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School of Aviation laptop program to become optional TECHNOLOGY Future pilots will no longer be required to rent computers from the university.

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brandi jewett

The Dakota Student

Aviation students can expect to see a substantial change in their program next year. After a 12 year run, the mandatory laptop rental program will be discontinued next semester. “We recognized that we needed to change,” stated Peter Schumacher, director of the Aviation Laptop Program. The laptop program was implemented 12 years ago to emphasize computer technology in the classroom and encourage students to “become more tech savvy.” However, according to Schumacher, presently a majority of students have their own laptop and are more aware of how to use it properly than past classes. Currently, many students see the mandatory laptop as an inconvenience. “We conducted a survey,” he explained. “And the results were that 70 percent were in favor of ending the program, 20 percent were against ending it, and ten percent were noncommittal.” With this input from the stu-

dent population, the aviation school agreed it was time to make adjustments and discontinue the program. After the mandatory program ends, Schumacher assures students without laptops that they will not be left without one. “We had to find a way to service those students who didn’t want the program to end.” Under the current mandatory program, aviation students leased a laptop (approximately $1,000 market value) for $340 per semester. An optional laptop program will be offered until spring 2011, allowing students without their own laptops to keep leasing the aviation laptops. The lease rate will remain the same as it has in past semesters on the optional laptops, but student will have the opportunity to keep the laptops once the optional program expires. After the mandatory and optional programs cease, students will be responsible for downloading software onto their personal computers for their classes. However, inconsistency among lesson plans makes it difficult to make specific software downloads mandatory for every student. “One can’t make the statement ‘You need this software for this class.’ because every class is taught differently,” explains Schumacher.

TECH > page

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Orpheus reimagined

See Culture&Media Page 07

MONEY University Campus Parking Committee unanimously votes against increases.

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brandi jewett

The Dakota Student

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Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

fter gathering information through the means of a taskforce and meeting after meeting with various organizations and groups on campus, a recommendation prepared by Tim Lee, head of Parking and Peggy Lucke, associate vice president for Finance and Operations, to raise parking permits prices was defeated by a unanimous vote during a University Campus Parking Committee (UCPC) meeting Wednesday morning. The recommendation would have raised prices substantially. Residence hall students and

commuting students would see their permit prices increase 35 percent to $155 next fall. Faculty and staff would see a 50 dollar or approximately 29 percent increase. In meetings with the Association of Residence Halls and Student Senate, Peggy Lucke told students that these prices would remain as such until 2014. In a report distributed at these meetings, with the price increase the projected revenue for parking rises from $1, 267,337 to an estimated $1,671,140 in fiscal year 2011. The recommendation now goes to Vice President for Finance and Operations Alice Brekke, who would make the final decision on whether the price increase is the right choice for the university. “It’s a really tough position for her to be in,” commented Student Body President Matt Bakke,

PARK > page

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Journalist speaks at UND Grand Forks gets

charitable next week

PRESENTATION Fargo native Roxana Saberi shares her experiences as a prisoner in Iran.

PHILANTHROPY KAT, DTD and Relay For Life raise money and awareness for various causes.

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brenlee loewen

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The Dakota Student

Roxana Saberi, acclaimed author of Between Two Worlds and self-proclaimed spokesperson for unjustly held Iranian prisoners, spoke to community members and students at the Chester Fritz Auditorium Monday evening. First telling her own story, then participating in a question and answer period, the story of Saberi’s imprisonment captivated those in attendance. Saberi, an Iranian-American, was working as a freelance journalist in Iran when she was arrested suddenly and without just

Andrew scott

The Dakota Student

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student UND law professor Greg Gordon interviewed Roxana Saberi at the Chester Fritz Auditorium Monday night.

cause in January of 2009. Accused of espionage and working for the American government, Saberi was mentally tortured and eventually admitted to the false charges against her. “At first when people would ask if I was tortured I would

say no,” Saberi said. “But then some human rights activists told me about ‘white torture,’ which doesn’t leave a mark on the body but can devastate the mind and

IRAN > page

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It’s a triple team charity event this weekend and next at UND with Relay For Life, Rally for Romans and KAT at Bat. Leading off is the Relay for Life cancer walk Friday, April 23 at the Hyslop Sports Center starting at 7 p.m. So far, 207 participants and 26 teams have registered. $6,897 has already been raised; their fundraising goal is to reach $35,000. Relay For Life supports the American Cancer Society. The

event is a life-changing one that gives everyone in communities across the globe a chance to celebrate the lives of people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost and fight back against the disease. At Relay For Life, teams of people camp out and take turns walking or running around a track. Each team is asked to have a representative on the track at all times during the event. Because cancer never sleeps, relays are overnight events up to 24 hours in length. Each year, more than 3.5 million people in 5,000 communities in the United States, along with additional communities in

DTD > page

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DS datebook 02

friday april 23, 2010

DATEBOOK

The Dakota Student editorial

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Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: dakotastudent.com

correction

> In an article in last Tuesday’s edition covering a recent art opening at the Hughes Fine Arts Center we misattributed quotes provided by Stephanie Clark and Brandi Helm, artists with displays at the venue. Quotes attributed to Ms. Helm were said by Ms. Clark, and vice versa. We regret and apologize for the error; appropriate corrections will be made in the online edition at dakotastudent.com.

> Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features

Comment

friday, april 23, 2010 > reading: Northword undergraduate reading series, a showcase of UND students’ creative writing pieces. At 4:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. Free and open to public; reception will follow. > relay: American Cancer Society’s 6th Annual Relay For Life at UND, in the Hyslop Sports Arena (all day). Relay For Life is the flagship program of ACS, and focuses on raising funds for cancer research and other advocacy work. Tell us what is happening on campus > Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

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Tell us what you think: Where do you stand on fees for parking at UND?

> Raise ‘em; gotta pay the bond somehow > They can find other sources > Just wait until I’m gone > Who drives to campus? Vote now on our website as well as leave feedback on www.dakotastudent.com > The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

Editor-in-Chief Michael Thomas > michael.thomas@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Mitch Molstad > mitchell.molstad@und.edu News Editor Allison Krause > allison.krause@und.edu Features Editor Derek Scott > derek.scott2@und.edu Sports Editor Alison Kelly > alison.kelly@und.edu Photo Editor Andy Ciulla > andrew.ciulla@und.edu Media Editor Luke Johnson > luke.m.johnson@und.edu

business

Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Natalie Cassell > natalie.cassell@und.edu Ryan Senn > ryan.senn@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677 All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

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> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.

The DS has launched a new website!

Visit DakotaStudent.com, and Join The Conversation.


the Dakota Student

Young Professionals hold first GP Summit BUSINESS Great Plains group will be meeting this June at Bismarck State College.

