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tuesday april 20, 2010

the

volume 127 issue 46

Today

Reaching the students, faculty and staff of the University of North Dakota since 1888

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Get artsy at the NDMOA See Culture&Media Page 9

Fate of REA logos remains uncertain

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shane zahrt

A closer look at the NCAA settlement shows which Sioux heads can stay and which must go.

The Dakota Student

The North Dakota State Board of Higher Education’s decision to retire the Fighting Sioux nickname and logo earlier this week marked a significant milestone on the road to resolving a long-present conflict, and also signified the end of an era for UND athletics. Many questions remain about how the transition away from the nickname and logo will ultimately play out, and how the university’s new moniker will be selected. Many students are expressing particular confusion

regarding how the change will impact the relationship between the university and the Ralph Engelstad Arena. As many students are aware, the arena contains roughly 2,500 depictions of the Fighting Sioux logo; if the venue were to host any type of post-season or championship play in the future, many of them would need to be removed under the terms agreed upon between UND and the NCAA in their 2007 settlement on the issue. According to University President Robert Kelley’s statements made in a question and answer session about the issue held on

April 10, Kelley is also waiting to see how some of the legal considerations will take shape. The main reason being that the Ralph Engelstad Arena is in every way a separate entity from the University of North Dakota. “It raises some interesting questions about how far that legal settlement does apply to a private entity,” said Kelley to the crowd at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. According to Peter Johnson, associate director of University Relations, President Kel-

07 Senate chides Parking on price hikes

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student The marble Sioux face on the floor is one piece that will likely stay.

REA > page

GOVERNMENT Student leaders pass resolution expressing disapproval of increasing cost of passes.

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brandi jewett

The Dakota Student

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student

Love your Earth this week ENVIRONMENT Grand Forks and UND have a week’s worth of events leading up to Earth Day.

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brandi jewett

The Dakota Student

In continuing its efforts toward a more environmentally friendly campus, the University of North Dakota is teaming up with the City of Grand Forks to sponsor numerous events over the course of the week leading up to Earth Day, April 17-23. The week features daily events along with programs running the entire week. The Earth Week celebration is a response to the growing demand for cities around the country to become greener. Both entities are currently working on such initiatives. The city is currently maintaining the Green Grand Forks program, which works to increase efficiency in running the

city, such as reducing the amount of gasoline used during daily operations of public works vehicles, saving taxpayers money. Other successful implementations by the program include an extensive bike path program and changing streetlights over to more efficient LED light bulbs. UND has just announced a Climate Action Plan working towards reducing its carbon footprints and increasing environmental consciousness for the next generation of students. Current achievements by the university mentioned in the plan include the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified building (University Place) in the state of North Dakota and will soon boast another once the renovation of the Education building is complete. The report also cited that the university’s current recycling program keeps ap-

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EARTH > page

ELS cleans the English Coulee

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shane zahrt

The Dakota Student

With the snow that once covered the University of North Dakota campus now melted, and other signs of spring showing up all over campus, a group of UND Law students and their friends decided to devote a their weekend to making campus a little bit greener. The Environmental Law Society is devoted to studying and promoting awareness of issues related to energy and the environment. Saturday afternoon they took action by heading to campus to clean up the coulee. Scott Brand is a first year law student and the president of the group. “We’ve done a couple of events in the law school discussing environmental issues and having speakers and whatnot, but you

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ELS > page

The issue of parking permit price increases found itself to be he hot topic during Student Senate on Sunday. Graduate School Senator Jackie DeMolee authored a resolution urging senators to inform Parking that they are not in favor of the potential rise in permit prices this year and encouraging them to seek funding from other outlets. “I’m afraid that students are going to stop buying permits because of the increased cost,” explained DeMolee. She cited this would lead to a further increase in permit prices due to a drop in revenue. “Permit prices have increased 223 percent over the past six years,” she pointed out. S e v eral senaRemember, when tors voiced you are voting you their agreement with are representing DeMolee’s UND students. arguments. “ W e Casey Hayden should be senator, Education saying this is not in the best interests of the students,” argued Education and Human Development Senator Casey Hayden. Engineering and Mines Senator Brenden Jehlicka was also strongly in favor of the resolution. “Remember, when you are voting you are representing UND students,” he said, expressing his belief that some senators were not looking out for their constituents. Student Government Advisor Tony Trimarco also agreed that students should not be seeing further increases in permit prices.

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SEN > page


DS datebook 02

tuesday april 20, 2010

DATEBOOK

today, april 20, 2010

> event: Eurydice, a play that takes an alternative look at the classic myth of Orpheus through the eyes of its heroine, will play all this week at at 7:30 p.m. in the Burtness Theatre on the UND campus. Call the box office at 701.777.2587 for more information, or visit between 2 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. > event: The Tony Award-winning musical Cabaret will play at the Chester Fritz Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. saturday, april 24, 2010

The Dakota Student editorial

Editor-in-Chief Michael Thomas > michael.thomas@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Mitch Molstad > mitchell.molstad@und.edu News Editor Allison Krause > allison.krause@und.edu

>

Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: the new dakotastudent.com

Features Editor Derek Scott > derek.scott2@und.edu Sports Editor Alison Kelly > alison.kelly@und.edu Photo Editor Andy Ciulla > andrew.ciulla@und.edu Media Editor Luke Johnson > luke.m.johnson@und.edu

> Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > View photo albums from campus and around the community > See an interactive version of the DS in print using www.issuu.com > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features > And JOIN THE CONVERSATION

business

Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons >

> concert: Famed guitarist Tim Sparks will be performing with special guest Phil Heywood at the Empire Arts Theater at 8 p.m. Tickets are $18. Call the Chester Fritz box office for advanced tickets at 701.777.4090.

Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Natalie Cassell > natalie.cassell@und.edu Ryan Senn > ryan.senn@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677

> event: UND Children’s Center will host its annual benefit and silent auction from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Center. Tickets are $15. Tell us what is happening on campus > Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

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All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177 > The Dakota Student reserves the copyright priviledge for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

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> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.

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DS World Brief

A somber Poland lays Lech Kaczynski to rest

KRAKOW, Poland, and MOSCOW — Polish President Lech Kaczynski was laid to rest in a centuries-old crypt Sunday alongside the remains of some of the most revered figures in this nation’s often tragic history. The funeral Mass and procession to the nation’s most sacred cathedral put a somber end to a week of mourning in Poland. Kaczynski and his wife were killed last weekend when the presidential plane clipped a tree and crashed while landing at a fog-shrouded provincial Russian airport. Many of Poland’s top military officials, lawmakers and icons of recent Polish history also died in the crash. The international presence at the state funeral in Krakow was reduced significantly because of the plume of volcanic ash that has engulfed European airspace since Thursday. President Obama, French President Nicolas Sarkozy and German Chancellor Angela Merkel were among the world leaders who canceled their plans to attend. But Russian President Dmitry Medvedev managed to fly in from Moscow, underscoring the thaw in the nations’ historically strained relations since the deadly crash. The tragedy has gripped Poland with particular power in part because the plane crashed near a site notorious in Polish history: The forests of Katyn, where Soviet secret police secretly slaughtered thousands of Polish officers and other prisoners and dumped the bodies in mass graves. Kaczynski and his delegation were to attend a Mass to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Katyn massacre. The stark irony of the crash elevated Kaczynski’s death into an event regarded not only as the loss of a leader, but as an echo of Poland’s most tortured moments. “To be here is a historical duty,” said Pawel Staniszewski, a 22-year-old student who joined the tens of thousands of mourners who milled in the streets outside author’s name the funeral Mass. “I feel that we are TheinDakota Student taking part a very historic moment, and that we needed to come to tell our grandchildren about it.” An estimated 150,000 mourners jammed the streets around St. Mary’s cathedral, weeping softly and praying rosaries. The bodies, which have lain in state in the Presidential Palace in Warsaw this last week, were flown to Krakow and pulled slowly through the streets to the church. Weeping Poles lined the roads to see them pass. Although Katyn has festered at the heart of strained relations between Poland and Russia, Moscow has made a point of accommodating Polish air crash investigators and has welcomed grieving Polish families, expressing sympathy for the tragedy of the Poles.

