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tuesday september 14, 2010

DakotaStudent issue 5

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100 yearsharness at the Burtness Students the wind See SeeCulture&Media Media&CulturePage Page09 9

CONTROVERSY or ENTERTAINMENT?

Ohio preacher’s visit to campus has mixed reactions from students

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XAVIER PASTRANO The Dakota Student

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hroughout history, many people have debated about what they believe in. Groups of people take a stance for what they believe is right while others take a stand to disprove them. Some accuse an individual for corrupting and poisoning minds while others see the individual as an educator. This situation can also be applied to the present. On Thursday September 9th, there was a rather large gathering of students in the quad of the UND campus that afternoon. There were no free gifts being given away, no free food and nothing to sign up for. The students gathering around were there because of one man, and there were many opinions being shared. Tom Short, an evangelical preacher, has devoted his life to spreading the word of God at college campuses around the United States for the past 30 years. His most recent visit was right here at the University of North Dakota. For three days spanning from September 8th through the 10th, Short stood out in the quad and shared his beliefs with anyone willing to listen. Using what some parents and teachers would call an “outside voice,” Short made sure that anybody walking by would hear what he had to say. Upon arriving to the center of discussion, many students were buzzing with first impressions of Short. Victor, a junior at UND

12 Student Government and UND observatory ROTC hold 9/11 tribute sees renovation SHORT > page

Photos by NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

TELESCOPE Space viewing equipment now ready after years of fundraising and work.

MEMORIAL UND and Union honor veterans in ceremony themed “Thanks to the Student Soldier”.

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JASMINE JONES

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KATIE BACHMEIER

The Dakota Student

The Dakota Student

Nine years ago our nation was in turmoil. Terrorist attacks created a nightmare situation on our homeland, and chaos throughout the world. On September 11, 2010 our nation remembers those who served their country and those who gave the ultimate sacrifice—their life. UND also did their part in remembering the catastrophic event on 9/11 by commemorating the fallen and still serving, both on the day, and before with a memorial service. On September 9th, 2010 Student Government sponsored a memorial ceremony. The event took place in the Memorial Union, in the fireside lounge. The event has occurred at UND since the terrorist attack on our country occurred, each year baring a different name and theme. This year’s theme was titled, “Thanks to the Student Soldier.” Key note speakers included Student Government President, Matt Bakke, a UND student who was recently deployed, an UND ROTC member, and closing remarks by President Kelley. Student Government

President Bakke’s opening statements included the reason the ceremony was most appropriately held at the Memorial Union. “He [Bakke] explained that the Memorial Union is dedicated to World War Two, and that it was most fitting for the ceremony to be held [at the union] because the Union is a memorial itself,” Terran Chambers, Student Government Public Relations Coordinator said. The ceremony not only represented UND’s appreciation for those who lost their lives in the tragic

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HONOR > page

If you ask most students where the University of North Dakota observatory is, they will likely respond that they did not even know one existed. Paul Hardsen, PhD has spent the last five years renovating the place, and it is now ready to use. The observatory is about fifteen miles off campus, just south of Emerado and

the Grand Forks Airforce Base. It is, however, completely worth the drive. Paul Hardsen has restored three optical telescopes and one radio telescope. “From 2005, I’m guesstimating that I’ve put in $200,000 to what we have now is four internet compatible telescopes. Three optical and one radio telescope,” Hardsen says. The observatory was funded through several different sources. The North Dakota Space Grant, college departments and private donations have been the main source of contribu-

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STARS > page

KYLE SCHROEDER > The Dakota Student


DS datebook 02

today, september 14, 2010

> volunteer: Empire Arts Center is welcoming new recruits all day to help out at the theater over the season. wednesday, september 15, 2010

> travel: This year’s Study Abroad Fair will take place all day in the Loading Dock at the Memorial Union. Organizations and representatives will be available to discuss study abroad options with students. thursday, september 16, 2010 > conversation: Mesa Española will take be at Archive’s Coffee House from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Mesa Española is a Spanish speaking table welcome to students both new and familiar to the language, and is a great way to improve speaking and listening skills as well as a great way to meet new, interesting people.

Tell us what is happening on campus >

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friday september 14, 2010

DATEBOOK

Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

Hats off to our Sports Editor, Joel Adrian, whose feature story on a Minnesota KISS concert that was printed in our last issue was discovered by the band and posted on their official website.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

The Dakota Student editorial

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Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: dakotastudent.com > Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features

Comment

Tell us what you think: How did you feel about Tom Short visiting UND?

> He’s more than welcome > He’s too abrasive > Don’t really care > He’s overstayed his welcome

Vote now on our website as well as leave feedback on www.dakotastudent.com > The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

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Editor-in-Chief Alex Cavanaugh > alex.cavanaugh@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Erin Lord > erin.lord@und.edu News Editor Rachel Smerer > rachel.smerer@und.edu Features Editor Josh Brorby > joshua.brorby@und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@und.edu Web Editor Luke Johnson > luke.m.johnson@und.edu

business

Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Natalie Cassell > natalie.cassell@und.edu Ryan Senn > ryan.senn@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677 All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

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> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.

The Dakota Student is looking for news and sports reporters. Stop in to our office in McCannel Hall, room 170 and fill out an application. www.TheDakotaStudent.com

www.Th


DS World Brief Copenhagen explosion raises concerns

COPENHAGEN, Denmark —An explosion in a Copenhagen, Denmark, hotel toilet may have been linked to terrorist activities, the head of the Danish secret service PET said Saturday. Jakob Scharf said initial investigations indicated that Friday afternoon’s blast might have been a botched preparation for a terrorist attack. An injured man arrested shortly after the explosion was refusing to answer police questioning, reports said. Police apprehended the man after he was seen running away from the Jorgensen Hotel and into the nearby Orstedsparken park. The park was evacuated and the surrounding streets were cordoned off as explosive experts were called in to remove a suspected suicide belt around his body. After several hours, a remotecontrolled bomb disposal unit removed a bag strapped to the man’s waist. The bag did not explode when a shot was fired at it, and the suspect was taken by ambulance to hospital. Police said the man was in his 40s, of “European or North African appearance” and spoke English. His injuries were said to be not life-threatening. No one else was injured in the blast. A search of the building later turned up a pistol. Police did not say whether the man was acting alone or had accomplices.

Shoe thrown at Greek Prime Minister at protest

ATHENS, Greece—A man threw a shoe at Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou on Saturday in protest at the socialist government’s austerity measures, as thousands demonstrated against the proposed swath of spending cuts and tax rises. The shoe missed its intended target and the man was arrested along with two accomplices, radio reports said. Several thousand angry protestors rallied late Saturday in the northern city of Thessaloniki, where the prime minister was attending the opening of an international exhibition. As the crowd chanted for the austerity package, aimed at rescuing the flailing Greek economy, to be targeted at the wealthy, Papandreou repeatedly vowed to press ahead with the cuts, saying: “Yes, it must happen.” The 49-year-old assailant told reporters he was a radiologist and member of an ultra-conservative organization. He said he threw the shoe to protest government fiscal and labor reforms.

world news report thursday september 14, 2010

> Inside:

‘The American’ gets reviewed.

Healthcare problematic in Beijing HOSPITALS Low wages and poor economical conditions lead to issues for medical needs.

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TOM LASSETER

McClatchy Newspapers

BEIJING—The frail old woman sat on a small wooden folding chair, staring at the sidewalk and waiting for a bed to open up at the hospital across the street. She was carrying a sack of clothes, a ginseng root in a bottle and half a watermelon in a grocery bag. “It’s really tiring,” she said, looking exasperated. Su Qixin, 71, was scheduled for breast surgery last week, but the west campus of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital had no room for her. If she were well-heeled, Su might have bought her way in, but the wife of a factory worker from Shandong province had no choice but to sit on the street for two days, interrupted only by a night in a run-down dormitory. Although Su Qixin is just one person in a corner of Beijing, her experience is a reminder that in the shadows of China’s massive economic clout, the standard of living for ordinary Chinese still lags far behind that of developed nations. China is now the world’s second-largest economy, but many of its 1.3 billion residents face low wages, a massive

gap between rich and poor, and dysfunctional public services that breed discontent. National leaders, obsessed with avoiding any sign of civil unrest, have pledged several times to address those issues. Articles in official media this year have underlined the concern with titles such as “Country’s wealth divide past warning level.” World Bank figures show that despite the gains of recent decades, China’s gross national per-capita income is only $3,620 —124th in the world, above Angola and below Tunisia. In the United States, annual per-capita income is $47,240. Serious income disparity strains the situation further: The top 10 percent of Chinese households earn about 26 times what the bottom 10 percent earn, according to a study conducted for the Credit Suisse investment bank. The implications are clear at the capital’s leading hospitals. At Peking University First Hospital, a patient can stand in line for hours to buy a 14-yuan ticket, about $2, to see a doctor. Or a patient can pay 200 yuan, almost $30, and see the same doctor without waiting. Inside the hospital, the experience is relatively calm. For those who can afford only the $2 tickets, however, the ordeal can last all day, causing anguish and outbursts; several times this year, it’s boiled over to bloodshed. On March 10, a patient

TOM LASSETER > MCT Part of a line of people wait to buy tickets for appointments at the Peaking Union Medical College Hospital

who was unhappy with his treatment at a north Beijing hospital slipped back onto the grounds and stabbed a doctor in the head, chest and back. The doctor died immediately. On June 17, the mother of a patient at a west Beijing hospital stabbed a doctor with a fruit knife. The doctor survived with wounds to her hands, thigh and calf. Early this month, Chinese media reported that a man had pleaded guilty to murder for stabbing another man in the chest at a hospital in southeast Beijing. The two men had been competing for business from reselling hospital admission tickets. Police and health officials recently launched a campaign to discourage such scalpers. They

arrested dozens of people last month, hung bright red signs forbidding the practice and set up crowd control systems outside hospital entrances. The Chinese government last year announced a $124 billion plan to build new hospitals, boost health care subsidies and provide insurance to at least 90 percent of Chinese citizens by 2011. There’s also an economic spinoff. Fears about the cost of health care and a lack of confidence in the system are frequently cited reasons for the reluctance of Chinese to buy more goods and services. For all the official efforts, though, visits to three Beijing hospitals last week found lines at two of them and plenty of unhappy people.