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Brenlee Loewen The Dakota Student

On June 3, 2010 the Great Plains Young Professionals Summit (GPYPS) will take place in Bismarck, North Dakota. This three-day event is hosted by the Bismarck-Mandan Young Professionals Network and was designed to allow young professionals from around the area to come ask questions, develop their skills and learn how to make the most of their abilities. “The Great Plains Young Professionals Summit was created to bring together young professionals to focus on personal and professional development, enhancE one’s leadership skills, and SHOW the importance of

giving back to our communities,” and Professionally,’ and our proaccording to the GPYPS website. gram includes presenters that “Nationally and internationally will touch on all three areas. Our recognized speakers are lined up program committee sought after to share their expertise with at- speakers who would inspire our tendees of the summit.” audience and help us accomplish Included as keynote speakers these goals. Our three keynote in the event speakers have are Michael earned interIt is our hope that national recSolberg, president for the attendees will be ognition and COO of their work able to define and and we are State Bank & Trust in excited enhance their career very Fargo, ND, to hear their goals. Susan Powpresentaer, an intertions.” nationally Kicking Jerry Haas recognized off the sumchairman, GPYPS mit on June author and teacher and 3, Solberg Joel Kotkin, known for his au- will discuss his achievements thority on global, economic and and how he reached them in his social trends. line of work. Jerry Haas, chairman of the Haas explained, “Solberg will GPYPS, explained the rationale speak about redefining success behind choosing the speakers. for young professionals through “The theme of our summit is his own company’s formula for ‘Thriving Civically, Personally, success, which has grown his or-

ganization into one of the largest independent banks in the Midwest.” On June 4, Power will offer a “bold and innovative approach for imagining the future of work as society moves into the Conceptual Age,” Haas described. Finally, on June 5, Kotkin will conclude the summit speaking about a 2050 America and how young professionals will be influenced as those changes take place. These three are not the only speakers to present; several other influential professionals will be available to lead sessions and answer the questions of summitgoers. “The Great Plains Young Professionals Summit is focused on professional development, so it is our hope that the attendees will be able to define and enhance their career goals,” Haas added. The summit is geared toward young professionals from 21 to 39 years old living in the Great Plains Region. “We have invited young professionals from North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana, Minnesota, Saskatchewan and Manitoba,” Haas explained. “The summit will be the perfect opportunity to network with other young people from around our state and region.” Great Plains Young Professionals Summit will be held on the Bismarck State College campus at the National Energy Center of Excellence. Registration begins on May 3. For more information visit the GPYPS website at www.CPYPsummit.com.

DS

> Brenlee Loewen is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brenlee.loewen@und.edu

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author’s name

The Dakota Student

NEWS

PARK >

From page

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who attended the meeting and voted on the recommendation. He and current Association of Residence Halls President Remington Zacher were the only two students serving on the committee. “I was very happy with the decision,” stated Bakke. “I walked out of the room with a smile on my face.” He explained that while on the campaign trail for his current position, he listened to many students voice their concerns, the biggest of which was the current parking situation on campus. Bakke says keeping permit prices where they are was his biggest goal when he joined the committee. Tim Lee of Parking believes he and those working with him on the recommendation did an excellent job of preparing. “We worked hard on preparing the report,” he stated. He now worries that if Brekke chooses not to raise prices then proper repairs will not be able to be made on parking surfaces around the campus. “It takes a significant amount of money to maintain them,” he explains. “This is a point of concern.” Bakke on the other hand believes that if students could be assured their money was going to directly benefit them and their parking situation then they would be more accepting of the increase. “As long as we see something being changed and the prices being raised to fix the lot, then I think students would be more understanding,” he said. “Instead most believe any money raised would be used to pay off the ramp.” Bakke would like to see alternatives for acquiring funding explored next year with the creation of a committee whose objective would be to investigate these options. The committee would be composed of students, faculty, and staff but it would still allow “student voices to be heard”. If permit prices are increased, he believes fewer students will purchase permits and a lot more will be complaining. He believes that naming the parking ramp and advertising in it are two ways to bring in money. Another would be increasing the price of parking during special events. He would also like to see UCPC call on business majors on campus and allow them to gain experience in their field of study by creating a successful business plan for Parking. “We’re one of the top business schools in the country. I think it would be great if we could use these people’s expertise in this matter.” Whether prices are raised or not remains to be seen. However, next fall students will have a new option in paying for their permits. During the first three weeks of the semester students will be able to put their permits on their financial aid instead of having to pay up front, alleviating some of the stress on their checkbooks.

DS

> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu


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commentary

friday april 23, 2010

DS View Parking fees

STATIC? Prices may go unchanged, but bills will need to be paid eventually. The UND parking committee’s recent decision to not recommend an inflation of the price of parking permits next year is a victory to many students who avoided purchasing a permit this year in protest of the rapidly climbing costs. The assurance that parking costs will remain the same next year is a relief, but we must be aware that UND’s parking system is still paying for its recent developments—in particular, the ramp. And those debts will need to be paid eventually. As such, next year’s permit fee’s standstill, if that is the end result, will only delay the inevitable. The ramp and any future developments to UND’s parking system will be paid for by the funds collected from parking permit fees, so the rates are likely to rise eventually. However, given the current economic situation, a hold on the inflation will help students deal with the cost of attending at UND. UND charges $115 for most of their student permits, which is less than NDSU, where a parking pass costs $125. MSU Moorhead charges $100 per year, and University of Minnesota at Crookston charges $68 for an unreserved parking permit and $110 for a reserved pass. The lowest, however, is Minot State University, which charges only $30 for a reserved parking pass annually and only $20 for an unreserved space permit. Although UND’s rates are on the higher end of the spectrum in the area, they are nothing compared to the rates at some campuses in metropolitan areas. For example, Columbia University in New York City charges $150 to $400 each month for parking. While larger cities offer more public transportation options than Grand Forks, the high parking rates put pressure on students to utilize alternative means of transportation. This leads to more students carpooling, biking, taking the bus, or walking, depending on their distance from campus, which in turn leads to a more environmentally-friendly student body. However, the students who reside off campus have no other way to campus other than their own vehicle, and this leaves them with no other option but to purchase a rather expensive permit. With few zones available to park that do not require a permit, students who want to drive their own car to campus are forced to go the permit route. The expense of parking will always be an annoying burden, but it is pretty much unavoidable. The debt that has been accrued during renovations and maintenance eventually needs to be paid off, and permits are one way to tackle the issue. It remains to be seen how UND will solve the parking problem, and until then students will have to decide between paying the price for convenience or choosing an alternative means to campus.

Editorial Board Michael Thomas Editor-in-Chief Mitch Molstad Opinion Editor Allison Krause News Editor

Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

Letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

UND elevator gone awry

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Sara Tezel

The Dakota Student

Last week I briefly mentioned a list of my fears. This column will go into detail about an incident involving one of the things I forgot to mention: elevators. Now, being afraid of elevators may seem a little immature for a college student who generally chooses to forgo the two flights of stairs up to my car. Usually, when I’m alone at night and headed up the ramp, I tell myself that the safest option is riding the elevator. Being female, I’ve learned that creepos can hide in the dark corners of stairways, waiting to catch me unawares as I dig through my purse looking for car keys or some other object that distracts me from being fully aware of my surroundings. That being said, my decision to take the elevator is usually one based on personal safety

(read: paranoia) instead of laziness, because even someone as unfit as myself can usually trek up three flights of stairs without losing his or her breath. The incident that changed my stance on elevators, especially in Grand Forks where no building is higher than maybe six stories, happened this past Monday after my night class got out. It had been a long day so my choice to ride the elevator with a classmate was probably just as much about safety as it was about being tired. We rode up to the third floor together, where I bid her adieu as she exited the elevator. I stayed on because my car was waiting for me one floor up, right next to the door in a primo parking spot. The doors shut, separating me from my blonde friend, and I waited patiently for the elevator to go up one more level. And I waited. And I waited. The elevator did not move. Now, I,

being a level-headed individual, did not panic immediately. I did not imagine the elevator plummeting to the ground, my body mangled as every bone in my body shot out of my skin like in some gruesome horror flick. I did not imagine that the air would slowly turn into carbon dioxide as I took in all of the fresh oxygen and my body converted it (like a boss). No, I stayed calm and hit the button for level five. Again, nothing happened. At this point, I hit button two, and one, and the button for the basement. I was frozen on floor three so I thought the logical thing to do, other than scream and carve my last will and testament into the sides of the elevator with my fingernails, would be to hit the “open” button. Alarms started going off. Now if I thought I was uptight

