new and upgoings on, as the band is quite ac- dated content like blogs, videos, tive online, communicating with online song demos and pictures so their fans, and also giving away our fans can see what we are up to. free merch (sign their wall today It is tremendously beneficial. before the show for your chance to win some). The band recently BAND > page took the time to answer a few

LIVE MUSIC Popular band discusses upcoming two-set gig at downtown bar.

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the Dakota Student

Breathing fresh air

OUTDOORS Students find fun distractions from classwork as the weather warms up.

>

SHELby Thorlacius The Dakota Student

Wordplay is hard. Spring has sprung in Grand Forks, and with the nice weather on the rise the campus is, once again, coming alive. “I haven’t seen this much activity since welcome weekend,” said Rebecca Ray, a sophomore here at UND who is also enrolled in the Visual Arts program. People have been out and about like never before in 2010. Just by taking a drive down University Avenue, it becomes evident that summer is finally upon us. “People are grilling, playing frisbee, laying out in the sun and just hanging around outside; it’s been really great to see,” said Ray. Ray went on to say, jokingly, “I really like to go rollerblading with my cronies… all day err day” One of the growing sports at UND is frisbee golf, or frolf for short. There has been a lot of talk around campus about this upcoming game. It can be played with an assortment of discs, which include driver and putter discs, at one of the courses around Grand Forks, such as Lincoln Park. Jack Reimer, a sophomore, said

he likes frolf because, “it is a free competitive sport.” Patrick Thomas, who also plays golf for UND men’s team, added that frolf, “is an awesome sport in nice weather, and it’s good fun.” Now that winter has passed we also get to revisit alternative forms of transportation, and not motorized transportation, but foot transit instead. This year we have seen the typical bikes, rollerblades, and skateboards, but now there is a new board that is taking over the sidewalk, and it’s called a longboard. Longboarding is like surfing on pavement, so it’s no wonder so many people are taking it up. It’s a break from the flat paved land, because the rider can imagine the concrete sidewalk is actually water. The UND parking ramp is also a great place to find longboarders drifting down and around. “It’s an awesome ride, it’s just really chill and relaxing, especially with some good music running through my headphones,” said Dillon Moore, a freshman. Because more kids have been seen out and about, it would be safe to assume there is a spike in the crime rates, right? False. Just by taking a look at the crime statistics online, it became clear that there are no more tickets for minor and consumption given during the

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like this decision. Feelings continue to run high, both on-campus and on Facebook groups devoted to the logo. One of the biggest things gleaned out of the entire situation was that, should I be asked to return to Grand Forks and UND for a ceremony in my “honor,” I should expect nothing less than people asking me to “kiss [their] white ass[es]” and claiming that I should return the tuition waivers and scholarships I received as an Honors student and Graduate Service Assistant. In the ensuing onslaught of comments online, the true nature of fans both pro-and-anti logo was revealed. Quotes from Ralph Engelstad and Thomas Jefferson were thrown out for debate (“To Adolf, From Ralph” was conspicuously absent from the discussion). Some hold onto a fleeting hope that their “beloved” Sioux might return. Frankly, I hope it doesn’t. UND has a grand opportunity at its doorstep: a new beginning. One in which everyone can move forward, standing proud behind a logo that doesn’t ostracize, stereotype, offend or marginalize. A logo that, according to President Kelley, will not be the Flickertails. For that, we can all be thankful.

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> Martin is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at martin.rottler@und.edu

ROOF >

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change of pace, so to speak. Mike Wegscheider of Joe Black’s said that the bar crowd shifts from mostly students to those who are in town for events or as part of a “regular” group. “We sponsor a lot of softball teams,” said Wegscheider, citing the summer league in which several bars and restaurants have stake. He mentioned that Joe Black’s will continue running the same specials throughout

CULTURE&MEDIA LET’S BUILD A PYRAMID

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NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student Maureen Clemmons, Ph.D. of Pepperdine University discusses alternative possibilities of pyramid-building techniques utilized by ancient Egyptians. She spoke at the Center for Innovation on campus Wednesday.

