Issuu on Google+

the volume 128

Today Today

tuesday tuesday september april 14, 19, 2010 2011

DakotaStudent issue 47 5

37°/ 73°/2753

Reaching the students, faculty and staff of the University of North Dakota since 1888

Local Local Weather Weather Forecast Forecast

Wed. Wed.

45°/4727 Thurs. 47°/ 75°/ 75°/3555

Provided by: UND Weather Update. www.atmos.und.edu

TPS to bring speakers to campus

>

Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

TROUBLED MN the TWINS Students harness wind See See Media&Culture Sports PagePage 10 9

>

STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

The first ND GLBTQA Conference at UND will take place April 30. The conference, which is organized and hosted by the UND Ten Percent Society, is the first of its kind at UND and will bring nationally renowned speaker and equality activist Robyn Ochs and Kathy Fick, the director of Christus Rex, and Dee Ann Duchane, a transfeminist, Trans-activist and LGBT recovery advocate from the Fargo/Moorhead area. The conference, which will be held at Gamble Hall, will start at 8 a.m. with registration and checkin, then will feature an opening talk by Kathy Fick of UND Christus Rex. Following the opening speaker will be a workshop session, then, in the afternoon, the keynote speech will be given by Robyn Ochs. Ochs is an award-winning teacher, speaker and activist and is the editor of Getting Bi: Voices of Bisexuals Around the World and other publications. After the keynote, two more workshop sessions will fill the afternoon, with the closing speech delivered by Dee Ann Du Shane, an active Transfeminist, Transactivist and LGBT recovery advocate. Du Shane is involved with Tri State Transgender, Rainbow Recovery and the Pride Collective and Community Center. The conference will wrap up with entertainment at Smith Hall. For registration information, visit ndglbtaconference.com and fill out the registration form.

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student The Sorlie Bridge between Grand Forks and East Grand Forks sits at the water’s level as the Red River crested last Thursday afternoon at 49.6 feet (as pictured). The river’s highest point, reached in 1997, was 54.35 feet.

Honors to hold conference > Students present research as part of academic program

BRANDI JEWETT

“We are encouraging students to get involved in research during their undergraduate studies,” says The Dakota Student Brian Schill, the program’s Undergraduate Research Coordinator. After picking a topic and usprovides seing various research methods, Graduate schools niorsThewithconference a platform to present projects spanning multiple seand employers like their thesis and research findings. mesters will yield fruit for stuyear 28 students will be predents involved in the Honors to see these kinds of This senting. Program. things... Students begin their preparaThe program is holding its tion for the project during their 13th annual Honors Conference Brian Schill junior year and work closely tomorrow from 9:15 p.m. to 5 honors professor, UND with an advisor throughout the p.m. The event is free and open project’s duration. They create a to the public. In order to graduate from the program, students research question and must design experiments or are required to complete a research-intensive project, complete with a thesis statement and original THESIS > page research.

6

Senate talks conference, by-laws TOPIC LINE Support sought for GLBTQA event and changes to Stu. Gov. discussed

>

BRANDI JEWETT

The Dakota Student

During a brief meeting Sunday, Student Senate approved one resolution and one bill. The approved resolution requested Student Government’s support for the upcoming North Dakota GLBTQA Conference on April 30. The resolution’s presenters said conference is the first of its kind

at UND and if successful may become an annual event. There is also potential it may travel to other campuses. The resolution received unanimous approval. Also approved was a bill laying out changes to the Student Government by-laws. One major change adds the stipulation that bills and resolutions must sit for a week in all subcommittees. The bill’s presenter, Garrett Wedan, said the changes were made due to complaints from past senates regarding not having enough time

SENATE > page

6

NATHAN TWERBERG> The Dakota Student

Student Organization Funding Agency (SOFA) chair Joshua Raynes appears at Senate to seek approval for several SOFA liaison positions.

Substance use trends see shift ILLEGAL Research shows decrease in alcohol consumption, drug arrests increase.

>

MEGAN TALLEY

The Dakota Student

New research shows that North Dakota college students are drinking alcohol less and smoking marijuana more. A study was conducted last year using approximately 4,000 students across North Dakota’s 11 public colleges. The study was conducted by Jane Frisch in Jamestown, ND. The study showed that incidents of having five or more drinks in one sitting dropped from almost 51 percent to about 48 percent, with student pot smoking rising slightly to 23.5 percent. The national rate is at about 31 percent, according to Frisch. Frisch says students are having fewer drinks per week and drinking less often. She also said that almost 30 percent of students hadn’t had a drink in a month. “Drug numbers are on the rise and have been for a few years now,” said Tracy Meidinger, Lieutenant with the University Police Department. Meidinger says drug arrests and offenses are way up. “I fear drug numbers [will continue] to go up,” added Meidinger.

USAGE > page

6


DS datebook 02

today, april 17, 2011

> symposium: Physics and Astrophysics will host a public lecture on “General Relativity: A Simple Explanation,” presented by UND student Matthew Brorby at 8 p.m. in Witmer 116. Weather permitting, the talk will be followed by a telescope viewing session. wednesday, april 18, 2011 > presentations: The Honors Department will host the Honors Conference from 9:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the seconf floor of the Memorial Union. thursday, april 19, 2011 > talk: Joseph Hartman of the Geology department will give a lecture on “India and the Northern Great Plains—Integrating Fossil Histories at the End of the Mesozoic” at the NDMOA with a reception at 4 p.m. and the lecture at 4:30 p.m. Tell us what is happening on campus >

*

tuesday april 17, 2011

DATEBOOK

Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

The DS is looking for editors for the upcoming year. Pick up an application at 170 McCannel Hall.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

The Dakota Student editorial

Editor-in-Chief Alex Cavanaugh > alex.cavanaugh@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Erin Lord > erin.lord@und.edu News Editor Rachel Smerer > rachel.smerer@und.edu

>

Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: dakotastudent.com

Features Editor Megan Sevigny > megan.sevigny@und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@und.edu Web Editor Madi Whitman > madisson.whitman@und.edu

> Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features

Campus notes

>Criminal Mischief - Four instances: 450 Stanford Rd., 3530 University Ave., 3601 University Ave., 3333 University Ave. > Theft of Property - Four instances: 425 Oxford St., 3303 University Ave., 2901 University Ave., 500 Stanford Rd. > Fire Call - Three instances: 15 23 St. N., 314 Cambridge St., 3980 Campus Rd. > Other reports - Other Assist (440 Stanford Rd.), Ingesting Controlled Substance (400 Stanford Rd.), Welfare/House Check (2891 2 Ave. N.), Noisy Party (1100 Hamline St.), Found Property (200 State St.), Accident-Property (276 Centennial Dr.), Theft from Motor Vehicle (3500 University Ave.), Harassment (3980 Campus Rd.).

business

Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Alexandra McClauflin > alexandra.mcclaflin@und.edu Kyla Lindstrom > kyla.lindstrom@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677 All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

> The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

>

> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.


the Dakota Student

NEWS

03

New alumni center to come The stigma of motherhood ADDITION UND’s new building, funded by the Gorecki family, is set to be built by Sept. 1.

