Page 1

the volume 127

Today

tuesday april 27, 2010

DakotaStudent issue 48

Reaching the students, faculty and staff of the University of North Dakota since 1888

64°/37

Wed.

65°/46

Local Weather Forecast

Thurs.

Provided by: UND Weather Update. www.atmos.und.edu

64°/45

>

Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

Get revved up with SAE See Culture&Media Page 9

Big Event coming together Standing Rock Forks community through community

VOLUNTEER Service efforts service initiatives,” Amy Jordan, direcbeginning soon in Grand Forks tor of the UND Big Event said. Starting in the morning, volunteers and East Grand Forks as stuwill spread throughout Grand Forks dents organize efforts.

>

Brenlee loewen The Dakota Student

The University of North Dakota is joining with more than seventy other universities to take part in a day long, student-run community service project, appropriately named The Big Event. “The mission of the Big Event at UND is to foster good will and common goals among the students, University of North Dakota and the greater Grand

to take part in pre-arranged service activities. Jordan explained the variety of deeds provided: “Volunteers complete service projects ranging from raking, painting, picking up garbage and washing windows, to assisting at nursing and elderly care homes, organizing at nonprofits and working with kids at youth events.” Jordan added that this year there are several large tasks assigned in both East Grand and Grand Forks. “Some major projects include the East Grand Forks Parks District as well as the Fairgrounds

(where at both locations, volunteers will be picking up trash and raking). We also have painting jobs at many locations as well as helping at the YMCA youth events going on that day and visiting with residents at nursing homes.” Jordan explained that volunteers will meet at the Wellness Center at 9:00 a.m. on May 1 to check-in and receive their t-shirt and breakfast as well as any supplies needed for their job site. By 10:00 a.m., volunteers will have headed out and be arriving at the service location. “No job is too big or too small for Big Event volunteers.” Jordan reiterated. “In the past we have been able to

BIG > page

08

again discussed GOVERNMENT Student Senate passed resolution Sunday to support any future decision made by the two Sioux namesake tribes.

>

Brandi jewett

The Dakota Student

Student Senate saw a resolution and a number of bills come to the floor on Sunday. The proposed resolution implored Student Government to fully support any decisions made by the Standing Rock and Spirit Lake tribes on the topic of the nickname. Co-author of the resolution Residence Hall Senator Mathew Johnson believes the Standing Rock tribe should be given the chance to vote in support or in opposition of the nickname. “They want their voices to be heard,” explained Johnson. “They want to vote on this issue.” He and co-author Residence Hall Senator Nate Elness also added a clause saying Student Government will not take a position on the issue. “We want to make this all about the tribes,” stated Elness.

SENATE > page

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student

02

Student Health UND SPRING awarded SPORTS 2010

ACCREDITATION American Association for Ambulatory Health Care With a 27 game tour for UND casts approval on UND’s medical baseball and a football scrim- service center. mage between UND Green and UND White, every team is losing veterans and gaining new blood as the flux between seasons will produce a new and exciting season for the fall of 2010.

Re-join the conversation: DS Online

TECH The Dakota Student website sees big changes in form and function.

>

STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

Staying up on the latest news from UND, Grand Forks and around the country has become even easier with the Dakota Student’s launch of its new website last week. The newly redesigned site features a bold, modern look, Twit-

ter and Facebook connectivity as well as stories and photos from our awardwinning writers, columnists and photographers. The visually stunning site features up to the minute stories in news, sports, features and opinion that will give users an interactive journalistic experience. For those individuals who are unable to pick up an actual print copy of the newspaper, visitors to the site can view the print version of the Dakota Student through our partnership with www.issuu.com. Users can interactively turn

individual pages, read stories and check out actual printed advertisements as if you were reading the real thing. The DS is expanding our blog network as we continue to invite our thousands of intelligent readers to contribute to the conversation online by commenting on stories and columns. The new website is the product of months of collaborative work by the Dakota Student editorial staff and

WEB > page

08

>

STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

UND Student Health Services has received a stamp of approval from the American Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC/Accreditation Association) through an accreditation. This means an outside, independent, non-profit organization has thoroughly examined the operation of UND Student Health Services and determined that it is set apart from other outpatient facilities. The three-year term of accreditation recognizes the efforts of the staff and school to provide optimal care for the patients. “We believe our patients deserve the best, “ said Michelle D Eslinger, M.B.A., director of UND Student Health Services in a press release last Thursday. The AAAHC visits the health center and conducts an assessment with a host of volunteer physicians, nurses, and administrators. The organization has set standards for what constitutes quality health care, standards that are recognized even at the national level. The process is educational for health centers, they

HEALTH > page

02


DS datebook 02

tuesday april 27, 2010

DATEBOOK

The Dakota Student editorial

>

Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: dakotastudent.com

today, april 27, 2010

> public talk: The Department of Physics and Astrophysics is hosting a public talk by Dr. William Schwalm entitled “Anatomy of Black Holes,” at 7 p.m. in Witmer 116 with a telescope observing session to follow.

> Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features

wednesday, april 28, 2008 > lecture: The Arts & Sciences Interdisciplinary Speaker series is concluding with a lecture by Verena Thiele from NDSU. The event will be held at Merrifield 300 at 4 p.m.

Comment

> premier: Fire Hall Theatre presents “Kimberly Akimbo.” Show starts at 7:30 p.m., and tickets are available at the Chester Fritz Box Office. Tickets cost $15 for adults and $12 for students/seniors/military.

What do you think of the new Dakota Student website?

> art show: Art and Design presents Joshua Nichols at 4:30 p.m. at the Col. Eugene E. Myers Art Gallery, Hughes Fine Arts Center.

Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

HEALTH > From page

1

can look at areas for improvement and see what they are doing best. “Going through this voluntary process challenged us to find better ways to serve our patients,” said Dr. Mark Christenson, MD, the medical director of UND Student Health Services, in the same release. The accreditation is support for the dedication and efforts of this campus’ student health center. “[It] signifies that we have met the rigorous standards of a nationally recognized third party,” added Laurie Betting, DPT, and assistant vice president for Health & Wellness. For UND students, this means that continued health care right on campus. Not only do students benefit from the convenience of having Student Health Services, they now know that the quality of care is up to the standards mandated by the AAAHC.

SENATE >

> Looks great! > Preferred the old one. > There’s a DS website? > There’s no difference to me. Vote now on our website as well as leave feedback on www.dakotastudent.com > The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

Tell us what is happening on campus >

1

Taxi Cab Company to keep the program running. Next they passed a bill covering From page expenses for a trumpet ensemble’s Former student government July trip to Australia to play at the member and UND alumni Mi- International Trumpet Guild conchael Nowacki was fully in sup- ference. The total cost of the trip port of the resolution and voiced is $9,872. The bill asked Student his disproval Gove r n m e n t of the tribes’ They want their to cover costs voices being not paid for by voices to be heard grants or other ignored. “We have stupid ... They want to vote funds raised by white people the ensemble. on this issue. on both sides The third arguing who bill presented Mathew Johnson have no idea at the meeting residence hall senator asked Senate to what they’re talking about,” fund an on-site he pointed out. “It should be up to visit of Clean-Flo International for them [the tribes].” $2,800. The resolution passed unaniIf contracted, the company mously. Senate also passed the would work to clean up the Engrest of the bills on the agenda, lish Coulee with a diffuser system. the first of which restructured the Cab Crawler financial plan. Stu> Brandi is a staff writer for The dent government will pay $4,000 Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett@und.edu a month to Red, White, and Blue

DS

*

Features Editor Josh Brorby > joshua.brorby@und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@und.edu Web Editor Luke Johnson > luke.m.johnson@und.edu

business

Tell us what you think:

thursday, april 29, 2008

Editor-in-Chief Alex Cavanaugh > alex.cavanaugh@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Erin Lord > erin.lord@und.edu News Editor Rachel Smerer > rachel.smerer@und.edu

Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Natalie Cassell > natalie.cassell@und.edu Ryan Senn > ryan.senn@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677 All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

>

> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.