ALEX >

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reading or other, equally relevant reading. More importantly, a reading room is a common area for students to meet out of class and socialize. This develops community among students, which will lead to more interactive and more dynamic classes. In my recent semesters, I have noticed some groups of students that share schedules and, as a result, carry the summer that they’ve been running all year, and that live music will be announced as booked. Blue Moose, Mike’s Pizza, Applebee’s and Whitey’s will continue serving outdoors on the East side of the river, as well. Another hangout across downtown, Rhombus Guys, just opened up their patio for the warm season. The pizza place and bar (which features award-winning food) has a roof-level dining area where some summer events will be held. “We have a couple bands coming,” said Rhombus employee Seth Boggs.

material and discussion from one class to another. This is the type of relationship students in every department should have; a relationship that extends beyond each class into a more complex study that connects every English major and professor and makes our department a changing entity. And this is the kind of place we all want to claim as the source of our education.

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> Alex is the Editor-in-Chief for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at alex.cavanaugh@und.edu

Solo acts like Wade Bomber and Kayla Robison will be making appearances, and bands such as Two AM, Chrome, and local favorites the North River Ramblers will be stopping by during the summer, too. “We’re going to have movie nights on Monday nights—old school comedies like Caddyshack and stuff,” said Boggs. The movie night is something new for the pizzeria, but if they handle it the same way they’ve handled their live music (Fridays and Saturdays, usually) and Springfest, the event should go smoothly. Ah yes, and don’t forget about Springfest coming up on May 8 (check out our final issue on Tuesday for more information). Also going down that Saturday is Cultureshock, a big, free, outdoor show presented by Area and Whole Wheat Records. The event will go from 1-11 p.m. with performers Sovereign Sect, Kipp G, Swiff vs. Swurve, and more. The whole thing will be going down in the Square downtown, and an after-party will follow at Whole Wheat Records. Of course, there’s plenty to do in and around Grand Forks, especially when summer rolls around and the great outdoors is just waiting to be explored. Sometimes, though, cooling off with a frothy beer or hanging out and listening to some great music are a student’s best shots at relaxation. As for this writer, well, you might find him at a fine downtown establishment or somewhere out in the great green countryside, but (shameless plug) if you absolutely have to find him on a Friday night, you best look at an old standby: Judy’s Tavern.

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> Josh Brorby is the Features Editor for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joshua.brorby@und.edu


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>

Classifieds

friday april 30, 2010

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services is fun, but I have seen a lot of lives a fest—but it’s our job to bring the HEAT > BAND > EMPLOYMENT destroyed by it.” party and energy to every show. We CAMPUS LIQUORS HIRING PART-TIME EVENINGS. SEE BILLY AFTER 3:00PM. SUMMER HIRE: YMCA is taking applications for Camp Counselors, Swimming Instructors and Lifeguards. For an application go to www.gfymca.org. Free membership to all employees. Ph: 775-2586. LOOKING FOR SUMMER EMPLOYMENT? Enjoy day hours, M-F with weekly paychecks. Must have driver’s license & vehicle. Would like to start training asap and can work around school schedule. Pick up application at Merry Maids: 1407 24th Ave. S. Entrance H. 775-6778.

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DS: You guys play a lot of outdoor festivals and are known for really exciting performances; is it difficult to make the transition to the indoor venues? Like, say when playing the Crosstown lounge tonight with Jon Wayne and the Pain? RM: Outdoor festivals, especially nighttime slots, are a different experience than your standard club gig. The “party” atmosphere and crowd energy are going to be inherently different at

give 100 percent at every gig and play and perform the best we can no matter where or what it is. So if you’re already planning on heading downtown, or are otherwise looking for a 21+ alcohol involved activity, the Crosstown Lounge is going to be full of bohemian infused beats and good vibrations at 10 p.m.