>

LISA CASAREZ

The Dakota Student

It has been fifteen years in the making, but the new UND Alumni center will start to become a reality very soon. The new Gorecki Alumni Center is set to start construction this year, according to Tim O’Keefe, CEO of the Alumni Association. “We are in the phase, and we plan to start in June.” According to a UND press release, the site was approved last November and the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education gave approval for a site west of the Chester Fritz Auditorium. The long awaited building project will accommodate an over-due need for space for the Alumni Association as well as the closely related UND Foundation. As of now, the Alumni Association does not hold events or gatherings on campus, or sometimes not all due to “lack of facility.” O’ Keefe explains that between 1889 until now they haven’t had a building to meet their needs. “In 122 years, we have had alumni, [but] we have never had a place to call home.” The namesake of the building comes from Dorothy and Benedict Gorecki, who have donated $4 million as part of the $10.5 million for the building.

The Gorecki’s, from Milaca, Minnesota, are founders of Gorecki Manufacturing. According to The Alumni Review, the Gorecki’s are “long-time supporters of the University” and highlight the reason why they wanted to financially contribute to the new Alumni Center. “It has more to do with furthering education,” said Benedict Gorecki. “The fact that the UND Alumni Association and UND Foundation connects alumni with each other and is the fundraising arm for the University really appealed to us.” The Gorecki’s have also made previous contributions to the UND Foundation. As for how the new building is going to affect current students, O’ Keefe says, “We certainly want the center to have full use; the whole campus because we look to students as future alumni.” The first floor will contain meeting rooms and serve as a place to hold gatherings, while the second floor will provide sufficient office space for the UND Foundation and the Alumni Association, who are currently separated between the J. Lloyd Stone house (a.k.a. Oxford house) and the Strinden Center on University Avenue. “We are two separate organizations, but we work together,” says Milo Smith, Director of Communications for the Alumni Association. “As of now we have zero interaction with the current student body,” says O’Keefe. “In addition to current students, faculty, staff and administration, the Gorecki Alumni Center will provide a

warm and welcoming home for alumni and friends, corporate visitors and prospective students and visitors.” O’Keefe also highlighted how the building is aiming for LEED certification by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). “Students associate a high level of standards with the University and we want to exemplify that with the construction of the building.” LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design which is a voluntary certification program that tests the energy efficiency and environmental sensitivity of buildings. According to the USGBC website, “LEED provides building owners and operators a concise framework for identifying and implementing practical and measurable green building design, construction, operations and maintenance solutions.” UND press reveals how the center has finally become a reality as “legislation allowing for its construction has been in place since 1997. Fundraising for the project actively began in 2007. To date $7.3 million in commitments have been secured with the goal of raising $10.5 million.” O’Keefe elaborates,” It is projected to be a fourteen month phase, and the building is expected to be done September 1, 2012. “There will be a celebration upon the completion of the Gorecki Alumni Center during homecoming of the 2012-2013 academic year.

DS

> Lisa Casarez is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at lisa.casarez.2@und.edu

RESEARCH Professor Heather Terrell talks about some of society’s stereotypes of women.

>

Katie bachmeier The Dakota Student

On Thursday, April 14, The College of Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary Speaker Series welcomed speaker and UND psychology professor Heather Terrell on the topic of “Pregnancy and Motherhood: Stereotypes, Stigma, and Social Location” at 4 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Library. The hour of insight allowed attendees to better understand and appreciate pregnancy and motherhood in the view of society. The talk addressed common questions about how motherhood is socially constructed. Terrell brought to the surface many socially structured views of how motherhood and pregnancy is viewed by society, both positively and negatively. She also illustrated to those who attended the judgments surrounding pregnancy and motherhood and how they specifically reflect and correlate with matters of age, race and class. Terrell also presented research on the relationship between abortion and mental

health. Such topics are ones that many forget about when thinking of pregnancy. She said that it is very seldom that families or individuals seriously think about the mental health issues many women face when constructing judgments of pregnancy and motherhood. Terrell also presented new research about judgments that are imposed upon women in relation to pregnancy and motherhood, specifically focusing on how the decisions women make about pregnancy and motherhood are perceived by others, and how women may be stigmatized for their childbearing decisions and experiences. The College of Arts and Sciences Interdisciplinary Speaker Series invites many speakers throughout the campus staff and faculty to present on controversial and intriguing topics each semester. Those who attended were able to look past such a common subject­—motherhood— and see it magnified to every detail, judgment and social ‘norm’, thereby allowing a new appreciation to take form. The hope is that students and other attendees gain better understanding of what is going on in academia and to obtain a more balanced view of the world.

DS

> Katie Bachmeier is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at katie.bachmeier@und.edu


04

>

commentary

CommentAry

DS View J. Crew

meDiA Controversial advertisement makes our culture reflect on its values. Isn’t is strange what gets coverage these days? Three wars and a nation in economic peril, and we are concentrating on toes—well, to be fair to the critics, pink toes. J. Crew recently published an [unknowingly] controversial advertisement where the company’s president, Jenna Lyons, is pictured with her five year old son, playing on a Saturday afternoon. Under the photo of Jenna holding her sons freshly painted toes, there is a caption saying, “quality time: Lucky for me, I ended up with a boy whose favorite color is pink. Toenail painting is way more fun in neon.” In response, the media decided to take on the persona of our inappropriate, overreactive uncle. You know, that one that makes all the uncomfortable and ignorant comments at Thanksgiving. The conservative media in particular dubbed the picture as “blatant propaganda celebrating transgender children.” Really? First off, this argument is completely overblown. Children at that age simply play; they are not being conditioned for anything. Some little girls like playing in the dirt, while some little boys will play with a Barbie no matter how many times mom and dad try to replace her with a G.I. Joe. They are not making a political statement; they are just being kids. More importantly, though, is what this “controversy” says about our cultural values. What is wrong with a little boy liking nail polish? Even if painting toenails isn’t a traditional masculine practice, who really cares? Why does this bother us so much? The 20th century ushered in an enormous amount of progress toward equality, and the 21st century is close on its heels in terms of speedy change. Despite these positive changes, the J. Crew ad is proof that there is much more to be done. When the media feels that a five year old with pink nail polish is proof of a liberal agenda to destroy the nation’s value system, it is obvious that gendered norms are still very stifling. If a little boy cannot wear nail polish, does that mean a little girl should not play catch? If it is deemed as too “girly” for a boy to play with the color pink with his mother, is it equally disturbing for a little girl to be interested in blue Tonka Trucks? Even if the advertisement is crossing gender boundaries (and that is a big “even”), that should be taken as a positive, not a negative. Gendered norms are completely artificial and constraining, and their usefulness is wrapped up in maintaining a very conservative, harmful status quo. They are not something to help propel our society forward. The J. Crew ad has received a lot of notice, and many of us want to speculate as to why. But at the end of the day, intellectualizing—although important—may be unnecessary in this situation. Because, come on people…it’s just nail polish!