Celebration in wake of disaster RELIEF Pakistani flood victims enjoy end of Ramadan amid death and destruction.

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NADEEM SARWAR

McClatchy Newspapers CHARSADDA, Pakistan— Millions of Pakistan’s flood victims on Saturday celebrated Eid-al-Fitr, the end of the holy month of Ramadan, at temporary shelters in relief camps or in the open, many with little food or water. The worst floods in the country’s history have swamped one-fifth of the country, killed over 1,700 and left more than 2 million homeless, according to the United Nations. The deluge has also destroyed millions of hectares of crops. Eight million people rely on food supplied by government or aid agencies. Pakistan has been sluggish in providing relief to the flood survivors, who have criticized the government as they celebrated Eid-al-Fitr at the relief camps across country. Aid from the world community has also been very slow. “My house has been destroyed

and with that all I had. My three daughters are wearing old clothes at Eid. I had a few hundred rupees left with me that I spent to buy new shoes for my daughters,” Zahir Ahmad said. He stood outside a tent at the Khandar relief camp in Charsadda, a district in the northwestern province of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa. “We have got nothing from the government. No one has come here to help us,” Ahmad said. Many of the flood victims were not interested in celebrating the most important festival in the Islamic calendar. “What sort of Eid we can celebrate here in these tents?” said Gul Mohammad. “Eid is for them who have a home. We have no house, no clothes. We cannot visit any relative’s house and no relative can visit us. There is no Eid for us.” The government urged citizens to avoid festivities at Eid and celebrate it with simplicity. Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani and opposition leader Nawaz Sharif visited some relief camps and met the affected people. “This year’s Eid festival is being

celebrated on such a moment of history, when a large part of country is under the devastation caused by pre-Ramadan floods,” Gilani said. “Millions of fellow countrymen are homeless and facing severe difficulties.” He said he hoped that the country would deal with the problems posed by the disaster. “No doubt, brave nations face the challenges with courage and mettle,” Gilani said. At the Governor’s House in Karachi, the capital of the southern province of Sindh and financial hub of the country, more than a dozen popular singers and TV artists spent hours with flood survivors and distributed gifts. Actresses decorated the palms of women with henna. “We are celebrating with simplicity but we are trying to converge it with the happiness of flood victims by giving them smiles,” said Sindh Governor Ishratul Ibad Khan. But those few symbolic acts were limited and provided little respite for millions of helpless people. Around 125 kilometers southeast of Karachi, dozens of half-naked children sat on graves in the Makli Hill burial ground, with no hint it

was an Eid. Their parents were too busy fetching water from a tanker that had arrived after two days, the refugees were running out of water. Hundreds of the families occupied the graveyard, with ornate tombs of hundreds of Muslim saints dating from the 14th century, when the surging waters from the River Indus flooded areas in Thatta district. Few families have been given tents by the government or the UN aid organizations. Most of them stay in the open, in the scorching heat or monsoon rains. At night, they struggle to protect the children from poisonous snakes and scorpions. “We have been here for last two weeks and still we are sitting in the open. When the sky is clear, the heat is unbearable during day time. When there is rain, we get wet and cannot find a place to sleep,” Javed Iqbal said. “Forget new clothes and some food for our children; we are dying to get water here on the day of Eid,” he added. “There is no Eid day for us, for us every day is a matter of death. We are just trying to keep ourselves alive.”


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commentary

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Ds View

Religious Debate culture and life Christian extremist Tom Short comes to campus.

The yearly appearance of Tom Short on the UND campus is always fraught with controversy. While many recognize and respect his right to free speech, we must understand that he is invited to our campus, and although many students have differing ideas about religion or politics, many can agree on one thing—Tom Short is not welcome here. This is more an observation than an opinion based on our personal views or beliefs. At almost any given minute, someone was involved with a heated altercation with the man. At one point, Short was seen dodging questions about his motives regarding whether or not he was being paid to be on our campus, and, more disturbing, Short, on a diatribe about terrorism, said, “Would I want someone blowing up the building I’m in?” At the moment he said that, he placed his hand on the shoulder of an international student watching the spectacle. At this point, the individual in the photo on the front page stood up to Short and his racist comment. The point of this example is, do we really invite this sort of spectacle to our campus? Do we really want someone here who will single out our students and accuse them of being terrorists? Do we want someone to stand on our beautiful campus and spew hateful comments about any of our students, regardless of their nationality or religious or sexual preference? No, we should not invite such division to our campus. We have had enough over the past years, and now it is time for us to, like the individual featured in the photo on our front page, stand up for our fellow UND students and make our university one that we can be proud of and safe being a part of. In a time when religious intolerance has reached new boundaries, we need to protect our community from such hateful ignorance. Another perspective of Tom Short is that the man is simply a joke. The upper classmen immediately know when he’s arrived; as nice as our flowers are behind the library, never are there as many people around the flora as when Short’s made his presence known. We call and text our friends, making bets on what bigoted slur he’ll use when we walk by. What a waste of time for those involved with H2O. Perhaps they see it in terms of “if we’ve converted just one Christian, we’ve done our job,” while the real world sees people running away from the religion the second he arrives. It seems numerous Chrisitans on campus find Short’s style and beliefs disheartening as well. His Tagline—“Tom Short: making Christians feel like idiots and making sure non-Christians stay as named.” H20 should see the trouble that they are causing by bringing this man to our campus and should acknowledge that he is not welcome here. Kudos to those who stood up to this bully. You are protecting our community and its integrity.

Editorial board Alex Cavanaugh Editor-in-chief Erin Lord opinion Editor

Rachel Smerer news Editor

Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

Study abroad offers life experience

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by the time I got home longer hair than I am proud of. Every time that someone The Dakota Student brings up studying abroad I am the first I love to travel. I love going to places one to jump in and share my experiences. that I have never been and taking the road I know Norway may not seem appealing less traveled just for a better view. This is to all (even though at least one of my two the reason that I have driven across counreaders are Scandinavian), but to me it was try four times (Florida twice, Washington the best place to go. state, and San Diego, CA). However, I got to spend time in Norway, but as much fun as I had while seeing absoI visited other parts of Europe as well— lutely amazing things (Yellowstone and enough so that I took enough photos for the Grand Canyon), those types of spring Facebook profile pics for as long as I live. break trips are just glorified tourism. Some of the adventures included taking Studying abroad is Communion at something differI met many friends, the Notre Dame ent. Cathedral in Paris had great adven- and climbing the For those of you that do not tures, some hard- mountains to look know, on Septemat the fjord below ships.... ber 15th the loading on the Preikestolen dock is hosting the Kirby Graff in Stavanger, Nor2010 Study Abroad way (if you don’t Columnist know what that is Fair. This event illuminates the many google it for me). programs that give Now, obviously my memories are students the opportunity to go to colunique, but the joy of studying abroad lege in another country. Now, many of is creating your own memories that you these signs and opportunities slip through can share with your children. I can see it the fingers of most of the students here at now—“I was in New Zealand running UND, and by the time they realize that it through the mountains with a sword just is often too late. like in the Lord of the Rings”, “This one In the spring of 2009, I was privitime I was in China I met Jackie Chan and leged to have studied at the American Chris Tucker” or “While in Australia Mel College of Norway. I met many friends, Gibson tried to kill me”. While these stohad great adventures, some hardships, and ries may or may not ever happen, studying

kirbY GraFF

abroad gives you that chance. After college, is it really plausible that one can take five months of their life and devote it to another country? Unless you are the “Most Interesting Man in the World,” this is not likely. Studying abroad gives you an opportunity to have the time of your life during the best years of your life. Look, I can understand why someone may not want to study abroad. Things that are new can scare people, and if I told you I wasn’t scared at times while in Norway I would be lying to you. It is hard to be away from your family and friends, but someone once told me that one cannot really appreciate something until it is gone. I love Minnesota and I love UND, but without living in Norway I don’t think I would appreciate them as much. Attend the fair or head over to see the helpful staff at the International Center. Either way, you will get some great information about any country that you want to study in. I did and I have yet to regret that decision. Just like rooting for your favorite team, studying abroad is something that I defend and I will continue to defend. I just hope that you have some of those convictions as well someday.

Ds

> Kirby Graff is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at kirby.graff@und.edu

Jewish faith for beginners

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Martin rottlEr

The Dakota Student

Most of my friends here know me for two things: my prop headed-ness (I’ll admit it; I’m a pilot nerd) and my unique religion. That’s right, I’m Jewish. For many here, I’m the only Jewish person they know personally. That aspect of life here doesn’t bother me. I was able to look past the fact that our school’s hero, Ralph Engelstad, was a goose-stepping friend of Adolf Hitler. The area does a wonderful job at downplaying that fact (“Oh … the Hitler birthday parties? Did I show you the Italian marble and leather seats?). Many of my friends and family were concerned about encountering anti-Semitism here. Truth be told, the worst I have encountered is sheer unfamiliarity with the concept and religion. So, let’s build some familiarity together! First things first: Jewish people do not believe in Jesus Christ as the Messiah. Most traditionalist sects of Judaism believe that the Messiah has yet to come. Lesstraditional sects believe that the idea of a one-person-Messiah is in fact a metaphor

for something bigger: a messianic age in my mom is Jewish, making me Jewish. which everybody gets along and doesn’t try This gives mother and grandmother the to convert everyone else. Our sacred book free right to the liberal use of guilt in their is the Torah, which is the Hebrew version children’s lives. of the Old Testament of the Bible. Contrary to popular belief, we Jews Traditional Torahs are hand-written do not control the world’s governments in Hebrew on large and media. We scrolls of parchment. ...we tend to take a have a lifestyle and Our Sabbath begins family values that very personal view spread out beyond on Friday night and lasts until Saturday of the conflict in the the synagogue night. We are com(our “church”). Middle East. monly referred to as This is my favorthe “chosen people” part of being a Martin Rottler ite due to a biblical Jew. You can leave Columnist your hotdish, lefse reference involving Abraham’s covenant and lutefisk at the with God. door when it comes to matzoh ball soup, Judaism is a non-preaching religion, brisket, deli food and kugel. meaning we won’t be handing out ToWe Americanized Jews have our own rahs on the corner of University Avenue version of Mecca: The Carnegie Deli in in front of the Fritz. Obviously, doing so New York City. There, you can feast on would be quite a financial burden, as they a reuben sandwich that is the size of your are very expensive, and a physical burden head. Friday night dinners with family are as they are extremely heavy. It is possible to convert to Judaism, but for most sects it is a lengthy process. Judaism is a maternal Martin > page religion passed down from the mother;