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world news report > Inside:

tuesday april 20, 2010

Women’s softball wins big at home. Pg. 13

European airlines test ash cloud ICELAND Companies hit with losses after volcano decide to test the skies above Europe.

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HENRY CHU

Los Angeles Times

LONDON — With their losses mounting, European airlines began experimenting Sunday with test flights to see if air travel could somehow resume despite the cloud of volcanic ash in the atmosphere that shows little sign of budging. The Dutch airline KLM said it had received permission from aviation authorities to fly seven of its planes stuck in Duesseldorf, Germany, back to Amsterdam one by one with only a crew on board. The first one departed early Sunday morning. “These are test flights,” KLM President and CEO Peter Hartman said in a statement. “This does not mean that normal air traffic has been resumed.” The return of the stranded aircraft follows a flight conducted by KLM on Saturday evening in Dutch airspace to see whether conditions were safe for flying despite the ash blown up by the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland. KLM said that the Boeing 737-800 airliner reached an altitude of 41,000 feet, the maximum allowed for that type of jet, and that an inspection afterward “revealed that no problems had been encountered and that the quality of the atmosphere is in order.” In addition to KLM, airlines in Germany and France are also expected to run test flights Sunday. Aviation experts cautioned that even successful tests did not mean an immediate restoration of normal service. But airlines facing losses of millions of dollars a day were clearly hoping to find a way to resume operation. On Saturday, the cloud of grit from the still-erupting Eyjafjallajokull volcano began creeping as far south as Italy, forcing authorities to shut down airports in the northern part of that country. Travelers anchored to Earth continued their scramble for hotels, or for trains, ferries and even taxis to reach their destinations. In Copenhagen, an enterprising cab company posted fares for long hauls across the continent: about $2,000 for passengers going to Amsterdam, $6,000 all the way to Madrid. Most of British airspace remained closed, with planes grounded until 1 a.m. Monday at the earliest despite a brief window of opportunity for a few flights Saturday afternoon from airports in Scotland, Northern Ireland and northern England. By Saturday evening, the volcanic pall covered the whole country once again. In Germany, flights were suspended until at least 8 p.m. Sunday,

BOB HALLINEN > Anchorage Daily News In this file photo from December 15, 1989, a KLM Boeing 747 flew into a cloud of ash from Alaska’s Redoubt volcano in Anchorage. The planes four powerful turbofan engines stopped and the jet dropped more than two miles before pilots could restart the engines and land safely.

local time. In northern France, including Paris, authorities canceled all flights until early Monday. Irish, Belgian, Dutch, Austrian and Swiss airspace was restricted. Most major airports throughout Scandinavia were idled, including Arlanda, Stockholm’s largest, which warned on its website: “The forecast is now even more uncertain than before.” With the pileup of marooned passengers growing by the hour, and with U.S. airlines canceling more than 80 percent of their flights to Europe on Saturday, analysts say

clearing out the backlog and getting the system back to normal could take days once the ash cloud dissipates. And no one was predicting when that would happen. “It’s still erupting,” Armann Hoskuldsson, a scientist at the University of Iceland, said of the volcano. “It’s more or less constant.” The airline industry alone stands to lose more than $200 million a day, the International Air Transport Association said. The Europe-wide aviation agency Eurocontrol said it expected only 5,000 flights across

European airspace Saturday, compared with 22,000 normally. The volcano’s eruptions were “fairly stable” Saturday, in contrast to its irregular activity Friday, scientist Hoskuldsson said. Ash and tiny particles of glass were being spewed up to three miles in the air. In Britain, balmy blue skies over much of the country gave no hint of the layer of grit high in the atmosphere. But some residents as far south as the county of Buckinghamshire, just north of London, woke to find a fine gray coating of ash on their windows.


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commentary

tuesday april 20, 2010

DS View Earth Day

ACTION Use holiday as impetus to effect real change in the Grand Forks community. Though some may consider today a holiday of sorts, this week’s true celebration will be coming this Thursday: the 41st Earth Day. As an idea, Earth Day was formulated in 1970 by former Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-W.I.), who conceived of it as a nationwide teach-in in response to environmental degradation. Since 1970, the concept of Earth Day has grown exponentially—recognized as a national American holiday in 1970, it’s now celebrated in some form throughout most of the world. Earth Day has been, from the beginning, designed as a community-centric event. It’s as good a time as any to continue a national dialogue about environmental issues, but more importantly, Earth Day encourages us to look and act reflectively, and within our reach: make changes on a local level, in your own neighborhood, and the result is significant collective gain. In our UND community, Earth Day will take center stage all week; the Wellness Center has organized a tennis shoe recycling program that will be ongoing at several locations around campus, and many other public campus and community events are on the docket through Friday (see advertisement on page 10 for details). Beyond participation in the week’s events, Earth Day holds another purpose: the encouragement of critical selfexamination when it comes to environmental issues. Applying that eye to the university and to the Greater Grand Forks community, one thing is plain: we need to do better, not just this week, but throughout the year. Grand Forks considers itself a “green” city, but in an age where that word serves as little more than a marketing stamp, reality shows that this city retains gaps in its efforts to protect this little corner of Earth. We encourage Grand Forks officials and citizens alike to focus less on the fuzzy concept of a “Green Grand Forks,” and focus instead on finding practical, no-nonsense solutions to real environmental problems. Trash pollution remains an issue in our community, a situation that isn’t being fully addressed by weak area recycling programs—for example, a story on the front page of this edition hints at some of the mess that accumulates in the English Coulee (on a side note, we’d like to extend a thank you to the Environmental Law Society for this efforts at cleaning up some of that said mess). Instead of burdening residents with the duty of toting their trash to locations around town (like the center on Demers Ave.), the city needs to install more receptacles near residential areas (particularly bordering apartment complexes). Of course, residents (students and non-students) must in turn take a more active role in managing their waste, too. Grand Forks and the university could also take a step toward a more sustainable community by investing more deeply in public transportation. Cities Area Transit is appreciated but could be improved—an expansion of routes and research into hybrid technology could yield some real benefit. The message here is that we need to concentrate on measurable steps toward a cleaner community—that’s progress. So take the spirit embodied by Earth Day, while keeping in mind that conservation is a year-round effort.

Editorial Board Michael Thomas Editor-in-Chief Mitch Molstad Opinion Editor

Allison Krause News Editor Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

Letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number.

Nickname: the racist few > DAVID BARTA

The Dakota Student

“I don’t know whose decision it was, but I think it’s a terrible decision… From going there and being part of it, it’s something you’re really proud of. They’ve got a great history, a great tradition, and everyone’s always respectful of the tribes and the name (emphasis added). You wore it with pride and I don’t see a problem with it.” This emotional opinion, expressed by Zach Parise, illustrates the biggest obstacle preventing any clear consensus on the logo. Both sides are so involved in supporting their own opinion that they tend to speak about the issue emotionally, causing all discussion to break down. For the anti-logo faction arguments to be true, the pro-logo faction has to concede that the logo can be hostile and abusive. This is problematic because the majority of supporters see the logo and nickname more as a jersey and sports team than they do an actual people (disturbing as this may be.) As a result, the pro-logo camp tends to overlook the racial implications involved in this debate precisely because for them, the racial issues don’t play a part in how they view the logo. They are passionate about the team and its illustrious history, and are appalled and offended at the thought that they might be inherently racist. On the other hand, for the antilogo faction to concede that the prologo faction is correct, they must accept that the logo has never been a source of racism or even inherently based on the issue of racial identity. For those who have dealt with the racism that this logo and the controversy surrounding it has produced, it is insulting to be told that they should feel “honored” by something that has had very real and extremely negative impacts on the lives of a group of individuals. This impasse describes almost the entire history of the logo debate. Like most debates involving racial identity issues, it isn’t easy to come to a clear consensus because of the heated emotions on both sides, nor is it clear how a compromise can be made as any potential solution requires one side to abdicate to the others will. This is not simply a

problem that faces UND, Grand Forks, and the State of North Dakota; rather it is a problem with the system of democracy that we adhere to. In our system we believe in upholding the rights of the minority while emphasizing the majority’s authority to make rules. When faced with an issue like the logo, the resulting decision that has to be made leaves no silver medal for second place. The logo will be retired and as many lament the loss of the long, proud tradition it represents, they blame the anti-logo faction for stripping them of this beloved aspect of its self-identity. The pro-logo faction should not be upset at the anti-logo faction for their

Were it not for the very real impacts of their actions, this group is so small as to be invisible ...