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SARA > page

Letter: Proud to be at UND

As Program Manager for UND’s Center for Human Rights & Genocide Studies, and President, Master of Public Administration Student Organization, I had the privilege over the last 8 months to lead and organize the efforts to get Roxana Saberi to speak at UND, culminating in a very successful event last Monday night. I learned a lot about UND in that time frame, especially since I am not from this area. What I learned over this last year, is that UND is much more than any logo or nickname. UND is a community. It is a diverse community of students and faculty; administration and staff; athletes and veterans; artists and scholars; students who come from around the world and alumni who have gone around the world; we are local students and distance students; we are a part of Grand Forks and they are a part of us. It is this UND community that made the Between Two Worlds: A Discussion with Roxana Saberi event a tremendous success. We provided Roxana the largest crowd that she had ever

presented in-front of, and in-turn – for those who missed it at the book signing – the Grand Forks Mayor came unexpectedly from his City Council Meeting to present Roxana with a Key to the City, and to proclaim that Grand Forks had declared April 19, 2010 – Roxana Saberi Day. The event was a success not because of the work of a few but because so many members of the UND community came together and worked together to make it so. So, I would like to take a moment, and try to recognize all of the different parts of our community who helped make this event what it was. First, we have our four co-sponsors of the event: the Center for Human Rights & Genocide Studies; the Master of Public Administration Student Organization; the Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee; and the University Programming Committee. Also, I would like to thank the Student Government; the Student Senate; the UND Foundation; the Office of the Vice President for Student and Outreach Services; the Memorial Union Administrative Offic-

es; the Office of the General Counsel; Accounting Services; UND Dining Services; the Student Involvement Office; the Office of Student Organizations; The Chester Fritz Auditorium; UND Catering; UND Parking Office; UND Police Department; Burtness Theater; Sign & Design; UND Duplicating; the Office of the President of UND; University Relations; the College of Business and Public Administration; The UND Bookstore; The Dakota Student; Studio-One; the Mayor of Grand Forks; the Grand Forks City Council; The Grand Forks Herald; WDAZ; all the businesses that allowed us to post the event; all the members of UND and the greater Grand Forks community who showed up to make the event a success. What did I learn from this experience? I learned what it means to be a part of the UND Community. I learned what it means to have pride in UND. I learned that I am: Proud to Be – UND. Dan Sylvester A Proud Member of the UND Community


the Dakota Student

COMMENTARY

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Open door for ordination of women > EMILY HILL

Dakota Student

Sitting down to read the April 12th issue of Newsweek, I was surprised to see the face of Virgin Mary featured on the cover. Her eyes are reverently looking directly at her audience and the words below her say “What would Mary do?” The featured article, entitled “A Woman’s Place Is in the Church,” combated the rising issue of sexual-abuse in the Catholic Church. The author of the article suggested that in order to help solve the continuing abuse of children, women must be allowed to become a part of the Church’s hierarchy—specifically, the priesthood. Although I agree that acknowledgment and consequences need to be brought about when dealing with these past and present sexual abuses, I am not convinced that the remedy is all in the hands of women. The sad fact is that abuse could still occur even if women were participating in a greater capacity. Women can abuse power just as men can. But I do agree with the author’s main sentiment, that yes, the stained glass ceiling of the Church needs to

break open for 21st century women to take equal ownership in their Church. For quite some time I have been dissatisfied with my standing as a woman in the Church. It started when I was a little girl sitting during mass, wanting to become a priest when I grew up. Since then, I’ve matured a bit and realized that I am not personally called to this holy profession; however, I remain frustrated with the archaic view on women and their position in the Church. When writing my undergraduate thesis, the most common response for when I asked various priests why women could not be ordained was that it is not about being “called,” it is about being “chosen.” But there are many women out there who truly believe they are chosen by God to fulfill this role in the priesthood. However, the Catholic Church still does not “choose” women. The Church has continually ignored the achievements of women in the modern age. Women are now integrated within the workforce and public, and even in some cases, religious life. In the United States, 50 million women work full-time and

in the European Union that number is increased to 68 million. Within most Protestant denominations, this fight over women in the ministerial role was fought and lost a half a century ago. Lutheran women in Denmark were granted ordination rights in 1948. The first woman to be ordained an Episcopalian priest gained this achievement in 1976. So why is the Catholic Church so behind? Richard Sipe, a former

...the Bible paves the way for women excelling to leadership within church governance.

Emily Hill columnist

priest who has spend three decades studying the gender-power dynamics within the Church, critiques the Church in the modern world saying, “What other culture do you know of that’s all male, theoretically and practically?” As it stands, the Church’s opinion about women and the priesthood is this: women are not made of the correct matter

in order to successfully be ordained. However, where does this justification come from? Surprisingly, it is not the Bible. In the Bible, Jesus did not say anything about the roles women should play in the future. In fact, if anything, the Bible paves the way for women excelling to leadership within church governance. The Bible displays Mary Magdalene as the loyal follower of Jesus and promoter of his ministry. Women are the first witnesses to the Resurrection, and it is Mary Magdalene who proclaims the news to Jesus’ male apostles. Paul refers to many female apostles and deacons in his letter to the Romans: Phobe, Prisca, Tryphena, Tryphosa, and Junia. So where is it written that women cannot participate in the priesthood? It is in the humanly created rules decided upon by Church governance. However, it is safe to say there have been major strides for Catholic women with the occurrence of the Second Vatican Council in the 1960s: women now can be lectors, liturgical and music ministers, and communion and alter servers. But even though they can participate more fully within the mass,

the Church still refuses to consider their ordination in a time where ordained priests are in need. But it is now time to take notice of the large gap between the Church’s humanly created principles and the functional reality of the modern age in which we live. Statistics show that 60 percent of American mass attendees are women and they contribute to $6 billion a year to the weekly collection plate. The number of nuns outnumber priests quite dramatically, however they are still in a mostly “invisible” or fairly “silent” position within the Church. And as priest vocations fall in cascading numbers in the U.S., 80 percent of parish ministries are up and running because of the work by parish women. As it stands, because of the nature of our modern age and Church right now, female ordination seems inevitable. But for right now, as the late Sister Yvonne of the Fargo Presentation Sisters once said to me, “Women are at the back door of ordination. But once it opens, we will be there.”