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friday september 3, 2010

New Americans treated unfairly Drivers not being safe > coverage of the September 2 episode, published the following day, a parking infraction outside The Dakota Student a Somali-owned cafe of S. Washington caught the attention of a local police officer. He then We have long since acknowledged that called the Border Patrol. T The nephew of the cafe-owner, Ahmed Grand Forks has become a growing home in recent years to hundreds of political refugees, Farrah, told the Herald that the Border Paknown upon arrival as New Americans. I, my- trol demanded to see the immigration papers self, have been witness to several positive steps of any Somali near the cafe. The situation estaken towards welcoming this increasing popu- calated and three men were handcuffed and detained until their imlation in the past year alone. I danced, ate, Critics of this par- migration status could be determined. [Check the and learned of their ticular legislation Grand Forks Herald online different cultures at the first farmer’s market of argue that it en- for the full story.] When Robin the summer (held on courages racial pro- first relayed what hapWorld Refugee Day). I have heard the stories filing... Erin Barta pened to me I felt nothing but indignation. Though I of peers who have decolumnist was not there, nor am I the veloped relationships more informed person in with different refugee families, aiding in the acclimation process and the world, it seems to me that there are several providing an invaluable service to the commu- problems with what occurred. It is true that immigrants in this counnity. On numerous occasions I have been told promising stories of the work that Lutheran try are supposed to carry their immigration Social Services and Global Friends Coalition documents on their person at all times. Even pursues. So, it is with a melancholy mind that I so, Robin described how many do not simply write of a dismaying account relayed to me just because of the value those documents carry. If they were lost, stolen, ruined, etc., they cost over a week ago by a professor of mine. I was sitting in the office of Honors Profes- several hundred dollars to replace, leaving the sor Robin David, trading stories of the week owner unequipped to defend serious accusathat had just come to an end. David, President tions of immigration status. Many of these of Global Friends Coalition, said that just the people have been here for years and years. Is it night before she had been called by the Grand entirely reasonable to require a New American Forks Herald and asked to comment an inci- to carry valuable documents with them at all dent between the Border Patrol and some So- times every day for five years? For ten? I pursued the matter of immigration papers mali New Americans. According to the Herald’s

Erin barta

Feeling okay to grieve a lost pet > heather jackson

his soft fur, even talk to him about my day and how much I loved him. The Dakota Student In June I lost one of my best Companion animals become such friends. He had been with me for a huge part of our lives. Sometimes nine and a half years. He was sweet, humans develop closer relationships beautiful and caring. Perhaps, read- with our animals than we do with er, you are thinking of a person. But other people. The animals become this best friend was my rabbit, and a consistent and enormous aspect his name was Ramone. of our lives. We are responsible for Ramone came into my life their well-being. when I was a pregnant 18-year-old. Our daily routines involve takHe came to me as a high school ing care of our animals. We expect graduate present in May of 2001. our animals to be waiting for us He was a beautiful black and white when we get home, to greet us and Dutch rabbit. The name “Ramone” show so much enthusiasm when we came from the punk band, “The walk through the door.   Ramones.” As a teenage punk Although Ramone was a rabrocker, of course I had to name bit, most would not expect how his my rabbit after an influential punk behaviors were. But he was happy band. So, Ramone, it was. when I got home. He would spend time with my daughter and I in the living room ...I wanted to hold all evening until bedhim and tell him time when he would spend the night in my how much I loved room. Sometimes he slept him. on my bed and I would Heather Jackson wake up in the middle Columnist of the night to see two cute rabbit ears at the end of my bed in the Ramone was a part of my life moonlight. He was liter-box trained when I experienced a lot of pain and would beg for treats. He was a and change. He was with me dur- wonderful friend.  ing the last part of my teenage pregSadly, Ramone started getting nancy, the abusive relationship I sick in December of last year. He was in and the few moves I’ve had would go through periods of not within the states of North Dakota eating, and I would get him on and Minnesota. He was always some meds to get his digestive track there for me. I could hold him moving again. This continued off when I felt sad and alone. It seemed as though he knew how I felt. He cuddled next to me and I would pet HEATHER > page

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a bit more online and I discovered that only one state makes it a punishable crime to not carry those papers. Under the Senate Bill 1070 or “Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act,” passed this past April, it would be a state misdemeanor to be without those documents in the state of Arizona. There is currently a federal injunction keeping the bill from taking full effect. However, critics (of what they call “Nazizona”) of this particular legislation argue that it encourages racial profiling, while advocates contend that individuals would not have their papers asked of them unless some violation of the law occurred. I enjoyed the debate between the two sides, specifically because it raised a helluva good point: immigrants are typically protected from having their papers demanded of them unless they have broken the law. Yet, violations of the law seemed irrelevant outside that cafe twelve days ago. Farrah described how the police officer’s presence attracted the curiosity of more Somali New Americans, people that had nothing to do with the initial parking confusion – they just wanted to see what was going on. These same people still were asked to show their papers when the Border Patrol showed up. Lastly, the question of why the Border Patrol was called in on a parking/driving infraction seems pertinent. Admittedly, there could have been several legitimate reasons why; I just can’t think of any. It seems pretty clear that the Border Patrol’s presence isn’t typical

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ERIN > page

Grand Forks losing text war

The city of Grand Forks is fi- gerous, but many of us (especially nally jumping on the anti-texting college students) don’t even think bandwagon. The city council re- twice about answering a text mescently passed a law that, starting sage in the middle of rush hour. A few months ago I was drivOctober 15th, makes it illegal to send text messages, check e-mail, ing down the interstate, and I got and use the internet while driving. a text message. Being the ultraThe penalty? A whopping $15 responsible young man that I am, I had my friend in the passenger fine. Car and Driver magazine re- seat steer the car while I answered cently did a [very unscientific] study Is the $15 fine in to examine the efGrand Forks really fects of texting and driving. They put a going to do any22-year-old intern thing? behind the wheel of an SUV and had Andy Kinnear him drive down an Columnist abandoned runway. There was a light mounted on the windshield to the text message. When I finished simulate the brake lights of anoth- and looked up, I saw that my er car. An observer would trigger friend, who was supposed to be the light and measure his reaction making sure we didn’t go off the side of the highway, was sending a time. They first tested his normal re- text message too! While having the action time, followed by reaction passenger steer the car while I was times while reading and sending texting wasn’t the safest thing to text messages. Then they got the do, I couldn’t believe that anybody intern drunk. They had him drive would be crazy enough to try to down the runway again (remem- send a text at the same time. We all know that texting while ber, this was a closed course and not on the road so it was safe and driving is a bad idea, yet most of legal) to compare his drunken re- us do it anyway. The Virginia Tech action times with his texting reac- Transportation Institute found that a truck driver is 23 times more tion times. The results were what most likely to get into an accident than people expected. The intern’s av- one who is actually paying attenerage reaction time when reading tion. Billboards and commercials a text message was the same as are popping up left and right to when he was driving with a 0.08% blood-alcohol content. We can all ANDY > page agree that driving drunk is dan-

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Sara tezel

The Dakota Student

Last Wednesday I was almost hit by a car. Now I know that writing an article about almost being run over may seem slightly tacky and melodramatic after Loran Carl was actually struck by a vehicle, but it will all come full circle once this article reaches a conclusion. First, let’s examine my own near miss. It was 9:45p.m. on a Wednesday night. I was leaving a meeting for the service organization that I am President of and realized that I was headed one direction to my car, while the other members who stayed late were headed in the opposite direction. Now, being that the people I hang out with are of a friendly variety, I was offered a ride to my vehicle but turned it down because A. I am a young twenty-one-year-old, B. I am blessed with legs that work, and C. I’ve been indulging in one too many fatty meals in Marketplace so I figured I could stand to burn a few calories. After parting ways with my comrades (yes, I said comrades because it’s a super sweet word), I went out the front door of the Union and proceeded to make my way to the crosswalk so that I could continue on my journey to my car. Upon reaching the crosswalk, I glanced to my left down University and saw a car roughly a city block away. I adjusted my binder and stepped into the crosswalk, unconsciously (at the time) assuming that I would be at the road divider or at least in the car’s line of sight, by the time he or she was anywhere near me. Then my binder was knocked out of my hands. Did you see what I did with that last paragraph? I left you, my faithful reader, at a cliffhanger. You’re concerned, you’re invested, your hands are shaking because you’ve put yourself in my shoes, you‘re wondering how the car managed to miss me by roughly an inch or two…or maybe you want me to just get on with the rest of the story. Now we were at the part where my binder is knocked out of my hands by a driver who was obviously not paying attention to me or the speed limit. I have several theories as to why the driver didn’t see me. The first has to do with the idea that campus is dead once classes are over. Perhaps the driver didn’t even think that someone would be in a crosswalk near ten o’clock so he or she wasn’t paying attention. The second theory has to do with texting and driving. Grand Forks just passed a ban on the dangerous “skill” because it takes the attention off of the road where it should be when one is operating a roughly 4000 pound machine. This person may have had no idea that they were close to running me over, and theory two could easily be coupled with the first one. The final theory is the least likely and has to deal with the mafia and horse heads so I’ll leave that one to the imagination. This was the closest I have ever come to being hit by a car. I can’t imagine what would have happened if I had been a foot farther in the crosswalk, and after the unfortunate event with Loran Carl, I don’t have to let my mind go crazy thinking up different possibilities. I shared this experience with every person that I’m close to and also several complete strangers who had the misfortune of being stuck in an elevator with me, and the general consensus was that traffic

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SARA > page


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tuesday september 14, 2010

NEWS

Tree dedicated for Potato Bowl Season Hispanic heritage CELEBRATE The Grand Forks community is gearing up for it’s annual fall tradition.