editorial board Alex Cavanaugh editor-in-Chief Erin Lord opinion editor

Rachel Smerer news editor

editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

Liberal focus on language

>

HeAtHer JACkSon The Dakota Student

Recently the NBA commissioner David Stern fined Kobe Bryant $100,000 for using a homophobic slur. While I do not support what Bryant said, do not agree, and am a part and an advocate of the LGBTQ community, the fine shocked me. Many LGBTQ organizations applauded the fine and demanded an apology from Bryant. He did apologize. He is however, appealing the fine (honestly, I don’t blame him). Once he apologized, it seemed as though there were sighs of relief, as if, homophobia was erased because Bryant apologized and got a fine. $100,000 will do nothing (where does that money even go? To help the LGBTQ community? Probably not). My first thought was that Stern fined him to make the NBA “look better” by trying to “combat” homophobia. When in fact, fines will not make homophobia go away. It only sets up a situation in which people will fear saying that word because of the fine. It doesn’t set up a situation in which people actually communicate how they feel when they hear that word. In other words, the fear of the fine is why people won’t say the word, as opposed to discussing how it impacts them or actually doing something about homophobia. How about the many players who have been accused of rape? Some of them are not fined as much as Bryant was. One example is Garrett Wittels, a baseball player who got a $10,000 bail for being accused of rape. He also was cleared to go to practice for his team and the court case is still pending. He raped 17-year-old girls. Raped. He did not say an offensive word; he changed these girls’ lives forever. Wouldn’t it be more productive

to have conversations about how one feels when they hear a word or phrase, instead of throwing fines at celebrities and/or sports figures and creating laws to not use certain words? Ironically, while writing this article, I came across an article critiquing the constant onslaught against language called “From Redistribution to Recognition: A Left Critique of Multiculturalism“ by Anis Shivani. Shivani discusses a similar argument I am proposing here, so I only thought it was appropriate to cite him in this article. His argument and where I am going is that politics have started to fo-

...as a Leftist, I’d much rather see real change occur instead of fines... Heather Jackson columnist

cus on language and other superficial and surface problems. Talking about and focusing on language does not change or really challenge systematic oppressions. Basically, it sets up a situation in which people feel this need to constantly not offend people without ever being told the reasons why. There is a constant response of, “that’s offensive! Don’t say it!” Followed with a fine (in some situations) or an urged apology (as if that erases sexism, racism, homophobia and so on). Supposedly, these fines and apologies have become acceptable and only creates a growing internal resentment of the person who said the word or phrase. A quote from Shivani’s article states, “Liberals, rather than changing the economic conditions leading to subjection of women and minorities (a project they gave up on a long time ago), sought to attack

some forms of speech, limiting it at times and abolishing it at others. Not economic reorganization but speech performance became the center of attention.” As I was saying, the constant bombardment of language has become the central focus of Liberals. Instead of doing something to actually change the systematic oppression and economic situation of the oppressed, groups and individuals are constantly calling out people for words they say. Sure, what someone says may hurt me, but an apology does nothing beyond an individual level. In fact, I feel more assertive and empowered when I tell someone what they said personally hurt me, as opposed to living off of assumptions that people shouldn’t say certain things because it may/may not be offensive to me. An apology does not change the systematic oppression that sexism has created for being a woman. I’ve already accepted that our culture is sexist, why do I want to try to reform it? I’d rather live in a world in which sexism (and other oppressions) don’t exist. Do I have an answer on how to do that? Honestly, no. However, as a Leftist, I’d much rather see real change occur instead of fines being slapped on celebrities or soft Liberal groups (such as the Human Rights Campaign) publicly demand an apology. These types of actions take away energy from what is truly going on. It hides true oppressions and the reality of people’s lives. As Shivani said and I am also arguing, speech and not offending people has become the center of attention for Liberals, instead of focusing on the reality of true oppression and economic disadvantages.

DS

> Heather Jackson is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at heather.jackson@und.edu


the Dakota Student

tuesday april 19, 2011

05

Liberal hesitance problematic Students’need

>

Aaron wentz

education, the health care system, etc.). I don’t disagree with the thrust of the films; what I disagree with are the conclusions and the film’s proposed “solutions,” or the Late Saturday night, as I drove away lack thereof. What’s endemic here is that filmmakers from the train station after a failed attempt to secure a ticket for a trip, an incident of this stripe, by and large, operate by the which included various levels of misinfor- Liberal principle that “if people only knew mation, I was struck by the state of the in- what was going on, they’d change things.” frastructure in this country. I was baffled Which leads to suggestions for “solutions” like, “we just need to get as to why, in the age of the internet, in an The hard truth is together and work to make society better,” or industrialized counthat there isn’t some worse, “write your contry (THE industrialized country) it felt savior off in the dis- gressman.” As Slavoj Zizek like Kruschev’s Rustance... notes, how we conceive sia. I wish I could say that this was an Aaron Wentz of a problem is sometimes part of the probisolated incident, columnist lem. Social change can’t but it was not. The happen without a posiproblem here wasn’t that I had a bad experience and wasted a tive political program, some shared cause, lot of time, the problem is a problem of what Walter Benjamin called a theological infrastructure, the vehicle that moves so- dimension. What these films illustrate is that what calls itself the Left has no soluciety. Over the last decade I’ve seen a sub- tions, no shared idea that people can orgastantial number of what, for lack of a better nize around. These films are the symptom term, I’ll refer to as “Disaster Documen- of a larger problem. What remains of the Left is waiting taries.” These are the type of films that quasi-Leftist Liberals make about the sad around for “the working class” or some state of the country (see: Michael Moore’s other such entity to finally emerge and orbody of work, Food Inc., Super Size Me, ganize and take back society from the robWal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Prices, ber barons, all the while the society continues to be stolen by corporations and the The Take, Gasland to name a few). In every instance I was granted a fuller infrastructure crumbles. Liberals don’t get a pass either; with understanding of some specific problem this country is facing and furthermore their consistent lack of a backbone, the how these problems are not the result of Democratic Party’s unwillingness to use individual choices, but the result of the in- power when they have it (see: Obama’s creasing corporatization of various sectors first two years as President with a control of society (the food system, the environ- of both the House and the Senate), and ment, local commerce, the media, public their pathetic illusion that somehow we’ll The Dakota Student

