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friday march 25, 2011

DakotaStudent issue 40

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after the quake

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Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

Tibetan monks visit UND See Culture&Media Page 9

A couple walks down a muddy street with belongings scavenged from what was left of their Natori, Japan home Monday, March 14. BRIAN VAN DER BRUG > Los Angeles Times

Disaster resonates in the hearts of Japanese students at UND. Story by Alex Cavanaugh

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wo Fridays ago, as UND dismissed for Spring Break and Grand Forks was bracing itself for a blizzard, Japan was hit with a record 9.0 magnitude earthquake that led to a devastating 50 foot Tsunami, subsequent earthquakes, and a nuclear dilemma that left the entire world in a state of concern. As the Japanese government scrambled to gain control over the escalating situation, and as the death toll rose in the affected areas, many students at UND felt the disaster’s effects halfway across the world. Keisuke Yoshimura, an aviation student from the Shimane prefecture in Southwestern Japan, saw the news of the earthquake on Mixi, a Japanese social networking site. He then posted the news on Facebook, and turned on the news—which he watched for ten hours straight. It was that Facebook post where Music student Rieko Eguchi of Tokyo learned of the disaster. She explained that at that time she had no idea of the severity, so she tuned in to Yahoo.jp, but was still unsure about what was going on in Japan and her home city. “At first I thought it wasn’t so serious,” said Eguchi. “But then I tried to call my mom and couldn’t make

I couldn’t do anything. I was thinking of my family—if they were safe or not. Rieko Eguchi student, UND

contact.” This was because NTT, the biggest Japanese phone company, limited access because of the volume of calls going into Japan. “I was just crazy,” Eguchi explained. “We couldn’t get enough information, even [those] in Japan. Here in America, it was very hard to get information. I couldn’t do anything. I was thinking of my family—if they were safe or not.” She then heard the news of the train system in Tokyo being shut down for fear of more earthquakes,

leaving commuters stranded at their places of work, some traveling by foot to their homes—a several-hour walk for many. It was four long hours before she was able to make contact with her mother. “My mother is strong—she was laughing because she didn’t want me to worry about them. She said it was crazy; she couldn’t keep standing on the ground. Even she didn’t know what was happening in the Northern part of Japan.” “I was just crying,” Eguchi said. “After the tsunami, the next big issue was radiation.” Eguchi’s mother explained to her that Tokyo was fine, but the situation was far more severe to the north. Natsuki Yamamoto, a student in UND’s ELS program, is from Fukushima prefecture, an area hit especially hard by the earthquakes, where a damaged Nuclear power plant still has many on edge. Yamamoto heard about the earthquake from her host family, and she immediately tried contacting her family at home, but was unable to establish contact for

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JAPAN > page

Student Gov. sees UNDIA plans 41st Wacipi low voter turnout INTEREST Election results show little over 800 ballots cast, few candidates considered cause.

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BRANDI JEWETT

The Dakota Student Volunteers working the polls for this year’s Student Government elections witnessed a sharp decrease from last year’s voting turnout. According to unofficial election results, only 865 students cast ballots during the March 9 election. Last year’s elections featured three presidential tickets in comparison to this year’s uncontested pair of Kylie Oversen and Nate Elness. Around

CULTURE Time-Out Week will run from April 3,000 students voted to determine 4-10, conclude with powthe student executives and senators wow April 8-10. last school year. Elections chair Jackie DeMolee believes the large number of unopposed candidates played a role in the low turnout. Student Government voting stations were available at Gamble Hall, the Memorial Union, the Link in the School of Aerospace and Wilkerson Hall. Although these locations were meant to increase the election visibility, students took little interest in voting. “I sat in the Link six out of the eight hours it was open and had only

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VOTE > page

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THOMAS CARPENTER The Dakota Student