RESPECT Kelley and the Organization of Latino Americans honor culture.

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stephanie liden

The Dakota Student

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LISA CASAREZ

The Dakota Student

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

A Fall Fiesta Maple tree was planted behind Twamley in honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month last Wednesday, with President Robert Kelley and OLA (Organization of Latino Americans) members in attendance. OLA President Jeremy Alameda gave a speech before presenting MC Diop, director of Multicultural Student Services and President Kelley. “I would like to take a moment to reflect upon the history of Hispanic Heritage Month, the Organization of Latino Americans and the future of both within the University of North Dakota and the Grand Forks community.” According to the Hispanic Heritage Month website, “The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15 and was enacted into law on August 17, 1988.” National Hispanic Heritage month was created for “celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.” Alameda says, “OLA is a platform in which Latinos on campus and in the community can participate in and celebrate their culture.” This month is relevant because it coordinates perfectly with specific holidays in Latin America, such as September 15, which is the Independence for many countries including Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala and more. Mexico’s Independence Day falls on September 16, and Día de la Raza is a day celebrating the current identity of Latin Americans (being of mixed European and indigenous descent), in conjunction with Columbus Day which recognizes the ramifications of European influence on Indigenous cultures of the Americas. This day is celebrated on October 12th in Mexico and in many other Latin American countries. President Kelley also gave the speech at the planting, which revealed his ties to the Latino community. “I grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico. I went to school with kids who had parents in Old Mexico. [Being in that environment] I came to enjoy the history of Mexico.”

He further explained, “Growing up in New Mexico, the first music I ever listened to was Mariachi music, with the trumpets, guitars, etc.” He stressed the importance of diversity on campus, “If we understand cultural diversity, we’ll be more comfortable with it.” He went on to stress Latino contributions to society, “The Latino community has had tremendous impact on the United States.” He cited actors, singers, authors, including pop culture figures John Leguizamo and Jennifer Lopez, as well as personal friend and author Rudulfo Anaya, also from New Mexico and famous for the novel Bless me Ultima. “[Hispanic Heritage] enriches our culture. Everything from social issues, politics, to art; it just completely enriches our campus.” Alameda said in his speech at the ceremony, “Today’s dedication is symbolic of the rich Hispanic Heritage both locally and nationally and it is also a symbol of the commitment to education made by Latino students from the past, present and future generations. I invite everyone in attendance and on campus to take part in our culture today, tomorrow and forever.” To learn about different events that the organization will be hosting by going to OLA’s website http:// sos.und.edu/erabell/ola.html or by contacting Multicultural Student Services here on campus.

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> Lisa Casarez is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at lisa.casarez.2@und.edu

As the temperature in this region falls and football fans and pigskin players gear up for game season, the most anticipated and scrumptious part of the year arrives. This week, the Grand Forks community can look forward to celebrating the forty-five-year-old tasty tradition known as the Potato Bowl. Kicking off the event yesterday was Hugo’s Potato Bowl Pete Hidden Medallion Contest. The hidden medallion which is encrusted with the Potato Bowl’s emblem is hidden somewhere in the Grand Forks community. Clues have been given out since last Monday as to the whereabouts of the token. The winner of this contest walks away with $12,000 in Hugo’s gift cards, game tickets, and a place in the parade that will take place later this week. Starting today at noon, the Po-

tato Bowl USA Golf Scramble is held at Valley Golf Course in East Grand Forks, MN. Four-person teams are encouraged to try their hand at becoming champions for $95.00 per team. Tee time begins promptly at 1:00 p.m. The most popular event, Thursday’s annual French Fry Feed (sponsored by Simplot), boasts to be the world’s largest of its kind. Attendees are encouraged to enjoy fresh hotdogs with their fries, inflatable games, meeting athletes and live music. New to the feed this year is a french fry eating contest. The event will take place at University Park at 5:00 p.m. Marketing Director at the Northern Plains Potato Growers Association and Potato Bowl committee treasurer, Ted Kreis says, “the event has been known to feed over 10,000 people. Next to the [football] game, it is the biggest event of the week.” After the fry eating festivities, a fireworks display and pep rally will be held at Memorial Stadium, not far from University Park. Those who partake in Potato Bowl are encouraged to tune in to Lite Rock 104.3 to experience music

choreographed to the sparkling show, sponsored by Rydell Motors. Friday this week, there will be a luncheon held at the Alerus Center for Sioux Boosters. “The Potato Bowl started in the 1960s as a way to recognize the potato industry in the valley. Its tie to UND benefits both the college and the local potato business,” claims Kreis. To begin the end of the week’s events celebrating everything spud, the Sons of Norway are sponsoring a Potato Pancake Breakfast held from 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1401 9th Ave. South. That same morning, there will be a parade beginning on the corner of Demers Ave. and 7th St. South, and ending at the Riverwalk parking lot past 4th St. Northwest. The finale of Potato Bowl starts with a noon tailgating in the Alerus Center parking lot, followed by the football game vs. Northeastern State. More information about Potato Bowl can be found on UND’s website.

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> Stephanie Liden is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at stephanie.liden@und.edu

Research to prevent disease

SCIENCE Medical School searches for new ways to detect breast cancer early.

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ALLE MEAD

The Dakota Student

Want to do something big for Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October? As important as it is to raise money for research and awareness, sometimes people feel like they need to do more. One way is by participating in the prevention and early detection clinical trial now taking place at the UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sorry guys, this is only for women 18 and older. Registered nurses Julie Dahlman and Becka Lessard, two members of the research team, are looking for women of all races and family histories to participate in the free clinical trial. Part of their jobs

includes enrolling patients in this study and advertising awareness and research. Their work reaches more than just women on campus, however. “We see participants in Grand Forks, Fargo and Thief River Falls,” Lessard explained. Volunteers will first be screened to determine which trial is right for them. For example, women who have a personal or family history of breast cancer may be eligible for a different trial from someone whose family members have not had breast cancer. Expectant mothers who plan to breastfeed and breast cancer survivors qualify as well and may be placed into different studies. Usually volunteers only need to visit for one to three trials. If some

people want to participate in the study but think they’re too busy with work, school or both, Lessard and Dahlman said that they allow flexible scheduling. Dahlman’s and Lessard’s goal, according to one of their pamphlets, “is to develop noninvasive and minimally invasive tools to aid in preventing and detecting breast cancer.” One noninvasive method for early detection involves collecting and studying nipple aspirate fluid. As scary as this may sound, both Lessard and Dahlman assured that the process is anything but. Nipple aspirate fluid naturally exits the body when the breast tissue

CANCER > page

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the Dakota Student

NEWS

Annual Stone Soup Awards Senate meets

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on new changes

COMMUNITY Campus center looks to recognize citizens who make a difference.

GOVERNMENT Students meet and discuss transportation complaints, Greek issues.

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COLE ALLICK

The Dakota Student

The Center for Community Engagement is holding the 5th Annual Civic Engagement Awards. The event is held to recognize UND students, faculty, and departments for excellent community involvement, service learning, and community-based research. The Center for Community Engagement, created in 2004, maintains one mission statement; to link academic resources with community needs. Their main NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student purpose is to keep students aware of local, current situations and for the Center’s annual Civic En- Awards Program at the Memorial to offer support to provide for a gagement Awards (often called Union Ballroom Wednesday, November 10. better community. For students, the Stone Soup Awards).” “The Stone Soup Luncheon Nominations are can be made the organization promotes civic gets its name from an old folk tale. by any of three ways: a phone engagement and leadership. A few projects that the Cen- A couple hungry travelers stopped call, e-mail to the Center or enter for Community Engagement in a village where nobody would try forms via the Center’s website participates in are; LINK, in share their food, so they started (www.communityengagement. which students can meet and get soup from just a stone. Villag- und.edu). There are five categoconnected to individuals in their ers heard about the stone soup ries that a person can be nomipursued profession and Commu- and gradually contributed their nated in: Public Scholar Award, vegetables and herbs until there Faculty Service-Learning Award, nity Connect, was plenty of Engaged Department Award, in which If we all share our soup for ev- Undergraduate Civic Engagestudents, faculty and knowledge and skills, eryone. The ment Award, and Graduate Civic Center uses Engagement Award. community we can make for a bet- this as a mes“Students can get involved by members are sage for the nominating a candidate for any connected to ter community present-if we of the awards, volunteering to share knowlMuriel Kingery all share our working the luncheon or contactedge so they Center for Community k n o w l e d g e ing the Center for more informaare better able to deal with Engagement employee and skills, we tion” said Kingery. can make for Grand Forks Mayor Michael problems faca better community” said an in- Brown and UND First Lady ing the community. Marcia Kelley will serve a special Muriel Kingery, an employee tern for the Center, Paige Wold. The Stone Soup Awards are stone soup. The event is open to at the Center and AmeriCorps VISTA member had this to say: primarily designed to recognize the public. Reservations can be “The UND Center for Com- the work done by the community made by contacting the Center munity Engagement works to members as well as UND stu- at (701) 777-0675 or cce@und. connect university resources dents, faculty and departments edu. with community needs, primar- to make North Dakota commuily through service learning and nities better. The Civic Engage- > Cole Allick is a staff writer for The public scholarship. The nomi- ment Awards are to be given out Dakota Student. He can be reached nation period is open right now at the Stone Stoup Luncheon and at cole.c.allick@und.edu