From page

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springtime than any other time of year. There are actually more tickets given out in the first month of school than in the last ones. And with springfest right around the corner, a lot of kids have police on their minds, so to avoid trouble during these last few weekends of school UPD officer Tom Brockling gave this advice: “Obey the law, don’t drink underage, and don’t take drugs, just say no… I know a lot of people think alcohol

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We have heard these words all our lives, but to ensure staying out of trouble, these pieces of advice are the simplest to follow. Just because the weather is heating up does not mean police records need to heat up as well, so stay safe and have fun, and good luck on finals everyone!

DS

> Shelby Thorlacius is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at shelby.thorlacius@und. edu

> Derek Scott is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at derek.scott2@und.edu

THE BRONZE BOOT is now accepting applications for weekend server and hostess/cashier. Please apply in person at 1804 North Washington Street.

SERVICES HAD SEX? HAVE QUESTIONS? PREGNANT? NEED HELP? We are here for you. FREE and 100% confidential. Pregnancy test, first trimester ultrasound, options counseling. Education on pregnancy, abortion, STD’s. Women’s Pregnancy Center, 11 South 4th Street, Suite 210, Grand Forks. 746-8866. Hours: Mon-Thurs, 9-4:00. Please call for appointment. Visit our website at: http://www.gfwpc.org

MISCELLANEOUS ELECT RIEMERS SHERIFF. Another candidate supports making criminals pay for their own investigation and arrest. This was last done in ancient witch trials against women and made many court officials wealthy. Paid for by Riemers in his own behalf. Roland-Riemers.com

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Pull Tab Nite! 20 ox. Schooners of Bud, Bud Light, Miller Lite, Coors Light or Amber Bock

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*

The library will have extended hours for finals week and will be open until two a.m.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

S CHOONERS H AVE L ANDED !

Schooners of Premium Rail Drinks only Schooners of Premium Rail Drinks only It’s German Day! Schooners of Heineken Schooners of Morgan drinks

Smoking Permitted After 3pm

Long Island Ice Tea Schooners Chuck Norris’ Bonzer Bombs


DS >

scores & schedules

friday april 30, 2010

>Inside:

Softball UND: 1

sports

Men’s and Women’s golf finish off seasons in Edinburg, Texas pg. 14

UND: 1 UW-GB: 9 UW-GB: 9

America Sky Conference UND: 6th place MGLF

Great West Conference UND: 4th place WGLF

Having a

BALL

Jake Magner and Casie Hanson hit the field for different reasons

>

LOGAN DICK

The Dakota Student

Bob Feller, an American baseball player of the 1940’s and 50’s, was quoted saying, “Every day is a new opportunity. You can build on yesterday’s success or put its failures behind and start over again. That’s the way life is, with a new game every day, and that’s the way baseball is.” Whatever kind of ball game you look at, that phrase of encouragement can be applied to it. Baseball player, Jake Magner, and softball player, Casie Hanson, are two of UND’s leading ball players. They both have a whole lot of success behind them that they have been able to build upon. Jake Magner Junior Jake Magner comes from the baseball town of Grand Rapids, Minnesota. Growing up

as an athlete on the baseball team offensive play. was a serious matter, for he was Coach Jeff Dodson explained, a part of a team that was known “The big thing about Magner for winning. Now as the offensive is that he can swing the bat real leader on the baseball team here at well… He is one of the best college UND, Magner likes to think that hitters out there.” his background in baseball was the This week Magner was one of key to his accomplishments today. seven DiviThis past sion I athletes It is great to be that to be selected weekend, UND baseball played kind of guy that can as a Louisfour games ville Slugstep up on offense ger National verses New York Tech, a feland lead the team... Player of the low conference Week, due to Jake Magner his great feat team. UND was able to pull off junior infielder against New wins in two of York Tech. the four games, “It is great but it was in the second game that to be that kind of guy that can step Magner especially shone. up on offense and lead the team Magner successfully toward our successes,” Magner hit four home runs in that single said. This season the baseball team game and had nine RBI’s, setting a started off with a packed calendar new UND school record. Magner consisting of 27 away games scatracked up six total homeruns for tered all across the nation. the weekend, showcasing his great “The season started out with a

