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NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

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Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

‘Curse’ in full swing See Culture&Media Page 7

UND swimmer vies for olympics

National competition coming into view

“Curse of the Starving Class,” a play about social fallout in the wake of a disillusioned American Dream premiered Tuesday at the Burtness Theatre.

After years of training and practicing, 23 yearold Carissa Gormally sees Olympic competition a growing possiblity.

Upcoming forum to build community connections >

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

the Olympic Swim Team. The last day of finals falls on The Dakota Student Gormally’s birthday. “Getting onto the Olympic After years of practicing breast- Swim Team would be a great presstrokes and backstrokes, one UND ent,” she says. However, her trainer senior hopes to fulfill her dreams of is focusing on the immediate fubeing on the Olympic swim team. ture. Carissa Gormally, 23, has quali“We’ve got a lot of work to do fied for a chance to compete in the before we start thinking about that,” 2012 U.S. Olympic Swim Trials. says Lucas Baarlaer. Baarlaer is also The accounting major will be travel- the assistant coach for the UND ing to California to secure a spot in Women’s Swimming and Diving the 2012 team trials. Team. If she makes the cut at StanHosted by Stanford University ford, Gormally can expect to see August 2-6, the 2011 ConocoPhil- her practice times of 16-20 hours a lips National Championships allows week increase. “She’ll be facing stiffer competithe top six swimmers to move on to the final 2012 Olympic Team Trials tion,” says Baarlear. “And we need in Omaha, NE. Held June 25 to July 2 2012, the CARISSA > page meet will determine the members of

BRANDI JEWETT

DEVELOPMENT UND organization to host program in Mountain, N.D., where tight-knit town represents heart of Midwest collectivism.

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ALLEE MEAD

The Dakota Student

The small town of Mountain, ND, about 80 miles northwest of Grand Forks, is hosting the fourth annual Community Connect forum on Saturday, April 30. This forum, sponsored by UND’s Center for Community Engagement, is open to community members and students alike. Anyone who has great ideas to strengthen communities in North Dakota and Minnesota is welcome to attend this free forum. “By celebrating community and linking communi-

ties with each other and the university, students can focus on what it takes for a community to grow and develop,” Center for Community Engagement intern Holly Feldman said. While Mountain, with a population of 122, might seem like an unusual location for a forum, this little community is actually the proud owner of a brand-new multimillion dollar community center. The breakout session “Building for Community” reveals the secret of how the town came together to create the Mountain Community Center. Mountain is also known for its strong Icelandic heritage and tight-knit community. Members of many organizations, both on campus and off, helped make this forum possible. The UND members of the forum’s planning committee include

Finding strength in silent protest QUIET Students across the country take a unified stand against LGBT bullying.

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KATIE BACHMEIER The Dakota Student

Today, hundreds of thousands of students across the country will keep their voices silent. This National Day of Silence will be taking place at college campuses nationally in advocacy for Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual and Transgender awareness. It is through this day that the harsh realities of many LGBT students throughout the nation face on a daily basis, silencing themselves because of their sexual orientation, will be recognized. All students on campus are invited to begin Friday at Christus Rex at 8 a.m. to prepare for the Day of

Silence. Not only are members of the LGBT community welcome, but also those who wish to support LGBT rights, or those who would consider themselves LGBT allies. It is a day to acknowledge the silenced voices of this specific community and work towards a better understanding throughout UND and the Grand Forks community. “The day is open to everyone,” Daniel Walinsky, MA, Psychology Doctoral Student said, “It is not a time to protest, but rather to support.” The Day of Silence is the largest national day of protest to raise awareness of the silenced voices of many LGBT students in elementary schools and high schools around the country. Since the first Day of Silence in 1996, students across the

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FORUM > page

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New law journal launches

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STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

UND students from Japan and the United States work in conjunction with the UND Red Cross Club and the Office of International Programs to raise funds for the relief effort in Japan. Donations will be accepted at Wilkerson today and Odegard Hall next Monday and Tuesday. NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

Last Tuesday, the newly founded Journal of Law and Interdisciplinary Studies announced its official launch at the UND School of Law. The journal, which is the first in 100 years, will join the Law Review as the second publication for the school. Online-based, the journal’s first issue is available now, with articles by law professors Sanford Levinson, Ian Ward, Patric Gudridge and the North Dakota Poet Laureate, Larry Woiwode. With a new editorial board in place, the journal’s upcoming issue is in the works for release in the fall. The subject for the upcoming issue is “Aspirations,” with articles by Kermit Roosevelt III and Erwin Chemerinsky. The journal is available at web. law.und.edu/jlis.


DS datebook 02

friday april 15, 2011

DATEBOOK

today, april 15, 2011

> production: UND students will perform Sam Shepard’s dark comedy “Curse of the Starving Class” at the Burtness Lab Theatre tonight and tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. The play follows a dysfunctional family struggling to maintain their farm and their vision of the American Dream.

>comedy: A group of improv actors will assemble to make students laugh with their show Mission IMPROVable in the Loading Dock at 9 p.m. saturday, april 16, 2011 > fundraiser: The Hyslop Sports Center will host the March for Babies from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The event aims to raise money for the March of Dimes Foundation. > contest: Starting at 9 a.m. the Alerus Center will host the Sioux Tailgate Cook-Off Challenge in their parking lot. Tell us what is happening on campus > Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

The Dakota Student editorial

Editor-in-Chief Alex Cavanaugh > alex.cavanaugh@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Erin Lord > erin.lord@und.edu News Editor Rachel Smerer > rachel.smerer@und.edu

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Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: dakotastudent.com

Features Editor Megan Sevigny > megan.sevigny@und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@und.edu Web Editor Madi Whitman > madisson.whitman@und.edu

> Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features

Campus notes

> MIC/MIP - Nine instances: 501 Columbia Road, 2901 University Ave., 500 Oxford St., 500 Princeton St., 319 Harvard St., 500 Cambridge St., 600 Princeton St., 800 Columbia Rd., and 505 Princeton St. >Criminal Mischief - Five instances: 450 Stanford Rd.(2), 1150 Hamline St., 3530 University Ave. and 3601 University Ave. > Fire Call - Three instances: 2622 University Ave., 23 St. N., and 314 Cambridge St. > Other reports - Medical Assist (3570 University Ave.), Disorderly Conduct (500 Princeton St.), Noisy Party (409 Hamline St.), Theft of Property (812 Northwestern Dr., 3303 University Ave and 425 Oxford St.), Theft from Building (1150 Hamline St.), Ingestion of Controlled Substance (400 Standford Rd.), Welfare/House Check (2891 2nd Ave N), and DUI (800 Columbia Rd.). > The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

business

Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Alexandra McClaflin > alexandra.mcclaflin@und.edu Kyla Lindstrom > kyla.lindstrom@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677 All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

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> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.


the Dakota Student

NEWS

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Around the world with Marty Essen award winning author and an advocate for planet Earth. He is also a campus speaker, travelling across America with his slide show: “Around the World in 90 Minutes with Marty Essen.” He was at the University of North Dakota on Christalin casinader Tuesday, April 12. The Dakota Student Essen’s exciting journey began as an accident. After owning a Many of us want something small telephone service company more in life and it is not very of- in Montana for nearly ten years, ten that we have our dream career, Essen and his wife Deb decided especially in that they wantthese tough [I decided to] fo- ed to go on a economic vacation. The cus on places that d e s t i n a t i o n times. Marty Eswere off the beaten was Belize, sen is one of Central Amerpath... those lucky ica, because it few. He wakes Marty Essen had something up every day world traveler and speaker for both of knowing that them—scuba he is doing diving for Deb what he loves, and it is safe to say and a rainforest for Essen. he is passionate about what he When they returned, Essen does. wrote an article on his trip and So what is it that he does ex- received a great response from actly? Essen is a world traveller, an people. And the rest, as they say,

TRAVEL A lively presentation on the diversity of the planet and a new way to understand it.