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>

BRANDI JEWETT

The Dakota Student

Searching for student support for their latest fundraising campaign, Alumni Association President Tim O’Keefe spoke at Student Senate on Sunday. “We want to change the philanthropic culture associated with our campus,” proposed O’Keefe. He would like to see more people involved with the association’s campaign named North Dakota Spirit: The Campaign for UND. The highlight of this campaign will be the Big Give Program on October 8, when $10,000 will be given to a university department, program or organization of an audience member’s choice. The audience member would be picked at random through a text message registration process at the event. This campaign would focus on students, faculty, staff and first-time givers. Donations received from these groups would be matched one hundred percent up to $1,000. O’Keefe would especially like to students get involved. He hopes the campaign would “bubble up through the student body and take off.” Greek Housing Senator John Kappel pointed out students already pay tuition and fees to the university. “Why should students pay more?” he queried. O’Keefe explained that the donations are the student’s choice, and “are part of the educational process.” He said students should think of it as a “modest investment” in the university. Most importantly, the donations establish connection points with future alumni for the associa-

tion. If the Alumi Association can persuade students to donate their last two years of school and the three years following graduation, then this usually leads these students to donate for life. O’Keefe asked for a senate liaison to work with the Alumni Association to get students involved in the campaigns. Residence Hall Senator Matt Johnson and College of Business and Public Administration Senator Remington Zacher were appointed to the position. After hearing from O’Keefe, the meeting continued with official reports. Student Body President Matt Bakke announced the start of the Student Saving Club. Through this program students can receive discounts at local businesses when they present their student ID. Information and a list of discounts and participating businesses can be found in the Student Government office. One area of contention discussed around the campus was brought up during Governmental Affairs Commissioner Chelsea Stone’s report. The discontinuation of the 43rd street and Sixth Avenue bus stop resulted in 15 formal complaints being filed with Student Government. Currently petitions are being circulated and will be turned into Peggy Lucke, Associate Vice President for Finance and Operations, who made the official decision to close the stop. Another transportation issue was voted on in the form of a bill designating $24,000 to the continuation of Student Government’s Cab Crawler Program. The money will provide the Red White and Blue Taxi Company with $4,000 a month to maintain the current price of $3 for a single rider and $2 per person for two or more passengers. The bill passed unanimously with no debate.

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> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu


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NEWS

HONOR > From page

tuesday september 14, 2010

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events on 9/11, those who are serving their time at war, but also to commemorate and acknowledge the individuals that spent time overseas, at war, and are now a part of the UND community, sitting by our side in classes. An ROTC cadet also spoke about his ambitions and what continues his dedication to the military. “He spoke about preparing to go [overseas] and what keeps him going,” Chambers said. UND also commemorated 9/11 with members of UND student organization, Roughneck Drill Team, guarding the flag outside of the Memorial Union on Saturday, September 11th. Members of the Roughneck Drill Team are all UND students and coincidentally also all members of UND’s Air Force ROTC. The drill team ‘walked the carpet,’ Saturday all day from midnight to midnight, each hour demonstrating a changing of the guard much like the changing of the guard that is preformed at the Tomb of the Unknown at Arlington National Cemetery. “[This event] has occurred every year since I’ve been on the team, for the past three years,” Grant Anderson, Roughneck Drill Team Commander said, “it is past down, kind of a tradition.” At each hour mark a new cadet would enter with a sergeant, who then inspected their rifles, told the purpose of their demon-

CANCER > From page

stration to bystanders, and gave a few salutes. The exchanges seemingly were flawless, showing the preparedness of the cadets for this event. “We practiced for two weeks before-hand, two hours each night” Anderson said, “I made myself available for whoever wanted to practice.” Not only did the cadets have to learn how to flawlessly march, but also those who were sergeants in the changing of the guard had

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

to memorize lines in which educated those watching why they were outside of the union, guarding the flag. “It took a little more time to learn the verbage,” Anderson said, “Only three of us had to do that part of it.” Through the acts of the weekend, organizations on campus have shown that UND will always remember the events that occurred on 9/11 and acknowl-

edge their importance in our country’s history. It was shown that through the hard work and dedication it took to put both events together that UND students are willing to take time out of their busy lives in order to remember a day and reflect on its momentous effect on our nation.

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> Katie Bachmeier is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at katie.bachmeier@und.edu

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is warmed and massaged. No needles, no surgery, nothing to worry about. The research also focuses on more natural ways of preventing breast cancer, such as vitamins or natural food compounds. This trial began at UND in 2008 with the help of Dr. Ed Sauter, who is the principal investigator and physician scientist. This trial, along with other studies of breast cancer at UND, is funded by grants and approved by the Institutional Review Board, which serves to protect the patients. The team members are determined to find more ways to detect and prevent breast cancer, so they need all the support they can get. “We would encourage any females over the age of 18 to call us and see how they can help,” Dahlman added. Along with running the trial, Lessard and Dahlman will also be participating at the Grand Forks Women’s Showcase Oct. 2 at the Alerus Center and at the Breast Cancer Awareness Conference on Oct. 25. Anyone interested in participating in the trial or in receiving more information should contact Dahlman and Lessard at 701-777-4862. Regular office hours for the medical school are from 8 to 5 Monday through Friday. All people, men and women alike, are encouraged to show their support for breast cancer research and awareness this October.

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> Allee Mead is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at allee.s.mead@und.edu


DS

culture&media >

tuesday september 14, 2010

Inside:

100 The Burtness Theatre celebrates a century of student production

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SHAWN BRENNAN

The Dakota Student

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t’s 1910, and the students who make up the Sock and Buskin Society are getting ready. The knots in their stomachs are forming. I see trees, green grass and an excited crowd anxiously awaiting the first outdoor theatre performance at the University of North Dakota. That is how it works, isn’t it? The knots in the stomach bit? Has to be. I sometimes have a difficult time getting up to sing a single karaoke song in a not so crowded bar, so how do they do it? Year after year they do, and, this marks the 100th year of carrying on the tradition celebrating the written word through theatre. Can you imagine how many plays that is, how many countless knots in stomachs? They must be doing it for a reason, putting themselves through all those nerve-racking moments. And if you haven’t been to a production, you might not know why, you might instead fall in line with what Shakespeare’s first editors said, “If then you do not like him,” (or do not enjoy a theatrical performance at UND) “surely you are in some manifest danger not to understand him.” Let’s overcome that grave danger. How are you feeling today anyway? Like a king or queen? You ought to be. So why not check out a performance, pretend it’s the sixteenth century and you’re watching Twelfth Night for the first time. If I were you, though I’m not, I would imagine myself to be king, which is to say that everyone around you

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THEATRE > page

photos by: NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student FILE PHOTOS > The Dakota Student


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CULTURE&MEDIA

Visiting Artist

GUEST Alison Helm comes to UND to share her craft and advocate creativity.

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NICK GOWAN

The Dakota Student

Last week UND hosted Alison Helm as part of their Visiting Artists Program at The Edmund Hughes Fine Arts Center. A native of Mississippi, she earned her Masters of Fine Arts from Syracuse University and is currently a professor of art, coordinator of sculpture and graduate advisor at West Virginia University. From September eighth through the tenth, she had visited with students and faculty, as well as offering a lecture and a workshop on wood bending and laminating. Professor Patrick Luber said in an email regarding the visit, “The student found the workshop to be most helpful, and Alison’s lecture was will attended...in fact the room was full.” While researching Professor Helm (as I went into this article vastly unprepared) I was surprised with one of her sculptures in particular, Justified Status, which was entered in Portsmouth, Virginia’s Courthouse Galleries 2008 Outdoor Sculpture Competition. Justified Status is a metal and glass sculpture that towers over it’s viewers. Long thin rods reach toward the sky in the natural elegance as a palm tree. Above the six-foot flat base that entices those who wish to study the sculpture closer are a

THEATRE > From page

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will be your royal court (of course many will be plotting your death, so to steal the throne, but nevertheless, if you don’t feel brilliant basking in your regal[ness], at the very least you will very much enjoy the performance, which of course was prepared especially for you). So what’s on tab for the 2010-11 Season at Burtness Theatre? How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying/with music and lyrics by Frank Loesser and book by Abe Burrows, Jack Weinstock, and Willie Gilbert Directed by Emily Cherry October 14, 15, 16, 22 7:30 p.m. October 23 2 p.m. matinee Scarcity by Lucy Thurber Directed by Graduate Student Benjamin Klipfel November 16-20, 7:30 p.m.

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> Shawn Brennan is a staff writerfor The Dakota Student. He can be reached at shawn.brennan@und.edu

dozen sugar beets reaching southward towards the sun. Sugar beets, a common item in crop-rotation in this region, or more precisely the sugar refined from them, are a staple in our nations candy bars, breakfast cereals and baked goods. Choosing to use sugar beets juxtaposed with steel offers an insightful view of the industrial nature of the natural products we use in our day to day lives. The question “what is natural?” comes to mind. Last month, a judge in San Fransisco blocked the ability for a seed distributor to plant a genetically modified “round-up ready” version of the biennial plants to be planted for seed. It is in this way that Justified Status truly shines. When it had been on display, Justified Status, out in Portsmouth, Va, brought the sugar beet to the people who would largely be unfamiliar with it in their part of the country. The injunction in California (where a majority of sugar beet seed is grown) will prevent certain beets from being seen here. The transparency of the conflict over genetically modified food can be seen in the violet glass in place of the green leaves found on natural sugar beets. Or maybe it’s just a thistle. Previous artists who have visited UND with the Visiting Artists Program include; Dan Attoe, Dan Welden and Peter Kuper. The Visiting Artists Program is brought to UND in part by The Myers Foundation.

DS

> Nick Gowan is the position for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at nicholas.gowan@und.edu

ERIN >

From page

tuesday september 14, 2010

5 Thai cuisine soon

protocol for that type of situation, especially if you were to imagine the same scenario with Caucasian citizens. It is possible that the questionable practices that I have identified are not “problems” at all. Perhaps this is going to be the standard for how our law enforcement handle situations with immigrants. It is possible that the behavior that I have found so bizarre and blatantly intrusive was done so according to the conventions of their professions. Consider that for a moment and then ask yourselves if these are problems. While you ponder, consider Ali Hussein, owner of the cafe, one of the three detained from 3 p.m. to 9 p.m. for forgetting his green card at home. Hussein has lived in the United States for decade, in Grand Forks specifically for the past seven years. He’s a business owner in our community. This is the second time this has happened to him. In and of itself, that seems like a problem.