Two weeks left until finals! Keep up the hard work!

www.TheDakotaStudent.com


DS

world news report

> Inside:

World Brief Obama lauds auto-sector rebound, pushes reform

SAN FRANCISCO—President Barack Obama on Saturday blamed the financial sector for its role in the demise of the auto industry, and while car makers have begun to heal, he said Wall Street still needs to be kept in check. “Many feared we would be throwing good money after bad: that taxpayers would lose most of their investment and that these companies would soon fail regardless,” Obama said in his weekly address. “But one year later, the outlook is very different. In fact, the industry is recovering at a pace few thought possible.” He cited the strides made earlier in the week by the two bailedout automakers. General Motors settled up the $8 billion owed to the U.S. and Canadian governments, while Chrysler posted an operating profit of $143 million. “The Treasury Department informed Congress that this financial rescue­­­­­­­­­­—which was absolutely necessary to prevent an even worse economic disaster— will end up costing taxpayers a fraction of what was originally feared,” Obama said. He then went on to implicate bankers for their role in nearly bringing down the U.S. auto industry, due to an “absence of common-sense rules” and the “enormous, irresponsible risks” taken by financial firms. “I once again call for reforms to hold Wall Street accountable and to protect consumers,” Obama said. “These reforms would put an end—once and for all—to taxpayer bailouts.”

Lehman Brothers sues Japanese firm to stop payment request

NEW YORK—bankruptcy administrator at Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. filed a lawsuit with a federal bankruptcy court Friday, calling for nullification of a demand by three subsidiaries of Nomura Holdings Inc. for unsetauthor’s tled payments tied toname derivatives The Dakota Student trading contracts. The lawsuit came in response to an earlier demand from Nomura Securities Co. and the two other subsidiaries for the failed U.S. investment bank to pay them a total of more than $700 million (about 65 billion yen) for unsettled derivatives transactions. The lawsuit was filed with the federal bankruptcy court in New York state. According to the court document submitted by the bankruptcy administrator, the contracts were signed before Lehman Brothers went under. The administrator said the contracts should have been automatically terminated if the U.S. firm collapsed.

>

tuesday april 27, 2010

Northword participants share their written work

Candidate faces stiff competition ELECTORATE Popularity, centrist politics could help Fla. Gov. Crist win Senate as independent.

>

JOSH HAFENBRACK Sun Sentinel

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — These days, the biggest buzz around the Florida Capitol isn’t whether Gov. Charlie Crist will run as an independent for U.S. Senate. Instead, it’s this: Can he win? Political strategists say the electoral odds are long, but if there’s a politician poised to pull it off, it’s Charlie Crist. He has universal name recognition across Florida, a moderate political brand and millions in the bank. “Do I think there’s a scenario where he could win? Yeah, he’s a centrist, he’s a populist,” said Ron Book, a prominent lobbyist and political contributor. “Anybody who discounts him is making a mistake.” Still, even for Crist, the path to victory is full of pitfalls in a three-way race against Republican Marco Rubio and Democrat Kendrick Meek. No independent has won statewide in at least 50 years in Florida. The governor, estranged from his Republican base, has until Friday to decide whether to run for the U.S. Senate as a no-party candidate. Parsing Crist’s daily hints—will he or won’t he?— has turned into a national parlor game. But even if he makes the jump, there’s considerable doubt about whether his independent

MARICE COHN BAND > Miami Herald Students at Alonzo and Tracy Mourning Senior High Biscayne Bay Campus or “ATM,” made signs to thank Gov. Charlie Crist, who came to their school dedication, Friday, April 16, 2010, in North Miami, Florida.

campaign would withstand a sixmonth race. First, there’s the numbers. Party registration in Florida breaks down 42 percent Democrat, 36 percent Republican and 19 percent no-party affiliation. The remaining 3 percent belong to minor political parties, like the Libertarian Party. The problem for Crist: With a small slice of the electorate unaffiliated with the major political parties—22 percent—he has to not only win big among independents, but get a sizable chunk of Republicans and Democrats, too. Both political parties have well-funded organizations that pay for TV ads, staff phone banks,

pass out yard signs and help get voters to the polls. Crist would be alone. Even though there’s no precedent in Florida, there’s a national example: U.S. Sen. Joe Lieberman, Independent Democrat from Connecticut. He lost the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate in 2006 but came back to win the general election as an independent. Like Crist, he was a well-known figure in his own state who had fallen out of favor with his party. “He’s going to need considerable crossover from both parties and a majority among independents,” said University of South Florida political science professor

Susan MacManus. “It’s not impossible, but it’s a tall order.” Political strategist Steve Schale calculates Crist would need around a third of Republicans and Democrats, plus 50 percent of independents. That would put him around the 3637 percent mark—perhaps just enough to squeak out a slight plurality over Rubio and Meek. A few keys, Schale said: Crist would need to win swing voters in the Tampa market, his hometown. A staunch Israel supporter, Crist needs backing from Jewish voters in South

Public Prosecutors Office, district offices hold two kinds of press conferences. One is regular press conferences, held every one or two weeks by deputy chief prosecutors; the other is extraordinary press conferences held when there are arrests, indictments or court rulings on important cases that have attracted public attention. Regular press conferences are held, and reporters’ questions are answered, even if district offices do not have particular information to announce. District offices decide whether it is necessary to hold extraordinary press conferences. In cases when an extraordinary press conference is not deemed necessary, prosecutors distribute written announcements to reporters. From now on, high public prosecutors’ offices also will hold extraordinary press conferences and distribute written announcements. Those eligible to attend the

press conferences are journalists for organizations belonging to the Japan Newspaper Publishers & Editors Association, the National Association of Commercial Broadcasters in Japan, the Japan Magazine Publishers Association or the Internet News Association of Japan. The Supreme Public Prosecutors Office said freelance reporters also will be able to attend the press conferences if they are judged to have sufficient journalism experience. The key point of the measure is to quickly and scrupulously publicize how prosecutors execute their powers to investigate and indict. In the past, prosecutors’ offices generally have been reluctant to publicize how they handle cases, and the actions taken have differed according to the personal views of district offices’ deputy chiefs. There have been many cases in which deputy chiefs did not properly explain the reasons for declin-

ing to indict suspects. In extreme cases, indictments themselves were not even announced. The Supreme Public Prosecutors Office said the change is to provide opportunities for more members of the public to access information from prosecutors’ offices, given the growing diversity of information tools. The measure primarily aims to bring in Internet and freelance journalists who do not belong to press clubs. In late March, the Internal Affairs and Communications Ministry released the results of its research on press conferences given by government entities. Fourteen entities received the top A ranking because they allowed Internet and freelance reporters to attend their press conferences. Three were ranked D—and prosecutorial authorities were among them­because they opened their doors only to reporters belonging to press clubs.

11

RACE > page

Prosecutors in Japan seek more publicity

JOURNALISM Japanese Public Office open press conferences to reporters.

>

Staff report

The Yomiuri Shumbun

TOKYO—The Tokyo District Public Prosecutors Office in Japan has begun the process of opening its press conferences to a wider range of journalists, accepting applications from freelance and other reporters to register to attend. The move is being taken in response to instructions issued by the Supreme Public Prosecutors Office, that became effective Thursday, for district public prosecutors offices around Japan to expand the lists of journalists permitted to attend their press conferences. On Friday, the website of the Tokyo prosecutors office displayed a notice explaining the purpose of its press conferences. According to the Supreme


04

>

commentary

tuesday april 27, 2010

DS View New Staff

REPORT The Dakota Student will be replacing the majority of editors next year. The Dakota Student’s success can be largely attributed to the dedicated staff of the past year. Alison Kelly and Michael Thomas in particular have spent a majority of their college years in the DS office creating layouts, editing pages, and completely redesigning the newspaper. Next year’s successors have a lot to learn from the committed group, as the editorial staff is being completely refreshed during the 2010-2011 school year due to the graduations, plans to study abroad and new opportunities for the previous staff. Alex Cavanaugh will be replacing veteran Michael Thomas as Editor-in-Chief, which will hand the DS over to fresh eyes with big plans for the following semesters. Alex is an English major as well as a previous DS staff writer and Writing Center employee. Alex’s background in literature is bound to give the newspaper a new texture that is exciting and welcome. Erin Lord will be replacing Mitch Molstad—another DS vet—as the new Managing/Opinion editor. Erin has experience with opinions, as she has been a writer for the section for the past two years, one of which was spent under the wing of her predecessor, Mitch. She is an English major as well as a Writing Center employee, giving bad grammar no chance. Her enthusiasm for politics and social welfare makes for interesting commentary but a rather boring person. Joel Adrian will be replacing the legendary Alison Kelly. Joel’s knowledge of mild to extreme sports gives the DS a new twist on UND athletics. He is a nursing major while actively pursuing a minor in Spanish. An avid reader of print media, the addition of Joel promises the DS a direct impact to loyal DS followers. His interests involve sports, outdoor activities and fighting bears. Rachel Smerer will be replacing Allison Krause as the new News editor. Rachel is a psychology major who has always had a not-so-secret love of writing as well. She is currently a Writing Center employee and has past experience working as a newspaper editor. Rachel is a student in the Honors Program and hopes to have a wide variety of news stories in the coming year. Nathan Twerberg will be replacing Andy Ciulla as the new Photo editor. Nathan is an Air Traffic Control and Communication major who has had a long time addiction to photography. His interest began with a simple camera in sixth grade and has grown dramatically. He has worked for the past year as a photographer for the DS and looks forward to bringing more great images in the coming year. Josh Brorby will be replacing Derek Scott (master of the Adobe Creative Suite) as the Features Editor. Josh is an English, Honors, and Chinese Studies major who also dabbles in animation over at the Hughes Fine Arts Center. He has an active interest in film and fiction and often pretends to have read books he has never actually read. His passion for writing might serve as a boon for the DS, or perhaps it will lead to long, rambling, aimless, pointless, distracting lists of adjectives. The next editorial staff is excited for the upcoming year and hopes to continue the success of the former editors. Their involvement in the DS will always be the backbone of further progress in years to come.