David Barta columnist

efforts to retire the nickname—it isn’t their fault that the nickname was retired. The fact is, in order for the logo to avoid being hostile and abusive, it cannot lead to hostile and abusive actions. This is not a conditional element of our society. The Supreme Court and our U.S. Constitution are very clear about the rights of individuals to be free from persecution based upon arbitrary factors like race or religion. Although most people have never made a bigoted or racist comment concerning the logo and tribal peoples, there are those who have. Last Wednesday’s Dakota Student article on the Facebook posts left by pro-logo supporters unequivocally illustrates that fact. From the baseless rants about rescinding non-existent “free rides” to the tasteless suggestion that we simply change our name to the “Fighting Prairie Negroes,” the logo’s retirement has sparked a conflagration of racist and bigoted behavior and comments from the unpleasant racial undertones most would like to ignore. To make matters worse, although the comments expressed within the article illustrate the extreme point of view, they represent the least offensive sample

of their ilk. These individuals make up the smallest minority of all the concerned parties involved. They are the ignorant, unthinking and occasionally outright racist individuals responsible for the controversy in the first place. They were the guys drinking beer and making fun of Indians at a tailgate parties before games; the NDSU fans who advocated the burning of villages and raping of women; and even last year, they were the small group of Greeks who didn’t give a second thought to throwing a drunken “cowboys and Indians” theme party reinforcing the most basic and crude stereotypes of Indian culture. They are the reason this decision had to be made. In the same way that a single student’s drunken resident hall damage inflicts most of its punishment on the individuals who did nothing wrong, the actions of the racist few were the impetus behind this dreary, decades-long controversy that has split our university and wrought untold amounts of grief and pain among the peoples of our state. The hardest pill to swallow in all of this is not the fact that the logo is being retired, but rather those responsible for its retirement will never be held accountable. Were it not for the very real impacts of their actions, this group is so small as to be invisible, and we, the soldiers of this debate, are left without recourse. The one bright spot in all of this is that now we all have the opportunity to build something great from the ashes of our past tradition. It won’t be that hard, because our UND athletics will still meet the highest of our expectations and our support will still be an essential part of their continued success. Then the racist few will be forced to choose between moving forward on the terms set by the rest of us or remaining alone, in a self-imposed exile of their own ignorance. The scars will heal eventually and soon all of the arguments will be forgotten in the midst of what is sure to be an ever growing list of titles and awards that will follow. And despite what you might think now, I think we will all be better off.

DS

> David is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at david. barta@und.edu


the Dakota Student

COMMENTARY

05

This nerd is taking a stand Tech gripes > ring hollow > JOSH BRORBY

The Dakota Student

A screaming came across the web. Roger Ebert, renowned critic, literatus, American hero, had reaffirmed a statement he made long ago in a new article on his website: video games cannot be art; they are simply competition like Mahjong or baseball, nothing more. The Internet responded in typical fashion: disagreement, discord, and (thank Jove) some well-thought out, well-reasoned arguments for why video games can be called “art.” I’m here to jump into the mix. Video games are art. I’d even venture to say that nearly every video game ever produced has some sort of artistic merit. That being said, Ebert made it clear that he has already received suggestions for games that stand as art, so I won’t spend time namedropping examples save these: Shadow of the Colossus (an ambiguous story set in an ambiguous world that is—as early art needed to be—beautiful), the Metal Gear series (a series aware of its soap-opera moments that isn’t afraid to relish in the kitsch—not too mention the sprawling, complex story), Indigo Prophecy (presents a story wonderfully, but has its flaws), and Katamari Damacy (visually outstanding, incredibly fun, hilarious, based on a simple concept). When it comes to art, I don’t think it needs third-party validation, someone to come in and say “Ah, this is art.” What would that do? What is art, after all? Some folks have very specific definitions and ideas of what art is, but I prefer Scott McCloud’s take on things: pretty much anything we do that isn’t meeting the two animal needs, survival and reproduction, is artistic (his example: a caveman making a taunting face after escaping a predator). That being said, where does the line between art and entertainment come into play? Is there a line? Further, does

it matter? perience it by playing slower or using differVideo games probably straddle that line ent methods), then that shows control by the between entertainment and art (if such a line “writer” of the game, the developers. exists), with some clearly falling on either Just like when you read a book, you are side. Ebert’s article focused on how the very participating; you are using your mind to medium of video games places limits on its experience the work in your own way, but definition: games have goals and objectives, you aren’t actually altering the work at all. games can be won, and games place limits on You can change your way of reading, you can the gamers; therefore, they are not art. think about different meanings while doing However, these goals and objectives, a close-reading, but the text is still ultimately these limits placed on those experiencing the the same (as written by the author) in the game, are only part of that one single game. same way a video game remains programmed Video games do not have one definable rule exactly the same. that stretches over them all; rather, each With video games you are given a more game is programmed and designed with its immediate experience, but the potential for own set of rules. Each game is self-contained lasting, resounding, meaningful experience and stand-alone, not unlike a novel or movie. is there, not to mention stuff that is just Do these rules necessarily straight-up beautiful negate the artistic qualities (just look at the level Where does the line design of Super Mario of the game, or do they (in some cases) add to it? between art and en- Galaxy sometime—it For example, the rereally is pretty). As I’ve tertainment come said in earlier columns cently-released Final Fantasy XIII was a departure into play? Is there a (RE: comics), every for the series, opting to use medium experiences line? an extremely linear level this hazing by the old, Josh Brorby and soon video games system rather than the traditional world map that columnist will have their day. allows for more choice. That being said, The linearity of the game reflects some of its some third party assigning the “art” label themes: government control over citizens, doesn’t really make or break anything at all— the “duty” required of them, and, ultimately, it doesn’t matter. The gaming community hurtling toward one’s fate, one’s death. The doesn’t need anything from folks separate game isn’t really won or lost because no from it, least of all validation. Games speak matter how quickly or slowly one plays the for themselves, and the last thing the world game, the outcome will still be the same (as of video games needs, I suppose, is the term far as story goes). “art” dragging it into a world full of baggage. Video games are an interesting medium After all, when no one thinks a medium conbecause they usually give gamers the illusion tains art, then they really have the freedom of choice—actual choices means sport while to create what they want, and that ultimately a forced path means a required experience, leads to the creation of real beauty. like a film or book. Games are participatory, sure, on an immediate level, but if you can’t > Josh is a columnist for The Dakota Student. actually change the experience or alter the He can be reached at joshua.brorby@und.edu work (you can only change the way you ex-