DS

>Erin Barta is a columnist for The

Dakota Student. She can be reached at erin.barta@und.edu

SARA >

From page

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coming to EGF RESTAURANT Fargo business partners gearing up to open new establishment.

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PATRICK EVANS

The Dakota Student The Grand Forks area has many different restaurants in it; there are Chinese restaurants, Mexican restaurants and a Japanese restaurant, but no Thai Restaurant. A new restaurant that will soon be opening in East Grand Forks hopes to rectify this situation. The restaurant, called Little Bangkok & Wasabi, will be opening at 300 Demers Ave in East Grand Forks and will service the Grand Cities’ desires for Thai cuisine and sushi. The owners of Little Bangkok & Wasabi are David Scheer and Thamrong (Keng) Dechawuth. They own five restaurants in the

Fargo/Moorhead area. They plan to make Little Bangkok & Wasabi a cross between their Wasabi: Sushi & Asian grill restaurant in Fargo and their Thai Orchid restaurant in Moorhead. The idea is to introduce traditional Thai dishes to Grand Forks as well as fusion cuisine including some fusion sushi. Scheer and Dechawuth don’t buy into the whole franchise scene. For their Grand Forks location, they didn’t want to build a copy of their LeeLa Thai or Thai Orchid restaurants. They try to listen to what people want and build each location based upon feedback from the community. This is what lead them to design Little Bangkok & Wasabi as the did. It’s not specifically a Thai restaurant, but will have samplings from many different

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THAI > page

on University has been busier and more dangerous this year than in the past. To the drivers reading this article, please keep your phone in your pocket, your eyes on the road and your foot ready to break. To the pedestrians, a little hesitation before crossing the road could save you a trip to the hospital. Sometimes a driver grows agitated after watching student after student meander across the road and thinks that they can beat the next (unlucky) person before he or she reaches the middle of the road. With drivers putting a little extra effort into seeing their surroundings and with pedestrians not being so cocky or bold when it comes to squaring off with 4000 pound machines, maybe we can make prevent another tragic accident.

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> Sara Tezel is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at sara.tezel@und.edu

Kathryn Korsmo, DDS


the Dakota Student

STARS > From page

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tions. The observatory has also undergone numerous renovations. “This summer, we removed a very old trailer and replaced it with something liveable...with something that has heat [We also] put a wireless network out there. We now have indoor plumbing in the trailer and central heating. There is also a plan to revamp the security system. All the telescopes can be used. Two are online and the other two here are going to be operational very soon. Then we’ll have four available, and they will be used by space studies students.” Hardsen hopes that he will be able to get an NSF proposal to do undergraduate research from colleges around the state. The internet capable telescopes can be used from anywhere around the world. This enables people to look at the North Dakotan sky from several different angles. The telescopes can be used for basic research like astronomy and photometry. If students are interested in seeing the newly improved observatory there is an open house September 20 and September 21. The observatory is open for private parties as well. While there, people are invited to see all of the hard work Paul Hardsen has invested into the

CULTURE&MEDIA observatory. Group tours or student groups are also welcome to set up a tour, even the Boy Scouts are making a trip for an over night party later this month. Space studies students currently use the observatory. Hardsen teaches the 425 space studies course at the observatory. The students all take advantage of the four telescopes and they are able to view other galaxies and comets. “We keep someone there all night in case there are simple problems. For example, the telescopes pointing in the wrong direction.” “This is really a resource for students if they want to take a class in learning how to use a telescope and basic astronomy projects. Physics students may find it interesting as well,” says Hardsen. He also encourages students from liberal arts backgrounds to take a course in space studies. Hardsen teaches from the ground up, starting with basic fundamentals that shouldn’t be too intimidating for those new to the work. One thing is for sure, UND has an observatory that is under utilized. To find out more, students can look on UND’s website or come to the open house on September 20 and 21.

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> Jasmine Jones is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at jasmine.jones@und.edu

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Giles Keyte > MCT Campus

‘The American’ visits Italy

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MOVIE REVIEW

***** > ‘The American’

ALEX CAVANAUGH

The Dakota Student Some say that George Clooney plays himself in every film he’s in, and while I generally disagree anyway, the recent film adaptation of Martin Booth’s “A Very Private Gentleman,” titled for the screen, “The American” is a film in which Clooney breaks the cinematic mold. A forewarning regarding this film: it relies heavily on the viewer’s attention to detail and develops characters through indirect explanation. For instance, rather than developing Clooney’s character through the mainstream method of scene and dialogue, much of the time Clooney is alone, and therefore the viewer becomes familiar with the character through his behavior, which is then reinforced through his interaction with other characters, namely a priest, a prostitute and an assassin. The plot of “The American” is

simple. An American assassin (Cloo- sad, and while the viewer never reney) is attacked in Switzerland while ally knows his past, we are forced lying low and flees to a small town to sympathize with him and his in Italy, where he poses as a pho- situation. It is this complicated, troubled tographer and agrees to complete a final job of machining a specialized character combined with the beaurifle for another assassin. Through tiful scenery of the Italian countrythis time in Italy, Clooney’s character side that make this film as beautiful decides that he wants to lead a more as it is, with its European style and normal life and spends much of the very western situation. Even the movie trying to get to that point. graphic sexuality in the film is por“The American” is in the same vein trayed in an artistic way, utilizing as many other Focus features, as it the same literary indirect-discourse has artistic settings and stylistic nar- style of exposition. Every aspect of this film, it seems, is beautiful in a rative. One scene that is especially travel-channel meets PBS way. Another strong component memorable is one in which Clooney is being followed by a Swedish of “The American” is its score. hit man through the narrow, ancient The soundtrack is very subtle, yet labyrinth streets of the small Italian ominous, and plays into the gentle town, at night. The lighting of the build of tension throughout the scene reflects the wet bricks of the film, reminiscent of the music in streets and sidewalks, and tension a Wong Kar Wai film or “Lost in builds steadily through the pursuit Translation”. See it for yourself, but don’t exuntil the scene’s exciting climax, involving a car chase with Clooney on pect a “Bourne Identity” or “James Bond”, think more along the lines a small scooter, of all vehicles. The driving force of the picture of “Lost in Translation” meets is Clooney’s character, the assassin “Leon”. questioning his purpose in life, filled >Alex Cavanaugh is the Editor-inwith fear of mortality and desperate Chief of The Dakota Student. He can for a normal life. In actuality, Cloo- be reached at alex.cavanaugh@und. ney’s character is very complex and edu

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ANDY>

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warn us of the dangers, but it seems like none of us can wait five minutes until we get home to respond to a friend’s “omg lolz!” Since we all know that texting while driving is dangerous, but none of us are willing to stop, this new law seems like a good idea. What’s surprising is that state legislators have twice tried pass a statewide texting ban and both times the bills failed. Is the $15 fine in Grand Forks really going to do anything? The threat of a $9 speeding ticket hasn’t really encouraged me to drive slower. Across the river in Minnesota the fine for texting and driving can be as high as $300. In Wisconsin, a second offense will soon cost you $800. Making texting and driving illegal is a step in the right direction. A $15 ticket is just a really tiny step. If the penalty for getting caught is the same price as two beers at a hockey game it’s not going to encourage anybody to stop. The city council even admits that the main point of this law is to allow police to pull people over and tell them about the dangers of texting. We already know it’s dangerous. We just don’t want to stop.

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> Andy Kinnear is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at andrew.kinnear@und.edu


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Classifieds

tuesday september 14, 2010

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services person at Kedney Moving Center, was all about. “I want students to EMPLOYMENT SERVICES SHORT > 4700 DeMers Avenue. see that Jesus is the way to God From page

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UND stated, “I haven’t been here for long, but from a first impression he seems angry, like he’s trying to force something down our throats.” While Victor was much more subtle with his reaction to Short, other students made their opinions loud and crystal clear. One student who walked by gave Short the finger and uttered an expletive in his direction. Another student shouted “Hail Satan!” as he passed by. There was also a group of students who stood behind Short and held up a rainbow flag, the symbol of the GLBT (Gay, Lesbian, Bi-Sexual, Transgendered group). Short responded to their reactions with, “People are quick to judge when you’re out here talking and holding a bible.” Short’s discussions and debates with the students varied in topics, but the most popular ones seemed to revolve around questioning the existence of a god, what makes us human, science versus faith and the recent news of the planned Quran burning in Gainesville, Florida. Short made sure to clear up any confusion about his stance on the event. “I do not endorse the burning of the Quran,” he said. “It’s not a good idea, nor is it a good idea to burn a bible.” This opened the way to a discussion about Christianity and Islam. Short stated, “I believe that the only way to Jesus Christ is through Christianity, so I do not agree with Islam.” Things took an intense turn when a male student, who stated that he had served time in the military, felt the need to defend several Saudi Arabian students from Short’s comments about his feelings towards Islam. Although there were various opinions being thrown around and many sides being taken, it was plain to see that discussion was happening, and that was the goal according to Pat Schultz, an active member of H2O ministries and the man responsible for bringing Short to the UND campus. “We want to challenge the students’ thoughts on world views that they may experience on campus,” Schultz said. “We also want to provide an avenue for students to ask honest questions in an open forum.” In response to the idea of an “open forum” several students had things to say. “I don’t think it’s about his personal intentions,” said Blue Weber, a UND student. “It’s about getting people to question things and that’s what people need.” Creighton Brown, a graduate student stated, “I feel that he’s being abrasive in hopes of starting a conversation. Being abrasive only creates a reaction rather than start a discussion.” After Short’s afternoon of preaching, I had the opportunity to speak with him and see what he

and that the word of the Bible is true,” said a raspy voiced Short. “I have a love for God and people and I want to help students make the right choices because this is an important age.” As stated before, Short has been preaching at college campuses for the past 30 years. When asked if students now days are more difficult to talk to than students 30 years ago, Short had this to say. “There are stronger anti-Christian attitudes now days, and there are fewer Christians, but the people aren’t much different. Just a few years ago the big debate was about abortion and now it’s homosexuality. The issues change, but the people don’t.” So, whether you agree or disagree, support or oppose, one cannot deny that some very interesting thoughts and insights were poured onto the sidewalks of the UND campus that day. The first amendment of the US Constitution states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Short and the students of UND definitely took advantage of this right, and they used it to defend what they believe to be right.