Editorial Board Alex Cavanaugh Editor-in-Chief Erin Lord Opinion Editor

Rachel Smerer News Editor Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

Letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number.

Left must reestablish ideals

>

Aaron Wentz

The Dakota Student

May Day, or International Workers Day, is perhaps the only Leftist holiday (though it falls on May 1st, it is not the same holiday as where one might expect a Maypole to be danced around). In Minneapolis, many Left-leaning, or explicitly Leftist groups gather for a parade, among other activities. As May Day approaches, I’m at a loss to find much cause for celebration on the Left in the US, currently. As the encroachment of the populist Right steadily gains political momentum nearing the election season and Glenn Beck’s relentless onslaught on not just the Left in this country and abroad, but nearly the entire history of the European Enlightenment continues unhindered, I’m left asking, where to begin? Unfortunately, a figure like Glenn Beck (and to be clear, I’m not one who views him as the voice of the Tea Baggers; I’ve talked to more than one Tea Bagger who take serious issue with his approach) needs to be taken seriously, in a few ways. First of all, to give the Devil his due, I think that his analysis of our current political and economic moment is mostly correct. That is, he is correct that increasingly power is being handed over to the few (corporate and governmental élites) at the expense of the many (for him this means the white middle class, ultimately). I think he’s right that this is the case. I, of course, take issue with what he leaves out, i.e., his obscene racism, a far too heavy focus on the virtues of Capitalism and the terrors of the U.S. government at the expense of a critique of Capitalism itself, etc. In short, I’m not on his side (I’m violently opposed to his approach), I just think his analysis is correct at times; his conclusions (nuking the Middle East, etc.) are where he goes completely off the rails. That being said, there are two other reasons he ought to be taken seriously. The first is that Glenn Beck, as well as the Tea Baggers as a whole may sound “crazy” to Liberals, but as Noam Chomsky points out, the Tea Baggers are the only ones who are speaking to the con-

cerns of working people in this country. Chomsky notes that the policies that have created this backlash (and I’m not talking about Obama’s health care bill, more specifically government policies over the last half century that have increased military expenditures at the expense of social services) have been carried out by Liberals and thus, Chomsky argues, Liberals aren’t going to own up to this, so the Tea Baggers are offering a solution albeit a “crazy” one; it’s still a solution, and more importantly, it’s more than Liberals are offering. Therefore, there’s a reason people are getting behind the Tea Baggers, so they should not be ridiculed. Their concerns should be taken seriously and

This cannot happen while simultaneously maintaining the status quo.

Aaron Wentz columnist

then the idea would be to offer them an alternative. As Chomsky notes, “Take over your factory.” This brings us to the current state of the Left, though I don’t think it’s as simple as Chomsky makes it sound. I do formally agree that an alternative must be created, but what alternative? Glenn Beck (as well as other heavy hitters on the Right) claim that Obama is turning the US into a Socialist country. My problem is that he gets it wrong, not in the sense that there aren’t Socialist features to Obama’s plans (there are) and not that this is not a problem (as Slavoj Zizek argues, authoritarian Socialism is not far from being realized in the West, see: Berlusconi in Italy, Sarkozy in France). What I take issue with is the question of how long this has been going on and how he’s defining Socialism. I think that if Obama has any Leftist in him at all, it’s with the awareness that the health care system in this country was in an impossible state—things could not go on in the direction they were going (fully privatized, explosive prices, crippling the economy to the point of (some sectors of ) big business backing

a government-run system) and that politically there was no solution. So the health care bill we ended up with was a failure, but a failure in the right direction. As I argued to the Tea Baggers that I’ve talked to, when the health care system is fully privatized, corporations are totally unaccountable; there’s no possibility of any censure. However, when the government is involved, there’s at least the (formal) possibility of accountability. So, for me, Obama’s wager was not a compromise with the status quo, but, at best, a formal shift in the status quo. It could backfire (and in some ways already has, see: women’s health issues going by the wayside, the potential de facto overturn of Roe v. Wade practically written into the bill), and perhaps this bill will get repealed come January. It’s impossible to know, but at least there was an attempt to wrest control of the health care system from corporate control. Is this a utopian reading of the situation? Yes. But the right kind of utopia. Zizek argues that it’s just as utopian to imagine that Capitalism can continue its unfettered development despite the problems of the environment (as well as other factors) as to imagine that against all current indications, a new sort of society might be possible. I would make a similar argument against the current trends of what calls itself the Left in this country. This is especially true of student movements focused on big protests scattered across the country throughout the year. This sort of political tourism does nothing but, as Zizek argues, maintain the existing order in the guise of “doing something.” My question is what is gained by going to DC every few months, dancing in the street and coming home? A vacation? Certianly not social change. A friend and I were watching a sort of documentary about Frank Little on Saturday. Little was an organizer for the IWW (Industrial Workers of the World) in the early 20th Centry. He was sent to agitate at the copper mines in Butte, Montana, in 1917. He was lynched by Pinkerton Operatives (a detective agency hired by the mine owners) the same year. In meetings with the miners prior to his death he said

07

AARON > page


the Dakota Student

COMMENTARY

05

Letter to an overzealous driver No running

>

JOSH BRORBY

The Dakota Student

Hey there, man. How’s it going? How are you? How have you been? Good? That’s good to hear. You’re looking okay; have you lost weight? Have you been hitting the Wellness Center or the Y or something? Oh that’s cool. Yeah, fast metabolism is a gift from God, for sure. How are your classes going? Ah, I get it. I know what you mean. And your girlfriend—how is she? I hear that. You’re probably wondering why I’m writing you this letter. I mean, we don’t really talk to each other much. Heck, let’s be honest, we don’t really know each other at all! I know, I know, it’s audacious to even assume that we’re friends, let alone pen pals. Yet here I am, typing away, and there you are, reading your little eyes out, enjoying another fine spring day at UND. No, this isn’t about your latest stunt at the hockey game. That was a riot! I wasn’t offended at all by the chant, don’t worry. And those dead animals you threw on the ice? Come on, that was just hilarious. No, I’m not writing to you about myself, either. I’ve never been a big fan of Christmas letters, and if I was, it would appear that I’ve missed that boat by months— classic me! Oh wait, that’s aright, you don’t know me—and you know I’m not too keen on rambling about myself. If you ever want to talk about personal stuff, just shoot me an e-mail, buddy. Friend, this is about some of your behavior that’s been going on for, well, frankly, almost a year – something you might not even know you’re doing, something you did last summer, last fall, and just started doing again a few weeks ago when the road condi-

tions were perfect—just perfect: peeling out around the corner next to my house. Now don’t get me wrong, my roommates and I love a good pick-up truck. We kind of fancy ourselves car people. Each and every one of us loves a good... Engine. Pistons? Don’t even get me started. Johnson rods are pretty cool, too (that’s a thing, right?). Refilling a car’s blinker fluid is one of my favorite summer activities. When it comes down to it, nothing quite tops the sound of a roaring engine and screeching tires. I’m sorry, friendo, I’m starting to go off track, aren’t I? You’re right, you’re right, I’m not really a car person. You might even say

... nothing quite tops the sound of a roaring engine and screeching tires. Josh Brorby columnist