Every spring the UND Indian Association (UNDIA) hopes to bring people of all ages together for the Annual Time-Out Week and Wacipi (WAH-CHEE-PEE). TimeOut Week, April 4-10. It is a week’s

region bringing in thousands of spectators. UNDIA welcomes everybody to come and student admission is free. Wacipi is usually the first powwow of the year and kicks off the powwow season in the region. The powwow season usually doesn’t begin until summer when the weather is nicer, but because UNDIA has the use of an indoor facility they are able to hold their powwow earlier. “Everybody’s

state Board of Higher Education may take action to discontinue the use of the nickname or logo. It requires the attorney general to consider filing a federal antitrust claim against the NCAA if the association takes any action to penalize UND for using the nickname and logo. The law will not take effect until August. For the law to become effective at an earlier time, “the bill would have to contain an emergency clause,” explains Dr. Robert Boyd, the Nickname and Logo Transition Officer. Dr. Boyd is not under the impression there was

an emergency clause in the bill. The new law puts the transition process in a new place. “UND has, for the time being, put a temporary hold on the transition process we were undertaking,” says Boyd. According to Dr. Boyd, UND has been under the direction of the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education since the beginning. This puts the next steps for the University in the hands of the State Board of

16 Nickname bill passes senate TRANSITION Logo legislation signed into law, UND officials unsure of further direction.

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MEGAN TALLEY

The Dakota Student

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

worth of fun and educational events meant to educate people about Native American life and culture. Wacipi, meaning “people dance” or “celebration” in the Lakota/Dakota language, is a three day long powwow featuring dancers from all across the country and Canada, showing off Native American dances, traditional dress and beadwork. This year is the 41st annual Wacipi and will be held at the Hyslop Sports Arena, April 8-10. According to UNDIA, Wacipi is the biggest cultural event in the

Governor Jack Dalrymple signed the Fighting Sioux bill into law Tuesday, March 15. The bill states University of North Dakota athletic teams shall be known as the Fighting Sioux and neither UND nor the

WACIPI > page

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LOGO > page


DS datebook 02

today, march 25, 2011

> impermanence: The Mandala Project closing ceremony will take place at 12:00 p.m. at the North Dakota Museum of Art, followed by an Interfaith blessing ceremony. The event is hosted by Christus Rex. > entertainment: TNA wrestlers will perform at the Alerus Center as part of TNA Live. The show will start at 7:30 p.m.For ticket information, see the Alerus Center Box Office or Ticketmaster outlets. saturday, march 26, 2011

> spring: The 2011 Home & Garden Show will be held at the Alerus Center Saturday and Sunday. monday, march 28, 2011 > display: At 3:30 p.m., the Department of Art and Design will hold BFA exhibitions and receptions for Everette Johnson and Kayla Evenson at the Hughes. Tell us what is happening on campus >

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friday march 25, 2011

DATEBOOK

Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

The Dakota Student editorial

Editor-in-Chief Alex Cavanaugh > alex.cavanaugh@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Erin Lord > erin.lord@und.edu News Editor Rachel Smerer > rachel.smerer@und.edu

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Join the conversation at www.TheDakotaStudent.com

It’s all here: dakotastudent.com

Features Editor Megan Sevigny > megan.sevigny@und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@und.edu Web Editor Madi Whitman > madisson.whitman@und.edu

> Find the most up to date stories, columns and photos all in an easy to use, convenient place > Comment on issues and stories affecting your lives as students > Search the archives for past stories > Read campus highlights and features

Campus notes

business

> Criminal Mischief - Four instances: 3251 5 Ave. N.,3205 Longbow Ct., 3371 Longbow Ct., 3241 Longbow Ct. > Medical Assist - Four instances: University Ave./ Hamline Dr., 1300 Ralph Engelstad Ave., 3303 University Ave., 2901 University Ave. > Accident-Property - Two instances: University Ave./Columbia Rd., 3012 University Ave. > Other Assist - Two instances: 715 40 St. N., 500 Tulane Dr. > Other reports - Civil Process (Columbia Tunnel), Disorderly Conduct (2620 University Ave.), Criminal Trespass (2620 University Ave.), Theft of Property (110 State St.), Fire Call (3971 Campus Rd.), Found Property (5 Ave. N.), Extortion/Blackmail (448 Stanford Rd). > The Dakota Student reserves the copyright privilege for all stories written and published by the staff. Permission must be given by the Editor to reprint any article, cartoon, photograph or part thereof. > The Dakota Student is a student-operated newspaper published by the Board of Student Publications and the University of North Dakota. > Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of UND, Student Government, the Board of Student Publications, or the administration, faculty, staff or student body of UND.