DS

> Emily is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at emily.hill@und.edu

Discover yourself abroad Poor logo reaction

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MARTIN ROTTLER

The Dakota Student

People of the University Of North Dakota, it’s time to get the hell out of Grand Forks. It’s high time we cast away any attachment to the city, state, and region. We’ve spent enough time here…it’s time to go forth and experience the larger world, a place without funny accents and lefse. Since 2006, I’ve used this opinion column as part-travelogue. As I’ve made the conscious effort to journey around the world, I made it a point to share my experiences with you. In some measure, I hope that the stories I’ve shared—be it a grandmother’s dinner in Bogota, drinking on the steps of a piazza in Florence, or going to Norway for 22 hours—both entertain and inspire those that read them. There is a certain entertainment that comes from watching people see and experience new things abroad. It’s why the Travel Channel is so popular. Watching Samantha Brown or Rick Steves wander the quaint streets of some far-flung European city or Andrew Zimmern chow down on whichever animal-genital or insect might be the local delicacy du jour in a random Asian country is fun to watch. What we Americans see on these shows is out of the ordinary and often beyond our realm of comprehension, especially when we consider just how young various parts of our own country are. It’s also funny to watch people squirm when Zimmern chows down on the testicles of a random animal native to country x. Why do I advocate the entire city, state and region’s departure? It’s one thing to watch a Travel Channel show, it’s a completely different thing to actually go out and experience the world for oneself. This is a hard hurdle for people to get over. A 2008 US Government Accountability Office report estimates that only 28 percent of the US population has a passport. Without a passport, it’s impossible to leave the United States. While there is something to be said for traveling within our great country, the insights gained on a trip to somewhere with a completely different culture and, in most cases, language, trump anything you might gain from a trip within the USA. I’ve made it known in prior articles that I would like to be Anthony Bourdain when I

grow up. His No Reservations television show is the closest I’ve come to replicating my own travel experiences around the world. Tony is living the dream; to him, it’s not just a trip, it’s a journey. Each step of the way we are along side him as he checks out local food, drinks local beverages, and meets people. His show truly embodies all that is good in travel—no package tours to Mexican resorts located behind armed guard or places that serve watereddown American food (ordering a cheeseburger in France is asking for a beat-down by the travel-minded such as myself). It’s the closest you can come to actually being there. I’ve traveled to 23 countries, 40 states, and several Canadian provinces in 23 years of life on this earth. The first number alone sets me apart from the majority of people in the United States, often by a large number— yet, I have friends from Australia that have done that in a year. Other nations’ cultures place a huge value on travel. This non-insular thinking ranges from the common “gap-year” amongst my Canadian and Australian friends to the requirement that a friend from Sweden leave the country for a year as her parents were going to kick her out of their house whether she liked it or not. Travel changes perspectives. It enlightens, teaches and entertains. By going elsewhere, I have gained a better perception of myself, my origins and my country. These insights come from getting lost in Europe, doing things out-of-the-ordinary, and trying new foods and drinks. While the blood sausage I ate in Colombia might have looked disgusting, by trying it I extended my cultural palette and found a unique taste unlike anything I’ve found elsewhere. It’s far too easy for we Americans to resort to what’s comfortable—our surroundings, food and culture. People always ask how I’m able to go the places I go. The answer, while not enough for some, is simple: it’s a matter of priorities. I value the experience, prioritize my life and save. I’m also not afraid to do something highly unusual. I’ll say it again: Grand Forks, get the hell out of here!

DS

> Martin is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He/She can be reached at martin.rottler@und. edu

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HEATHER JACKSON The Dakota Student

There have been several articles in the Dakota Student since the State Board retired the logo. Since I have always identified with the anti-logo side, I never had much to say. I felt the logo was/is racist and thought the argument ended at that. As I am sure I have stated in a few articles in the past, I am white and I do not have to experience racism. I do not know what it is like to be an Indigenous/Native student on campus. My whiteness gives me privilege to NOT experience that. Did I choose this? No, but that is how our culture and society is. People gain privileges that they may not see. However, I have been schooling myself on white privilege and making it a point to understand racism (in the ways I can). Since the retirement of the logo, some friends of mine who do not live in Grand Forks asked me how the campus was doing since the logo was retired. One in particular asked because she wanted to come to the Time Out events last week. She was worried about security, and since she is not white and against the logo, that was a main concern of hers. I told her some of the things I had witnessed and what I felt the environment was like. I also told her about the recent marches and photo by Sitting Bull. Sadly, she decided not to go to an event she looks forward to every year. Last year, there was no funding to provide for the Pow Wow, so she did not attend last year for obvious reasons. The reason I wanted to write about this issue is that she is probably not the only person who made that choice. The fact that she chose not to come (and told other people not to based on the email I sent her) because of the backlash on campus from the retirement of the logo is a huge failure for UND. People in surrounding communities did not feel safe enough to attend events on UND’s campus. I am sure some people on campus feel the same way. How does this

make our campus look? As I stated in an article I wrote a couple weeks ago (an article that went to press before the retirement was announced), this issue is not isolated to Grand Forks. While I am not from Grand Forks, I understand people have tied the logo to the tradition of the community the city. However, this is not isolated to Grand Forks. People all over the country are paying attention. It is being blogged about and has been on national news. The backlash from mostly white students is being noted. People are paying attention. People are looking beyond how the logo is attached to the so-called tradition of Grand Forks, and seeing it as racist and appropriating the culture of indigenous tribes, especially when photos pop up of white students in “indigenous” clothing or when extremely racist comments about financial aid and reservations are made. I have seen many of these photos on Facebook, unfortunately, and I am sure many other people have, too. Wasn’t it just in 2007 that a sorority had a “Cowboys and Indians” theme party? Amber Annis wrote an article in response to the party, “Shame on Gamma Phi” (3/28/08), comparing the party theme to blackface. I agree, and I would make that comparison to the photos I have seen from “Sioux” parties all over the Internet. These “Indian” theme parties certainly pay no respect to any indigenous tribe. This backlash continues to give UND, the students, the faculty and the staff an awful reputation. In conversation, many people have stated they are embarrassed to attend UND. The backlash seems to be the only focus in the news or on the blogs that UND has. UND is a university, a school, a learning institution – wouldn’t we want to focus the attention on those things rather than on the racist, reactionary backlash over the retirement of the logo?

DS

> Heather is a columnist for The Dakota Stu-

dent. She can be reached at heather.jackson@ und.edu


06

friday april 23, 2010

NEWS

IRAN >

From page

1

conscience. It’s a combination of manipulation and intimidation, threats, solitary confinement and cutting people off from the outside world.” After Saberi renounced her confession and made public her

DTD >

From page

1

protest of innocence, she was sentenced to eight years in prison during an Iranian court hearing. Saberi explained how hard it was to face the thought of spending the next years of her life in prison. “I started to cry and then I told myself, ‘Roxana, you have to pull yourself together. It doesn’t help when you think about those

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student

19 other countries, gather to take part in this global phenomenon and raise much-needed funds and awareness to save lives from cancer. For more information e-mail Laurel Hurst at laurel.hurst@und.edu Next up Delta Tau Delta Fraternity will be teaming up with Alpha Chi Omega Sorority hosting their annual charitable volleyball tournament, “Rally for Romans” April 23, 24 and 25. They will be raising money for Michael Romans of Hallock, Minnesota. Romans is a 49-year-old man diagnosed with Primary Lateral Sclerosis (PLS), a form of Lou Gehrig’s disease. Last year Delta Tau Delta raised nearly $5,000 for local community members in need with their annual haunted house and volleyball tournament.