I don’t know the first thing about them, or that I couldn’t tell the difference between the sound of a pick-up truck peeling out and the sound of a Honda Civic Tokyodrifting. That’s all beside the point. You see, every day when I come home from class, I hit the living room to study, or maybe the kitchen to hang out, or my room to just relax. I like the ambient sounds of cars driving by slowly, students walking past, or birds tweet-tweet-tweeting from atop a tree. I can get some major reading done to those sounds. However, every once in a while, there you’ll come, banshee-screaming around the corner and letting your motor

rip itself apart down Columbia Road. And sometimes, that shit can get really annoying. Sorry, I almost flew off the handle there. We’re cool, we’re cool. I know I shouldn’t be complaining about it – after all, there are much more serious things going on in the world right now, and I consider myself pretty lucky to be comfortable enough socially and economically to be in a position to even attend a university (you or I could have been born into child-soldiery, for crying out loud!). I am happy knowing that I’m privileged enough to be in this position, and that I should be aware of the less fortunate (to use a hackneyed phrase) and do what I can to help, to change the way things work, to get other folks to join in conversations and dialogues concerning real issues (disregard the irony of me devoting 800 words to this letter, stranger). I worry about a lot of stuff, man. I don’t really want to complain about the little unimportant BS that is, in the end, utterly insignificant. That being said, could you take it easy on the gas pedal, Danica Patrick? Could you slow down around that corner, Richard Petty? I know you’re cool, we all do, everyone reading this thinks you’re the best, because you really are, you’re just tops, but that whole peeling out thing isn’t going to make you any cooler. You can’t really get any cooler than the ultimate in cool, after all, and that’s you. So take it easy, for all of us, and if ever we should meet, we’ll talk about driveshafts (I’m pretty sure those exist).

DS

> Josh is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joshua.brorby@und.edu

Student gov’t working for UND > David Barta

The Dakota Student

My column today concerns the efforts of the individuals at this campus who are far too often overlooked: members of student government. I’ve been at UND long enough to know that UND Student Government has its ups and downs, good characters and bad ones. Indeed, in the time I’ve attended UND, I’ve seen Student Government waste money on questionable projects championed by individuals whose intentions were morally ambiguous at best. I’ve seen them represent everything people would use to argue that students are un-professional, ignorant, careless, and self-absorbed sycophants, interested only in furthering their resume through Student Government at the expense of truly representing UND student’s needs. Indeed, I’ve said such things in this column, because in the past these things were true. But for the last year, these statements couldn’t be farther from reality. Not only has our Student Government been more efficient, transparent, and professional than any I’ve ever worked with, but they’ve done more to represent student interests than any other group in my time here. They are arguably the best groups of student representatives to serve UND, possibly in the history of the whole school. How do I say this? Well, first of all, it starts out with the fact that over the last five years, turnout in Student Government elections has increased more at any time in recorded UND history. This year, more students than ever before turned out to vote in the Student Government elections, beating the previous

record set the year before. Our student senators have tackled tough issues as well, funding some amazing, well attended speakers and publications (including the mightily amusing Twamley Shuffle:“Read it or Coulee monsters will eat you”), sponsored hundreds of student groups, some amazing international and cultural events, increased attendance at night life. They have organized a new student radio station, reorganized Student Government structure (making it much more efficient), told parking what’s what about ticket prices, completely revitalized Emerging Leaders, and have had several instances where the meetings ran until midnight or later. That’s right, not only did they do a tremendous amount of work, but they worked, not once but several times, past midnight discussing issues that affect students, not because they are paid or receive any tangible benefit, but because it was necessary in order to establish what was in the best interest of the students. These people really care about what happens to those who call UND home. Of course, leading this charge is a friend of mine who, more than anyone else, embodies the effort and leadership that Student Government has exhibited in the last two years. My friend Tyrone Grandstrand has served for two years now as the only two-term student body president in UND’s history. Now that he’s finished (and running for city council I might add) I feel it’s okay to write about how hard I watched him work for you, the student. You have to understand, I’ve sat in Friday night meetings that ran until 1 a.m. with Tyrone talking about how to deal with the horrible policy that is Higher One, to better distribute hockey tickets, increase student in-

volvement, and to even clean the coulee. He didn’t just talk about these things, he led the fight to improve them. As the greatest evidence of his concern for students, in my eyes anyway, is the fact that he was one of three people who were out and about at 5 a.m. taking water samples of the coulee with me when I was an undergrad. Our now former student body president waded through coulee water in the hopes that the research I was conducting would prove fruitful, providing a better campus for the students who call it home. I’ve seen him pursue the student interest on issues to the detriment of his studies and personal life, because that is how he operates. He’s a true believer in the process, a living, breathing radical who believes as sure as the sky is blue that if students simply organize themselves and coordinate their efforts, they can accomplish the impossible. And this year I watched him work with the amazing, intelligent, and professional members of Student Government to do what’s best for UND students. It’s going to be a tough act to follow for next year’s president and vice-president, but I think they’re more than up to the task. Good leadership breeds good leadership, and I would just like to remind everyone reading this to thank their student representatives and executives, who have worked so hard for UND’s student body over the past school year. In my opinion they’ve done a great job in a normally thankless position, and they deserve a bit of gratitude from all of us.

DS

> David is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at david.barta@und.edu

from ND

>

ERIN LORD

The Dakota Student

Because I don’t relate to the most conservative of ideals, my home here in North Dakota always keeps me on my guard— fists up, ready to combat any extremist, traditionalist views. When I meet new folks from other states and they ask me where I am from, I cringe a little bit when I give my answer, watching their perception of me change from undecided to a country girl in overalls holding a bible in one hand, rifle in the other, driving my pop’s Ford truck with extra overcoats and shovels in the truck bed. Not that a person like this is completely undesirable (obviously North Dakotans don’t believe so), but I personally would rather eat tofu for a month than shoot the life out of an animal, and the only manual labor I participate in is a carefully monitored workout regimen (now where did I put my eco-friendly water bottle?). But on my self-indulgent quest to act like a pretentious, elitist a-hole, I’ve realized that you can take the girl out of North Dakota, but you can’t take the North Dakota out of the girl. I’ve been subscribing to North Dakotan cultural habits blindingly, not even realizing it. What do I do with a day off and plenty of time to use at my leisure? Sure, I’ll throw in a Wire episode and read a little Vonnegut, but not before making a pan of bars (yes, just BARS, non-natives) and labeling the pan with my name just in case I decide to share. This is of course while my roast is busily cooking in my crock-pot; hopefully I picked up enough sour cream from the store! I used to eat like a vegetarian, never officially declaring myself one, but certainly finding the value in hummus and edamame. For a few months I officially became a pescetarian, but my North Dakota genes started kicking in, and suddenly there was nothing I wanted more than a big slab of red bloody beef (sorry for the graphic nature of that sentence my vegetarian friends). I can’t attribute the urge to anything but my North Dakotan heritage, because all reason tells me I shouldn’t be so excited about dead flesh. But, North Dakota tells me I should, and I have drudgingly obliged. I also have a developed a sordid love for babies. I used to be absolutely content spending my time with adult company that behaved like adolescents, but now I am starting to truly love actual children. I even hear myself saying things like “how precious” and “what a miracle.” The cynical me of last year would want to punch the touchy feely me of this year right in the face. I need to control this strange behavior, or before I know it I’m going to be making hamburger helper for my seven children. The final thing that reveals my background without my permission is my own voice. It doesn’t matter what I am talking about, how large my vocabulary, or how hard I try to keep the letter “o” out of my speech, it will eventually crop up and betray me. “The modernists prized their avant-garde writing style, but the pohhhhstmodernists”….ugh crap! Damnet, “o”! Why do you have to be so long and obvi-

07

ERIN > page


06

NEWS

tuesday april 27, 2010


the Dakota Student

Carnival helps homeless pets FUNDRAISER Emerging Leaders organize event for the Circle of Friends Humane Society.