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GET INVOLVED The Dakota Student is now hiring editors for the 2011-12 academic year. Pick up an application at 170 McCannel Hall.

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

is history. He said that he and his wife “decided to travel the seven continents and focus on places that were off the beaten path and of course, places that would cater to their different interests.” When they got back from their travels, Essen wrote a book titled, “Cool Animals, Hot Planet, Exploring the Seven Continents.” The book won numerous awards including the Best Books Award, the Benjamin Franklin Award and the Green Book Award. During his talk, Essen showed us some of the best pictures he had taken on his travels and explained

them to the audience. His main focus was on animals that had a bad reputation and why they should be looked at in a different light. One such example is the Vampire Bat, whose species are being killed off due their reputation as bloodsuckers. “These creatures do not suck blood, they lap it up and their saliva is better at keeping blood from clotting than any known medicine. Their saliva is also used in the prescription drug Draculin, which is used to treat patients with heart attacks,” Essen says. He says that it is necessary to educate

people about such animals, since we kill them off when they are actually saving us. Travelling all seven continents is no small feat, especially when you decide to go places that very few have been to. Essen recalled his trip to Malaysian Borneo and shared his experience in the rainforest. He said that it was amazing that they survived the trip since it was in the middle of nowhere and the terrain was nothing short of a challenge. This didn’t stop them though; their next stop was Zimbabwe, Africa. While canoeing along the Zambezi River, Marty and his wife had a close call with a hippo and narrowly escaped being its lunch. As Essen retells these stories, the audience gets the feeling that he would not trade these experiences for the world. Essen is a true advocate for our planet and he strives to give people the right information so that people understand the planet we live in a little bit more and perhaps as a result, will try to take care of it and preserve it.

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> Christalin Casinader is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at christalin.casinader@und. edu


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commentary

commEntary

DS View Day of Silence

tEn PErcEnt SociEty Today’s efforts call attention to the need for equality. Today marks the nationwide Day of Silence, an event that calls attention to harassment and equality issues. The Day of Silence brings attention to all the voices who have been silenced, and it is a good jumping off point to discuss the role of the LGBT club on campus. Most college campuses have a university recognized center that is specifically focused on the minority of LGBT students, much like UND’s Women’s Center stands to promote gender equality on campus. For example, the University of Michigan has a center specifically for LGBT students, the Spectrum Center, that has been devoted to LGBT students for the last 40 years. Centers such as these are incredibly important for a campus community, because they work to support outreach and advocacy for LGBT students. The events and programs that would be created by such a center help to increase awareness and equality on campus. Also, LGBT centers draw students to campus, because they demonstrate the administration’s commitment to all different types of people on campus. The ten percent society on campus does great work for the LGBT community, but it is limited in that it is a student run society, not an officially recognized and funded part of the college campus. A center at UND could provide administratively sponsored awareness about LGBT students, and it would provide programming, support and an eventual home for the “Safe Zone” program. UND has a no tolerance policy for sexual orientation discrimination, and a center could help distribute that important message campus-wide. It would also provide a meeting place for TPS—as of now, their meetings are generously held at Christus Rex, but a place particularly for LGBT students would be more than welcome. Another use for a center for LGBT students would be that it would work as a proactive unit to prevent and respond to discrimination and hate crimes. Near the end of February, LGBT students at UND were unfortunately victims of a targeted assault due to their sexual orientation. Even though the situation was not involved in the legal sphere, news of the situation spread like wildfire on campus. Unfortunately, there was a noticeable lack of public response by the UND administration. In order to increase solidarity among LGBT students on campus, situations such as these need to be recognized and dealt with. A center would be a guiding tool to help both students and the administration deal with such crises. UND is a big advocate for diversity on campus, and the university works hard to make sure all students feel safe. A LGBT center on campus should be a key participant in this effort and propel UND forward. We all want to feel welcome on campus and part of the UND community, and more resources for LGBT students and allies would help serve this purpose. Today is the Day of Silence, a day to bring harassment issues to the forefront. What are you willing to do about it?

Editorial board Alex Cavanaugh Editor-in-chief Erin Lord opinion Editor

Rachel Smerer news Editor

Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

Letter: Obama’s campaign plans Dear Mr. President:

I write this letter to you out of frustration and disappointment; but, I also write it out of hope. You have an opportunity, Mr. President. You have an opportunity to bring about the change that you so passionately defend as characteristically American, the same change that you championed and promised before your election as President of the United States. I have lived in this country my entire life and I have seen and experienced the chaos that has become so ingrained in the American political system. I have heard my grandparents speak of times when politics and, more specifically, politicking were conducted with more honor… with more deference to the values that this country was founded upon—a time when the everyday American was more than just an afterthought in the mind of a recently elected government official. The reelection rat-race has torn our politicians away from the voices of the American public and towards interests groups, exploratory committees and corporate fundraisers. You, too, Mr. President have fallen into this way of conducting reelection campaigns. Recently, you announced your bid for reelection as President of the United States. This announcement also carried with it an intended goal of $1 billion in campaign funds. I am angry with you Mr. President, very angry. But, the only thing I am more conscious of is my disappointment. I believed in you and your message of change… not that I necessarily no longer do. You simply need to understand that my faith in you as our President has been shaken and my understanding of your message and its meaning is changing in very profound, fundamental ways. The thought of you spending 1$ billion on television, radio, internet,

and print advertising sickens me, especially considering the financial difficulties that most Americans continue to feel as they are trying to dig themselves out of the “Great Recession” of the last several years. I understand that reelection campaigns cost money, Mr. President, I do. But, why does it have to cost $1 billion? To me, your announcement of this intended fundraising goal is indicative of the severe lack of attention that Americans–and that is an all-inclusive term–pay to how much money is spent on political campaigning. I am aware that major campaign finance reform has been taking place in this country since the 1970s. I ask,

...these reforms do not seek to limit the amount of money that is spent on campaigns.

Jon Hamlin letter

then, why is it that every election cycle more money is being spent on campaigns than in the previous cycle? It seems major campaign finance reform has been ineffective. Or has it? Perhaps these reforms do not seek to limit the amount of money that is spent on campaigns; but, instead, make it easier for money to be drawn in and retained. That is a mistake and an affront to the everyday American because it assumes that if you simply throw a bunch of advertisements at the American public they will see the carefully designed layout, the painstakingly thought-out slogan and march to the poles, ultimately putting a little black check mark next to your name. The sad thing is, that this

is true; but, that doesn’t make it right Mr. President. We, as a country and a people, so often assume that simply because the world looks to us to set certain international norms, we do not need to be introspective about the values we espouse or the methods we condone. This assumption has led us to give ourselves a “free pass.” What I mean is that we believe our morals cannot be judged, that our way of doing things is not open to question. Do you realize, Mr. President, that we are the only democracy in the world that spends so much money on political campaigns? Do you realize that our democracy has one of the most unregulated campaign systems in the world? We could learn a thing or two from European systems of campaign finance and campaign finance reform. This brings me to the opportunity that I spoke of earlier. You have an opportunity to change the way campaign financing is done in this country… and not only the way it is done but also the way it is thought about. Your opportunity comes in the form of a challenge from me, a lowly ol’ college student in North Dakota: I challenge you to make campaign finance reform a priority should you be reelected, and I also challenge you to cap your intended campaign fundraising goal at $250 million (which I still believe to be quite high; but, it is a start). This is an opportunity that I hope you take, Mr. President. You’ve made me think that change is possible… now make me believe it’s possible.