Teams can register from Friday up until the first game at 4 p.m. for $12 per-person including an event t-shirt, or buy additional shirts for $6 each. Play is five-on-five with an optional alternate for each team. Prizes will be awarded for the top winning teams. Call Thomas Connelly to sign up for a team at (781) 799-1499. In addition to the volleyball tournament, be sure to bring your car for the carwash Saturday, and your test your luck at the 50/50 raffle. Burgers, hot dogs, cookies and soda will be available for sale at the event. Then, catch the grand slam the next weekend for Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority’s “KAT at Bat” softball tournament on Saturday and Sunday, May 1-2, in University Park. All proceeds will go to Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children (CASA), which was created in 1977 to assure that abused and

things you can’t have. It doesn’t help to think about the world beyond these walls or about the past.’ I knew what I had done was right. Recanting my false confession was right.” After several months of international public support and pressure from Barack Obama’s administration, an Iranian appeals court proclaimed Saberi innocent and she was released on May 11, 2009. Saberi expressed how hard it was to be the only one leaving the prison, “I looked over my shoulder and the prison disappeared and finally I wept, but my tears were not tears of joy for my freedom. They were tears of sorrow for the many prisoners of conscience I was leaving behind— prisoners whose only crimes were to peacefully stand up for basic human rights.” Since then, Saberi has been speaking out against Iran’s prisoners of conscience—people held in captivity because of their race, religious beliefs or those in resistance to the results of the 2009 Iranian Presidential Election. Saberi reinforced this saying, “I wish I was never imprisoned but I do believe that this biggest challenge in my life also offered me neglected children are represented in the judicial system. The event starts at 1 p.m. on both days, and is free and open to the public. Free-will donations will be accepted on the days of the event and vendors will be selling shirts and food items. Teams must have a minimum of nine players up to a maximum of 12 players, and the cost for entering the tournament is $45 per team. Call Ashley Vick at (612) 240-8979 to sign up for a team. Last year, more than 68,000 CASA volunteers served more than 240,000 abused and neglected children through 1,018 program offices. CASA volunteers have helped more than two million abused children since that first program was established in 1977.

DS

> Andrew Scott is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. He can be reached at andrew.scott@und.edu

the largest opportunity of my life. It also gave me a responsibility to use my book as an opportunity to join others and to use the freedom that we have to speak out for those people who are struggling to make their own voices heard.” Throughout the evening, Saberi issued several pleas for support against unfair arrests. “The efforts of ordinary people also make a huge difference. We have to show Iran’s authorities that they can not get away with unjust imprisonment and torture.” She said, “Many others are still in detention today.” She challenged those in attendance to visit websites that support human rights, talk to their government representatives and sign petitions. “People can take part in rallies, they can sign petitions and take part in Internet and letter writing organizations. They can contribute to human rights groups such as Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and International Campaign for Human Rights,” said Saberi. “You can also write to your lawmakers asking them to pay more attention to human rights violations in Iran and other countries.” For more information on imprisoned journalists check out the Reporters Without Borders website at www.rsf.org or go to www.oursocietywillbeafreesociety.org to sign a petition to free writers and journalists in Iran.

DS

> Brenlee Loewen is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brenlee.loewen@und.edu

SARA >

From page

4

about being stuck before, my anxiety levels shot through the roof. Visions of my mangled and broken corpse officially entered my head. I started to take quick and shallow breaths as the walls began to close in on me. I tried to recall what those “Worst Case Scenario” books said about surviving an elevator crash. I remembered something about spreading your limbs out, lying on the ground in a position resembling an X. Instead of covering the elevator floor with my body, I sat in the corner, held on to my book bag for dear life and fought back tears as I reflected on my short, meaningless life. After five minutes of sheer terror, the elevator (or God, because after this incident I now believe in a higher power) decided it was time to send me on my way. I sat in my car and tried to figure out how to make use of this second chance I was given. I envisioned feeding blind orphans, picking garbage up on the side of the highway and starting a shoe drive for children in Africa. Once the ideas for becoming a better person stopped coming, I started my SUV and drove off into the sunset, toxic fumes trailing behind me as the made their way into the sunset.

DS

> Sara is a columnist for The Dakota

Student. She can be reached at sara. tezel@und.edu


DS

culture&media >

friday april 23, 2010

Inside: Falcons find a new home at UND

Hard to pronounce, Fun to watch THEATRE Department ends dramatic season with a modern update on a Greek classic.

>

DEREK SCOTT

The Dakota Student

The UND Theatre Arts Department is ending their season, tragically. Eurydice (yur-ID-ihsee), which debuted April 20th and runs until April 24, is based on the original Greek tragedy of the same name. The production was directed by the department’s own Kathleen McLennan and based of the work off Sara Ruhl. First off, don’t let the name Eurydice throw you off, it’s not set in ancient Greece, and there are no costumed satyrs. The play is set in modern times, and the audience is given the old myth from a fresh perspective, Eurydice’s point of view. Without giving to much away, Eurydice (played by Megan Lonski) is speaking with her famous musician boyfriend, Orpheus (played by Philip Muehe) about being his muse and getting married, I think. I got there just as it started and saw the first scene from the TV in the lobby. Funny story: while standing in the lobby, I was joined by two Red

Lake Falls women who had driven from Minnesota to see the play, only to arrive and be informed they were a whole day early. The Theatre Department was kind enough to let them watch the dress rehearsal for free, and kudos to them for doing so. I’m also going to assume those women drove home that night happy, knowing the show was definitely worth the drive. Personally, I thought Eurydice was funny, for a tragedy. When Eurydice, for reasons you’ll have to find out for yourself, loses her brainy book-smarts and forgets how to cry, read or love, things get really humorous. “I tried to cry, but I couldn’t remember how, I just drooled.” Orpheus however, that poor guy, he doesn’t get one happy moment throughout the entire play. Later on, after Eurydice has forgotten how to read, she resorts to standing on things. Lonski really did a great job with her character–switching from really brainy to completely daft, then back to brainy must have been difficult, not to mention being the play’s namesake, main character, and having to die twice. Luckily, there is a great supporting cast helping her out. She is eventually tricked away from

Orpheus by a “Nasty Interesting Man,” (played by Benjamin Klifel) and then some poetic tragedy befalls her. [Spoiler Alert] Once she takes the world’s saddest elevator to the land of the dead, she is joined by the stones, Lukas Skjaret, Chris Ibarra, Alyssa Thompson, Amy Driscoll and Chris Berg. The various stones each have their own style and theme, kind of like if the seven dwarfs were rocks, and their cottage was river Styx adjacent. Orpheus and Eurydice have only a few brief moments together in the whole play. Eurydice spends much more time with her father (Hyrum Patterson) in her bedroom made entirely from string. Their dialogue is deep and meaningful, but not hard to follow; they certainly aren’t speaking Greek (I had to). The play starts at 7:30 (get there early!) and will be performed tonight at the Burtness theatre, and once more Saturday night at the same time. The UND Theatre Art department has done a great job this year, and if you haven’t been able to check out their other productions, see this last one while there is still time.

DS

> Derek Scott is the features editor for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at derek.scott2@und.edu


08 CULTURE&MEDIA

A new roost WILDLIFE Two falcons return to campus on the UND water tower near the Hyslop.