be able to compromise our way to a more just society has devastating effects on the country. I am by no means on the Right— I count myself as a Leftist—but at least the Right can get things done. They don’t wait around for permission to take power; they impose their ideas on society and let society deal with it. Liberals could take a page out of their playbook. Taken as a whole, what these films illuminate is that the glue that holds society together, that is, the social, as well as physical infrastructure is going, if not gone already in some places. The hard truth is that there isn’t some savior off in the distance, biding his time to come and rescue us from the mess we’re in; there’s no Left waiting in the wings to rise up. As Zizek notes, there’s no guarantee that things will work out and one day the Left will win. He points out that the light at the end of the tunnel is another train heading straight for us. There is over $800 billion tied up in student loans and few jobs to employ all these students. What happens when these loans go into default? They’re bankrupt proof. They will follow us forever. What if there’s no one left to bail us out. The question to be asked, then, is not when will the Left coalesce, but rather, what happens if we don’t act? What if the fate of society rests with us and crumbling roads next to shiny new corporate buildings is just a preview of how bad it will get? What if we’re the ones we’ve been waiting for?

DS

> Aaron Wentz is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at aaron.wentz@ und.edu

More than a barber: in memoriam > David barta

The Dakota Student

My favorite line in Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is “The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here.” I like it because it transcends the war and battlefield about which it was originally stated and is directly applicable to our daily lives. Death comes for us all, and though death requires one to live first, is does not necessarily require one to live well. I bring this up because Gerald E. “Jerry” Pokrzywinski died at the age of 74 on Thursday, March 31 after suffering a stroke. Although it had been in the news, I didn’t find out until last Wednesday night. Jerry, as he was affectionately known to those who knew him, ran Jerry’s Campus Barbershop in the basement of the Memorial Union. To say he was a barber is a dramatic understatement of his position. He was The Barber. He was one of the longest employed service providers on this campus, having run his barbershop since 1959. I described him once, in an article I wrote several years ago for the Dakota Student, as an institution. Looking back, it’s amazing to think that this man cut the hair of half the Presidents who had ever served UND. He’d cut the hair of Senators, movie stars, basketball heroes and hockey legends. In between he cut the hair of everybody else who wandered into his shop, people like myself who will be little remembered only several years after graduating. He was there through Civil Rights, through the floods, the championships and everything else of note that has occurred at this University. I have never spo-

ken to a single person at UND who did him. The Union isn’t as warm without the not know of or think highly of him. It was smells of aftershave and shaving cream, always the same whenever his name came and the happy sounds of clippers, vacuums up, “Jerry? The barber? He’s one funny and laughter that constantly trail down dude…” or some iteration thereof. Indeed the Union hallways when he held court. It he was funny. He was a storyteller of the tears me up that I wasn’t at his funeral, that greatest order, a king of the North Dakota I had no idea until nearly two weeks later. conversation, and master of small talk. You That we will all miss something this imcouldn’t sit down in his barber chair with- portant is an inevitable consequence of livout smiling, nor could you leave his shop ing as well. Sometimes the people we care without feeling better about your entire about are taken before we can adequately day. What made him The Barber was not tell them how much we appreciate them simply his mastery of his craft of cutting and their existence. I don’t doubt that these words will be hair and shaving necks (with the always enjoyable hot foam) but rather his ability little remembered, as I don’t pretend to to bring light and mirth to the people who think that my abilities are sufficient for adequately honorentered his shop. this man, but In his own small way, He was there ing as Lincoln said, I as the decades passed by, through Civil cannot honor him Jerry made this entire cammore than his pus a better place to be. Rights, through the any noble life already Until recently he was as floods... has. He was one of constant as the days of the the best people I’ve week, and despite health David Barta ever known. A man issues that began takcolumnist who managed to acing him from his beloved complish one of the shop, he was still available by appointment for those who would have greatest feats man is capable of: a life well lived. Yet, of all the qualities that can be no other. He was one of the first people I met ascribed to him, the one I will miss most is at UND. He was a Sioux fan through and probably of the littlest consequence. More through, with championship plaques and than just The Barber, he was a husband, other sports memorabilia adorning his father and all around wonderful person. green and white shop. He always made fun Most importantly, to me at least, he was of my Bohemian ancestry and I always told my friend. Jerry, UND will miss you, your family will miss you and I will miss you. him his shop stank of Jealousy. Memories of my time with him, in Sleep well friend, until we meet again. their limited context, are remarkable because of their uniform happiness. He was > David Barta is a columnist for The Dakota a great man. Student. He can be reached at david.barta@ und.edu UND is a little bit darker without

DS

for good sleep

>

emily burkland

The Dakota Student

College students are traditionally depicted as getting either too much or too little sleep. We can skip classes and sleep in until noon without risking the loss of a job or a paycheck, and the average student can utilize a multihour mid-afternoon break as naptime. Or, we pull all-nighters frantically pulling together projects, spewing words into final papers or cramming for exams. Whether it is poor planning and procrastination or an unusually heavy load of coursework that keeps you up into the wee hours of the night, there are many tricks that students use to stay awake. Downing coffee, pop, energy drinks or other caffeinated beverages is always a popular and effective choice. Listening to music, working in a well-lit area and taking periodic short breaks also help. However, it is questionable whether pulling an all-nighter or even consistently getting too little sleep is a good choice, even if you are using the hours spent away from your bed in study. Sleep is an essential function for our body and mind, and by depriving ourselves of it, we can face dire consequences not only for our health, but ultimately our grades. All-nighters have long been a staple of collegiate life. In fact, more of us are getting by on less sleep than ever. A study by St. Lawrence University found that two-thirds of college students are pulling all-nighters each semester. However, these same students also had a lower GPA on average then students who never pulled an all-nighter. Even if you are finishing one paper, presentation, or project effectively during your late night study session, the sleep you are losing can have long term effects on your performance as a student for the rest of the semester. Even if you aren’t staying up all night, getting less sleep than you need can still have consequences. A study by the University of Pennsylvania outlined the risks for consistent sleep deprivation: study subjects who got only four or six hours of sleep a night were outperformed by those who got 8 hours each night. Also, the people with less sleep did worse each day…the more days they racked up without enough sleep, the worse their performance got. For a student, the consequences of not getting enough sleep can be grim. If a student stays up too late on a Sunday night to catch up on their homework from the weekend, they are setting themselves up for a less successful week. If they follow that night with more late nights and early mornings for the rest of the school week, they could be setting themselves up for failure for their Friday exam, for example. There are even more serious consequences for the sleep-deprived. Beyond a noticeable drop in performance as a student, there are other, health-related concerns. Yawning through your 8:00am class isn’t the only consequence; lack of sleep can put you at risk for obesity, greater levels of stress, depression and even can put you at greater odds for car accidents. It only takes a lapse of a few seconds behind the wheel to put yourself and others in great danger. As students hurtle towards the end of the semester, it is important to carefully consider the importance of sleep in your life as a student. If success and reaching your full potential is your top priority, then getting an adequate amount of sleep should be your priority, too.