DS

Supporters: honor and respect? > AARON WENTZ

The Dakota Student

This past Friday, there were some important developments regarding the status of the Nickname on this campus (and the larger community). At 7 p.m., the Grand Entry of the 40th Annual Time-Out Wacipi Powwow began. The Grand Entry is the procession of participants onto the dancing area. It is led by war veterans, honored guests, and the dancers who follow behind (paraphrased from the playbill). Two hours later, a pro-Nickname march convened in University Park (while the Grand Entry was still happening). I attended (at least part of ) both events. I’ve noticed (in the past two weeks) that white Nickname supporters directly are beginning to (or perhaps they have been for some time) identify with the “Fighting Sioux” moniker. A quote from the front page of last week’s DS, “I’ve had Sioux tradition in my family. My parents graduated as Sioux, my brother and sister graduated as Sioux and I wanted to graduate as a Sioux.” Notice the phrasing, the language is such that the student identifies, “as a Sioux.” Let’s take a step back here. Before I launch into my argument, I want to make a few things clear. First of all, the crowd at the march in support of the Nickname on Friday night was (to my eyes at least) not comprised entirely of white folks. In fact, a majority of the folks who spoke over the PA system were indigenous. The thrust of the argument (a paraphrase, feel free to correct me if I’m wrong) made by these (indigenous) folks was that since the

Nickname was supported by a majority of tribal members (they argued) and the fact that the Nickname honored tribal members, its use ought to continue on UND’s campus. I have no problem with this, so long as it’s coming from indigenous folks. I’m white, therefore I’m not in a position to speak for or to the experience of indigenous folks. That is not my aim here. Regarding the indigenous folks who were at the rally, if, in the course of their work to keep the Nickname, they band together with white folks, then so be it. What concerns and perplexes me is that when white folks make the exact same argument, it takes on a radically different character. Why? Generally speaking, whenever I’ve engaged in a debate over the Nickname with Nickname supporters, the argumentation usually follows as such: when I say that I’m opposed to the Nickname because it is racist, the response is generally that the Nickname “honors” indigenous folks. When I respond with something to the effect that, no, it doesn’t “honor” indigenous folks, because many (certainly not all) indigenous folks claim that it is racist, the response from the white person I’m engaging in polemics with is something to the effect that, “We pay for their college, so if the Nickname goes, then their scholarships should go,” or something more emphatic and more explicitly racist. So the argumentation shifts from, “We’re honoring them” to (more or less) “they should take the money and shut up.” I’ve seen this repeatedly, for years. Of course, as President Kelley pointed out last Friday, the notion that indigenous folks leave the University with no (or for that matter less) debt,

or that all indigenous folks get a full scholarship to UND is simply not true. The problem is that this contradictory logic exists simultaneously in the argumentation of white Nickname supporters (henceforth referred to as WNS). The way that it is possible to hold both propositions in one’s head simultaneously is for white folks to identify directly with the Nickname, that is, the white nickname supporter identifies, “as a Sioux.” Therefore, the WNS see the Nickname as their own, and they claim it as such. Thus, they see themselves as doing indigenous folks a favor by “honoring them” and when that logic is questioned, their response that indigenous folks ought to “take the money and shut up” is the result of the unspoken element of their logic, i.e. because (within the WNS’ logic) the nickname belongs to “us” (white folks) and indigenous don’t have anything to say about the issue (unless they support the nickname) because “we” (white folks) are the “Fighting Sioux.” For WNS, the Nickname does not reflect some sort of homage paid to indigenous cultures in terms of an active engagement with the history and culture of indigenous tribes (as evidenced on Friday, there were at least close to as many people marching in support of the logo at 9 p.m. as were in attendance in the bleachers at 7 p.m. at the Grand Entry), but rather they see the Nickname as a part of who they (WNS) are. In this sort of climate, it is a mistake to

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AARON > page

ERIN LORD

The Dakota Student

We live in a culture where information and communication is at our fingertips in an instant. I can check the score of the Twins game on my cell while driving home in a prairie no man’s land, I can text a friend during break at work if I remember a tidbit of The Daily Show that is worth repeating, and I can discover when Glass Houses was released immediately and conveniently with the help of my laptop. Given these amazing advances in technology, it would seem that our society would be greatly appreciative of the conveniences we have been blessed with in 2010. Surprisingly, you never hear about how gracious students are that they can find research in the matter of one click for their term paper. Nor do we hear how incredibly comforting it is that we can call AAA when our car breaks down at 2:00 a.m. on the highway. Instead, we are constantly exposed to negative commentary about the technological age. “Text messaging is going to destroy the future generation’s ability to write,” and “students are always finding bad sources online.” My favorite one is “All of this technology makes people lazy.” How apocalyptic and unappreciative are we? Communication between friends and family members is faster and more efficient, but instead of delighting in this fact as we should, we create some obscure hypothesis about how text messaging is going to covertly infiltrate the education systems, and English classes will never be able to recover from the lol’s and the brb’s and the Luvz yaz! :). Let’s give our teachers more credit. Would we prefer to go back to limited technology and corporal punishment? Would we rather our children go to a school where they would be smacked with a “learning stick” each time they miswrote the Apostles’ Creed? Technology has definitely expanded our language and created more colloquial words, but that is not necessarily negative and it doesn’t mean that we didn’t have colloquial language before the advent of technology. If anything, the new technological language has helped us to become more playful with language and find new and interesting ways to communicate in a quick, condensed way. And I also give the human species enough credit to not employ the language when it is inappropriate, say in academic writing. Let’s not belittle our race. I continue to be frustrated when I hear complaints about how the Internet is creating unreliable sources and people are not getting the “right” information anymore, as if having a limited source from the one local newspaper in town was a better option. That’s the price we pay for our inquisitiveness, and I believe it’s a small price. There have been many times I have looked something up for purely scholastic reasons and have been led to ask the “why” question, and, before I know it, I’m looking at a map of Yemen. Twenty years ago, this would not have been possible. If one curiosity led to another, you better be in a major library and have the time to search through countless books. Yet, we complain that the Internet has “bad stuff ” on it. What pessimistic creatures we are. The last and most annoying comment—

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ERIN > page


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NEWS

tuesday april 20, 2010


the Dakota Student

REA >

From page

1

ley is exploring the possibility of revisiting some of the stipulations made in the 2007 settlement, “The president doesn’t have any desire to see any changes to the Ralph,” he said, speaking to the Dakota Student last Friday. The primary reason, according to statements made by Kelley, is that he would prefer that university resources go toward academics and research programs, rather than having to absorb the cost of renovating parts of the large arena. The 2007 settlement is very specific as to what aspects of the arena bearing the Fighting Sioux logo can remain unaltered. For one, items of historical significance will be permitted to remain. That means all of the Fighting Sioux men’s hockey program’s seven national championship banners will be able to continue to hang from the rafters, as will the conference championship banners that hang across from them. Tributes and memorials to past Sioux teams and Native American leaders will be unaltered, and the entrance plaque to the Betty Engelstad Sioux Center will be permitted to remain. Additionally, changes that are considered cost prohibitive would be exempt from removal. This would apply to the large granite in-floor logos installed on the main floor of the arena. Other logos that would eventually be removed due to wear and tear regardless of the logo change may remain, but only until dates agreed to in the settlement. In all, it is estimated that 1,800 of the roughly 2,500 lo-

ELS >

ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student

gos would have to be removed in order for post-season play to be held at the REA. Despite the reality of the settlement, REA officials have been reluctant to make any commitment to start the process. Arena officials were unavailable for comment, but general manager Jody Hodgeson vowed in an interview with WDAZ television on April 8 that not a single thing would be changed at the arena. He went so far as to say that it will be his office’s recommendation that nothing ever be changed at the arena, and that no one ever be allowed on the premises with the intention of altering any part of the arena. University officials are committed to working with all concerned parties, even if it means revisiting the terms of the settlement between UND and the

NCAA to alter which stipulations of the agreement can extend to privately owned entities and arenas, such as the Ralph Engelstad Arena. Peter Johnson reiterated President Kelley’s commitment to work with all parties, and doesn’t expect that the decision will do any harm to the relationship between the university and the REA. “We have had a strong relationship all along,” he said, noting that Ralph Engelstad built the arena to support the university, its athletic programs and the community at large, and that none of the interested entities will benefit from a conclusion that is not agreeable to all parties.