>

SHELBY THORLACIUS The Dakota Student

They are the fastest creatures on the planet, reaching speeds of 200 miles per hour, and two of them are right here on campus. This year two Peregrine Falcons are nesting on the UND water tower for the first time in this university’s history. They had previously been nesting on the “Smiley” water tower, but as we all know, it has been taken down. So, last fall their nest was moved to its new location, with hope that the birds would find it, and thankfully, they did. It was moved with the efforts of avid bird watcher Tim Driscoll. The two resident falcons are named Roosevelt, a male, and Terminator, a female. They lived on smiley in 2009 as well, but before winter came, they fled. Driscoll moved their nest, and Smiley came down. This has been the third year that Grand Forks has hosted perigrine falcons, and Roosevelt has not always been the dominating male. In 2008 Terminator had an other mate named Bear. In 2008 while living on the smiley water tower, Bear and Terminator gave birth to a baby falcon named Ozzie. He was named Ozzie after the man who painted the smiley face on the old water tower, James W.

“Ozzie” Osmundson. Sadly, Ozzie the falcon passed away not too long after he was born. He struck an electric wire, which caused his death in July of 2008. He was the only offspring of Bear and Terminator. Unfortunately, it is presumed Bear has died because he has not returned to accompany Terminator for another summer. But a girl’s got to do what a girl’s got to do, so, in 2009, Roosevelt and Terminator mated and have been together ever since. Last year they hatched three new baby falcons, and they should hatch another three this year in May. The reason these falcons are held so dear to so many enthusiastic hearts is because they were once on the endangered species list. They were put there mainly due to the use of DDT in the years following World War Two. DDT is a chemical pesticide, and it has alarming and terrible effects on bird eggs. It makes the shells weak and difficult for the birds to survive hatching. But since the ban on DDT in the 70’s, there has been a spike in population for the peregrine falcons and other birds alike. So, here they are, on our home UND water tower and off that dreaded list. It’s fitting that the first yeear they’re here is the same year UND forfeited the old mascot, the Fighting Sioux name. This makes me wonder, maybe we have another mascot just

09

BIRDS > page


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DS

>

Classifieds

friday april 23, 2010

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services

EMPLOYMENT

CAMPUS LIQUORS HIRING PART-TIME EVENINGS. SEE BILLY AFTER 3:00PM. SUMMER HIRE: YMCA is taking applications for Camp Counselors, Swimming Instructors and Lifeguards. For an application go to www.gfymca.org. Free membership to all employees. Ph: 7752586. LOOKING FOR SUMMER EMPLOYMENT? Enjoy day hours, M-F with weekly paychecks. Must have driver’s license & vehicle. Would like to start training asap and can work around school schedule. Pick up application at

Merry Maids: 1407 24th Ave. S. Entrance H. 775-6778. THE BRONZE BOOT is now accepting applications for weekend server and hostess/cashier. Please apply in person at 1804 North Washington Street. SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: Counselors, speech and occupational therapists and aides, reading instructors, recreation, crafts and waterfront personnel needed for a summer camp in North Dakota, working with children with special needs. Salary plus room and board. Contact: Dan Mimnaugh, Camp Grassick, Box F, Dawson, ND 58428. 701-327-4251; email grasbek@bektel.com

SERVICES

HAD SEX? HAVE QUESTIONS? PREGNANT? NEED HELP? We are here for you. FREE and 100% confidential. Pregnancy test, first trimester ultrasound, options counseling. Education on pregnancy, abortion, STD’s. Women’s Pregnancy Center, 11 South 4th Street, Suite 210, Grand Forks. 746-8866. Hours: Mon-Thurs, 9-4:00. Please call for appointment. Visit our website at: http:// www.gfwpc.org

MISCELLANEOUS ELECT RIEMERS SHERIFF. Would actively fight the exploding number of frauds and scams using

mail, phone and internet. Would support more law enforcement joint efforts with rural communities. Paid for by Riemers in his own behalf. Roland-Riemers.com

*

Check out the new website!

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student One of the falcons overlooks the UND campus from its new roost after returning to the city to find its old Smiley Tower home missing.

BIRDS > From page

8

watching over us on the water tower. These birds are birds of prey, and they typically eat smaller and medium sized birds in the area. They rarely feed on small rodents like mice, voles, and squirrels.

TECH >

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Differences among classes aside, students will be provided with access to software for classes. Ending the mandatory program is a relief to many students’ pocketbooks. Opposition to the program’s implementation has been present ever since its start. Students have often complained about paying each semester for a computer whose total cost would be covered after three semesters of lease payments. However, “It’s erroneous to think you are paying for the computer,” points out Schumacher. “Students are paying for the help desk services when they are paying every semester.”

$6

This week we’ve been honoring Earth, and it could only be made more incredible if we honored our new guest on the water tower, the peregrine falcon, as well.

DS

> Shelby Thorlacius is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at shelby.thorlacius@und. edu

The portion of the lease payment going to the help desk has kept the services there top notch. “In a survey of students 92 percent were satisfied or very satisfied with the help desk,” he reports. Students outside of the aviation program may see a similar program being offered to all students at the university. This optional laptop program would allow any student in need of a laptop to lease one through the university. “We’ve been meeting all year to discuss this program and hopefully it will be something offered to students in the near future,” stated Schumacher.

DS

> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu

1/2 lb Burger French Fries AND Soda

Happy Hour Lounge 4-6pm Mon-Fri $2.45 Bar Pours & Domestic Beers

Lounge or Dining Room No coupon necessary

Bronze Boot 1804 N Washington


DS >

scores & schedules

> Inside:

A quick look at early season Twins baseball and promoting an NFL analyst, pg. 11.

vs. New York Tech,

vs. South Dakota,

Baseball four- game series in

Softball doubleheader Saturday

Grand Forks

@ Apollo Field

It takes two

>

Logan dick

sports

friday april 23, 2010

@ conference cham-

Men’s & pionships, Apr. 26-27, Women’s Golf Edinburg, Texas

Senior Emma Larson

Lone seniors Katie Callison and Emma Larson lead tennis team to GWC tournament.

The Dakota Student

Athletes Katie Callison and Emma Larson are the two lone seniors of the UND women’s tennis team. They have been through good times and bad times in their four years of competition, including everything from dealing with injuries to winning conference championships. Their current, prestigious titles of “Captain” on the tennis team are well deserved. Katie Callison Katie Callison has been a dedicated tennis player for UND for four years, but her tennis career started much earlier than that. Callison began playing tennis when she was in second grade. She came from a tennis playing family, in particular; her dad competed at Augustana College in South Dakota. “I moved to a tennis community, so it was easy to get involved at a young age. I was involved in a lot of sports, such as softball, soccer, and swimming. But tennis was my favorite, so I stuck with it!” Callison explained. Callison is originally from Mesa, Arizona. “My first year here in North

Dakota was a shock; almost a culture shock! I wasn’t used to small town ways compared to urban Mesa. The winters were harsh too, but I have gotten used to them and I think I even enjoy them now.” Callison’s desire to attend UND and pursue a life full of tennis was slightly due to the fact that her older sister, Emily, came to UND to play tennis from 2005-2009. Callison explained that her sister loved the experience and loved Coach Tom Wynne. Those facts were convincing enough for her to decide to play tennis at UND as well. Coach Wynne expressed, “Katie is the most experienced player on the team… She reminds me of the quote ‘It is better to be green and growing rather than ripe and rotten.’ Her attitudes and abilities have been green and growing over the years, and I like that.” Among all of the memories made playing tennis for UND, Callison picked one of her favorites. At the end of her sophomore year, the team won the conference tournament, declaring the team as North Central Conference champions at the time. “This was an extra special memory for me because it was UND’s last year as a part of the