Jon Hamlin Chinese Major


the Dakota Student

friday april 15, 2011

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Toronto police blames harassment victims Dealing with

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madi whitman

that they would like to be sexually assaulted. Despite the obvious rebellion present in their “Women should avoid dressing like sluts in dressing like sluts after you just told them not to, their response isn’t so much about the order not to be victimized.” The Toronto Police, referring to sexual as- “dressing like sluts” component of your statesault, recently offered us this gem. I have de- ment, but the implications of what it actually means. cided to write a letter in response. You see, when you say that women actively Dear Toronto Police, Thank you, you sexist bastards. On behalf factor themselves into being sexually assaulted, of women everywhere, I am truly apprecia- you are perpetuating victimization. Even if you don’t explicitly say it, tive for your concern, “SlutWalk” is an you are telling women that made apparent by deserve to be raped for your identification of event...to protest they expressing their perceived this issue. If we are on the horrible procla- notions of femininity. Is the receiving end of the kind of message sexual assault, it is our mations you made. that you want to send to womfault. In fact, dressing “like sluts” really is an Madi Whitman en who have been sexually invitation to be asweb editor assaulted? Your statement suggests that it is. I suggest saulted. I know that’s what we women have in mind when we choose you reconsider. You may want to think about what you’ve our outfits for the evening. You have every right to blame us. Your acknowledgement that we done for other reasons. Did you know that Yale had it coming might steer us from dressing like is going through something similar? A recent news article commented that Yale received sluts in the future. However, I bet you didn’t expect the back- $510.4 million in federal funding. They let lash, or you probably wouldn’t have made such their students get away with making statea ridiculous statement. I’m sure by now you ments like yours, and now they might lose that know all about “SlutWalk,” organized by the money. Their students, however, are a different fine citizens of Toronto. In case you don’t know, because I suspect your powers of observation breed of awful. Let me tell you about some of and general intelligence may be a bit limited, as the things they’ve done. Did you know that demonstrated by your statement, “SlutWalk” is some of their fraternity pledges displayed signs an event in which the awesome folks of Toron- that read “We Love Yale Sluts” near the Yale to have banded together to protest the horrible Women’s Center? Did you know that, at an proclamations you made. Some of them dress event in the fall, another fraternity’s members provocatively, some don’t, but they all choose shouted things like “No means yes! Yes means to wear what they wear without broadcasting anal!” in a public setting? Yale didn’t do much The Dakota Student

about the sexual harassment complaints, and look at what’s happening to them. I should also mention that these fraternity members probably have these incidents on their records now, which will probably make getting certain jobs pretty difficult, let alone doing anything that one might expect people from Yale to do, like run for political office. The problem isn’t that you could take a financial hit for what you’ve said, or that you might not be able to move up in the office hierarchy. The problem is that you, as members of a community with authority and some power, suggest that it’s acceptable for the young men of Yale to develop these attitudes about women. You, as police officers who are supposed to be concerned with protecting everyone, have created an exception; people don’t deserve to be victimized, unless they’re women who dressed like sluts. It doesn’t matter that your abominable sentence doesn’t actually say that you think women who dress like sluts deserve sexual assault. What matters are the implications that women are active members in the sexual assault, that they provoke and cause the sexual assault, and that women who ignore your kind advice must be doing so intentionally because they want to be sexually assaulted. I invite you to reconsider what you’ve said, because even though you probably feel that you have my best interests in mind, your statement holds a lot of meaning that I’m not sure you really want to convey. Have fun at “SlutWalk,” and give them my best.

DS

> Madi Whitman is the web editor for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at madisson. whitman@und.edu

A digest version of our lives

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Mitch Molstad

The Dakota Student

“The experiences of our past dictate the nature of the present.” We’ve all heard this before, or something akin to it—that our personalities, values, wants and goals are rooted less in genetic makeup or in some providential source, and more in the multitude of influences placed upon us as we grew up. I think, nowadays, most people accept this as truth, at least in a partial sense. The majority of us would agree, I think, that the interactions we had with our families, our friends, and our surroundings as we developed played a critical part in who we all have become. We’re left with the memories of these events, and of these people. But here’s what I’m curious about: can we trust our memories to be reliable reflections of our pasts? Does the answer to that question even matter? And how do these memories, trustworthy or not, relate to our lives in the present? When the band Deerhunter’s latest record Halcyon Digest debuted last fall, lead singer Bradford Cox wrote about the meaning of the album’s title on his Facebook page. He said something that struck a chord with me, beyond the context of his band’s music. “[The title Halcyon Digest] is a reference to a collection of fond memories and even invented ones,” wrote Cox. “…the way that we write and rewrite and edit our memories to be a digest version of what we want to remember, and how that’s kind of sad.” I wasn’t sure at first how to interpret that… and yet it still felt poignant. And also, I felt like I agreed with Cox— that does sound kind of sad. He’s saying we romanticize our past, we hack it up, scrub out parts of it and reframe it to fit what we want or need it to be at a given time. I’ve thought about that quote a bit, and I no longer think that Cox was spot-on with the observation. I do agree that we reassess and revise our memories of the past, and perhaps we even invent some along the way, but that pro-

cess isn’t limited to the creation or exaggeration it later at twenty. If that event was, for instance, of those things I’d consider to be fond. Trau- the death of a loved one, at fourteen we may matic or cathartic memories play just as large feel confusion and sorrow; at fifteen, that death a part in helping to define who we are as those may be a major life event, and we may look we could call “halcyon”—peaceful, happy, back on that loved one and see only his or her tranquil recollections. The core of what Cox good qualities (and the relatively recent absence said still holds true though, I think—human of them); but by the time we’re twenty, we may memories are malleable, and they change (at only remember that event as a minor shaping our will or no) over time, just as we do. agent in our lives, perhaps less important than But why do we do this? Or, more appro- our current job, or college or our last relationpriately, as we’re not necessarily controlling this ship. process, why does this happen? Well, you’ve To quickly summarize: our experiences are probably heard the statement that humans are not the same as our memories. Our pasts are wired to recognize and work in patterns. To made up of experiences—things that happened take that a step further, where patterns don’t to us, and how we reacted to them. Experiences already exist (whether in society, nature, or in aggregate, and have sometimes overt, someour own memory), we tend to impose them— times subtle effects on the hardwiring of our think of seeing pictures in the clouds, or a face personalities and values. on the moon’s surface or distilling a rhythm Memories work in the opposite way. They from the noises in a busy street. may be accurate reflections of our experiences, Bradford Cox implied that we approach and they may not be, but just as we evolve over our memories as a digest—I time, so do our memdon’t think he was far from ...we may minimize ories. the truth. Allow a metaphor But perhaps it certain experiences, isn’t so important after to explain. People look at their curdistort the impor- all, whether or not our rent selves, and they see the personal memories tance of others... conclusion of a story. The perfectly reflect our body of that story is comMitch Molstad past experiences. Perposed of all those experiences haps it’s more imporcolumnist tant that we are comthat molded who we are, including all of the events and fortable with where people that made major or minor contribu- we stand in the present, and that our current tions to our lives. actions and ambitions make sense in the conAs we grow up and change, the conclusion text of a larger storyline. Because I think our to our story also changes. And as a result, we memories of the past, realistic or not, lend some need to adapt the body of the story, or the plot necessary stability and context to our lives. would no longer make sense; the meat of the So are our memories really “a digest version story needs to be reconciled with the changes of what we want to remember,” as Bradford on the back end. Cox wrote? I think that’s fair to say. In effect, we may minimize certain experiNow, though, after thinking through it a ences, distort the importance of others or con- bit, it doesn’t seem quite so sad. jure up new memories entirely in order to make sure our lives fit a logical, cohesive narrative. > Mitch Molstad is a columnist for The Dakota An event we experienced at fourteen canStudent. He can be reached at mitchell.molnot mean the same thing to us compared to stad@und.edu when we recall it at fifteen, or to when we recall