real tough schedule, but it is getting better every day,” Magner explained. “Missing classes was tough, but I like to travel. Plus, we got to play at some pretty nice ballparks in the nation.” Great ballparks, as well as the opportunity to play very competitive teams are just a couple of the advantages that Magner mentioned as being benefits in the switch to Division I. He expressed an overall good feeling about the transition. Magner feels the greatest competition and pressure from Utah Valley, a main competitor in the Great West Conference that will challenge the team during the upcoming final tournament. Magner has great confidence in his team and finds them to be more than just teammates. “We are a close knit team this year. Differences between upper and lower classmen on the team don’t matter; we are just all enjoying the game and the good times.”

Coach Dodson alluded to that same fact of team unity. “Jake is a great team player. He plays smart and hard everyday.” Currently, Magner is working toward a major in secondary education, with an emphasis in social studies. Casie Hanson Graduate student Casie Hanson is quite the dedicated athlete here at UND. Right now, her focus is on softball, but she was able to balance both hockey and softball all the way through her first four years of college. “Being a two sport athlete had a lot of time restraints, and it brought on a bunch of stressful situations, but I would not trade it for anything,” Hanson explained. As a senior, Hanson focused on hockey and decided to redshirt

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BASE > page

Senior Casie Hanson

Junior Jake Magner photos by ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student


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friday april 30, 2010

SPORTS

Mile high mistake UND golfs well BRONCOS Mixed feelings around the NFL over the coach McDaniels’ decisions.

>

DeVON ROEHRICH The Dakota Student

There is nothing more inspiring than living out your faith in a world that is becoming increasingly less aware of the presence of a Higher Power, especially in the ego-driven line of work known as professional football. Like many of you, I love the person that is Tim Tebow, as he has become the most recognized college football player of our generation. He is one of the few athletes in the college universe that has transcended sports, and subsequently there has never been more draft buzz for a late firstround pick than there was for Tebow last week. Some analysts had him going as early as the teens, where other experts had him projected to go in the fourth or fifth rounds. Tebow presents an unbelievable dichotomy for NFL clubs trying to evaluate the most important position in sports, the quarterback. Think about how important the intangibles are with the quarterback position. You need to be a believable leader, because in the NFL, most games are decided in the fourth quarter when the pressure is at a premium. If you as a teammate have any doubt whatsoever about the guy running the show out there, there are going to be problems. Tebow has every intangible imaginable. When he tells you to go to work, it is only after he finishes a grueling two-hour training session himself. He bleeds passion for the game, and he spent every waking moment from January 1 through mid-April completely revamping his throwing motion to try to increase his NFL draft stock. But that is where the love ends, and I become highly cynical about the player that is Tim Tebow. Quick! Name the last NFL quarterback who ran a pure-shotgun, veer option-based system who relied more on brute strength than passing skill and had a successful NFL career! Um… besides a three year stint for Michael Vick, the answer is no one. He lacks the most important physical attribute that a quarterback can possibly have: accuracy. Drew Brees may be short, Tom Brady may be slow, Peyton Manning may not be the most clutch, and Brett Favre may not be the most consistent, but they are all incredibly accurate (yes, even Favre…. NFL’s all-time TD passing leader did not get there through pure arm strength). As an NFL team, your firstround pick is not to be spent on a multi-year project that will more than likely end up as a component of the latest “wildcat” formation craze; nor is to be spent on a fu-