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> Xavier Pastrano is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at xavier.pastrano@und.edu

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KEDNEY MOVING CENTER now hiring movers and packers. Part time and full time available. Pay dependent on experience. Starting wage of $9/hour. Apply in

RENTALS 2-BEDROOM APARTMENT RECENTLY RE-DONE. Located at 2205 20th St. N. Upper lever of 3 story house. Washer/ Dryer, heat and utilities included. Close to campus, perfect for college student. $750/month plus electricity. Call 320-808-1984 for more information.

HAD SEX? HAVE QUSTIONS? PREGNANT? NEED HELP? We are here for you. FREE and 100% confidential. Pregnancy test, first trimester ultrasound, options counseling. Education on pregnancy, abortion, STD’s. Women’s Pregnancy Center, 11 South 4th Street, Suite 210, Grand Forks. 746-8866. Hours: MonThurs, 9-4:00. Please call for appointment. Visit our website at: http: www.gfwpc.org.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs

THAI >

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Asian cultures. Scheer and Dechawuth’s restaurant career began with the LeeLa Thai in Fargo. The restaurant business was new to them and they didn’t know what to expect. At the time, there were no Thai restaurants in North Dakota and they didn’t know how they would be received. Over 400 customers came to their grand opening and the restaurant just couldn’t handle it. Everything that could go wrong did go wrong, and Scheer had to shut down the restaurant for a week to regroup. They hadn’t planned on the demand for Thai cuisine in Fargo to be what it was. This gave them some idea of what the region could handle and they went on to open three more Thai

restaurants in the Fargo/Moorhead area. The idea to open a restaurant in the Grand Forks area came from talking to customers at their Fargo locations. Many of the customers seemed to be coming from Grand Forks. After visits to Grand Forks, Scheer sensed a desire for Grand Forks to have its own Thai restaurant and decided to fulfill it. He originally looked for a location in downtown Grand Forks, but couldn’t find the price that he wanted. He settled for a location in East Grand Forks, but still hopes to build another in Grand Forks at some point. Currently, they are hiring staff

for their new East Grand Forks location. To find out more about their East Grand Forks location, visit their Facebook page Little Bangkok/Wasabi. If you visit Fargo or Moorhead before Little Bangkok & Wasabi opens in Grand Forks, you can get a taste of what is coming by stopping at one of their other restaurants. To learn more about their Fargo location visit www.drunkennoodle. com, www.wasabifargo.com, or www.thaiorchid.info.

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> Patrick Evans is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at patrick.evans@und.edu


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tuesday september 14, 2010

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scores & schedules

sports

Eastern Illinois XC recap, soc>Inside: cer trip, Montana Volleyball tourney

UND vs

Football N.E. State

9/18 @8 pm

Green Bay Tour-

M&W Golf nament

9/13-14 @830 am

UND @ NDSU

Volleyball Tourney 9/16-18

Nebraska Invite

M&W CC Lincoln, Neb.

9/18 @10 am

UND football suffers tough loss NIU huskies survive North Dakota comeback

TOUCHDOWN UND had two tough road games, but now look at the home opener.

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BRANDON BECKER The Dakota Student

After a 45-0 defeat at the hands of Idaho, the North Dakota football team was more than determined to bounce back strong against Northern Illinois University. It wasn’t going to be easy having to go on the road for the second straight week against a great football team. UND, just like in Idaho, got off to a poor start. Junior NIU running back Chad Spann broke free for a 79yard touchdown run to open the game, creating an early deficit for UND. It wasn’t exactly the way Head Coach Chris Mussman wanted his defense to start the game especially after giving up 45 points the week before. Spann totaled 140 yards on the ground on 21 carries, however the real story of the game was Huskies’ quarterback Chandler Harnish. Harnish had a game-high 178 yards rushing to go along with 146 yards through the air. NIU was able to jump out to a 13-0 lead after Harnish was able to connect on a four-yard pass to Martel Moore midway through the first quarter. The Huskies added a field goal early on in the second quarter, to take an amounting 16-0 lead. It looked as if North Dakota was on their way to being blown out for the second consecutive

week until Harnish made a crucial mistake. He was driving the Huskies down the field trying to get them into field goal position before the half when he threw a deep out route that was picked off by UND cornerback Dominique Hawkins and returned for a touchdown. The 63-yard interception return by Hawkins was the first touchdown of the year for North Dakota and it happened with only 13 seconds remaining in the second quarter. After a successful PAT from Zeb Miller, the score was 16-7 for the remainder of the half. Neither team was able to get their offense going the first couple of drives in the third quarter. Senior UND quarterback Jake Landry ended the score drought when he hit freshman receiver Greg Hardin for an 85-yard touchdown that brought North Dakota within two points. It not only was Hardin’s first career touchdown, it was UND’s first offensive touchdown this year and it couldn’t have come at a better time. It didn’t take long for NIU to respond and take back the momentum. The Huskies went on a four-play, 52-yard drive, which was capped by a 40-yard touchdown run by Harnish, putting the Huskies back up by nine with 14:53 remaining in the fourth quarter. With the UND offense unable to get anything going, Chris Anderson stepped up and blocked Northern Illinois’ Josh Wilber’s punt to give UND the ball at NIU’s 31-yard line. The offense would stall and Miller came on to make a 40-yard field goal to make the score 23-17.

UND’s defense held up and North Dakota got the ball back one last time with a chance to pull off the upset. Landry was able to get the offense to the NIU 27-yard with 11 seconds remaining. His first pass was intended for Hardin but was broken up by Rashaan Melvin leaving time for only one more play. There wouldn’t be a miracle finish as Landry’s final heave was picked off by Tommy Davis to end the game. While UND dropped to 0-2 on the season, they have to be happy with Hardin’s performance. The freshman caught six balls for 171 yards and was the only UND receiver to have over 25 yards receiving. After a rough first game, Landry bounced back throwing for 261 yards with one touchdown and one interception. North Dakota’s running game was unable to get anything going as they totaled just 67 yards on 31 carries. Next up for UND is the much anticipated Potato Bowl where they will take on Northeastern State in their home opener this Saturday.

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> Brandon Becker is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at brandon.becker2@und. edu

RB Josh Murray jumps for a score.

A UND ball carrier is tackled. UND will try to achieve their first victory against Northeastern State Riverhawks this Saturday for the Potato Bowl. The home game is at the Alerus Center with a kick off time at 4 p.m.

A North Dakota DB defends a pass against the Huskies.

photos by SCOTT WALSTROM/NIU MEDIA SERVICES

WR Greg Hardin fights with a defender for a catch.


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tuesday september 14, 2010

SPORTS

Womens Soccer UND Cross Country loses on the road runs to first in Illinois (5-1-0) while Brittany Kindzierski, Hall, Jessie Pettit and Gina Soto all recorded assists. Junior goalkeeper Sara Kaltwasser showed promise in making 10 saves in her first start of 2010 as the Miners out-shot UND 29-14, Devon Roehrich while also attempting nine corner The Dakota Student kicks to UND’s six. “I’m glad we got the win,� UTEP head coach Moving to Division I will no Kevin Cross said. “We had a great doubt lead to some rough patches crowd, and they certainly gave us in all sports, especially when fac- some extra energy tonight.� ing new opponents and traveling UTEP controlled the tempo literally across the country. The and possession from the beginwomen’s soccer team has faced ning, producing a pair of shots on a difficult test thus far into the goal within the first few minutes 2010 campaign, and they entered of the game. this past weekend still in search of UND’s Monica Stierman was their first victory. up for the task both times howFriday ever, stuffing night’s affair tries We have nothing respective in Las Cruces, by Anoop Josan New Mexico, to hang our heads and Schultz. had North Dakota’s about. We played North Dakota taking initial opportuon the Aggies our best soccer to nity came off a from New corner kick at date. Mexico State. 3:58. A service Kristen Gay into the scoring Defense ruled the Head soccer coach area found the early parts of foot of Kelsey the game, as neither team could Zachman, but Kaltwasser was in attempt a shot until NM State good position to make the stop. scored at 8:24 in the first half. Coach Gay felt fatigue was Sophomore Crystal Burns picked a major factor in UND’s perforan opportune time to score her mance, and that the pressure of first goal of the year, putting the playing two tough programs in ball in the top left of the net past 36 hours wore on the team. “It’s UND goalkeeper Monica Stier- tough playing back to back games man. like that against good teams,� Gay The Aggies out-shot North said, “The difference was their Dakota 7-5 in the first half, with ability to put their chances away.� sophomore midfielder Cassie De Junior forward Rachael Leon attempting a game-high Loomis led the team with five three shots. shots and Stierman finished with After halftime, the Aggies eight saves for UND, who look to and North Dakota continued to return to action next weekend in struggle on the offensive end, with the Montana Tournament facing UND out shooting the NM State off against New Mexico on Friday shot just 8-4 after intermission. at 4 p.m. and then following with Despite the losing effort, North Montana Sunday at 2:30 PM. Dakota did win the shot attempt battle 13-11, but it wasn’t enough > Devon Roehrich is a staff reporter to hold off the Aggies, who ended for The Dakota Student. He can be up victorious by a score of 1-0. reached at devon.roehrich@und.edu The Aggies had as many as eight different players attempt a shot at Stierman, and standout redshirt freshman goalkeeper Mikaela Bitner led the Aggie defense with nine saves. UND coach Kristen Gay was pleased nonetheless. “We are very happy with this result,� Gay said. “[We had] nerves early on and NMSU buried one early but we kept fighting and created chances against a very good team. We have nothing to hang our heads about. We played our best soccer to date. Monica Stierman had a breakout game for us.� Saturday’s battle was not quite as promising. North Dakota battled the University of Texas at El Paso at the Miners’ University field on Saturday night, and they once again came up on the short end of the scoreboard, 3-0. Tess Hall scored nine minutes into the first half, and UTEP was never seriously threatened on the way to recording a 3-0 win against North Dakota. Tori Martyn and Skye Schultz also scored for the Miners

STRUGGLES UND still searching for elusive first win after dropping two games on the road.