DS

> Emily Burkland is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at emily. burkland@und.edu


06

NEWS

USAGE > From page

1

There could be numerous factors contributing to the decrease in drinking and the increase in smoking marijuana for North Dakota college students. Nobody really knows the right answer, but assumptions can be made based upon personal experience. Alcohol education programs have been flagged as a major contributor to the decreasing drinking numbers. Frisch, who led the new study, says the decreased usage of alcohol is due to the educational efforts across college campuses. Meidinger said he feels “educational programs are working, but people aren’t taking as many risks. I think they are just doing more preplanning to make their evening out a little safer.” Meidinger explained students plan ahead as to how they are getting from point A to point B before the night starts. Meidinger also added that “most habits are already formed before they [students] get to the University. It’s not a habit they are picking up here.” Melissa Leathers, second year law student, agrees, saying “things are changing in the high school setting.” Leathers discussed how she feels more students are starting to drink in high school. With regard to the increase in marijuana usage, Leathers says, “I’m not surprised. People now aren’t afraid to talk about the fact that they do it.” Leathers added that she feels the negative connotation with smoking

pot has relaxed and it’s more socially acceptable today than it used to be. “People don’t put the stereotype with pot smoking like they used to. It’s almost more okay now to say you do it,” added Leathers. Meidinger also discussed the many programs law enforcement has for alcohol use, but the lack of drug programs. “We have a lot of programs focused on alcohol. Realistically, we have nothing specific targeting drugs.” However, Meidinger says they’re getting there. There is a Narcotics Task Force, which Meidinger says is always busy. This task force is made up of multiple agencies including state, local and federal groups. The police department is also working to get more officers through the Drug Recognition Expert training. Meidinger says “a Drug Recognition Expert is trained in detecting drug impaired people.” It’s a three week long training, which Meidinger says is paying off. Meidinger added that there are times when drugs are easier to get and times when it’s harder. This could play into the increase in usage of drugs as well. Regardless of the cause of this shift in substance use, marijuana use can be harmful to individuals. This recent report by Frisch is shedding light on the substance abuse trends in North Dakota, and hopefully officials can work to educate and keep students safe.

DS

SENATE >

tuesday april 19, 2011

1

quired three-fourths majority to a two-thirds majority. From page Winkles’ amendment failed Changes made to the election time read bills and resolutions code were also included in the thoroughly, to speak with con- bill. stituents, research items necessary The election chair will now to understanding bills and resolu- be appointed by the second sentions, and bills and resolutions be- ate meeting of November and the ing pushed through too quickly. elections committee will be apPreviously, only bills requir- pointed at the final senate meeting allocaing of the fall tions from semester. the projects T h e s e These changes account were changes were would slow the made to acrequired to sit before becommodate process down. ing brought time-line isto the floor. Jacob Winkles sues faced by Honors previous comhonors senator mittees. Senator Jacob Winkles The bill believed the change would only also contained several other hinder Senate. He moved to strike changes, including the removal it from the by-laws. of a clause stating chairs can only “These changes would slow serve on standing committees for the process down,” he said. three years. Greek Senator John Kappel Other items were also modidisagreed with removing the sec- fied to reflect the wording found tion from the by-law update. in the Student Government ConInstead of striking the chang- stitution. es, he suggested keeping them Changes to the constitution and modifying another part of were approved during the last stuthe by-laws. dent body election. Currently, in order to bypass the one week waiting period, a > Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for three-fourths majority is needed. The Dakota Student. She can be “We could change the re- reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu

DS

THESIS > From page

1

other methods to gather the date required to answer it. “Students in the biomedical and physical sciences conduct experiments in laboratories,” says Schill. He says non-science students in the humanities or social sciences will utilize focus groups or surveys to gather data. Once their project is complete, students present them at the conference. Powerpoints and displays can be used by students during their presentation. Schill says getting these students involved in research is part of a national trend that has been growing for a decade. “Graduate schools and employers like to see these kinds of things,” he says. “It shows them the student can work independently.” Schill also says a majority of students enjoy the experience and describe it as an extremely useful part of their undergraduate education. He welcomes all students to the conference to learn from others’ work. “They see their peers are doing this and they can too,” he says. “It encourages them to get involved in research, either in the Honors Program or in their own departments.”

DS

> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu

> Megan Talley is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at megan.talley@und.edu

our Bring y hunger man party macho for a

diso to Para tter – or just a l on a pla joy an origina n E party! an tradition Mexic e you visit. im every t

905 Washington •Grand Forks www.paradiso.com

PAR3003


DS

culture&media tuesday april 19, 2011

>

Inside: Gradspot.com’s Guide to Life After College, Women Into Science

Rock journalist to share some crazy stories Story by Matt Roy The UND Communications Program, along with the Grand Forks Herald, have invited entertainment journalist Carl Arrington to come and share his stories and experiences with superstars, including the likes of Ozzy Osbourne, Madonna, the Beach Boys and Tina Turner at a public event at the Grand Forks Herald’s Community Room on Wednesday, April 20, at 7 p.m. Ever since Arrington began an underground newspaper Photo courtesy of Carl Arrington called The Buffalo Bill at his junior high school in 1965 (which he got suspended for), it was clear that he was going to grow up to be a rebellious, cutting edge writer. Originally from Utah, Arrington has lived all over the United States, as well as overseas in London. He attended Utah State University, where he worked on the newspaper staff with UND journalism professor Dr. Richard Schafer. Arrington originally wanted to be a political writer, but after working at the press office of a Washington Congressman, he decided that political writing was too boring; he decided that he wanted to interview rock stars instead. One of his first major interviews was with Madonna in 1984. He would also go on to write major profiles on musicians Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder and Tina Turner, as well as writing the occasional piece on movie stars such as Carrie Fisher and Sylvester Stallone. His experiences not only involved meeting the stars but also spending time with them outside of the interview for a few days to get to know them personally. While working at People magazine as an associate editor and San Francisco bureau chief, Arrington wrote two of the magazine’s top selling cover stories, one on Michael Jackson and the other on Madonna, which ended up selling more than five million copies on newsstands. He has also been a rock critic and entertainment reporter for the New York Post, as well as Detroit Free Press. Arrington has been featured in publications such as Time, Rolling Stone, US Weekly, Men’s Life and TV Guide. There were moments where Arrington had to go further than just interviewing and reporting celebrities. On one occasion, he had to drag a drunk Ozzy Osbourne out of the fountain in front of the Ceasars’s Palace hotel in Las Vegas. He has also been invited on stage by the Beach Boys, and was one of the first reporters to see KISS without their make-up. Always one to be innovative and daring in his work, Arrington once moved into an Alzheimer’s treatment center for a week to write a medical story on an innovative clinic in Arizona before much was known about the disease. Expect to hear these stories and more at Wednesday’s event at the Grand Forks Herald’s Community Room on Wednesday, April 20. Pizza will be served as well, making the event a must-attend for anyone who has the night free, wants to enjoy some pizza and listen to some very entertaining stories from a big time entertainment journalist.