DS

> Shane Zahrt is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at shane.zahrt@und.edu

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NEWS

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ous other everyday garbage items, but there were also some strange and interesting artifacts that they From page fished out of the coulee. can only talk about something for “The most interesting thing so long before it’s time to go out that we found was pieces of potand get dirty and do something tery, and not just broken pottery, yourself.” we found full pots, cups, and other He says that the inspiration ceramics,” said Brand. The group for cleaning the English Coulee also recovered chairs, bicycles, a came from passing over it on his futon cushion, many parking tickdaily commute ets, and some to and from that A futon frame and evidence school. UND students bicycles don’t blow are practicing “Every day on my way to themselves into the saferBsex. school I take r a n d water. wishes that stuthe bus or I ride dents would be my bike, and Scott Brand more mindful I go over the president, ELS of where they English coulee, discard their and it doesn’t take much to look at the English waste. “There’s no shortage of recycoulee and see that there’s trash all cling containers around campus, or around it, both inside and outside garbage receptacles. Think about where your garbage is going to go of the water,” said Brand. The group also thinks that when you don’t put it in those.” However, given some of the students should feel a sense of responsibility for the health of their items that found their way to the campus, and the coulee in particu- coulee, there is clearly more carelar, “It’s the only stretch of water lessness and reckless behavior we have on campus, so keeping it among students than could simply clean should be a priority,” added be attributed to chronically missing the garbage can. “A futon frame Brand. In all, about 15 people partici- and bicycles don’t blow themselves pated in the clean up effort, includ- into the water,” said Brand. Despite completely filling the ing law students, friends and a faculty advisor. They made their effort back of a full sized pick-up truck by both land and sea. Most of the with garbage recovered from the volunteers patrolled the shoreline, river, the group is convinced they while two teams of two volunteers could have filled at least one more. floated the river in canoes, fishing The felt good about the amount out items that were unreachable they were able to recover, but sadly from land. The canoes themselves they were not able to get it all. They were borrowed from the Memorial encourage other groups to pick up Union, who waved the rental fee where they left off. once they heard the group would be using the equipment for a community clean-up project. > Shane Zahrt is a staff writer for The The group found mostly scraps Dakota Student. He can be reached of paper, bottles and cans, and vari- at shane.zahrt@und.edu

DS


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NEWS

COLORFUL CULTURE

EARTH > From page

1

proximately 500 tons of waste from being dumped into landfills each year. With evidence of environmental awareness being a top priority on campus, students can expect to see a variety of events drawing attention to this cause. On Earth Day, students eating in the dining centers during dinner hours will be rewarded for going tray-less. The Association of Residence Halls’ Recycling Board will have booths set up in Wilkerson and Squires dinning centers and will be giving out reusable shopping bags to students who are not using trays.

PETER BOTTINI > The Dakota Student A Native American chicken dancer performs at this weekend’s 40th annual Time Out Wacipi event.

AARON > From page

5

part of taking that complexity seriously is asking what right white folks have to claim the Nickname as their own. The answer is that they (we) have none. White folks are not “Fighting Sioux.” No matter how much some WNS would like to think so, it is simply not the case. People can buy all the logo gear they want and it will change nothing. The bottom line is that the scene I witnessed on Friday, of tribal members leading (a majority white) Nickname supporters in prayer was a fake, an obscenity on the part of

the WNS (the indigenous folks at the rally are obviously free to use their prayers as they see fit). The racist logic that sustains the use of the Nickname within white consciousness cannot be outrun by “identifying” with the Nickname. I’ve been around this issue long enough to know that immediately beneath the veneer of “honor and respect” is the racist logic that indigenous folks “owe it to white folks to let us keep using the Nickname, because we pay for it with scholarships and if they take away the logo, then the indigenous folks can go back home.” This logic implies that indigenous folks are not welcome

DS

> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu

on this campus. This is a logic that is more prevalent than some would care to admit. I violently disagree with this logic, but it’s here and as such, it needs to be addressed. Ultimately it is not clear who will make the final decision about whether or not to continue using the Nickname, but if we’re going to make this campus a safe place, it is better to look at reality than to fool ourselves into thinking this logic isn’t a large part of what’s framing the issue.

DS

> Aaron is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at aaron.wentz@und.edu

ERIN >

From page

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people are becoming lazy—is simply hypocritical. The person that is complaining about this problem is doing so wearing his jeans that have been imported from across the world and while also streaming music from his computer. Our lives are so much easier because of technology, and we therefore have much more leisure time to spend as we choose. If you squander that time by watching ESPN for four hours straight, well, that’s your fault. Don’t blame the amazing advances in technology for your inability to do something meaningful with your life. When it comes down to it, the issue has little to with our actual relationship with technology. It’s more about human pessimism and our forever-present apocalyptic mindset. We’re self-centered

tuesday april 20, 2010 enough to think that in our lifetime the world has never been worse, and technology is obviously to blame. Tell that to the sufferers of the bubonic plague or the slaves that were kidnapped from their homes and shipped across an ocean. People consciously choosing to watch TV rather than going for a run is nowhere near the suffering that people before our conveniences experienced (it’s almost embarrassing putting the two in the same sentence). So next time we want to complain that Johnny looked up Thomas Edison on Wikipedia and got inaccurate information, let’s have a reality check. For every tiny problem technology causes, there are a million other reasons why it benefits our lives.

DS

> Erin is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at erin. lord@und.edu


DS

culture&media >

tuesday april 20, 2010

Inside: Motorcycle Safety Lessons

Art imitates nature NATIVE ART Museum offers local artists a venue to display their natural stylings.

>

DEREK SCOTT

The Dakota Student

This past Saturday, the North Dakota Museum of Art held an opening for three brand new exhibits. The opening was quite the event: live music, tiny hot dogs, even wine. The exhibits will run from April 18th until June 13th. Saturday I attended the event with someone who had never been the North Dakota Museum of Art. For anyone else who has never been to the museum, it’s located behind Twamley Hall (the place that takes your money). Downstairs the gallery had the exhibit Shared Histories, by Canadian artists Tim Schouten, Keith Berens, and Carol Hepper. It featured an arrangement of paintings and sculptures, challenging what you might think of as Native American art. The first thing about the ex-

hibit that instantly caught my attention was the Jackson Pollock on the back wall, or a piece that was a spot on homage: real sexy splatters and bright colors. I wandered over and took a closer look. That’s where this exhibit really shines—in the details. Artist Berens, like his fellow Canadian artists, had used traditional Native American materials, like bees wax and tree resin, to create this “wet look” splatter painting. Continuing to walk around, I noticed that Schouten had mixed bits of dirt and clay into his paintings. My guest summed it up best: “I want to touch them all.” It’s hard not to touch them; the paintings all have such an amazing textures, and the way the artists worked the dirt and other natural materials into the exhibit really emphasize the natural environment. Later in the night, a small child tried to climb inside one of Carol Hepper’s deerskin sculptures. Strangely the child’s mother was not ok with this, but we all held out hope the toddler in footed

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ART > page

photos by DEREK SCOTT > The Dakota Student


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Two-wheeled safety TRANSPORTATION Bikers should take to the road this spring with responsibility in mind.