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finals stress

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kirby graff

The Dakota Student

Across campus students scurry to and from classrooms and buildings. As this semester comes to a close, more of those students will gravitate towards the library or any other seemingly quiet place. Headaches, nervous twitches, restless legs and lack of sleep will dominate the lives of the students. In response to that there are some tips that every student must know. The most important thing is to study. This seems like a no-brainer, but it is actually often overlooked. Many students from my undergraduate years would briefly study for exams or even sometimes wing it. While it may work from time to time, it is not something that is a good idea. Some teachers like to throw curveballs on an exam or in the class; if you are prepared you can knock that curveball out of the park (as an example, a chemistry test I took as a sophomore was so awful that I changed majors and went on to pursue law. A really good decision overall after a horrific experience). Make a schedule to study for an exam. If your test is in one week then try to study an hour a day for each class. This way by the night before the exam it will be secondhand knowledge and not the first time you will be looking at it. If you are concerned about time constraints, then maybe eliminate an afternoon nap or put off a video game session until after finals. It may not seem like it now, but grades are important. Many of my friends did not have good grades their first year and were trying to make it up for another three. Also, good grades help with getting your first job outside of college, or getting into a graduate school of your choice (which more and more students are having to do). Do not pull an all-nighter studying for an exam. It may seem like a good idea to learn everything in one night, but there are more cons than pros. Sleep is your greatest ally. Get your seven or eight hours of sleep every night. This will help with relaxation, and feeling refreshed for an exam is better than fighting to stay awake. Traditionally, everyone that I know who has pulled an all-nighter studying for a final has not done as well as the studious students. Studying too much can be a bad thing as well. Some people spend all waking hours studying. There must be a balance. Every person has there own balance, and it must be found. However, getting burned out can be easy. There are some useful steps to avoid that from happening. Try going to the gym. Lift weights, play basketball or go for a run. All these things release endorphins and endorphins make you feel better. One could also try doing something that makes them happy. Go see a movie, cook a nice meal or even a phone call to a loved one or good friend—something that will help ease the tension. In the grand scheme of things, finals are just very small blips on the radar. However, they are currently the most important things in our lives right now—treat them as such. Not everyone can afford college, or has the physical means to attend. We are the leaders of tomorrow and we should take this challenge seriously and not something that we try to accomplish on a whim. The people that help save the earth, the people that fix society’s problems and the people that run this country all had to take finals. I have a feeling that they took them seriously.

DS

> Kirby Graff is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at kirby.graff@ und.edu


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NEWS

CARISSA > From page

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to get her more comfortable.” Gormally says if she performs well enough to become a part of the team, she will take some time away from college to focus on her dream. Previous competition Last week Gormally competed at the Eric Namesnik Michigan Grand Prix meet, where she placed 14th in the 50-meter freestyle swim. Held at the University of Michigan, swimmers from all over the world traveled to contend. “There were 25 athletes representing 20 countries,” she says. “Some pretty big names were there to compete.” Fourteen-time gold medalist Michael Phelps and 11time gold medalist Natalie Coughlin were two of those big names. “It was really cool to watch them compete,” says Gormally, who managed to get a few photos taken with some of the famous athletes. Making a splash Since her arrival at UND, Gormally has received numerous awards for her performance. She was named “Freshman Athlete of the Year” after she broke the university record for the 200-meter freestyle relay and 400-meter freestyle relay. She also holds school or conference records for the 50-meter freestyle, 100-meeter freestyle, 100-meter breaststroke, 200-meter

medley relay and the 400-meter medley relay. Sophomore year brought her national championships in the 50-meter freestyle and 100-meter freestyle. She was recognized as “UND Swimming and Diving Most Valuable Female Athlete” her senior year and was voted “All Decade Performer.” “I give it my all during practice,” she says. Baarlaer agrees. “She’s a positive role model for the team. The girls look up to her.” Getting her feet wet Gormally first took to water when she was four-years-old, receiving swimming lessons in her hometown of Williston, N.D. She began to swim competitively at the age of five and continued all through elementary and high school. While competing for the Williston Coyotes, Gormally won her first state title as a junior, placing first in the 100-meter breaststroke competition. She took the title again as a senior and claimed the 50-meter freestyle championship as well. For her accomplishments she was named the “2005 Outstanding Senior Athlete of the Year.” “Coming from such a small town, its amazing to be where I am,” she says.

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> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu

LGBT >

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country have gone about their dayto-day business silently, expressing solidarity with their LGBT friends and family members by not speaking for the day. In the past 15 years, Day of Silence has become one of the largest student-led action events in the country. The day is coordinated by the Gay Lesbian Straight Education Network (GLSEN), through out the U.S., including the Red River Valley’s chapter, based in Grand Forks. “It remains a goal to continue to get increased support from high schools in the area,” said Walinsky. The event will have a break of silence at 3:30 p.m. with a seemingly structured conversation of participant’s feelings of the day’s events and the effects of bullying concerning LGBT rights. The day was initially started to advocate acceptance in elementary and high schools, but since all UND students have at one time or another attended high school, all individuals are aware of the bullying outcome. The day’s goal is to have a more diverse and accepting university as a whole.

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> Katie Bachmeier is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at katie.bachmeier@und.edu

our Bring y hunger man party macho or a

diso f to Para tter – or just a l on a pla joy an origina n E party! an tradition x e M ic e you visit. im every t

905 Washington •Grand Forks www.paradiso.com

PAR3003

FORUM > From page

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rector of Multicultural Student Services Matsimela Changa Diop, professor of geography Douglas Munski, graduate student Yuliya Kartoshkina and associate professor of anthropology Marcia Mikulak. “It is a great opportunity for people from communities in rural North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota to come together with the university faculty and students to share common issues, concerns and ideas,” Feldman added. The day of the forum starts with registration and exhibits at 9:00 a.m. The forum will officially begin at 9:30 a.m., with the keynote address “Community as an Economic Development Tool” by UND graduate Mark Goodman, whose appearance was sponsored by the UND Geography Department. The first breakout sessions begin at 10:45 a.m. and attendees will have a choice between “Building for Community” and “Making the Most of Your Volunteer Efforts.” A buffet lunch will be served and the next breakout sessions,

friday april 15, 2011 “Developing Community Opportunities” and “Promoting Celebrations,” take place at 2:15 p.m. The forum concludes at 5:00 p.m. after a tour of the nearby Icelandic State Park Pioneer Heritage Center. According to the forum’s press release, “the Community Connect Project, begun in 2006, is a UNDcommunity collaboration designed to link communities with each other and with university resources for community self-development.” Registering is easy­—students simply need to fill in their name, address, phone number and email address on the registration forms and indicate whether or not they will be riding the available bus from UND to Mountain. Interested students can find the registration forms at www.communityengagement.und.edu and should email these forms to cce@und.edu. Students can also register by calling 701-777-0675. Registering and attending the conference are free and the bus leaves at 7:00 a.m. Today is the last day to register.