NCC, right before we switched to DI. We were able to leave that conference in good standing,” Callison commented. There have been a lot of benefits, as well as some drawbacks for the tennis team due to the competition switch. “I enjoy the better competition that the Division I change has brought. It is fun to be challenged to push yourself and strive for your best because each match that we go into is tough.” Callison also explained her frustration with the DI transition in the fact that the team isn’t allowed to go any further than the conference tournament. This year, UND gets to host the tennis conference tournament. Callison sees the opportunity as an advantage. “Since Grand Forks is usually really windy, teams are not going to be prepared for that element since their home courts are located less windy areas. But since we constantly practice in the wind, we will have a huge home court advantage.” Going into the conference tour-

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TENNIS > page

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Joel adrian

The Dakota Student

Erik Sanders, Logan Evans and Chad Boehm competed in the North Central Collegiate Cycling Conference championship last weekend. The UND team, including Mario Czarnomski, won the Team Time Trial Championships. The group will be competing at the University of Minnesota this weekend in pursuit of the Road Race title.

photos submitted by DENNIS KAPPERS

Cycling wins conference CLUB Riders win conference championship, led by captain Mario Czarnomski.

photo submitted by MARIO CZARNOMSKI

Senior Katie Callison

The UND club cycling team recently won the Team Time Trial (TTT) in the North Central Collegiate Cycling Conference championship last weekend held, at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln. The TTT is a race with a designed course where each team is composed of three to five riders who start together and finish with a recorded time. The start is standard, where one team starts, and then after a certain interval of time elapses, another team begins. The team finishes the trial when the front wheel of the last rider crosses the finish line. UND started with four riders, but ultimately finished the race with three riders. UNDCC completed the TTT 15 mile course with a combined time of 37 minutes and 58 seconds. “We felt that we could win with the other riders presented on

other teams and we just went for it” stated team captain Mario Czarnomski. The championship team included Czarnomski, Erik Sanders, Logan Evans and Chad Boehm UND defeated teams from the Universities of Minnesota, Iowa, Kansas State and St. Olaf college en route to their TTT championship. Right now, the UNDCC team plans to capture conference championships in the Road Race and Criterium. The team will be on the road this weekend competing Friday and Saturday at the University of Minnesota in pursuit of the Road Race title. “It will be a course on campus with tight turns and a very technical layout,” stated Czarnomski. Upon returning from the U of M, UNDCC will be hosting the Criterium championships on the weekend of May 1-2. The Criterium is a short track race that is usually less than one mile long and is counted in laps that will start at 10 a.m. on both days. “We will be hosting the Criterium championships that weekend and it should be really fun because the course will be set up to run around

the Ralph Engelstad Arena. Plus we wanted a break from traveling every weekend,” Czarnomski said. The final weekend of competition for the UND cycling team is May 7th through the 9th at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. As of now, Czarnomski is the only rider who has qualified for the national race; however, winning the TTT conference championship this past weekend gives the UND cycling team reason to be optimistic about the near future. The University of North Dakota Cycling Club is always looking for new riders who are enthusiastic and willing to work hard. Members do not have to be affiliated with UND to join. The ultimate goal of the UNDCC is to improve the image of collective cycling within the greater Grand Forks Area. Any person interested in participating in this club is encouraged to visit the UND at www.und.edu/org/cycling or talk.campusdakota.com/index. php?board=187.0.

DS

> Joel Adrian is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joel.adrian@und.edu


the Dakota Student

SPORTS

11

Twins off to a hot Gruden: TV’s newest star start at Target Field

become stars in and of themselves, for the past decade. as their divisive personalities and But last week provided a breakeye-opening opinions have created through moment for a man who an entirely new realm for sports actually used to be a Super BowlMLB Minnesota basefans to debate and spew about. Skip winning head coach in the proball displaying impresconsists of some of the best in baseBayless on “First and 10” (ESPN2, fessional football universe, as Jon ball: Joe Mauer, Justin Morneau, sive numbers in early 9 a.m.) is an excellent example. The Gruden hosted a 4-part series called Devon roehrich Michael Cuddyer, and Jason man has never played professional “Gruden’s QB Camp” (he interseason play. The Dakota Student Kubel. New addition J.J. Hardy, sports in his viewed and anawho figures to be probably the best life, yet more Timothy boger ESPN is sitting on lyzed the top for shortstop the Twins have had since We are living in an age where of my friends QB prospects for The Dakota Student Cristian Guzman in his prime, bats sports, business and technology are know who he a gold mine with this weekend’s It’s hard to find a problem with eighth—something that speaks to growing at rates never seen before in is and how he NFL Draft) that this guy ... the Twins right now. the depth of the Twins lineup. human history, as the human desire thinks than aired on SportsA 10-4 start, their best since Jim Thome—yes, THAT Jim to instantly know everything cannot any other of Center through2001, has silenced the naysayers Thome—turns a suspect bench be more apparent. the actual exDevon Roehrich out the week. and has catapulted the Twins into into another formidable weapon, There has been one noticeable athletes who Gruden becolumnist came part of the the mix of early season playoff, and and has so far provided the Twins medium that has captured the es- contribute to World Series, favorites. with exactly that. sence of this phenomenon, and this the program. ESPN family last It’s a start that has fed the fiery It’s a consistent team that has four-letter acronym has become Woody Paige on “Around the year when he was named the third excitement lit by one of the most withstood some of the best pitch- completely imbedded and synony- Horn” (ESPN, 4:00 p.m.) is another commentator for Monday Night solid off seasons in franchise histo- ing that the American League of- mous with any and all sports news columnist who has gained nation- Football. Gruden’s first-year perforry, with general manager Bill Smith fers. In fact, Chicago’s Mark Buer- whatsoever. ESPN has grown to wide fame for his goofy ramblings mance was solid, but he was differadding strong bats and defenders hle, Boston’s Jon Lester and Kansas include more programs that even I and lovable passion for all sports, ent than the brash, loud and lovableto create arguably the best lineup City’s Zack Greinke—three of the can keep up with, and it seems like and Tony and Wilbon have been yet-intimidating commander that Minnesota has ever seen. top pitchers in the AL—combined new anchors, analysts and studio mainstays on “Pardon the Interrup- we fell in love with while coaching Long gone are the days where segments are born by the hour. tion” (ESPN, 4:…… you get the the Raiders and Buccaneers and his the Twins’ lineup consisted of As a by product of this revolu- point – ESPN is ‘slightly’ saturated zeal that few coaches today could scrappy utility players who were BALL > page tion, certain TV personalities have with sports debate programming) possibly match. But he was good, and his football knowledge is off-the-charts, giving him layers of credibility to whatever his football opinions materialize into. That is why ESPN needs to let Gruden take the reins and just talk passionate football like he did with Pull Tab Nite! Sam Bradford, Tim Tebow, Colt 20 ox. Schooners of Bud, Bud Light, McCoy, and Jimmy Clausen last Miller Lite, Coors Light or Amber Bock week on his QB Camp. The program really gave viewers an authentic look at how NFL coaches grade, evaluate, and critique quarterbacks, Schooners of Premium Rail Drinks only and it was incredibly refreshing to see these superstar college quarterbacks being fairly criticized in an Schooners of Premium Rail Drinks only entertaining yet respectful manner by someone who knows what he is talking about: this guy made It’s German Day! Rich Gannon into the NFL MVP Schooners of Heineken in 2002, then went to Tampa in ’03 and won the Super Bowl with ViSchooners of Morgan drinks kings castoff Brad Johnson. Most importantly, we were reintroduced to the real Jon Gruden, Long Island Ice Tea Schooners aka “Chuckie” (it’s unbelievable how Chuck Norris’ close they look alike when Jon has Smoking Permitted Bonzer Bombs that freckled smirk on his face), the After 3pm man who tells you what he thinks of you with no punches pulled, yet makes you feel motivated and confident about the future the more you talk to him. •The party in the park starts at 11 am on May 8th, and is done at 5pm. All ages are allowed, but you must be 21 In a world that has become rito drink alcohol. diculously cynical, Gruden’s overlypositive clichés and voice inflection •You cannot bring your own alcohol into the park, the police will bust you if you have open containers on public on Monday Night Football has actuproperty anywhere in the city. ally been quite acceptable, especially teamed with the underrated Mike •There will be a $5 cover charge to help cover the cost of this great annual event. Tirico and the NFL film-aholic Ron •You must purchase drink tickets which you then redeem for 16oz. beers (only $3), or flavored drinks. A drink Jaworski. ticket stand is located outside the beer tent. ESPN is sitting on a gold mine with this guy, as he has the rare abil•People of the legal drinking age cannot provide alcohol for minors. ity to bring condescending criticism •Please dispose of cans and garbage in the appropriate recycling or non-recycling containers located throughout the to star players without ruffling anypark. one’s feathers, and he so genuinely energetic and charismatic that you •Dancing, partying, and laughing is allowed everywhere. Have a great time and make memories with your friends. know he is not putting on an act will be the first band. whatsoever. Gruden will be back headwill be next and headlining is: coaching in the NFL very soon, so time is of the essence. This was some of the best stuff ESPN has done in recent memory, and they should •Backpacks and other bags are not allowed. All purses and murses are subject to search. capitalize on this momentum im•ID is required to enter. If you leave the event, you will be required to show ID again. mediately.