DS

> Matthew Roy is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at matthew.roy.2@und.edu


08

tuesday april 19, 2011

How to succeed in real life GRADSPOT New release provides tips, strategies and insights for recent college grads.

>

Megan Sevigny

The Dakota Student

It’s all too common for recent college grads to emerge into the real world scratching their heads at the seemingly endless number of options before them. What kind of job should a recent college grad look for? Where should they live? What is a credit report and how can they make sure theirs is good? And is it really worth it to go to grad school? These questions and more are answered in this year’s version of Gradspot.com’s Guide to Life After College. This book, written by David Klein, Chris Schonberger, Stuart Schultz and Tory Hoen (all recent college graduates) touches on many questions recent college grads and soon-to-be grads are likely to encounter in the real world. The topics range from the obvious (how much health insurance coverage is necessary) to the surprising (how to travel abroad for free). The book starts with a general overview of options and tips for the college grad who is just transitioning into the real world: how to stock a kitchen, how to date outside of a college environment, ideas for traveling abroad and how to make

GUIDE > page

8

Get to Know Your Editors Name: Madi Whitman Positon: Web Editor Q: Why anthropology? A: It is endlessly fascinating and it is so broad... I’m not quite done. Can you do that sass thing? Are you writing that? (long pause) I also think it has a lot of relevance to the current state of affairs. Q: What movie is next in your Netflix queue and why? A: Martyrs, a religious horror movie that’s supposed to be really good and really scary... I’m on the quest for the perfect horror movie. Nothing meets my standards. Q: Why doesn’t the honey badger give a poo? A: I don’t remember what happens in that video. Q: Being the web editor, can you please explain Rebecca Black? A: I can’t. Just one of those anomolies. Fun, fun, fun, fun... what can I say?

Helping women excel in science STEM New interest group will meet to discuss support for females in male-dominated disciplines.

>

Nicholas gowan The Dakota Student

A new group has formed on campus to help women involved with science, and they’re looking for you! UND Women in Science will have their Inaugural meeting and Welcome on April 27 from 3:45-5:00 p.m. in the Memorial Union Badlands Room. “This new student organization hopes to foster mentoring, communication and support between all levels of women active in the sciences. Please join us for our inaugural meeting for an introduction to our group and discussion about future activities. This

group is open to anyone in any major, undergraduate or graduate student,” says Victoria Maneev, the secretary for UND Women in Science. Though women have been catching up in terms of doctorates earned in the biological and agricultural sciences, women in math and computer science still lag behind. But that doesn’t have to continue into perpetuity. Supporting women in science should be done by everyone. We need to help foster equal growth amongst all men and women by not holding onto old-fashioned beliefs that women and “tough” disciplines are separate by nature. Trying to counteract the “Why So Few?” in STEM (science, technology, engingeering and mathematics) fields, UND

CLUB > page

11


CULTURE&MEDIA

DS

>

Classifieds

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT

09

COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services

EMPLOYMENT

COMMUNITY VIOLENCE INTERVENTION CENTER Violence Intervention Advocate/ Volunteer Specialist. FT position will provide services to domestic violence and sexual assault victims. This position will also supervise and train the crisis line volunteers. A Bachelor’s degree in human services and ND licensure required. Related work experience preferred. Law Enforcement Advocate. Fulltime advocate who provides crisis intervention and safety planning

with survivors of abuse, in collaboration with area law enforcement. A Bachelor’s degree in human services and ND licensure required. Please contact Deb at 746-0405 for application information. Closing date is April 20 or until filled. EOE SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: Counselors, speech and occupational therapists and aides, reading instructors, recreation, crafts and waterfront personnel needed for a summer camp in North Dakota. Working with children with special needs. Salary plus room and board. Contact: Dan Mimnaugh, Camp

Grassick, Box F, Dawson, ND 58428. 701-327-4251, email grasbek@bektel.com SPRING/SUMMER SWIM INSTRUCTORS-spring Part-time evenings & summer full-time. At the YMCA. Flexible schedule, free membership, fun work. Apply at 215 North 7th Street. Corner of North 7th and University Ave. or visit www.gfymca.org. NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER SEASONAL EMPLOYMENT with the Grand Forks Park District. Applications and job descriptions can be obtained at www.gfparks.org or 1210 7th Avenue South.

SERVICES HAD SEX? HAVE QUS-

TIONS? PREGNANT? NEED HELP? We are here for you. FREE and 100% confidential. Pregnancy test, first trimester ultrasound, options counseling. Education on pregnancy, abortion, STD’s. Women’s Pregnancy Center, 11 South 4th Street, Suite 210, Grand Forks. 746-8866. Hours: Mon-Thurs, 9-4:00. Please call for appointment. Visit our website at: http: www.gfwpc.org.

RENTALS QUIET ONE-BEDROOM APARTMENT. No smoking/no pets. Washer and dryer on site. Private entrance. Heat paid. $475 per month plus electric. 608 Walnut Street. 701-213-3181.