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> Allee Mead is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at allee.s.mead@und.edu

GET INVOLVED The Dakota Student is now hiring editors for the 2011-12 academic year. Pick up an application at 170 McCannel Hall.


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culture&media

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friday april 15, 2011

Inside: Foster the People EP, Wild and Scenic Film Festival

Dashed Hopes and The Elusive American Dream Story by Nicholas Gowan Running this week through April 16th is Sam Shepard’s “Curse of the Starving Class,” a 1978 play chasing the ever-failing “American Dream.” Starring and crewed by talented UND students and directed by Dr. Kathleen McLennan, “Curse of the Starving Class” is a must-see drama here at UND. Rated for mature audiences, this may not be the best play to bring children to see. The play centers around the exploits of the Tate family: Weston, the patriarch, is played by David Barta; Wesley, the son, is played by Andrew Markiewicz; the role of Ella, the distraught mother and wife, is shared by Abby Schoenborn and Emily Wirkus; finally, Emma, the firecracker of a daughter, is played by Kathryn Vocke. The family’s inability to interact and communicate effectively most of the time dominates the play. Screams, fridge slamming and chair throwing are all common forms of communication between the cast in the family’s kitchen; this creates an air of tension in the Burtness Theatre that could be cut with a knife. Havard Korsmo and Tyler Rood play the sleazy businessmen: the “lawyer,” Taylor, who plays off of Ella’s desperate housewife syndrome and dreams of a new life far away, and Ellis, the club owner with no qualms about taking advantage of his alcoholic customer, Weston. The main symbolic character, a lamb, was played by a 3-week-old named Kid the Killer, Bashil or Lambkins (depending on who you ask) that licked and chewed his way through parts of scenes one and four. The play has very dark humor intertwined throughout and showcases themes like spousal abuse, child neglect, alcoholism and swindling. Nervous laughter was heard throughout the piece. The toilet humor, when the lamb mistook a cue and made some business onstage, was met with little laughter. Markiewicz says, “The play is very dark; it is one of the darkest plays I have read. I am happy with the work that everyone on the cast and crew did. Everyone here is very dedicated to the craft and it shows with the quality of the play. I recommend it to anyone that is over eighteen.” A warning for audience members: the play does contain brief nudity. Markiewicz is playing his first nude role, which he was nervous about, but he confidently picked up the lamb and walked across the stage. When you read a text, be it drama, fiction or fantasy, or see a play, there is usually a greater meaning behind it. The American Dream seems to be the greatest archetype associated with “The Curse of the Starving Class,” and the cast presents many interpretations of this seemingly simple concept. Wesley, the angry son (well, all of the characters are angry), wants to stay on the land and turn it into something, even though he is likely to continue in the steps of his father. Emma, who enjoys her menarche through the play, looks to turn her intelligence into a career as a swindling auto mechanic in Mexico. Ella dreams of a life in Europe with her kids (and potentially her lawyer), which continues the theme of escapism. Finishing up, the shows run at 7:30 tonight and tomorrow night. Tickets run $6 for students and $12 for general admission. “The Curse of the Starving Class” is not to be missed.

Photos by Nathan Twerberg

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> Nicholas Gowan is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at nicholas.gowan@und.edu


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Newbie band’s EP impresses

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MUSIC REVIEW

***** >

‘Foster the People EP’

Matthew ROy

The Dakota Student

Los Angeles-based band Foster the People has come a very long way in a relatively short time. Formed in late 2009, the trio, comprised of Mike Foster (keyboards, guitar and vocals), Cubbie Fink (bass guitar and backing vocals) and Mark Pontius (drums) has already toured around the world, sharing their indie-pop in the vein of MGMT and Phoenix, with a touch of Animal Collective. Their most recent U.S. tour has sold out nearly every show, from Los Angeles to Minneapolis to New York City and plenty of places in between. Earlier this year, they released their self-titled EP, which features their current single, “Pumped Up Kicks.” Thanks to lots of play on NPR and other public radio stations, the single launched to number ten on Billboard’s top 100 Alternative tracks. Despite being only three tracks long, Foster the People EP is a truly amazing record that showcases just how versatile the band is. Its catchy hooks guarantee that the listener will be coming back to listen time and time again. The opening track, “Houdini,” begins with handclaps and one of the catchiest keyboard riffs that can be heard in recent recordings of this genre. The first half of the song is really just a build up to the second half; in the first half, Foster sings, “I’ve got shackles on my wings on tight,” and in the second half the shackles come off and the song explodes. It’s here where the line “raise up to your ability” is repeated multiple times and combined with the music. It is completely uplifting, and if you’re not at least bobbing your head, than you might want to check your pulse. The second track, the band’s first single “Pumped Up Kicks,” really displays the band’s musical talent, as they are able to turn an extremely dark song into something catchy and fun. The music would indicate a topic

FOSTER > page

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Earth Day flicks FESTIVAL Traveling advocacy group brings environmentally friendly films to Grand Forks.

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Patrick Evans

The Dakota Student

The Wild and Scenic Film Festival is coming to UND next week on Earth Day. In case you have been living under a rock, Earth Day is an annual event to celebrate the Earth, nature and the beauty inherent in the world. This year, Earth Day falls on Thursday, April 22, and the Wild and Scenic Film Festival is coming to the Grand Forks to celebrate this day. This festival marks the 9th annual Wild and Scenic Film Festival, which began in January in California. The film festival consists of ten different short documentaries about many different environmental subjects. The film festival tours around the country, and they are stopping in Grand Forks through the efforts the Non-profit Leadership Student Association, in addition to many other local organizations. The films cover diverse topics such as how organic food is produced, water, conservation, renewable energy and outdoor exploration. The goal of the festival is to inspire people to pay more attention to environmental issues. The festival explores many of these environmental concerns and tries to

offer solutions to make people more involved in their communities. The film festival is open to students and the community, but admission is not free. Tickets will be $8 if ordered in advance and $10 at the door, but only $5 with a valid student ID. This seems to be reasonable for the three-hour-long film festival. The $5 will allow you to see all the films in a theater setting with concessions. At this time there will also be a silent auction hosted by the film festival, which includes paintings by local artists, Pride of Dakota Products and loot from Patagonia, Grist and Osprey. Sierra Nevada Beer will also be served at the event, so bring your ID. The event consists of ten different short documentary films about the environment. Some of the highlights will be Meet Your Farmer, which advocates the need for family farms and the importance of knowing from where your food comes. There is another film, Slow the Flow, that shows many techniques that were utilized by a school district to go green as well as many easy and cheap ways to save the environment. The rest of the films are 1% of the Story, Brower Youth Awards, Marcus Grignon, Wild and Scenic Intro, Evolution and Extinction, The Majestic Plastic Bag, The Story of Bottled Water, The Windmill Farmer and Living Downstream. Trailers to

FILM > page

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friday april 15, 2011

Get to Know Your Editors! Name: Nathan Twerberg Position: Photo Editor

Q: If you could photograph any dinosaur, which would it be and why? A: What’s the one with a long neck? A bronchiosaurus? I’m sure I could do a pretty cool thing with a wide angle lens. Q: What would your perfect summer consist of? A: Probably traveling the world and photographing cool things. Q: Why do you like pictures so much more than words? A: They are so much more eloquent and visually captivating. They’re much more... hmm... more powerful. And truth be told, it takes a lot more effort than putting together words. Q: If you had to impersonate someone for the rest of your life, who would it be? A: (laughing) President Kelley, because I do such a great impression of his voice.