>

Megan ewert

The Dakota Student

This Saturday, the UND Emerging Leaders held their third annual Animal Carnival at the Circle of Friends Humane Society in Grand Forks. The event, which ran from noon until 3p.m., involved a variety of activities for children and families to raise funds for the Humane Society. Michelle Benz, a member of Emerging Leaders, says that the event was a success. “We had nearly 100 people come through, and it was a great event. The kids had a lot of fun getting their faces painted, and the parents really appreciated having a family event on a Saturday. “We planned a lot of things to keep the kids busy,” Benz says. “We had games, prizes, a ring toss, duck pond, face painting, and of course, animals for the children to meet and play with. Anyone who comes in can easily get information on adopting a pet or the important work that the Humane Society does.” Benz says that the event is important for the Humane Society and the animals it houses. “When people come in and interact with the animals, those animals get socialized and have a better chance of being adopted into a home.” The Animal Carnival also helped to raise money for the Humane Society. “All of the proceeds from our event were donated to the Humane Society,” Benz said. “Most of our expenditures were from the group’s budget,” Benz says. “But we did receive donations to help us out. The Ralph Engelstad Arena donated popcorn,

NEWS

07

Gaming on a higher level

ORGANIZATION ORC gives students a venue for table-top RPGs and and McDonald’s donated beverto network with players. ages.” The face painting at the event was done by an honors student who offered her services to the group. “She’s really talented,” Benz says. “The kids loved it.” Benz says that the event was not the only one Emerging Leaders planned for the year. “We were given the task of creating a community project that made a positive impact. Some of us volunteered with the elderly, the School for the Blind, or other places.” “We picked the Humane Society,” Benz said. “We picked a passion we had, and that was helping animals.” The Humane Society is unique in its services to the Grand Forks area. “The Humane Society here has an open admission policy, and they will take any animal. Dogs, cats, birds, rabbits, and other animals are all cared for here,” Benz said. “If people can no longer support their pets, they can come and surrender them. This is a wonderful resource for people who are struggling to care for their animals and gives their animal another chance,” Benz said. Benz hopes that the event helps to remind community members about the importance of the Humane Society. “The thing I really hope that people take away from this is how much the Humane Society does for our community.” “I want people to know that they do such good work here by putting animals into wonderful homes and how they help and support our community,” Benz says. “We got great support from the community today, and we hope that they will continue to think of the event today and consider adopting a pet.”

DS

> Megan Ewert is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at megan.ewert@und.edu

>

allison krause

The Dakota Student

All around campus, if you look and listen, you can find level 1 sorcerers firing magic missiles at kobalds and hear the sounds of rolling dice. The Official Role-Playing Club of UND, or ORC, according to former President Josh Schwab, is “a group for gamers to network. NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student We provide space for tabletop Eric Klopfenstein rolls the dice as Lacey Konrad awaits gaming, card games and board the results. The two are part of a group that plays Exgames for all,” including not only alted in the basement of the Smith residence hall. students, but several UND staff Inn Fighting. We didn’t really have geon Master] did recruiting with members as well. enough people for a D&D game ORC and we attended a couple Beyond the usual Dungeons so we improvised.” Schwab says meetings, but now we just meet and Dragons, they play pen and they plan to continue meeting and at the place where we game at. It’s paper role-playing games (RPGs) playing through the summer. more private and less noisy.” such as Pathfinder, GURPS, The group is planning on goShe explains the Exalted gamShadowrun and Supernatural as ing to the gaming convention Gen ing system as “more flashy, more well as card games such as Magic Con in Indianapolis, Ind. August epic [than D&D]. You can shape The Gathering, Maids and L59. 5-8. “The estimated costs: badge, mountains, literally.” But the game Schwab says they would be open travel and lodging is $300 ... and isn’t all combat oriented. “Social to miniature we have room skills are practically a necessity. It’s games like We provide space for more peo- a really rich world to play in, also. Warhammer, ple.” It’s so rich I get gout.” for tabletop gam“but no one To be a Konrad talked about the difhas shown invoting memficulties of finding a location coning, card games, terest.” ber and par- ducive to their games. “It is hard and board games. take in the finding a place that is open, quiet, The various campaign Josh Schwab refreshments and unlocked. The school keeps groups have provided at ... locking us out of our rooms. former president, ORC many meet- But we have to be careful where their own meetings in ings, you must we game too because we get pretty common rooms around campus, pay the $10 yearly dues, but pay- loud.” but the club officially meets every ment is not necessary to play the If you want to join the gaming Friday at 5:30 p.m. in Gamble games. come to Gamble 325 at 5:30 p.m. 325. At the weekly meetings, they Lacey Konrad, recent UND on Fridays. often play games after taking care graduate and current staff memof business. “This last meeting we ber for the Air Traffic Control > Allison Krause is a staff writer for played a board game and a few program, is a part of an Exalted The Dakota Student. She can be people played a card game called campaign. She said, “Our [Dun- reached at allison.krause@und.edu

4

AARON > From page

something to the effect that a union must be formed and Capitalism must be overthrown by any means necessary. My friend asked aloud why no one talks like that these days. He raises an important question. Granted; the Butte miners were in an impossible situation, people were dying and they had no power except their potential unity. In impossible situations, as Zizek notes,

new ways out must be invented. This cannot happen while simultaneously maintaining the status quo. The student movements that are effective in this country are the ones that are taking their own universities to task. We need to start where we are and take a lesson from the old Left; social change is not gradual and pretty. It is often brutal and has a severe cost (see: Maoist groups in Nepal and India who are fighting for their survival). The alternative is to allow things to go on as they are, with results like in Arizona this week—the le-

DS

gal institution of American apartheid (people are required to carry proof of citizenship, legalized racial profiling, etc. Google : Arizona SB 1070). The way to celebrate May Day is to resurrect the ideas that the Left is founded on—emancipation, justice, freedom. This takes work and dedication, but, as Zizek points out, we are the ones we’ve been waiting for.

DS

> Aaron is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at aaron.wentz@und.edu

ERIN >

From page

5

ous!? It’s sad that I cannot even trust my own voice; it exposes me just like everything else. I guess I am just going to have to come to terms with the fact that I am North Dakohhhhtan, and there is no way to change the prairie blood that runs through my veins. And in all honesty, I much rather be North Dakotan than a resident of say Texas or Alabama. We might be a homogenous pool of funny talkin’ Northerners, but at least we aren’t the confederacy.

DS

> Erin is the Managing/Opinion Editor for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at erin.lord@und.edu


08

NEWS

WEB >

From page

1

brings together the ideas and imagination of Editor-inChief Michael Thomas, Web Editor Luke Johnson and Sports Editor Alison Kelly, as well as a host of other individuals. We invite you to explore the new site and its features as well as leave comments on the new design, stories, photos and columns. In the coming semesters, the Dakota Student will continue to make innovations to what we believe is a visually stunning and easy-to-use website. We hope to add additional interactive features such as video and audio files to add to the printed stories you find in our twice-weekly publication. Look for special featured sections like our current one highlighting the continued debate surrounding the Fighting Sioux nickname and logo. These timely special sections will include stories, columns, photos and other media related to individual topics and will provide readers with a one-stop source. We feel the new DakotaStudent.com gives users and readers a more dynamic and impressive online experience. The Dakota Student invites you to explore the newly redesigned, cleaner, crisper, more innovative and aesthetically pleasing DakotaStudent. com. Take advantage of our award-winning and accredited journalism in a whole new online experience. Thank you for supporting the work of the more than 60 editors, writers, photographers and advertising representatives by visiting DakotaStudent. com—your feedback is always welcome: email us at dakotastudentmedia@gmail.com or comment on our site. The New DakotaStudent. com: it’s all here. Join the Conversation.

BIG >

From page

tuesday april 27, 2010

1

accomplish every project request we receive. However, we do have the disclaimer that we serve projects on a first-come, first-served basis in the event that we do not get enough volunteers signed up to complete all projects. The team leaders of each participant team are required to attend a team leader meeting (held the week before the event) to find out where their group will be going in addition to any other information to pass on to their group.” UND hosted its first Big Event in 2005, and an overwhelming number of volunteers showed up. This year the number expected is much larger. Jordan explained, “This is the sixth year of The Big Event. Each year since it’s inception, The Big Event has had successively more participants completing more projects. In 2009, we had just over 1,000 volunteers. We expect to have over 1,100 this year.” Due to the growing number of participants as well as liability reasons, only UND students, faculty and staff can volunteer. The Big Event explains that “Each year, The BIG Event has gotten successively bigger with more volunteers participating and more service jobs being completed. In 2009…[we] completed over 80 projects in the community.” Initiated by Texas A&M University in 1982, Big Event was created by their Student Government as a way to share their appreciation for the surrounding area and community. Now, the idea has spread throughout the country with universities expressing their thanks through acts of service. Jordan added that even though official registration has closed, information can still be found. “If there are students that are interested in still volunteering, they should contact The Big Event at thebigevent@ und.edu. Otherwise, more information about the event can be found on our website at www.und.edu/ org/thebigevent.”