>

tuesday april 20, 2010

CULTURE&MEDIA

ALEX CAVANAUGH The Dakota Student

This weekend’s Red River Valley Motorcyclists bike show brought motorcycles both old and new to the Alerus Center, and Grand Forks was at a constant roar with bikes. Riders came from all over North Dakota and Minnesota to both check out what’s new on two wheels and to show off their own rides in an event that kicks off the beginning of North Dakota’s riding season. Even after the RRVM show ends, Grand Forks residents will see an increase in motorcycles on the streets, and many will get on their own bikes. While motorcycling is a fun and efficient method of transportation, both riders and the general commuting population should be aware of the vulnerability of motorcycles and the dangers and necessary safety measures that come with riding. One of the most important pieces of equipment that should accompany every rider is a helmet. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that helmets are 37 percent effective in preventing motorcycle fatalities in the event of an accident. In the case of in-town riding, the likelihood of a helmet saving a rider’s life in an accident is much higher. Wearing a helmet often means the difference between life and death. Some states have helmet laws that require every rider and passenger to wear a helmet, but although North Dakota does not, it is highly recommended from riders and law enforcement alike. Captain Dan Lund of UPD is an avid motorcyclist and member of Blue Knights International, a law enforcement motorcycle club. “We’ve had several motorcycle fatalities in Grand Forks,” Lund

let’s talk

said. of safe following distance for both Motorcycle safety is not only motorcyclists and larger vehicles, important to riders, but to every- as well as properly using mirrors one else on the road as well. “The and blinkers and following speed riding season limits. We need to make is starting Lund recstrong,” Lund o m mended sure that people are commented. every rider to watching for mo- attend a mo“We need to make sure that torcycle safety torcycles. people are course. While watching for Dan Lund there are numotorcycles.” UPD Captain merous coursLund cited the es in Grand vulnerability Forks, one of of motorcycles as smaller, more the best reputed is a class through agile, and faster-stopping vehicles ABATE of North Dakota. Anyas strong reasons why drivers and one interested in riding can take pedestrians should keep a closer the written test at the DMV and watch for bikes. complete the safety course in lieu “People are not used to seeing of the riding test through the motorcycles because of North Da- DMV. kota’s short riding season,” Lund Since the DMV is mainly a stated. While southern states are licensing entity and does not ofmore accustomed to seeing mo- fer instruction at their test sites, torcycles year-round, North Dakotans only see bikes on the roads for a few months out of the year. BIKE > page Lund also stressed the importance

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PHOTOS BY ANDY CIULLA> The Dakota Student The Vagina Monologues took place at the Loading Dock this weekend. The Vagina Monologues is made up of a varying number of monologues read by a varying number of women.

Summer Session at UND is a great time to add a minor, stay on track for graduation, take additional Essential Studies courses or re-take a class. There are hundreds of classes to choose from, evening and weekend too!

Early registration for Summer Session starts April 5. 701-777-6284 • summer@und.edu • www.summer.und.edu


the Dakota Student

CULTURE&MEDIA

11

Students get graphic LOCAL ART Two UND artists find inspiration from different sources for a joint exhibition.

>

Shelby Thorlacius

photos by ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student

The Dakota Student

Two UND artists, Brandy Helm and Stephanie Clark, currently have an exhibition at the Hughes Fine Art Center. The two female students are both enrolled in the Visual Arts program, and while Helm and Clark may share similar curricula, they are by no means alike in their artistic approach. “My artwork focuses on the vampire and its representations in

culture,” Helm said. Her emphasis in art is printmaking, which lends itself to the diversity of the representations of vampires. Helm mentioned that vampires have a history ranging from Victorian monster to today’s latest craze. “Silkscreen and lithography translate especially well to stylized graphic images,” said Helm, “appropriate to pop culture’s love for the creatures of the night.” Printmaking techniques grew from etching and lithography to silkscreen and photography and digital technology, which, as Helm put it, “mirrors the evolution of the myth of the vampire over centuries as a rich and multi-faceted character.” Her work combines “the camp, horror, and sensuality of the vampire.” She went on to say that “right

now, vampires are everywhere, from Twilight to True Blood.” Her inspiration, however, comes from work as early as Bram Stoker’s Dracula in 1897 and into the 20th century with the 1922 silent film Nosferatu. “Throughout the 20th century,” said Helm, “it broadened and became a category all its own, encompassing the terrifying and horrific, the brooding and sensual, the campy and exaggerated.” While Helm focuses on a vampiric culture, Clark focuses on ordinary, and turns it into the extraordinary. “I am really interested in abstract painting and its relationship to thought,” said Helm. Her influences come from the fields of literature, philosophy, and of course the art world, “from The Frankfurt School with the likes of Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adorno, to artists such as Charlene von Heyle and the painters of The Leipzig School. My pieces are abstractions of everyday objects and mundane environments with an emphasis on mark-making,” said Clark. I asked both student artists when the had decided to seriously persue art, “When did you find your artistic side?” Helm said, “I will answer with a quote that comes to mind from contemporary artist, Damien Hirst. It goes something like, ‘All children draw, it is a shame they ever stop.’ So, a simple answer to the question would be that I never stopped drawing.” And Clark responded by saying, “I started drawing probably as soon as I could as I could hold a pencil. I drew cartoons in elementary school and wanted at that time, to be a cartoonist. In high school, I was in an

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HUGHES > page

Kathryn Korsmo, DDS


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DS

Classifieds

tuesday april 20, 2010

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services and creatures of all kinds and colors. ART > On the left side, the bust of a woman BIKE > HUGHES > EMPLOYMENT CAMPUS LIQUORS HIRING PART-TIME EVENINGS. SEE BILLY AFTER 3:00PM. SUMMER HIRE: YMCA is taking applications for Camp Counselors, Swimming Instructors and Lifeguards. For an application go to www.gfymca.org. Free membership to all employees. Ph: 775-2586. LOOKING FOR SUMMER EMPLOYMENT? Enjoy day hours, M-F with weekly paychecks. Must have driver’s license & vehicle. Would like to start training asap and can work around school schedule. Pick up application at Merry Maids: 1407 24th Ave. S. Entrance H. 775-6778. THE BRONZE BOOT is now accepting applications for weekend server and hostess/cashier. Please apply in person at 1804 North Washington Street. SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: Counselors, speech and occupational therapists and aides, reading instructors, recreation, crafts and waterfront personnel needed for a summer camp in North Dakota, working with children with special needs. Salary plus room and board. Contact: Dan Mimnaugh, Camp Grassick, Box F, Dawson, ND 58428. 701-3274251; email grasbek@bektel.com

SERVICES HAD SEX? HAVE QUESTIONS? PREGNANT? NEED HELP? We are here for you. FREE and 100% confidential. Pregnancy test, first trimester ultrasound, options counseling. Education on pregnancy, abortion, STD’s. Women’s Pregnancy Center, 11 South 4th Street, Suite 210, Grand Forks. 746-8866. Hours: Mon-Thurs, 9-4:00. Please call for appointment. Visit our website at: http://www.gfwpc.org

MISCELLANEOUS ELECT RIEMERS SHERIFF. Justice and Fairness regardless of race or gender. Actively supports constitutional and family rights. Sheriff ’s goal should be to solve problems and not just keep jail full. Paid for by Riemers in his own behalf. RolandRiemers.com

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“Art is never finished, only abandoned.” - Leonardo da Vinci

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

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drew cartoons in elementary school and wanted at that time, to be a cartoonist. In high school, I was in an art program and literally took every art class that was offered.” These two are insisting that art is not something that can be found, it is something to be possessed. And

My pieces are abstractions of everyday objects and ... environments.

Stephanie Clark student artist

the reason they have made the progress they have was because they never gave up. They never lost their imagination and their passion, and that is a fascinating quality to nurture. Some advice they had to give to future students in the Visual Arts program, or anyone else for that matter, was to take advantage of the culture UND has to offer. From checking out the art museum, the library, movies and books, there is something to be learned everywhere. And always keep your friends close, because Helm and Clark cannot thank their’s enough. But lastly, the main advice was to never give up, and keep striving for your goals.