CULTURE&MEDIA

DS

Classifieds

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT

COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

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EMPLOYMENT

COMMUNITY VIOLENCE INTERVENTION CENTER Violence Intervention Advocate/ Volunteer Specialist. FT position will provide services to domestic violence and sexual assault victims. This position will also supervise and train the crisis line volunteers. A Bachelor’s degree in human services and ND licensure required. Related work experience preferred. Law Enforcement Advocate. Fulltime advocate who provides crisis intervention and safety planning with survivors of abuse, in collaboration with area law enforcement. A Bachelor’s degree in human services and ND licensure required. Please contact Deb at 746-0405 for application information. Closing date is

April 20 or until filled. EOE SUMMER EMPLOYMENT: Counselors, speech and occupational therapists and aides, reading instructors, recreation, crafts and waterfront personnel needed for a summer camp in North Dakota. Working with children with special needs. Salary plus room and board. Contact: Dan Mimnaugh, Camp Grassick, Box F, Dawson, ND 58428. 701-327-4251, email grasbek@bektel.com SPRING/SUMMER SWIM INSTRUCTORS-spring Part-time evenings & summer full-time. At the YMCA. Flexible schedule, free membership, fun work. Apply at 215 North 7th Street. Corner of North 7th and University Ave. or visit www.gfymca.org. NOW TAKING APPLICA-

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TIONS FOR SUMMER SEASONAL EMPLOYMENT with the Grand Forks Park District. Applications and job descriptions can be obtained at www.gfparks.org or 1210 7th Avenue South.

SERVICES HAD SEX? HAVE QUSTIONS? PREGNANT? NEED HELP? We are here for you. FREE and 100% confidential. Pregnancy test, first trimester ultrasound, options counseling. Education on pregnancy, abortion, STD’s. Women’s Pregnancy Center, 11 South 4th Street, Suite 210, Grand Forks. 746-8866. Hours: Mon-Thurs, 9-4:00. Please call for appointment. Visit our website at: http: www.gfwpc.org.

RENTALS QUIET ONE-BEDROOM APARTMENT. No smoking/no pets. Washer and dryer on site. Private entrance. Heat paid. $475 per month plus electric. 608 Walnut Street. 701-213-3181.

Local Jobs

FILM >

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all of these films can be found on Youtube. The Wild and Scenic Film Festival was founded by the South Yuba River Citizens League. The South Yuba River Citizens League is a watershed advocacy group for the South Yuba River in California. They received aid from community groups to put on a film festival in 2003 and began an annual event. They decided to take the film festival on the road and have plans to tour 100 communities nationwide, including Grand Forks. This is the first time the group has come to Grand Forks, and if the event is successful they hope to make Grand Forks a permanent stop on the film festival tour. This year’s event will start at 7 p.m. on April 21 in the Empire Arts Center in Downtown Grand Forks. The event is expected to take about three hours. The doors will open at 6 p.m. for those who wish to arrive early. Advance tickets can be ordered online at www.drcinfo.org.

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> Patrick Evans is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. He can be reached at patrick.evans@und.edu

FOSTER > From page

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that’s uplifting and inspirational, perhaps along the lines of “Houdini,” but the lyrics are about a tortured youth who “found a six-shooter gun/in his dad’s closet in a box full of fun things” and takes revenge on his tormentors. In the chorus, which is one of the catchiest moments on the album, Foster sings, “all the other kids with the pumped up kicks, you better run, better run/out run my gun.” The final track on the EP, “Helena Beat,” shows the range of Mike Foster’s vocals. More comparable to “Houdini” in its content, “Helena Beat” really allows Foster the People to reveal who they are as a band. The second verse starts with, “You know those days when you want to just choose to not get out of bed get lost in your head again?” Foster the People is the exact kind of band that someone would want to listen to on a day like that. It’s fun, it’s feel-good and, thankfully, it’s the longest song on the album. With their self-titled EP, Foster the People has done what would normally seem impossible. In a year that has already seen some great full-length releases from Radiohead, Bright Eyes and The Decemberists, Foster the People has managed to compete with nothing more than a three-track EP. Their full-length debut, titled Torches, will be released on May 24. Based solely on this EP, chances are it will be one of the year’s best releases. Foster the People EP is twelve minutes of pure bliss that should not be missed.

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> Matthew Roy is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. He can be reached at matthew.roy.2@und.edu


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scores & schedules

friday april 15, 2011

sports

NHL playoff preview, Softball >Inside: struggles, Men’s hockey season recap.

@ Mt. SAC Relays

T&F 4/15-16.

Walnut, Calif.

vs. Utah Valley

BSB 4/15-17

Kraft Field

@ UMKC Dakota Round Robin

SB 4/16-17

Kansas City, Mo.

Green/White game

FB 4/16 @1 p.m.

Alerus Center

Wind plagues team as Reuter shines

Rueter, competing individually, scored under 90 with an opening round 85. This put her only seven strokes behind the leader and in a tie for the seventh spot. Closing out the day, North Dakota State’s Amy Anderson was Kyle Rosseau in the lead with a six-over 78. The Dakota Student South Dakota State was in In the last tournament be- lead with a score of 339. North fore the Great West Conference Dakota had 373, which was 17 Championships, the women’s away from fifth place NDSU. golf team was down in Omaha, Sophomore Chivas Beaudoin Nebraska. They competed Mon- of UND was only one back from day and Tuesday at the Creigh- Job, finishing up with a 91. ton Classic which was held at Once the final round was finthe 6,110 yard, par 72 Oak Hill ished on Tuesday, things did not Country Club. On the first day change that much for the team. of competition, the UND wom- UND finished the tournament en finished in sixth place out of with a seventh place finish out seven teams. of the seven UND seUND senior Molly teams. nior Lauryn Leading Martin shot seven the way as the Job led the team Monindividual strokes better on top day shooting for North DaTuesday, shooting kota was again a 90 (42-48). Weather conLauryn Job. an 88. ditions were Kyle Rosseau She was able not very pleasto score a 91, staff writer giving her a ant to the golfers on the Oak Hill Course. two round total of 181 (90-91). The wind was brutal, affecting Reuter kept on hitting the long shots and creating higher ball well into the second and final than usual scores. Even though round. She was only two strokes the women from UND are used off of her score Monday, shooting to strong winds in Grand Forks, an 87. The score put her into a tie it definitely didn’t help them dur- for sixteenth overall at 172 (85ing day one. 87). Since Reuter was not comNorth Dakota junior Abby peting for the team, rather indi-

BOGEY UND finishes last in the Creighton Classic, bad weather partially to blame.