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TERRAIN North Dakota men’s and women’s teams finish high in road meet.

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kyle rudningen

The Dakota Student

The UND women continued their success and won the Eastern Illinois Panther Open on Friday. Once again, they were led by junior Lindsay Anderson. Anderson dominated the field, beating the secondplace finisher by 25 seconds with her time of 17:41.78. The UND women competed against Eastern Illinois University, Southern Illinois University and Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville. The meet scoring was performed head-to-head with all the teams running at once. Eastern Illinois gave the UND women strong competition. Eastern Illinois scored 31 compared to UND’s 26 in their head-tohead match up. (The scoring system is like golf: lower scores are better.) UND’s average time was 18:32.05 compared to Eastern Illinois’ average time of 18:43.94, which was good enough for a second-place finish for the EIU Panthers. Southern Illinois scored 32 compared to UND’s 25. Southern Illinois’ average time was 19:02.00. Lindsay Anderson wasn’t the only woman responsible for a UND victory on Friday. Three more juniors managed top-ten finishes. Sisters Katherine and Meghan Enabit finished 5th and 9th, respectively, with times of 18:17.85 and 18:39.63. Emily Emerson finished with a time of 18:30.06 which earned her 6th place overall. The UND women had six freshmen compete in the 5k race. Kahla Erickson led the pack of freshman with a 19th place finish and a time of 19:30.93. Casie Gates finished 25th with a time of 19:51.87.

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Other UND runners who com- 25:59.00. Kyle Economy continues to impeted were Taylor Pintar, Savana press. In only his second collegiate Weller, Victoria Lutz, Brittany Ungs, race, the freshand Anna Lipeman from Victusky. Pintar Anderson dominattoria, Minneplaced 31st ed the field beating sota, ran a time (20:17.32), of 26:23.05— W e l l e r the second-place by good enough placed 33rd for an 18th 25 seconds. (20:29.99), place finish. Lutzplaced34th Kyle Rudningen The UND men (20:30.54), Staff reporter have a younger Ungs placed team than the 35th (20:35.10) women. and Lipetusky placed 38th overall Adam Stainiger, a junior from (20:55.31). Chisholm, Minnesota, is the only The UND men did not fare other upper-classman on the team quite as well as the women. besides LeBlanc and Rose. He ran The UND men defeated Southa solid time of 26:58.24 for a 26th ern Illinois University-Edwardsville overall finish. with a score of 23 to 33, but the Other competitors for the UND UND men fell to a tough Eastern men included freshmen James Dean, Illinois group 23 to 33. Eastern IlRoss Nelson, and Jerrod Braam. linois was led by medalist Matthew Dean finished 32nd (27:19.89), Feldhake with a time of 25:39.69. Nelson finished 35th (27:44.90) and UND senior Josh LeBlanc ran Braam finished in 40th place overall an outstanding race coming up only (28:02.82). one second short of Feldhake’s time. The UND men and women will LeBlanc, an International Falls nano doubt hope to keep improving tive, finished with a time of 25:40.67 their team and individual finishes for second place. Last week at the as they travel to Lincoln, Nebraska, Ron Pynn Classic at Ray Richards next Saturday for the Woody GreeGolf Course, LeBlanc finished in no/Nebraska Invitational. 4th. Tyler Rose, a junior from Brainerd, Minnesota, finished with an > Kyle Rudningen is a staff reporter impressive race himself—managing for The Dakota Student. He can be a 7th place finish with a time of reached at kyle.rudningen@und.edu

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the Dakota Student

North Dakota has mediocre results at Montana tourney VOLLEYBALL UND women beat Temple and Montana before losing to Utah.

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TIMOTHY BOGER

The Dakota Student

A sweep at the hands of Utah State stopped UND’s volleyball team short this weekend in the championship game of the Montana Invitational tournament in Missoula. Utah State’s 3-0 defeat ended a nice weekend for North Dakota (8-3), who knocked off big-name schools Temple University and host Montana. Friday, North Dakota women overcame a few early deficits to knock off the Temple Owls in the first ever meeting between North Dakota and the large Temple school. North Dakota won 3-1, dropping the first game 26-24 before winning three straight 25-22, 2624, 25-18. Right side hitter Erin Joki, outside hitter Devin Trefz and middle-blocking senior Tiara Russell all had double-digit kills in the four-set match. Joki had thirteen, Trefz twelve, and Russell eleven. Senior Courtney Halvorson led the team with 16 digs. Teammate Annika Smed, a junior, was right behind with 15 digs. Saturday morning, UND knocked off the host of the tournament, Montana, in a five set nail biter. It was rematch of last year’s Montana invitational, but this time UND came out the victor instead of the Grizzlies. North Dakota defeated Montana 19-25, 25-20, 25-17, 23-25, 15-12. UND were able to win largely

thanks to Smed, who posted 14 kills and also added 10 digs. She was among five players with double-digit digs against Montana. Halvorson led the team with 18. Freshman Nikki Husfeldt (13), junior Taylor Bohannon (11), and freshman Erica Turner (10) were the others. Trefz led the attack with 18 kills. Husfeldt took the vast majority of the sets, notching 54 set assists. North Dakota’s party ended with a defeat at the hands of Utah State. The undefeated Aggies (90) swept North Dakota 25-19, 25-15, 25-19 to win their third preseason tournament in as many weeks. Smed, who was named to the all-tournament team, tallied her second double-double of the weekend and sixth of the season. Her ten kills led the team and her 13 kills was second only to Halvorson who had 18. But the Aggies’ defense stuffed North Dakota’s attack, forcing 29 Sioux errors and blocking 17 attacks. North Dakota has lost just once in each of their first three tournaments. Their next task will be the North Dakota State tournament just down the road in Fargo. The four-game tournament begins Thursday (September 16th). The tournament features the UND against North Dakota State, South Dakota State, South Dakota, and Tulsa. Thursday’s match against NDSU will be the first since 2003. UND begins their regular season—and conference schedule— on Saturday the 25th against South Dakota.

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> Timothy Boger is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@und.edu

MARTIN > From page

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a common occurrence; my family uses these as the one night a week we can discuss our bodily issues. Our holidays tend to be grand events in binge eating with the moral of many of their background stories being “They tried to kill us, we won, let’s eat.” Sadly, throughout our history, Jews have been chosen for much more than just a covenant with an omnipotent being. I had a Bar Mitzvah when I was 13. It wasn’t just a huge party, because there was lots of studying involved and I had to lead an entire service. Afterwards, however, there was a brunch and a “celebration” (party) that included broomball and dancing for family and friends. Hebrew is a common language that is encountered during synagogue services and is the official language of Israel. Old Jewish people also speak Yiddish, a language that is a mix of German, Hebrew and English. Oy Gevalt, schmuck, shtupp and schmooze have found their way into mainstream language. Israel is our spiritual homeland. As such, we tend to take a very personal view of the conflict in the Middle East. It is the stated policy of the government there that at any time Jews can exercise what’s called their rightof-return, meaning that if I wanted to, I could drop everything and move there with no restrictions. Some of my friends have actually done this. I have never been to Israel before, but will hopefully be going soon. See? Judaism isn’t that complex of a religion! We don’t have horns, we do tend to have large noses, and we aren’t in control of your television. Part of my religious education as I was growing up involved the study of many religions – Christian, Muslim, Buddhist and Hindu. I would encourage everyone to do the same. In the process of learning about someone else’s beliefs and morals you can and will strengthen your own. I hope I haven’t left you too fartootst. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to get off my tuchas, grab a nosh and kibbitz with the whole mishpocha, including my bubbe.

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> Martin Rottler is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at martin.rottler@und.edu

SPORTS

HEATHER> From page

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and on until May when he completely stopped eating for more days than he ever has. Suddenly, I started to force him baby food and critical care food, give him more medications and tried to cuddle and comfort him more than I have. There are no rabbit-savvy veterinarians in North Dakota, and even though the vet I saw at Petcetera did an awesome job, I called rabbit-savvy vets in Minnesota and contacted the House Rabbit Society. They were able to talk to the vet at Petcetera and give some advice. In the end, I did everything I could and was thinking of euthanizing him. He died peacefully with my partner and I at his side at 11:30p.m. on June 17. Grieving his death was one of the hardest things I have even done. The first few days I was extremely numb. My body ached and I couldn’t eat. I was in denial; I did not want Ramone to be dead. I wanted him to be alive and I wanted to hold him and tell him how much I loved him. The grieving process is still hard; I still tear up when I think about him. I still go into denial and get angry about his death. Reading books about pet loss was extremely helpful in this process. It also made me feel okay about my feelings. Of course, the thoughts came up about how he was “just a rabbit,” but he wasn’t. He was part of my family and I loved him very much. Nothing will ever replace that. Many of us on campus have companion animals or have had them in the past. Many may have experienced a companion animal’s death. In my experience, it was helpful for my grief to hear stories of other’s experiences. It has helped me process the emotions associated with grief. When people grieve, they are expected to move on too quickly. However, I think processing the emotions someone needs to have is extremely important. Our animals are a huge part of our lives; it is okay to grieve their deaths—we need to—so we can accept the fact that they are physically gone, but not from our hearts and minds. Solidarity to those who have lost an animal friend.  

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> Heather Jackson a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at heather.jackson@und.edu


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SPORTS

tuesday september 14, 2010


Dakota Student September 14th