ture fullback/H-Back/Tight End who will be on the field for only 1/3 of the offensive snaps. I understand Denver’s QB position has been bare since John Elway retired and that Brady Quinn and Kyle Orton don’t exactly put butts in the seats. However, this is not about selling jerseys or drafting motivational speakers. This is about fixing a franchise that has no top-quality wide receivers or running backs. This is about a second-year head coach trying to correct his past mistakes after the team tanked following a 6-0 start. Tim Tebow does not help any of these problems. I do not believe Tebow will be NFL-reliable when it comes to actually winning football games. These fans are rabid for a return to 1990’s glory, and with Josh McDaniels feeling that mounting pressure, he decided to tie his head-coaching career to a burly left-hander who until four months ago threw from the hip and could not consistently throw a slant route on the money. I do think Tebow has a long career ahead of him in the NFL,

but it won’t be as a week-in, weekout starting quarterback. The fact is this: while he displays top-10 work ethic habits and a fantastic dedication to training, he does not possess first round talent. He is a determined and natural athlete who will do anything and everything the Broncos ask of him, but does that really matter if he can’t really make the reads and throws an NFL quarterback needs to produce? When you trade away Jay Cutler, Brandon Marshall and Tony Scheffler, the key components in the Broncos’ passing game in the past 12 months, and then draft Tim Tebow in the first round, you are sending a loud message: character over skill. I understand a coach wanting to have good temperament in the locker room, but this is going past that. I appreciate good morals portraying the franchise, but spending the next three years to find out if Tebow can really play is just poor judgment.

DS

> Devon Roehrich is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at devon.roehrich@und.edu

in Texas tourney

Senior Kristi Lucken and junior Lauryn Job led the Sioux women, with a total score of 254 (tied for ninth place in individual scoring). Lucken’s best round was an 11-over-par 83, from her first DAVID RICHARDSON round of tournament play. The Dakota Student Job played the best round The Fighting Sioux men’s and of the tournament for the Sioux women’s golf teams competed in women with a 4-over-par 76 on their respective conference cham- her final round. pionships April 26th and 27th. The remainder of UND’s The women, competing in team finished the tournament the Great strong, with evWest ConferAlex Robb shot a ery Sioux player ence Chamexcept Lucken team—leading 71... playing their pionships, finished 4th and placed in a tie lowest-scoring overall. round in the for 15 in individual final round of The men, competing in play. UND’s scoring. the American women finished Sky Conferthe three rounds ence Chamof tournament pionships, finished sixth overall. play with a total score of 1035, Both conference champion- good for 4th place. ships were held at the Los Lagos Houston Baptist University Golf Club in Edenburg, Texas, a par-72 course designed by Ted GRASS > page Robinson Sr.

SIOUX The conference championships were held last weekend for men and women golfers.

>

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the Dakota Student

Sioux compete at SDSU TWILIGHT Junior Jessica Butler sets school record for 100-meter hurdles.

>

TIMOTHY BOGER

The Dakota Student

Junior sprinter Jessica Butler is putting up times that Sioux Track and Field has never seen before. For the second time this spring, Butler broke a school record, this time in the 100-meter hurdles. She ran it in 14.54 seconds, a time rewarded with second place at the South Dakota State Twilight Meet in Brookings on Tuesday. The previous record was 14.76, set by former teammate Jessica Clausnitzer in 2007. Her other record set was in the 60-meter hurdles in the Great West Indoor Championship in February. Butler placed second in the event , but her teammates would combine to win four events at the one-day meet that didn’t tabulate team results. Paige Kuplic, a freshman, won two individual events. She ran a

14

GRASS > From page

round under par. His total score of 236 led the team, and placed him in a tie for 15th in individual scoring. The top 3 UND golfers finished 1-2-3, with sophomores Matthew Rolstad and Tyler Monda finishing close behind Robb with scores of 237 and 238.