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student Delta Tau Delta and Alpha Chi Omega teamed up to host a weekend-long volleyball tournament to benefit Michael Romans of Hallock, Minn.

DS

> Brenlee Loewen is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brenlee.loewen@und.edu

Summer Session at UND is a great time to add a minor, stay on track for graduation, take additional Essential Studies courses or re-take a class. There are hundreds of classes to choose from, evening and weekend too!

Early registration for Summer Session starts April 5. 701-777-6284 • summer@und.edu • www.summer.und.edu


DS

culture&media >

tuesday april 27, 2010

Inside: Hollywood’s latest superhero venture: Kick-ass

photos by: DEREK SCOTT > The Dakota Student

Engineering monsters CONSTRUCT UND Students from a wide variety of backgrounds create metal marvels.

>

DEREK SCOTT

The Dakota Student

What do a racecar, an air cannon and a moon robot all have in common? A lot actually. For

‘

one, they will all be in the MeAnother thing they all have in morial Union common is that Ballroom May are built by For an exclusive they 6, along with UND students. video of the car visit Not just engia whole lot of other awesome majors, the new dakotastu- neering machines for as I found out, dent.com. the engineering but students expo. The expo from all over starts at 10:00 a.m. and runs until 4:00 p.m.

10

EXPO > page


10

tuesday april 27, 2010

CULTURE&MEDIA

Students shine at Don’t fear the paper writing exhibition NORTHWORD Senior english majors orate home-made works to a lecture bowl audience.

>

DEREK SCOTT

The Dakota Student

This past Friday afternoon, three unique students gathered in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl to read their self-composed works. The event allows undergraduate English majors a venue for selfexpression, a way to share their creative works. Northword is held once a semester; this event featured writers Erin Lord, Sara Tezel and Joseph Catanzariti. The event started out with

EXPO >

From page

09

projects is the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) racecar. It’s a scaled Formula One racer, capable of reaching speeds of over 120 mile per hour and built almost entirely on campus. The project has been a painstaking, yearlong process for all the students involved, detailing every zip tie and every inch of weld that went into production, even going so far as to compile a 150-page expense report. For an exclusive video of the car in all its racing glory, visit the new dakotastudent.com. Speaking of cool vehicles, hydrogen fuel is also coming to campus thanks to some hard working engineering students partnering with the Energy and Enviornmental Research Center (EERC). While the initial fuel station will be geared more toward fueling machinery like forklifts, the students explained that the technology for using this to fuel hydrogen cars is, in principle, quite similar. The Grand Forks Police Department is also paying close attention to one of the projects. Engineering students are working hard and finalizing the patent on their bomb disposal arm. Personally, I hope this robot doesn’t see a whole lot of action in Grand Forks, but knowing there is one more robot keeping us safe lets me sleep a little sounder. Some of the students are also doing their part to ensure next year’s Ralph Engelstad Arena’s hockey season will be getting one amazing t-shirt cannon. From what I saw, the machine will be more grenade launcher than cannon; the engineering students have constructed

an amazing buffet table of snack. Whomever is responsible for that did an excellent job. When the event started, we were greeted by Erin Lord. Lord’s story was particularly relevant to North Dakota residents. It spoke about a the nonchalant nature in which we classify binge drinking, specifically citing examples from her own life, recalling the way her upbringing has forever altered her perception of alcohol. The piece also talked about what it’s like to feel ostracized by ones own family, casted out for failing to maintain an adequately acceptable B.A.C. Next came the crowd favorite,

11

WORD > page

a semi-automatic launcher, styled like a giant six-shooter, and fires something like one t-shirt per second. Coincidently, the Ralph was already in the market for a machine to rain down cotton fury, and when the engineering students approached them with the idea, they quickly sponsored the group. Look for the machine to debut next year. Not content with focusing entirely on Earthly matters, still more engineering students have spent the year constructing an automated moon robot. The four-wheeled harvester will be entered in a competition with other universities, collecting regolith (pre-dirt stage of dirt, right geologists?) for scientists to study back here on earth. Students involved in these projects are enrolled in a year –long program that allows them to spend the first semester in the planning and the design phase of the projects, before moving onto the actual construction and testing in the second semester. This year–long process allows students the time needed to create these complex machines. However, for at least the SAE racecar, only nine months is proving to be still not enough time, and next year the program will be moving to a two year long design and build schedule. For more information about engineering, or any of the projects discussed, visit http://www.me.und. edu, and be sure to check out the expo in the Memorial Union Ballroom May 6 for a chance to check everything out in person.

DS

> Derek Scott is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at derek.scott2@und.edu

FINALS PREP Campus and Internet both allow students access to countless resources.

>

Josh Brorby

The Dakota Student

Finals week is looming, and for many students, that means pulling out the old quill, dropping an inkwell into the desk, and dashing off a few papers. The paper-writing process can be a tough one for many folks, freshmen and super-seniors alike, so having a quick rundown of helpful resources on campus and on the web is certain to kick-start the manic typing that’ll continue late into the night for the next few weeks. After all, getting started is oftentimes the hardest part of the writing process; staring at a blank page can be painful. The best and possibly most convenient place to get started is the reference desk at UND’s very own Chester Fritz Library. The librarians there are friendly, helpful, and can help you find almost any source you need to get going on that research paper. “We’re always glad to help show students how to research, give them tips, and show them how to find research materials from the library at home,” said Janet Rex, a reference librarian who works on the second floor of the Fritz. She urges students to come and talk to a librarian if they have any questions whatsoever. She also mentioned the usefulness of the internet (and the library’s

For students who prefer workown website). 3“A really good place to start ing from the comfort of their own for a lot of papers with a lot of in- homes, desks, or (let’s be honformation they can find at home est) even beds, the internet has is to go in and click the Articles a whole host of helpful websites, tab and do either a general search, not the least of which is bibme. academic search premier, or other org, a veritable treasure trove of online sources. databases,” said Not only Rex. “We have We have a lot of does the site a lot of full-text for sources availfull-text sources allow searches of able to students available to stu- books, magaat home.” The zines, journal website, www. dents at home. articles and l i b r a r y. u n d . Janet Rex what-not, it edu, can be accessed by all reference librarian allows users to almost austudents. For tomatically those off-campus, “they can use their u-mail create their bibliography right account to get access to the da- there on the web. Bibme.org is designed to help users cite sourctabases.” Of course, the Chester Fritz es correctly and create bibliograLibrary isn’t the only place to phies with ease. The site doesn’t turn to on campus if a paper have direct links to all the sources needs writing. Merrifield houses it allows users to search for, but it the Writing Center, a place to does give complete bibliographic check out for those who want a information, and that’s helpful hands-on approach to a paper. on its own. With luck, and with these At the Writing Center, trained consultants can take students resources at your disposal, dear through their papers sentence by reader, the paper-writing process sentence, word by word, and help should become that much simthem with pretty much anything pler. Oh, and don’t forget about the library’s extended hours they need. “The mission of the Univer- during finals week (open until sity Writing Center is to serve 2 A.M.). All these resources are as a resource on writing for the helpful, but the key to writing university community,” reads the papers is just sitting down and motto of the Center. “We help getting business done. So don’t people as they seek to improve delay; heed Janet Rex’s advice: their writing by offering positive, “Come to our reference desk!” constructive responses to their work in any genre or discipline > Josh Brorby is the Features Editor and at any stage of the writing for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joshua.brorby@und.edu process.”

DS


the Dakota Student

CULTURE&MEDIA

11

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

WORD >

From page

10

Sara Tezel. Her piece was also intensely personal. Recanting a first hand account of being misdiagnosed with depression, and being subjected to a pill regimen that ended up doing more harm then good. Tezel’s piece also spoke about losing the trust and respect of her family. It was dark, emotionally evoking and really enjoyable.

Northword ended with the third author, Joe Catanzariti. Catanzariti read a poem, and then read excerpts from his novel under construction. The novel will surely be a great read once he has it finished. The plot revolved around two friends and their haphazard adventure to a heroin filled coffee shop in a converted church.