GUIDE >

From page

8

the transition from college life a bit easier. After the basics are covered, the book segues into the working world and devotes three entire chapters to the subject: choosing a career, getting hired and working life. The second half of the book is devoted to housing, money (and the problems that go with it, such as credit card debt), cars and commuting, health and grad school. While the premise of the book may seem a bit gimmicky and the language the writers use may cause you to roll your eyes at times, the book essentially delivers what it promises: a guide to life after college that covers the included topics with a depth that gives the reader a decent comprehension of how to deal with the challenges they’re facing (or what’s in store for them in the near future). The book is also incredibly readable, as it makes the (probably correct) assumption that the information it presents is probably new to most readers. While the section on credit card debt may not provide enough information to singlehandedly save a recent grad who’s already thousands of dollars in debt, it does provide plenty of information for the grad who has not yet acquired debt and would prefer not to. In addition, the book provides definitions for those confusing terms most grads aren’t going to know (what exactly is gap insurance and do I really need it?). Not all of the information is going to be useful to the everyday reader; the section on cars and commuting, for example, seems to push the idea of buying a brand new car over a used one, which isn’t exactly a feasible idea for most recently-graduated twentysomethings. Overall, though, this book gives a good overview of how to survive once you’re on your own. In addition, more information that didn’t make it into the book can be found at gradspot.com, and the book also provides additional resources (both printed and online) to give the reader a more in-depth look at the topics it covers. The verdict? Gradspot.com’s Guide to Life After College is a handy guide to the real world that deserves a place on the bookshelves of recent grads or anyone who needs a little help with making informed decisions on important matters. Readers will more than likely find themselves reaching for this book again and again as new questions and challenges arise. It’ll save you countless phone calls to your parents while simply providing information instead of pushing opinions. And that is a win-win situation for everyone.

*

DS

> Megan Sevigny is the Features

Editor for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at megan.sevigny@ und.edu


DS >

scores & schedules

vs. NDSU

Biking for UND, the annual >Inside: charity competition between NDSU

BSB 4/19 @ 1 p.m. Kraft Field

sports

tuesday april 19, 2011

SB

@ SDSU Brookings, S.D. 4/20 @3 p.m.

@SDSU Twilight meet

T&F Brookings, SD 4/25 All Day

GWC Championships Houston, Tex. 4/25-27 @ 8 a.m.

WGLF

UND track visits Iowa and California SPRINT North Dakota sent athletes to two respective meets over the weekend.

>

Kyle Rosseau

The Dakota Student

This past weekend, the UND men’s and women’s track and field teams had split squads going to two different meets. Three individuals went to Walnut, California, running in the Mount San Antonio College Relays. The event is held annually and brings in high school, college and elite athletes from all over. This year was the 53rd relays and North Dakota would be represented. Running for UND included Josh LaBlanc,

Lindsay Anderson and Emily Emerson, who will compete against some great athletes. LaBlanc, in his final year of competing, was in the 10,000 meters going after the UND school record. This past indoor season he was successful at breaking the 3k and 5k record, so his chances seemed good at this one. In the university/open division, LaBlanc placed sixth in his section, clocking in at 30:05.24. Overall he placed 25th out of 68 runners. He bettered the old school record of 30:34 which was set in 1968. Running a personal best in the 5,000 meters, Anderson finished with a time of 17:00.55. She finished 14th overall out of 43 total runners. The winner of the race was from Sacramento State, who

finished in an impressive time of 16:43. Emerson didn’t want to go all the way to California just for one race; she competed in two. Her first one produced great results. She was able to run a personal best in the 1500 meters with a time of 4:32.84. Emerson was in the fourth section with 11 other athletes. The race had eight sections all together with a total of 126 athletes. In the 800 meters, Emerson finished with a 2:20.30, placing ninth in her section. Overall it was a great double and she showed lots of guts competing in those two tough races. On Friday and Saturday, UND athletes were in Iowa taking part in the Jim Duncan Invitational. The meet is held by Drake University, which also hosts the famous Drake

Relays. Several North Dakota athletes competed very well, posting some great results. Friday was the night for the distance events, which were held under the lights. Last year it was a great night, but this past weekend rain was a major factor. Adam Stainiger competed in the 3,000 meter steeplechase, finishing with a time of 10:22.56. He was seventh overall out of 18 other runners. On the women’s side in the same race, Jordyn Dass took fourth with a time of 12:17.23. Leading the way for the men on Saturday was Chris Stoks. He had a solid race in the 400, placing fourth in a time of 49.97. He was also a part of the 4x100 relay team which placed fifth in 44.31. The top finisher for the women was Jessica Butler, who took

second in the 100 meter hurdles. She continued her impressive season in the hurdles Saturday with a time of 14.80. She was only seven hundredths of a second out of first place. In the 800 meters, two UND athletes had successful races. Freshman Jesse Fenstermacher placed eighth with a time of 1:55.21 while junior Tyler Rose placed ninth in 1:58.41. Kahla Erickson was the top female for UND in this race, finishing in 2:25.01 Next up for the track and field teams will be a trip to South Dakota State. They will participate in the SDSU Twilight Meet, taking place on Monday, April 25th.

DS

> Kyle Rosseau is the staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at kyle.rosseau@und.edu

File Photo > The Dakota Student

TOPSY TURVEY TWINS Lonesome losses TROUBLED Minnesota Baseball can’t seem to find their swing as the new season begins.

>

Brandon Becker The Dakota Student

The baseball season may still be young, but that doesn’t mean that the Minnesota Twins can rest on their laurels and expect to magically jump to first in the AL Central. Even if the Twins are known for slow starts, I can’t ever remember them starting out this poorly and coming back to win the division. What’s most concerning for the Twins is that the Kansas City Royals and Cleveland Indians have raced out to scorching starts. If you think both starts are an aberration, think again. Both teams have stockpiled young talent over the past couple years and could very well take the division crown if Minnesota, Chicago and Detroit continue to skid. Right now, the best news for the Twins is that Joe Mauer’s trip to the DL ended up being for a virus and not anything serious. On the other hand, there is plenty of bad news to

go around. Justin Morneau is still getting himself back into the swing of things and it could very well take him most of the season to get back to his pre-concussion play. What else should concern Twins fans at the moment? Well, how about Joe Nathan blowing two saves over the weekend followed by him getting demoted in favor of Matt Capps, who himself blew a save over the weekend and hasn’t exactly looked sharp thus far. Also, the lineup—the strong suit of the Twins—has gone ice cold over the first few of the season. The Twins can’t rely on pitching like they did in the past. They’ve put together a talented lineup that on paper looks like one of the best in the majors. But with Delmon Young, Michael Cuddyer, Morneau and Danny Valencia struggling at the dish, it’s led to futile offensive numbers for Minnesota. So how exactly are the Twins going to right the ship and get back in the hunt for the division title? First they need to get healthy. Once they get back T-Nish (new second basemen who is currently out with a broken fibula) and Mauer the offense should be fine, but until then guys like Jason Kubel, Young, Cud-

dyer, Morneau and Valencia are going to have to pick up the slack. As far as the pitching staff goes the Twins have serious question marks that can’t be answered within the organization. Carl Pavano is a solid starter who can give you seven to eight good innings a night but he isn’t a shutdown pitcher. Francisco Liriano is too inconsistent and often implodes when things aren’t going his way. Scott Baker, Brian Duensing and Nick Blackburn are often hit or miss on the mound, and none of them possess great stuff. It’s likely at some point the Twins will call up top pitching prospect Kyle Gibson, but he fits into the Pavano mold. What Minnesota really needs is an ace. They need a pitcher that can out and dominate every time he steps to the mound. Somebody that can stop a skid that the Twins are currently going through, and until they get one, they’ll continue to be ousted in the first round of the playoffs or possibly miss out entirely.