ESPN NFL analyst brings fresh, positive primed to nibble their way to vic- commentary to Monday tories. Now, the meat of the order Night Football.

>

>

20

OZ .

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S CHOONERS H AVE L ANDED !

SPRINGFEST 2010

“Danger Goose” “India Ink”

“John Wayne and the Pain”

•Respect each other, the park, and the surrounding neighborhood. We want to make this event a huge success.

DS

> Devon Roehrich is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at devon.roerhrich@und.edu


12

SPORTS

BALL >

From page

11

to go 1-2 against the Twins with 12 runs allowed in those three games, ten of which were earned. They also had 23 hits combined against those three starters. Largely the question mark for the Twins remains their starting rotation, which lacks a defining ace or overpowering pitcher that dominates hitters. The Twins won the division last year without one, and with the rest of the AL Central as inconsistent as it is, they could very well do the same. But the goal, as the players have stated time and time again, is far beyond a division championship, though obviously that will likely have to come first barring a wild card berth. A matchup with the Yankees, whenever that occurs, will match the Twins’ best against the Yankees’ trio of CC Sabathia, AJ Burnett and Andy Pettitte, all of which would likely be aces on any other team. That’s hard to matchup against for any team, and the Twins need their young starters, as well as veteran Carl Pavano, to step up and keep games close. Those young starts (Nick Blackburn, Kevin Slowey, Scott Baker, and Francisco Liriano) have yet to develop a true leader or ace among them, and they probably need to. The hope is that Liriano, the catalyst for the Twins’ 2006 Division Championship, will challenge for that role. Liriano was beyond solid in his debut against the formidable (although incomplete due to injuries to Jacoby Ellsbury and Mike Cameron) Red Sox lineup. Liriano, or “Franchise” as some still call him, pitched seven shutout innings and struck out eight. Liriano has the potential to be as unhittable as he was before Tommy John surgery in 2006, when he went 12-3. Liriano’s slider, once a mind-blowing 90 miles per hour pitch that was virtually impossible to hit, is now down to the upper 80s, but is still

a pitch that baffles hitters. What is more evident now is that Liriano needs to save the slider for strike three, not strike one. So far Liriano has done that, throwing eight percent fewer sliders so far this season than he did in his breakout 2006 season (according to fangraphs.com). It’s a small sample size, of course, but it’s encouraging. He has mixed his pitches well and will figure to be a more rounded and disciplined pitcher than in years past. That might translate into an even better, and perhaps smarter, version of the pitcher who built a 2.16 ERA in ’06. If Liriano continues to shine, the Twins will be tough to crack down the stretch. They are not perfect, but they have a formula that could yield an AL pennant, or more. The team that has won its first four series feels right at home in the new confines of Target Field and will build off the momentum that has gotten them this far.

DS

> Timothy Boger is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@und.edu

10

TENNIS > From page

nament, Callison is concentrating on staying healthy and injure-free. The team has been plagued with injuries the entire season, so it is important that they all concentrate on being especially careful as the big tournament is approaching. Emma Larson Senior Emma Larson is also a very devoted tennis player and leader at UND. Coach Wynne explained, “Emma is a great kid to have in any sports program. The girls all call her ‘mama’ because she keeps everything in line, including the day-by-day stuff.” Larson grew up playing tennis. It was a part of her life since she was about four years old. Since her three older sisters were greatly involved in the sport, she was naturally attracted to it. Growing up in Glenwood, Minnesota, Larson was able to feed her passion for tennis by attending camps for several years and taking lessons while growing up. Weekends were filled with tennis and traveling

friday april 23, 2010 to competitions. Larson explained her dedication and fondness of the sport. “I think tennis is fun because it is both an individual sport and a team sport. You can focus on your own personal goals… you win when your team wins, no matter how you performed.” Right now, Larson is taking great pleasure in the present, her last tennis season. “We have challenges to face right now, and I just enjoy living in the moment… since Katie and myself are the only two seniors and the rest being freshmen, this season has been a lot different than previous years. It is fun to bond with the freshmen and lead them.” Along with the changes Larson also felt the dramatic switch to Division I athletics. She sees the transition as an open door to exciting opportunities. “It’s fun to play the big dogs! We realize that we are not that far off from them now. Their level of competition is definitely attainable.” Not only are the competitions tough, but the practices are as well. Larson explained that not only are they intense, they are very fun. The

UND tennis team focuses on doubles drills, which have aided them in being able to pick up the doubles points in nearly every match. Coach Wynne commented, “If she [Larson] is able to get in a close match, she’ll win it. That’s something that is nice to have, a confident athlete.” As the season is nearing its end and the big conference tournament is approaching, goals are readily on the tennis players’ minds. Larson has her heart set on playing her hardest and carrying the team through the great finale, the GWC tournament. “I am really excited to have the conference meet at home. All of our friends and family won’t have to travel as far to support us.” After the season is over, Larson doesn’t plan on ignoring her fascination for tennis. She was recently able to complete a training and certification program and is now a Certified Professional Tennis Instructor. Her plan for the summer is to teach tennis lessons at Center Court Fitness Club here in Grand Forks.

DS

> Logan Dick is staff writer for The

Dakota Student. She can be reached at logan.dick1@und.edu


Friday April 23rd