DS

> Shelby Thorlacius is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at shelby.thorlacius@und. edu

From page

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child’s mother was not OK with this, but we all held out hope the toddler in footed pajamas would make another go at it; she had plenty of room to fit, and I’m sure it would have made an excellent fort. The depth in the paintings was another interesting aspect. Standing too close, you almost lost touch of what was trying to be communicated. Upon heading upstairs and looking down at the photos from a distance, you could really appreciate the angles and perspective the artists worked into their collective pieces. From upstairs it actually looked like you could walk right up the roads and visit the old adobe houses. The upstairs of the NDMOA featured two other exhibits. The first one was titled “50: The Cable Years.” It was an exhibit from the university Department of Art and Design. Included artists were Brad Bachmeier, Alan Lacovetsky, Linda Olsen, and Tama Smith. The artists did an excellent job: a large woodenhead with a foreboding stare eyes visitors down as they ascend the stairs. From there, they are greeted with ceramic flowers

made from puzzle pieces is striking, and looking past her, you get a glimpse of the paintings downstairs, viewed in a totally new perspective. The final exhibit, called Relics, features some really old whiskey made at Mt. Vernon. This witch’s brew was made using one-dollar George’s personal recipe. Sadly, it was under plate glass, and no samples were offered. Also on display next to the hooch were old North Dakota road signs and the coolest cardboard giraffe I have ever seen in my life. Personally, I really enjoyed this exhibit, and my first time guest expressed the same sentiment. It’s no wonder, how could you not enjoy them? They have local artists, bright colors and plenty of different styles for everyone to enjoy. If you haven’t been this is a great gallery to check out. It’s not too complicated or deep, and the only emotions these paintings are evoking are the good ones. The NDMOA is always free to attend and their hours are available on their website, NDMOA.com.

DS

> Derek Scott is the Features Editor for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at derek.scott2@und.edu

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fer instruction at their test sites, the safety course is a great way for both beginners and advanced riders to improve their safety practices. The class is part in-class work and part hands-on riding on a course and covers proper riding technique, stopping, shifting, turning, and adjusting to road conditions to prepare riders for any situation they may encounter both on the highway and on city streets. It is everyone’s responsibility to make Grand Forks a community that is safe for motorcyclists and regular commuters alike, by, on the rider’s part, use of a DOT approved helmet, proper application of riding technique, and adherence to speed limits; and, on the regular commuter’s part, awareness of the presence of the smaller, more vulnerable motorcycles.

DS

> Alex Cavanaugh is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at alex.cavanaugh@und.edu


DS >

scores & schedules

tuesday april 20, 2010

> Inside:

sports

Women’s track and field, women’s tennis and men’s baseball were all in action last weekend.

Baseball UND: 6 UND: 9

UND: 1 UND: 6 UTPA: 2 UTPA: 8 UTPA: 2 UTPA: 3

Softball

UND: 10 MSUM: 1

UND: 6 MSUM: 3

Tennis

UND: 4 USD: 3

Freshman infielder Linda Sippola runs the bases during Thursday’s 10-1 win over MSUM in six innings. Sippola scored three RBI’s in the win off a homer in the sixth inning, scoring junior catcher Amber Roth and senior center fielder Casie Hanson.

photos by ANDY CIULLA > The Dakota Student

Sioux win big at home >

alison kelly

The Dakota Student

In their second home game series at Apollo Field this season, the Sioux women swept the visiting MSUM Dragons, defeating them 10-1 and 6-3 in the doubleheader. The wins also kept them perfect at home; earlier this season they defeated Dakota Wesleyan April 2nd 9-0, 6-0.

Game one Freshman Emma Gronseth pitched six innings and allowed only one run off of six hits to lead the Sioux to a 10-1 lead. Though UND had stellar pitching, their offense really led the way with five runs in the fourth and four in the sixth. Senior center fielder Casie Hanson, freshman left fielder Kayelee Schoeny and junior catcher Amber Roth all had two hits in the win. Several Sioux contributed to the run count with four different players

Women defeat MSUM 10-1, 6-3 in Thursday doubleheader, improve record to 12-28. bringing in runs. Freshman third baseman Linda Sippola led with three RBI’s, which came from her sixth inning home-run, bring in Hanson and Roth. Hanson also had two RBI’s: from her double in the first inning, scoring Roth, and her single in the sixth, again scoring Roth. Roth scored her own runs as well, bringing in Gronseth and freshman short stop Tone Schutte off her double to right center. Moorhead was only able to score in the top of the fifth when second baseman Betsy Dickson singled to left center and sent right fielder Jessica Hollis home from second base. Moorhead’s Mara Litzer was tabbed with the loss, she pitched five innings and gave up nine runs off of nine hits. Game two Freshman Michelle Frank got the start for the Sioux, allowing eight hits and three runs to get the 6-3 win in seven innings, giving her an overall

4-7 record. UND started the scoring, getting two runs in the first inning, one coming from an error by MSUM’s left fielder, Katie Howland, and the other from Sippola advancing home. The Sioux would lose the lead in the second and third innings as the Dragons scored two and then one run respectively to lead 3-2. The women wouldn’t allow any more runs, but would score four more between the fifth and sixth innings to give them the 6-3 win. Hanson scored two runs, Sippola scored one run and brought in one RBI and freshman second baseman Cami Bennett scored two runs and brought in an RBI to lead the Sioux. The win brings UND’s overall record to 12-28 and their home record to 4-0. The Sioux play South Dakota in a doubleheader Saturday at home.

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> Alison Kelly is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at alison.kelly@und.edu


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Track & field compete Men record first GWC win at SIU-Edwardsville BASEBALL Sioux defeat UTPA three games eight. Stoks took second in 49.94 to one in conference, WINS Senior Kayla Pfau and Barclay took fourth in 51.16. weekend series. Freshman Bryant Halvorson and freshman Megan was the only other top eight place Staff report Storstad take top honors winner, taking fifth in the long The Dakota Student at weekend meet.

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Staff report

The Dakota Student

Both the men’s and women’s track and field teams competed at the inaugural Gateway Classic, hosted by Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville Saturday and Sunday at Korte Stadium. UND and SIU-E have competed in several other sports, including men’s and women’s basketball and volleyball; both schools are transitioning to Division I after previously competing at a Division II level. Men Senior Kyle Rosseau led the men, taking second in the 800 meter run in 1:56.20, edging out SIUE’s Marc Presley by .39 seconds and losing only to Jordan Jennings (unattached) who won in 1:54.03. Two other Sioux placed in the 800 meter run. Senior Jeremy Jones and freshman David Niday took fifth and sixth respectively. UND also performed well in the 400 meter dash, with both sophomore Chris Stoks and senior Mark Barclay placing in the top

jump with a leap of 21 feet 2 inches. The men’s 4x100 team took second out of two teams in a time of 44.11. Other athletes competing were freshman Jonathon Kind who placed ninth in the 100 meter dash and tenth in the long jump. Senior Carl Hanson took ninth in the 100 meter hurdles and senior Matt Elbert nabbed tenth in the 400 meter hurdles. Freshman Adam Thelen took 11th in the 200 meter dash and junior Cory Absey took tenth in the 1500 meter run. Eastern Illinois won the meet with 162 points. The Sioux took fifth with 40 points and an incomplete team.

Women The Sioux women faired slightly better, taking fourth overall with 101 points and having two women take first place honors. Senior Kayla Pfau started out the winning with a 11 feet 7.75 inch leap in the pole vault, earning first place. Pfau was ahead of fellow

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The UND men’s baseball team came away with three out of four games in their four game series against Great West Conference opponent Texas-Pan American Friday through Sunday in Edinburg, Texas. Game one The Sioux were looking for their first conference win after losing four games to Utah Valley last weekend and got it in their first game, defeating the Broncos 6-2. Both teams coasted at a 1-1 tie until the seventh inning when UND exploded with four runs: two from the bat of junior outfielder Josh Lagein, one from senior infielder Andrew Gudmunson and the fourth from junior outfielder Criag Dolmage, who stole home with the bases loaded. The four-run seventh increased the lead to 5-2, giving the Sioux a comfortable lead with only two innings remaining. UND would score one more from outfielder freshman catcher Ridge Halenar who singled up the middle, sending junior short stop Jeff Bunch home from second base.

Texas-Pan American would score one in the ninth, but UND’s junior pitcher David Spies was able to close the inning giving the Sioux the 6-2 win. Getting the win was sophomore pitcher Zac Salfer, giving him a 2-3 overall record. Salfer pitched 7.1 innings, allowing nine hits and one run.