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vidually, as her score did not add to UND’s team score. It would have definitely helped and could have moved North Dakota up a few spots on the team rankings. UND senior Molly Martin shot seven strokes better on Tuesday, shooting an 88. It gave her a two day total of 183 (9588). Since Martin is a senior, the team will look for her to keep on improving her scores and be in prime shape for the conference tournament. South Dakota State maintained its team lead and took the championship with a score of 664 (339-325). This was done due to four of its five golfers finishing in the top fifteen. Taking medalist honors was Anderson of NDSU, who led after day one. She shot a 69 in the second round finishing with a 147 (78-69). UND’s Beaudoin tied for 30th place, sophomore Shantel Montgomery tied for 38th and freshman Kate Podolsk finished 45th. The North Dakota women’s golf team will have two weeks to prepare for the Great West Conference Championships. They will be held in Houston, Texas on April 25-27.

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> Kyle Rosseau is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at kyle.rosseau@und.edu

File Photo > The Dakota Student

A cruel game reveals true character at Masters MASTERS Even with terrible collapse, Rory McIlroy proves to be a gentleman in defeat.

>

Devon Roehrich The Dakota Student

Imagine being a 21-year old golf superstar, carrying the weight of Northern Ireland on your back as you are sleeping Saturday night on a 4-shot, 54-hole lead in the most famous tournament in the world. You are supposedly the leader of the next generation of golfing greats, the guy who last year at the Ryder Cup made honest and bold statements about Tiger and his lack of intimidation —and never backed down. You are respectful, charismatic and a Twitter-holic. The world is awaiting your coronation on Sunday evening, as Jim Nantz will host your victory interview in historic Butler cabin as you rightfully as—end to major championship

glory a dream come true! But Sunday was the definition of an utter nightmare. Rory McIlroy woke up Sunday with a four-shot lead and insurmountable confidence; he went to bed Sunday night as a guy who just shot 80 and tied for 15th, finishing an astounding TEN shots behind eventual victor Charl Schwartzel. Rory joined a recent list of guys in past two years who have choked away their chance on the last day to finally be major champion, players who put together downright embarrassing performances. Kenny Perry went bogey-bogey-lose-in-playoff to ruin a sentimental comeback story at Augusta in 2009. Last year, Dustin Johnson led the U.S. Open by three with eighteen holes to go, only to start out triple bogey-bogey-double-bogey to drag himself to an 82. Nick Watney blew a 3-shot final-round lead two months later at the PGA Championship, as Watney had to birdie two of his last three holes to put together a solid 81.

But Sunday was different. Rory’s swing looked so self-assured the first three days, and his feisty ,yet focused demeanor seemed well-suited for the treacherous emotions that Augusta National can bring about. Add in the fact that Rory was already an established superstar who had proven he could win worldwide (he was ranked #9 in the world) and that 19 of the last 20 Masters champions had come from the final group, and it seemed like the only drama on Sunday would be how long the party would last over in Belfast. But he struggled mightily for the first nine holes, and after a triple-bogey-bogey-double-bogey run on holes 10-through-12, he was toast. We went from thinking that Augusta was about to bring about the dawn of a new era to the cold fact that maybe we shouldn’t prematurely hoist college-aged golfers into our predetermined legacy. However, after watching Rory handle himself immediately following the collapse, one cannot

help but root for a kid who handled defeat with grace and dignity that is so rare in professional sports these days. He hopped on Twitter a few hours after signing his scorecard, saying “Oh and congratulations charl schwartzel!!... “Great player and even better guy! Very happy for him and his family!” After receiving a standing ovation upon coming back to the clubhouse, McIlroy graciously acknowledged their gesture. “I don’t know if people were just feeling sorry for me, or whatever it was,” said McIlroy, who didn’t reject a single postround interview request. “I’m incredibly grateful for it. I really appreciate it. It was a very tough day for me out there.” There will indeed be better days for Rory. Golf is the cruelest of games, and God knows the patrons at Augusta National have seen the anguish before (see Norman in ’96—still the most heartbreaking golf choke of our generation). On a historic Sunday that saw Tiger looking like Tiger for

his first 11 holes, eight different players held at least a share of the lead, and Schwartzel going 4-under his last four to claim a green jacket, the lasting memory from the 2011 Masters will undoubtedly be the collapse of McIlroy. There is nowhere to run is this game of golf, as every successive mistake you make is magnified in front of the world, and you have nothing but time to keep filling your head with desperate thoughts to somehow make it stop. He struggled to hold back tears after he duck-hooked into the water on 13. He hit out of a backyard on 10. He chunked chips and missed 3-foot par putts. He seemingly lost everything on Sunday. But he won something that lasts longer than green jackets, something that is more meaningful than circles on the scorecard. By losing with honor, he won respect. What a fickle game.

DS

> Devon Roehrich is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at devon.roehrich@und.edu


the Dakota Student

SPORTS

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UND moves on Chase for Stanley’s Cup as hockey is over dejected faces at press conferences, unable to describe their feelings accurately. Michigan had just pulled the carpet out from under the 26 guys that put on the Fighting Sioux jersey this year. Timothy Boger Those 26 had worked so hard The Dakota Student to build a team this good. Before The bitter agony that UND last Thursday, North Dakota had hockey fans won eleven everywhere exstraight and Before last Thurs- was unbeaten perienced were day, North Dakota in their last nothing compared to what They went had won eleven 15. the players on through Destraight... the ice felt. cember, FebruWe saw Timothy Boger ary, and March players scatwithout a loss. staff writer Their 32-9-3 tered all over, looking with record was the empty hearts to the other end of best with Dave Hakstol as their the ice where Michigan was celebrating their unlikely 2-0 victory. TIME > page We saw players with shocked and

AFTERMATH North Dakota continues on after being ousted in St. Paul last week.

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ELIMINATION With so many teams jockeying to be champions, it’s anyones ice in the NHL.

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Tadd Powers

The Dakota Student

2011 NHL Playoffs could be deepest playoffs in recent memory; almost every team has a legitimate shot of making a deep playoff run. Which teams will represent their conference come June, during the Stanley Cup Playoffs? Here are my predictions for the first round... Eastern Conference Washington #1 vs. New York Rangers #8 - Washington will not lose to an eighth seed like they did last year against the Montreal Canadians in seven games. Washington is hot at the right time and worked their way to a #1 seed this year. All of their key players are healthy for the first time this year, and it’s at the right time. Washington wins the series in five.