DS

> Derek Scott is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at derek.scott2@und.edu

RACE > From page

Kathryn Korsmo, DDS

03

Florida. And, Schale said, Crist can’t afford to lose the entire black vote to Meek, who would become the first African-American candidate elected statewide. “It’s doable, and I think he’s the only guy who could do it,” said Schale, a Democrat who supports Meek. “But I wouldn’t put even money on it.” So far, Crist has raised $10 million for his U.S. Senate campaign and has $7.5 million in the bank, a good start but not enough for a full-scale, statewide campaign. Abandoning the Republican banner would bring swift and severe consequences. His already dwindling Republican support would vanish. His campaign staff would likely desert him. Bigdollar GOP donations would dry up. Schale said Crist will have to rely on his strengths _ his talent for working a crowd and connecting with voters. “He’s going to have to lean on his likability and explain to voters how he can be effective shunning the political parties,” Schale said. “He might be the only guy who can pull this off.”


12

DS

>

Classifieds

tuesday april 27, 2010

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services

EMPLOYMENT

CAMPUS LIQUORS HIRING PART-TIME EVENINGS. SEE BILLY AFTER 3:00PM. SUMMER HIRE: YMCA is taking applications for Camp Counselors, Swimming Instructors and Lifeguards. For an application go to www.gfymca.org. Free membership to all employees. Ph: 7752586. LOOKING FOR SUMMER EMPLOYMENT? Enjoy day hours, M-F with weekly paychecks. Must have driver’s license & vehicle. Would like to start training asap and can work around school schedule. Pick up application at Merry Maids: 1407 24th Ave. S. Entrance H. 775-6778. THE BRONZE BOOT is now accepting applications for weekend server and hostess/cashier. Please apply in person at 1804 North Washington Street. SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: Counselors, speech and occupational therapists and aides, reading instructors, recreation, crafts and waterfront personnel needed for a summer camp in North Dakota, working with children with special needs. Salary plus room and board. Contact: Dan Mimnaugh, Camp Grassick, Box F, Dawson, ND 58428. 701-327-4251; email grasbek@bektel.com

SERVICES HAD SEX? HAVE QUESTIONS? PREGNANT? NEED HELP? We are here for you. FREE and 100% confidential. Pregnancy test, first trimester ultrasound, options counseling. Education on pregnancy, abortion, STD’s. Women’s Pregnancy Center, 11 South 4th Street, Suite 210, Grand Forks. 746-8866. Hours: Mon-Thurs, 9-4:00. Please call for appointment. Visit our website at: http:// www.gfwpc.org

MISCELLANEOUS ELECT RIEMERS SHERIFF. Supports gun rights but will not carry a gun as sheriff and will allow deputies that choice as well. More citizen protection and less effort in courthouse security. Paid for by Riemers in his own behalf. Roland-Riemers.com

RENTALS 3-BEDROOM, 1.5 BATH, AIR, FENCED YARD, SHED. SCHULT MOBILE HOME. LARGE DECK. NICE SHAPE. $7,500. 701-772-5708. PARKED IN GATEWAY TERRACE.

Kick-Ass delivers the goods

DS

MOVIE REVIEW

***** > ‘Kick-Ass’

Josh Brorby

The Dakota Student

There’s no doubt about it; Kick-Ass, as promised, doesn’t skip on the violence, profanity, or gleeful attitude it takes toward both. The comic book adaptation premiered April 16th after weeks of speculation by concerned parents, citizens, and do-gooders. How could a studio release a film that is, essentially, a playground for an eleven-year-old killing machine who shows no remorse? Who would pay to see this? Plenty of folks, apparently. Kick-Ass holds no punches, and it doesn’t disappoint. The movie is polarizing, no doubt about it, daring viewers to take a side: either you’re with the over-the-top, Tarantino-would-be-proud violence, or you think eleven-yearold kids shouldn’t be dropping the c-bomb and stabbing people in the face. For the people on director Matthew Vaughn’s side, the movie is an at-times hilarious nerd-fest that fans of the comic will be happy to see. The story focuses on a kid named Dave Lizewski who spends his adolescence the way plenty of teenagers do–staring at a computer screen with his hands in his pants. He’s not a one-trick pony, though. Dave also enjoys reading comic books, talking about comic books, and fantasizing about being a superhero in one of his many comic books. This would probably make for pretty epic entertainment on its own, natch, but luckily for the audience, Dave soon decides to take it upon himself to really become a crime-fighting vigilante. He dons a wetsuit and becomes the eponymous Kick-Ass, and soon he discovers that he’s not the only superhero on the beat. Hit-Girl (played perfectly by young Chloe Moretz) and Big Daddy (a passable Nic Cage) arrive on the scene to show Kick-Ass how business is really taken care of, and from that point onward, the movie delivers on the promises made by the up-in-arms. Kick-Ass definitely went out and earned its R rating (so if you have kids, shy away from this one). The movie is a pretty faithful adaptation of Mark Millar’s comic, despite a few small changes. (Spoiler: for fans expecting HitGirl to pull out “Condition Red” near the end of the film, the powder is expectedly absent.) Some ar-

MCT CAMPUS

gue that the film fails as a parody of the superhero/comic-book movie –that Kick-Ass becomes what it is at first toying around with. The film, though, does take some creative liberties near the finale that perhaps allow it to remain fully in parody mode.

I won’t drop another spoiler, though, so viewers will have to decide for themselves whether or not Kick-Ass keeps itself outside the realm of seriousness. One thing is for certain: the movie never fails to entertain. If you can handle blood, ultraviolence, and gratu-

itous swearing (and, lest I forget, awkward teenage encounters with sexuality), then Kick-Ass is right for you.

DS

> Josh Brorby is the Features Editor for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joshua.brorby@und.edu


DS >

scores & schedules

Baseball

tuesday april 27, 2010

> Inside:

sports

NDSU-UND scheduling update and womens softball drops two versus USD, pg. 14.

UND: 6 UND: 5 UND: 20 UND: 7 NYT: 11 NYT: 11 NYT: 19 NYT: 3

Softball UND: 3 UND: 6 USD: 4 USD: 8

Track & @ SDSU Twilight Invite, today in Field Brookings, S.D.

After a lengthy 27 game road trip, Sioux return home and ...

SPLIT SERIES

photos by ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student Junior outfielder Josh Ray connects during Sunday’s 7-3 win over New York Technical. This weekend was the first time the Sioux competed at home after a 27 game road trip. Ray scored a run out of three at bats and had no RBI’s.

>

Timothy boger

The Dakota Student

The Sioux wrapped up a four-game series Sunday by earning a split with the New York Tech Bears in their home opening series at Kraft Field in Grand Forks. It had everything, from great pitching performances to one of the greatest hitting expositions in school history? The Bears jumped out early and didn’t look back in the home opener, scoring a trio of runs in each of the fourth and fifth inning. North Dakota starter Zac Salfer was dispatched after four innings of work, and he was given his fourth loss of the season (2-4). The two played a wild and crazy doubleheader Saturday, the excitement of which nearly dwarfed a historic day for first baseman Jake Magner, who hit six home runs in the doubleheader, four in the wild 20-19 victory for the Sioux in the nightcap. Magner, who came into the day with six home runs on the year, hit two home runs in the first game that ended up almost as a carbon copy of Friday night’s game. New York Tech was all over the Sioux pitching staff in an 11-5 victory. It was that nightcap that provided a nail-biting, seesaw battle of a game that was only made more exciting by Magner’s performance. Magner hit four home

runs and drove in nine runs, and his team backed him up to ensure that the historic day was not a losing one. North Dakota scored in every inning but the fifth, and they led 14-3 after four innings. Two late rallies by the Bears would prove to keep the pressure on the Fighting Sioux. New York Tech put up two seven-run innings on the board in the fifth and seventh to keep the game close. Three insurance runs by North Dakota in the 7th and 8th were exactly what they needed, and senior Josh Nelson’s RBI double in the eighth scored the 20th run of the game, the magic number as it would turn out. New York Tech would get a two-run home run in the ninth to bring the game within one, but a groundout ended the game. Magner’s four home runs is a UND record. Five players in Sioux history hit three in a game, the last one being Anthony Brenner in 2007. Magner also broke the record for RBI’s in a game with nine, beating co-holders Troy Wasiloski (2005) and Gabe Dahl (2000) who each hit eight. Sunday was a polar opposite of Saturday night’s slugfest. North Dakota picked up their ninth win of the season largely thanks to sophomore starter David Lind (2-1, 5.40 ERA).

15

SIOUX > page


14

tuesday april 27, 2010

SPORTS

Softball loses series A quick update on Sioux scheduling SIOUX Women drop two against Great West Conference rival South Dakota Coyotes.