DS

> Brandon Becker is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at brandon.becker2@und. edu

in Kansas City > Tadd POwers

The Dakota Student

File Photo > The Dakota Student

The UND Softball team headed to Kansas City, Missouri for a round-robin tournament against Missouri-Kansas City and the University of South Dakota last week. UND went winless in all four games, but three of the losses could of easily been turned into wins. Game one—UND 3, USD 5 UND opened play against the Coyotes in the UMKC Dakota’s Round-Robin Tournament with a heartbreaking loss. After four straight wins against USD, dating back to last year, the streak was

12

FOUL > page


the Dakota Student

CLUB >

From page

8

Women in Science is now on campus to help women and those who support women being involved with science connect with like-minded individuals interested in increasing the equality all people deserve, including faculty or staff that would like to encourage women in science fields. Here is an excerpt from “Why So Few?,” a report made by the American Association of University Women: “Even girls and women who excel in mathematics often do not pursue STEM fields. In studies of high mathematics achievers, for example, women are more likely to secure degrees in the humanities, life sciences, and social sciences than in math, computer science, engineering or the physical sciences; the reverse is true for men.” Bias and stereotypes persist in the Sciences. Again, from “Why So Few?,” “women are shown as being used as lesser researchers in some ways; with the more the women “shares” herself, the better

she will do and advance. “Even individuals who espouse a belief of gender equity and equality may harbor implicit biases about gender and, hence, negative gender stereotypes about women and girls in science and math found that majorities of both women and men of all racial-ethnic groups hold a strong implicit association of male with science and female with liberal art.” Support is important no matter what field you are involved with. “When test administrators tell students that girls and boys are equally capable in math, the difference in performance disappears, illustrating the importance of the learning environment for encouraging girls’ achievement and interest in math.” If you feel that women deserve equal treatment with men in STEM fields, head off to the UND Women In Science meeting next Wednesday. For more information, contact undwis@ gmail.com.

DS

> Nicholas Gowan is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at nicholas.gowan@und.edu

Biking for UND RACE Competition against NDSU on April 30 will raise money for the Newman Center.

>

Patrick Evans

The Dakota Student

Everyone grab your bicycle shorts and prepare to defeat NDSU! The 26th Annual UNDNDSU Newman Center Bike Race to Hillsboro will be taking place on April 30 and UND needs to show up NDSU in charitable donations. Last year, UND raised $85,000 in donations for the St Thomas Aquinas Newman Center, while NDSU only was able to raise $72,000 for St. Paul’s Newman Center. We also had fewer riders enter the race than NDSU did. It would be excellent if we could beat NDSU in both the amount of money raised for charity and the number of entrants in the race. Sign-in for the 40-mile bicycle ride to Hillsboro will begin at 8

a.m. on Saturday the 30th at the Newman Center, with the start of the race at 9 a.m. The race will start at either the Newman Center or in Hillsboro. The race will always follow the wind, so the starting point depends upon which direction the wind is blowing on race day. Transportation is provided to the start location and back after the race. If you don’t have a bike, do not despair; bikes will be provided for participants without bikes. There will be free bike clinics the Thursday and Friday before the race from 2 p.m. until well into the evening. Participants are also invited to a free spaghetti dinner the night before the race. Breakfast will be served before the race, with lunch afterwards. Safety is paramount to the race and there will be trucks patrolling the race route to aid any riders. Medical aid will be on hand in case any issues should arise. There will also be way stations every 10 miles with refreshments and snacks for the participants. All racers will receive T-shirts for participating in the event. All the participants are encouraged to collect from sponsors, but if you are unable to find any there is a $20 fee to cover the cost of the meals, transportation, and other expenses. The goal of the race is to encourage community building and to raise the money needed to support the Newman Center. While these goals are commendable, another goal for UND is to show NDSU we can beat them in charitable fund-raising. The winner of the race is not just the team with the fastest time, but will also take into consideration how much money each team raised. A little competition will help everyone involved and will help the Newman Center the most. Anyone interested in participating in the race should stop by the Newman Center or call them at 701-777-6850. Let’s show NDSU who the most charitable school is.

DS

> Patrick Evans is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at patrick.evans@und.edu

SPORTS

FOUL >

From page

11

11

shattered when USD scored five runs in the seventh inning to beat UND 5-3. UND’s Emma Gronseth has been pitching well as of late. Gronseth’s last outing against Mayville State only surrendered one hit. Gronseth’s performance carried over to Saturday against the Coyotes. The UND pitcher completed six scoreless innings and only allowed one hit. Things started to unravel for the sophomore in the seventh inning. With a 2-0 lead heading into the final inning, USD broke the shutout with a lead off home run then persisted to bat around the lineup scoring five runs to take a 5-2 lead. UND had a chance in the bottom of the seventh to start a rally of their own loaded the bases but only connecting for one run. The meltdown was heartbreaking but had to be short lived. UND continued their tournament by playing host UMKC just hours after. Game two—UND 3, UMKC 4. UMKC started off strong with a two run home run in the bottom of the second, and added one more run, an RBI single, in the fourth and then another RBI single in the sixth to take a 4-0 lead heading into the final inning. UMKC’s pitcher Anna Sokolik only allowed three hits against UND through six, but just hours earlier UND saw their pitcher blow a shutout in the seventh inning. UND, hoping to be on the other side of a rally, was seeking some form of validation; hopefully in the form of victory. UND’s Brittany Baker, having a stellar performance in both games, was clutch in the final inning when she had two ducks on the pond and hit a three run bomb, to break the shutout and bring UND within one run. Sokolik was relieved by Deanna Friese to attempt to save the game for UMKC. Friese struck out three UND batters in a row to earn the save. Brittany Baker, the catcher for UND, had a spectacular first day of the tournament. She went 5-6 with two home runs and four RBIs. On Sunday, UND had to play both teams again and once again were winless. UND lost a heatbreaker against USD again, loosing in close fashion 1-0. UND’s final game against UMKC was a devastating 4-0 lost. UND’s record takes a hit with the four losses and is now 12-30. UND will resume Great West action on Wednesday against University of South Dakota State in Brookings, SD.

DS

>Tadd Powers is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at tadd.powers@und.edu

*

Cheer on UND as they take on the NDSU Bison today at 1 p.m. on Kraft Field!

www.TheDakotaStudent.com


12

SPORTS

tuesday april 17, 2011


April 19, 2011