12.40 in the 100-meter dash and later a 25.55 in the 200-meter. She won both events by over a tenth of a second, and both finishes placed her in UND’s top 10 records for each event. Another freshman, Kirsten Haas, also broke UND’s all-time top 10 by posting a first place 1:04.67 in the 400-meter hurdles. The fourth top finish by the Sioux was posted by Katherine Enabnit, a sophomore who topped the field in the 3,000 meter run with a time of 10:52.04. The UND 4x100 women’s relay team also took second place at the meet, which had participants from UND, USD, SDSU and Augustana. The men’s team didn’t have any new records set, but they also did have four first-place showings at the same Twilight Meet. Junior Brandon Quesenberry won the shot put title with a throw of 15.78 meters. Teammate Creighton Schroyer finished runner-up to Quesenberry, right behind him at 15.57m. Schroyer, however, would get The total team score of 945 after three rounds of play placed the Fighting Sioux in 6th place, behind tournament winner and host TexasPan American’s score of 917. UND’s golfers finish their season on May 1 and 2 in Morton, MN at the Dakota Cup. Both the men’s and women’s golf teams are young—the men and women each have one senior on the team, Lucken on the women’s team

his own title by finishing first in the discus throw. His 46.94 meter effort was good enough to beat the field by almost a meter. Sophomore Tyler Rose also captured a title for the Sioux at the meet. Rose ran an 8:52.32 time in the 3,000 meter run to take the top spot. Bryant Halvorson took second in the long jump, scoring a 6.74 jump.The men’s 4x100 meter relay team also took first at the event. The 4x400 meter team took second. The men’s team will return to action this weekend and will remain in South Dakota. They will participate in the Howard Wood Relays in Sioux Falls. Both the men and women will participate in the Great West Outdoor Track and Field championships at the end of the year. The conference championship will take place May 13-15 on the campus of the University of South Dakota in Vermilion.

DS

>Timothy Boger is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@und.edu

and Dustin Steiner on the men’s team. For Lucken and Stiener, the Dakota Cup will conclude their collegiate golf careers, while the rest of the team will return to the course in the fall.

DS

>David Richardson is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at david.richardson@und. edu

BASE >

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SPORTS

15

the freshmen players, but we have been able to figure each other From page out. It makes team building inon hockey and decided to red- teresting and exciting,” Hanson shirt softball due to the softball mentioned. The transition to Division I team being in a slight transition has also been year. This was a something good choice for I definitely enjoy that the Hanson. She perplaying the bigger more experienced softformed well, teams (in reference ball players and, as a result, she was named to the DI switch). on the team have had to to ESPN the Casie Hanson manage. Magazine’s Allsenior outfielder Hanson District team remarked, for women’s “I definitely hockey by the enjoy playing the bigger teams. It end of her senior year. Hanson has always been has been a big jump for us, but I hugely involved in sports activi- think we are doing very well. It is ties. In high school she managed just a little disappointing that the to balance volleyball, hockey, and teams in California get to practice all year round, but we comsoftball. Her hometown high school in pete well and are right in it with St. Peter, Minnesota had a weak them.” Hanson has not only made hockey program. Instead, Hanson was noticed in softball. As a it through one collegiate sport, sophomore, her team succeeded but two. Hanson has been successful in both, earning numerat state, taking third place. This being Hanson’s last soft- ous awards and breaking several ball season, she has really laid school records. UND will miss all of her talents and energy out her as she moves on in life. Hanson studies exercise scithere for the team. Each year the softball team ence and community nutrition tends to have several players here at UND in hopes of movcoming and going rather quickly, ing on to a graduate program so the majority of the team is and a career in health and fitness. young. This reoccurring situation She also doesn’t mind the idea requires an extra special effort of holding a coaching position made by the more experienced somewhere down the road. players to find the strengths in working with the rookies. > Logan Dick is a staff writer for The “It has been tough these past Dakota Student. She can be reached couple years to get to know all of at logan.dick.1@und.edu

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16

SPORTS

friday april 30, 2010


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April 30th Dakota Student

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