>

David richardson The Dakota Student

The Fighting Sioux women’s softball team met the University of South Dakota Coyotes on Saturday, April 24, in the final homestand for the young UND team. Undefeated at home until Saturday, UND’s women have been rapidly improving to meet their tough new competition in Division I. In their second year of D-I athletics, the Fighting Sioux have already won more games in the 2009-2010 season than they won total in 2008-2009. “We’re definitely making steady growth,” said third-year head coach Sami Strinz, adding, “…the girls on the team this year know what it takes to be competing at Division I.” Most of the depth on the Sioux roster comes from underclassmen. All members of the starting pitching rotation are freshmen, with sophomore Erica Younan as the sole returner to the mound from last season. Freshman Emma Gronseth has been especially vital to the team, leading the squad with 112 innings pitched so far this season. “Every time she [Gronseth] gets the ball ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student we have a great chance to win,” said Strinz. Freshman second baseman Cammi Bennett collides with Around the field, youth also a USD defender in the Sioux’s 3-4 loss. Catcher Amber prevails. Redshirted graduate stu- Roth led UND going 2 for 3 in the contest. dent Casie Hanson, who sat out ning, led by a solo home run blast In the second game of the douher senior season in order to play by designated hitter Kenna Olsen bleheader, the final home game for hockey for ( f r e s h m a n ) . the Fighting Sioux, it appeared that UND, senior ... the girls on the USD came the game would follow a similar Kristi Alcorn back at the pace. After taking a 2-0 lead in the and redshirt team this year know last minute, bottom of the 2nd inning, UND junior Amber what it takes to be though, ral- immediately allowed two runs to Roth are the lying in their the Coyotes in the top of the 3rd. only uppercompeting at Divi- final inning In the bottoms of the 5th and 6th, classmen on the to take a one UND appeared to break out, with sion I. team. Younan Sami Strinz run lead. The a run in the 5th and two runs in and outfielder Coyotes retired head coach the final three the 6th. Maggie O’Neal are the only returning sophomores, Sioux batters in order, taking the LOSS > page leaving freshmen to fill the remain- win. ing 13 roster slots. Strinz is excited for the potential of the freshman class, saying, “This group of freshmen will be seniors when we’re finally postseason eligible.” However, Strinz added that the underclassmen have a duty to their teammates this season as well, “We only have two seniors [Hanson and Alcorn] this year; we want to let those two leave on a high note,” remarked Strinz. Although struggling on the road with a 1-15 record, UND has managed to hold its own in neutral-field tournaments (7-13), winning key victories against opponents such as Houston Baptist University and the University of Tulsa. The Fighting Sioux have strongly defended their home field, putting together a 4-2 record at their home of Apollo Field. The final homestand for the Sioux ended the 4-0 undefeated streak that UND had enjoyed at Apollo Field, with the Coyotes taking the first game in a close 4-3 decision. UND held tight to a 3-3 tie going into the top of the 7th in-

15

NDSU UND-Bison rivalry renewed for basketball, other sports, but football uncertain.

>

Brandon Becker The Dakota Student

UND athletic director, Brian Faison, who has said that UND’s application will be discussed in June at a meeting of Summit League officials. If the Sioux get in, they will play the Bison twice a year on the hardwood and in other sports also.

It has been years since the How UND matches up? Fighting Sioux have taken on This is an interesting question, former Fargo rival, NDSU. The as the Bison have completed their series was discontinued in 2004, five-year DI transition period combut men’s basketball is set to re- pared to UND who will be entersume the rivalry this year. ing year three this upcoming fall. A two-year contract was re- And how could we forget NDSU’s cently signed, and the Sioux will remarkable run in their first year of hit the court against NDSU De- postseason eligibility that led to the cember 11 at the Bison Sports school’s first birth in the NCAA DI Arena. tournament? Gene Taylor, NDSU’s athletic Despite losing to Kansas in the director, has said that it’s a possi- first round, NDSU has set the bar bility that the high for UND. game could be If the Sioux It’s no secret that played in the could replicate UND wants to the Bison’s earFargodome. The Sioux join the Summit ly success, the will then host program would League. the Bison in certainly flourthe 2011-2012 Brandon Becker ish, but in sayseason; a date columnist ing that what has not been NDSU did was announced for extremely diffiwhen the game will take place. cult and rare. When December 11 arrives, Summit League update UND will be taking on an estabIt’s no secret that UND wants lished DI program that has been to join the Summit League, and playing a higher level of competithe recent nickname/logo retire- tion consistently for a longer pement will now allow the Sioux a riod of time. With that being said, chance to get in. Summit League CommissionBBALL > page er Tom Douple has spoken with

15


the Dakota Student

13

SPORTS

15

SIOUX > Men win two, lose two to NYT. From page

Lind went the distance, striking out four and allowing just three runs to the Bears’ lineup that had scored 42 runs in the previous three games. North Dakota’s hitters took advantage of timely walks and hits to provide Lind with plenty of breathing room en route to the first complete game of his college career. The Sioux scored two in the second, two in the third, and

three in the fourth inning to bury the Bears (16-16-1, 8-4 in Great West conference play) North Dakota (9-22, 5-7 in conference) will travel to Brookings for a doubleheader on Wednesday against South Dakota State, before returning home for a four-game series against Northern Colorado this weekend.

DS

> Timothy Boger is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.bogert@und.edu

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student Freshman pitcher Emma Gronseth delivers a pitch during a 3-4 loss to conference rival South Dakota. UND went 0 for 2 in the Saturday double header.

LOSS >

From page

14

Buoyed by this lead, UND seemed to have a win in the books. USD clawed back in the 7th again, with a surprising 3-run rally to tie the game at 5-all and take the game into extra innings. After a scoreless 8th inning, the Coyotes lit up for another 3-run rally in the top of the 9th. Freshman Lindy Sippola led a UND comeback in the bottom of

the 9th with a solo home run, but the Sioux failed to complete the comeback, losing by a final score of 6-8. The Fighting Sioux finish the 2009-2010 season on the road, with doubleheader games at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a final series against the University of South Dakota to end the season—a large rivalry for the Fighting Sioux. Before the surprising home

sweep by the Coyotes, Strinz stated, “…there’s definitely a rivalry [against USD]. We’ve been undefeated at home and want to keep it that way.” Following the closure of regular-season play, the team travels to Dallas, Texas on May 16 to compete in the Great West Conference’s tournament.

DS

>David Richardson is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at david.richardsont@und. edu

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student Senior infielder Jabby Bakhit hustles to first base during Sunday’s 7-3 win over New York Technical.


*

16 SPORTS

Spring scrimmage

BBALL > From page

In their final spring game, the UND white defeated UND green 45-36 at the Alerus Center Saturday. Junior quarterback Jake Landry had an easy day with the help of sophomore running back Josh Murray, who compiled three touchdowns for the offense. However, the defense came to play, as the combined totals were 72 tackles, 10 for a loss and three sacks. Leading the way for the defense were Mitch Goertz, Chavon Mackey and Garrison Goodman with five tackles a piece. With the strength of the Sioux relying on the defense, it will be challenged this season with the kickoff of the 2010 season against Idaho on September 2nd in Moscow, Idaho. LEFT: Mitch Sutton evades tacklers during Saturday’s scrimmage. BOTTOM: White defeated green 45-36 during their final spring matchup at the Alerus Center.

14

let’s take an early look at next season’s contest on the court. UND has a tough task at hand as they are losing Travis Bledsoe and Travis Mertens, both seniors this past year. Not only will they lose leadership, but Bledsoe and Mertens were the top two scorers on last year’s team. Derek Benter and Chris Clausen will be the only seniors on next year’s team, which will only have four upperclassmen and will need its younger players to have success. As for the Bison, they are losing four seniors, but will be returning their top two scorers. Michael Tveidt, who played an important role in NDSU’s tournament run two years ago, will be back and will certainly give the Sioux problems along with the rest of the Summit League. Tveidt averaged 15.7 points last season, and Eric Carlson was second behind him with 14.8. Carlson also averaged close to seven rebounds last year as he had a standout sophomore season for the Bison. He and Tveidt are going to be largely responsible for the success or failure of next year’s team. It will be a tough task for UND to beat the Bison this fall, but regardless of what the scoreboard reads when the clock hits zero, it’ll good to see the two teams on the same court together.

DS

tuesday april 27, 2010

> Brandon Becker is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at brandon.becker2@und. edu

photos by ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student

April 27th Issue  

April 27th Issue of the Dakota Student

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you