Philadelphia #2 vs. Buffalo #7- This matchup is very intriguing; we have the Philadelphia Flyers who are one of the coldest teams toward the end of the season, and the Buffalo Sabres are entering the playoffs, 16-4 in their last 20. The Flyers are very deep, but have a rookie goalie.Even though one of the best rookies this season, I do not like the inexperience at the most important position in the sport. The Sabres’ Ryan Miller is healthy and a very good goalie. He led Team USA to a Silver medal last year in the Olympics. Miller has proved that he can put a team on his shoulders and win, but the depth of the Flyers just seem too much for the Sabres to handle. I believe Miller will make this series interesting, but the Flyers will take the series in seven. Their offense is just to deep, and home ice advantage in Philly will be too much for the Sabres. Buffalo could win this series if they prevent a game seven in Philly. Boston #3 vs. Montreal #6This will be the best series in the opening round of Eastern Conference. The league’s top two goalies will face off—Boston’s Tim Thomas, league leader in save percentage and goals against Montreal’s Carey Price—who led the league in Wins. This matchup will be hard fought and low scoring. Montreal will look for revenge, as Boston’s Zdeno Chara laid a devastating and controversial hit to Montreal’s Max Pacioretty. Chara knocked the Canadian out for the season and stirred the fans of Montreal, and they will want blood. But Boston won’t back down. Boston will win this series in seven. Don’t miss this series. Pittsburgh #4 vs. Tampa Bay #5- Marc-Andre Fleury will be the difference; Pittsburgh has proven they can win without Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin. Tampa however has a very potent offense, but the Penguins plays a great defensive game and Tampa’s stars won’t be able to handle the hard checking and pressure the Penguins play with. Pittsburgh wins in six. Western Conference Vancouver #1 vs. Chicago Blackhawks #8- The Vancouver

Canucks won the Presidents Trophy (Best Record) this year, but got unlucky the last day of the regular season when they got paired with the Blackhawks for the first round. Chicago lost on the last day of the season; a win jumps them to the fifth seed. Instead the defending Stanley Cup champs have to play the best team in the NHL. Vancouver has depth and a veteran goaltender, which is arguably the best goalie in the NHL in Roberto Luongo. Vancouver’s Sedin twins will make a mockery of the Blackhawk’s rookie goalie Corey Crawford. This matchup has the best potential eighth seed upset; Chicago is very deep as well and has had Vancouver’s number in recent years. The Canucks’ Luongo will be the difference. If he plays his game, Vancouver will win in six. San Jose #2 vs. Los Angeles #7- This series will probably be the quickest. San Jose is the hottest team in the Western Conference, and their offense if firing on all cylinders. L.A. Is missing their top forward, Anze Kopitar, and really shows no signs or depth to beat the Sharks. San Jose will win in five games. Detroit #3 vs. Phoenix #6This competitive pair is actually a rematch from last year’s first round. Detroit won last year and shows no signs of a flip-flop this year. Detroit’s Zetterberg might be out for the first game, but the veteran experience of the Redwings will be too much for the Coyotes. Almost the entire roster from the 2008 Stanley Cup champion team is still intact; also with the addition of Mike Modano, currently the majority of the roster has won a Stanley Cup. The Wings have more skill and experience and will win the series in five games. Anaheim #4 vs. Nashville #5I believe this is the hardest series to predict. Anaheim has the most explosive scorer this year in Corey Perry who scored 50 goals this season. Anaheim won the cup in 2008 with the same corner stone players, Ryan Getzlaf, Corey Perry and Bobby Ryan. However they do not have the premiere goalie that got them to that cup in 2008. Right now the Ducks are playing with goaltender by committee, Nashville isn’t. Nashville’s Pekka Rinne has been one of the top goalies in the Western Conference this year. Nashville is also led by a stellar defense of Shea Weber and Ryan Sutter. Nashville was plus 25 this year in team-goals vs. opponent-goals, compared to the Ducks plus four. Defense will be the X-factor in this series. If Nashville can stop the top line of the Ducks, they will take this series in seven games. So far, my only upset in the first round is Nashville over Anaheim. If history repeats itself, there will be a few more unexpected themes. Look out for Montreal, Buffalo, and Chicago to potentially win those series in a tight seven games. I believe whoever wins the Vancouver and Chicago series will have a deep playoff run and possibly represent the Western Conference in the Stanley Cup.

DS

>Tadd Powers is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at tadd.powers@und.edu


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Hakstol as their head coach. Their success was built on the teamwork and pride that emanated from the fifth-year senior captain Chay Genoway all the way down to their four freshmen. The individual growth and opportunity always took the backseat to what was best for the team. That’s what made the pain greater. But what a ride it was. Such camaraderie and selflessness has defined this team for the last three seasons. Despite having more than a dozen NHL draft picks on their roster, North Dakota didn’t lose a single player either of the last two offseasons to a professional contract. That was while Denver lost superstars Joe Colborne, Patrick Wiercioch and Marc Cheverie in 2010. Wisconsin lost Brendan Smith among others. Minnesota lost Nick Leddy and Jordan Schroeder last season and barely had cleaned out their lockers last month when Aaron Ness signed his contract with the New York Islanders. To be sure, there were plenty of offers on the table for players like Genoway, Frattin and others the last few years. But they stayed together and stayed united and focused on what they could accomplish as a team. What a promising sign to the future of college hockey. This season provided a glimmer of hope to a collegiate sport in flux thanks to the evolving free agency market in the National Hockey League. The NCAA exists to support the student-athlete and provide for athletes to balance leadership, academics and athletics. Say what you want about the integrity of the NCAA, but (the nickname issue notwithstanding) North Dakota has built a model program with excellence and character going hand-inhand and leading the way. Boasting the of hardware—

two MacNaughton Cup regular season championships and two playoff championships—provides just another reason that UND is the envy of the Western Collegiate Hockey Association. It should be of no discouragement to the long-term success of this program that they failed—yes, once again—to win a national championship. Their postseason struggles are less so an indictment of their program than they are a testament to the increasing parity of Division I hockey. But eventually, the wins and titles will come. In the meantime, it’s important to savor these seasons. The character, teamwork and synergy that this team built for the last three years should be more than enough cause for celebration. After all, it’s the core mission of collegiate athletics and is the forefront of what makes college hockey great.

DS

> Timothy Boger is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@und.edu

friday april 15, 2011

Woeful ways in Omaha GROUNDER North Dakota softball was recently swept by Creighton in convincing fashion.

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Brandon Becker The Dakota Student

The UND women’s softball team took on Creighton this past Tuesday in Omaha, Nebraska in a doubleheader. UND came into Tuesday carrying a 10-24 record with hopes of righting the ship. Unfortunately, that would not be the case for North Dakota, as the Bluejays swept them. Here’s a closer look at the two contests. CU 6, UND 3 Both offenses were unable to get anything going in the first couple innings but the two squads combined for six runs in the third. Courtney Gonzales’ single with the bases loaded put UND on the board. UND’s lead would be short lived though, as CU responded

with four runs in the bottom half of the inning, which was led by Emily Perry’s three-run double. North Dakota responded with another run in the fourth but were unable to move anyone else across home plate. CU scored single runs in the fifth and sixth innings to take a three-run lead into the seventh where they would close out the game. Caralyn Chewning went 5.1 innings for North Dakota, giving up six earned runs on the afternoon and dropping her record to 3-7 on the year. UND left eight on base compared to just four for CU. CU 9, UND 1 The second meeting between the two teams wasn’t nearly as close or competitive as the first. CU used three three-run innings along with three home runs to route North Dakota in the nightcap of the doubleheader. UND’s only run came on a solo home run from Chewning—her sixth of the year. Sammy Snygg was able to

keep UND hitters at bay throughout the night. She gave up just four hits and finagled her way out of a fifth inning jam after loading the bases. It was Snygg’s first win of the season. Michelle Frank took the loss for North Dakota in the shortened game due to the eightrun rule. The loss dropped UND to 10-26 while CU improved to 18-17. Sophomore power hitter Amy Baker hit her 30th career home run for the Bluejays and her second of the day. It’s been a tough season so far for UND but they will have a chance to turn it around this weekend as they partake in the UMKC’s Dakota Round Robin Tournament. UND will play UMKC and South Dakota twice in the tournament. North Dakota won’t return home until the 28th of April when they take on Jamestown College.

DS

> Brandon Becker is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at brandon.becker2@und. edu


April 15, 2011