Game two UND scored a much needed run in the top of the ninth inning to give them the 9-8 win over UTPA in their second game of series. The Broncos led early, scoring two runs in the first and four in the second to lead the Sioux 6-1, who scored one run in the top of the first. The Sioux would, however, have a seven run fourth inning to

take an 8-6 lead. Freshman third basemen Kris Kwak started out the offensive run after he was hit by a pitch and sent to first; Kwak advanced to second after senior infielder Josh Nelson singled to the left. With runners on first and second, UTPA pitcher, Scott Wingo, hit Bunch to load the bases. With the bases loaded, senior infielder Jabby Bakhit scored two runs off a fielders choice and sent Bunch to second after a throwing error. Errors loaded the bases again when Gudmunson came to bat for the second time this inning; he grounded out to first previously which notched the first out of the fourth. Gudmunson doubled to

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the Dakota Student

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Tennis ends regular season with a win SIOUX Women win all doubles matches to defeat USD 4-3 in their final game of the season.

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staff report

The Dakota Student

In their last regular season match of the season, the women’s tennis team dug deep and defeated conference foe South Dakota 4-3, ending their season with a 7-12 record. Before the win, UND had been on a three game road skid, but were able to pull together three impressive doubles wins in Brookings, S.D. Starting off the match, UND freshman Erin Kappers lost a close 7-6, 1-6, 8-10 match to South Dakota’s Shadi Soleymani. Senior Katie Callison would avenge the loss with a 6-1, 6-0 power victory over Melanie Rockne of USD. Freshman Hallie Welk and

senior Emma Larson would also score victories in the singles matches. Freshman Megan Sween was narrowly defeated 6-7, 4-6 to Isabel Nunez and freshman Mindy Lawrence was dealt the same, losing 6-4, 6-3 to Kelsi Foster. Despite the singles losses, the Sioux’s doubles play would seal the deal with UND winning all three matches. The team of Kappers/Welk defeated Sloeymani/Rijalda Zeinic 8-1 and Larson/Callison took down the team of Nunez/Marina Kiefer 8-1 as well. Sween/Lawrence versus USD’s Rockne/Foster was slightly closer, but the Sioux still pulled out an 8-3 win to finish the match. The women have the next two weekends to prepare for the Great West Conference Tournament to be held in Grand Forks May 1-2. May’s GWC tournament will be the first time the women had a tournament since 2008.

FILE PHOTO > The Dakota Student Freshman Megan Sween lost in her singles play this weekend, but her and partner Mindy Lawrence pulled out a doubles win.


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left and scored three runs. After Gudmunson, Kwak flied out to left field to end the inning, leaving Gudmunson on base. Two other runners scored in the fourth, giving the Sioux a two run lead. UTPA scored two more runs in the sixth to tie it up 8-8. The most important run of the game came from Nelson who singled up the middle to score David Dafforn for the winning run. UND’s Brandon Baumgartner got the win after pitching 3.2 innings and allowed two runs to score, improving his record to 1-2. Game three UTPA would win the second game of the double header in a pitchers battle between the Sioux’s Derek Biermaier and UTPA’s Luis Flores. Flores came out the victor as the Broncos won 2-1, to get their first win of the season. No teams would score until the fifth when UND’s Kwak singled to right field and scored Gudmunson to give the Sioux the one run lead. Texas-Pan American answered in the bottom of the sixth, scoring one run and tying the match at 1-1. Flores would allow no more runs, but Biermaier allowed one more in the bottom of the eighth, giving the Broncos the 2-1 win in only eight innings. Flores pitched eight innings, allowing five hits and one run, giving him a 1-0 record overall. Game four After a slight rain delay, both the Bronco’s and the Sioux were able to take to Edinburg Field for their final game of the series. UND outlasted the Broncos, winning 6-3 and taking the series three games to one. Sophomore David Lind got the win after pitching 7.2 innings and allowing 11 hits and three runs. Baumgartner got the save, pitching 1.1 innings and allowing two hits. The Sioux began scoring in the top of the third, Bakhit reached home after a series of errors and junior outfielder Josh Ray brought in the other after singling up the middle and scored Dolmage. UTPA answered in the bottom of the third, scoring a run of their own off of left fielder Billy Donaho’s homerun. The Broncos would score two more runs in the eighth to round out scoring at three. UND scored three more runs in the sixth, two coming off of Bronco errors. The Sioux’s Ray scored the final run of the match, singling up the middle to bring in Bakhit in the top of the ninth. UTPA’s Leo Chang pitched 5.1 innings; he allowed five hits, five runs and was credited with the loss.The wins increased UND’s record to 7-20 overall and 3-5 in the conference. Next up, the Sioux take on New York Tech for a four game series in Grand Forks this weekend. These are the first home games for the men.

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2009 graduate Jessica Clausnitzer holds the record in 14.76. Butler also placed third in the high jump. senior vaulter Kate LaRoche who Freshmen Megan Gray and took second in the event with 11 Kirsten Haas took sixth and seventh feet 1.75 inch vault. respectively in the event. Both runFor freshman Megan Storstad, ners also placed in the 400 meter it took a 114 feet throw to take the hurdles. win in the javelin. Sophomore Emily Emerson Freshman Paige Kuplic had an- took second in the 800 meter run other banner in 2.15.34 and day, taking For freshman Me- third in the 1500 fourth in the run in gan Storstad, it took meter 100 meter 4:34.37. Both dash in 12.36 a 114 feet throw to times were good and fifth in to crack the the win in the enough the 200 methe UND Top ter dash in 10 list, as well. javelin. 25.26, both Senior Kristi times were Dahlheimer took good enough third in the 3000 to make UND’s top 10 all time per- meter steeplechase in 11:38.60 and formance list. sophomore Katherine Enabnit took Sophomore Cheri Boyer also eighth in the 1500 meter run to placed in both the 100 and 200 round out the distance events. meter dashes, taking eighth and sevIn the field events, sophomore enth, respectively. Mikaela Hirst took seventh in both The Sioux had three women the long and triple jump and sophplace in the 100 meter hurdles, the omore Brooke Biederstedt took most notable being junior Jessica eighth in the shot put. Butler who placed third and came Both the men and women will within .01 second of beating UND’s take part in next weekend’s Drake outdoor record, running a 14.77; Relays in Des Moines, Iowa.

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“I don’t think it’s fair that students are taking on the burden of Parking,” he stated. Trimarco believes the parking ramp is the main source of contention and cost increases. DeMolee outlined other possible sources of income for the parking office within the resolution, including selling advertising spaces in the parking ramp. Off Campus Senator Skye Mauch, who served as a student representative on the parking taskforce in the past, stated that while serving the topic of advertisements was brought up. “I don’t want to say it was shot down,” she said. “But it was definitely dismissed.” Mauch went on to explain that the committee would have had to “make time to explore other options.” Off Campus Senator Sampson Zikmund was not satisfied with the parking office’s rationale. “When I am told that they don’t have time to figure out how to make more money, as a business major I laugh in their face,” he said.

tuesday april 20, 2010 “They’re leeches sucking off of us.” Other senators found themselves on the fence on the issue. “I don’t agree with not supporting the increase but I would like to see them finding other alternatives for funding,” stated Aerospace Senator Samantha Curtis. She reasoned that the money to make repairs on parking lots that student often complain about has to come from somewhere. She suggested that the parking lots be paved with concrete, which is much more expensive than the asphalt currently used but lasts much longer. When coming down to a final decision, a majority voted in favor of passing the resolution. The Senate also passed a piece of legislation allocating $525 to this year’s Spring Fest. The money allocated pays for 350 sodas and waters available to those not wishing to consume alcoholic beverages. A student ID must be presented in order to receive the soda and water. Once the 350 run out, students will have to pay for them.

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> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu

Dakota Student April 20th  

Dakota Student April 20th

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