Retraction: In the March 8 article titled “Phillips to add to Conference lineup,” it was listed that Phillips would give a reading at the NDMOA. The reading will be at the Memorial Union Ballroom, with a reception at the NDMOA to follow.

Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Alexandra McClaflin > alexandra.mcclaflin@und.edu Kyla Lindstrom > kyla.lindstrom@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677 All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

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> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.

hockey dads & soccer moms, come and get your freaky on! Michael R. - West Allis, WI

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DS World Brief

Israel’s new laws have some fearing discrimination J E RU S A L E M — Is r a e l’s conservative-led Knesset adopted two controversial laws Wednesday that critics warn will worsen discrimination against the country’s Arab minority and make it easier to prevent Arab citizens from moving into hundreds of Jewish towns and villages. One law legalizes the practice of using “admissions committees” in small towns in the Negev and Galilee to reject would-be residents based upon their social “suitability,” a vague term that opponents fear will also be used to bar gays, black Israelis, single women, Christians and secular families. The second law is aimed at imposing fines on Arab towns and organizations that commemorate so-called Nakba Day, which falls on Israel’s Independence Day. Some Arab Israelis mourn the day as a “catastrophe” because it resulted in the displacement of 700,000 Palestinians. “This is not just a racist law, it’s an oppressive law,” said Hassan Jabareen, founder of Adalah, an Israeli advocacy group focusing on legal rights of Arab citizens. “It sends the public message that Israel not only doesn’t respect the history and memory of the Palestinian people, but they now prohibit Palestinians living under their regime from commemorating their own history and identity.” He said the laws are the latest example of state-condoned discrimination against Arab citizens, who also receive unequal treatment in their ability to purchase or lease land and to obtain citizenship for spouses. He said the laws would heighten tensions inside Israel’s Arab minority, which accounts for about 20 percent of the population. During a spirited Knesset debate that began Tuesday night and continued into early Wednesday, Arab lawmakers condemned the measures as “racist” and “anti-democratic.” “This is a black night,” said Jamal Zahalka, of the Arab-led Balad Party. “We will turn to the world for protection from your government, which acts with hostility toward the Arab public.” Zahalka said the admissions-committee law will effectively prevent Arabs from living in 70 percent of the country and that the Nakba law will “trample” free speech.

world news report friday march 25, 2011

> Inside:

UND vies for national championship.

Full circle of hardship for Japanese elders SURVIVAL Seniors in tsunami zone face greater challenges in wake of natural disaster.

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MARK MAGNIER

Los Angeles Times

MIYAKO, Japan—Chiya Yamane shuffles down the hall of the evacuation center, an old lady seeking refuge in a children’s school. She is wearing an oversized sweater, her shoulders hunched against the late winter chill that penetrates the Miyako Elementary School where she was brought after the March 11 tsunami tore through her home. She remembers hearing the tsunami warning; then the desperate attempt to get away. “But I’m 84,” Yamane said. “And very slow.” It was a rescue worker who appeared in time to carry her on his back, up the mountainside to higher ground and safety. “A great, great blessing,” she says, though she knows, too, that being saved meant her ordeal was just beginning. Japan is an aging society, a country characterized by a low birthrate and long life spans. More than one in five Japanese is over 65—roughly double U.S. levels—with the ratio closer to one in three in rural areas. But if those statistics dictate that a high number of the dead from this tragedy must be elderly, so, too, must be the survivors, now struggling to get essential medicines, stay warm against the cold, find their pets and salvage waterlogged mementos. Japanese soldiers found 128 elderly people abandoned by medical

staff at a hospital six miles from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant. Most were comatose and 14 died shortly after. Eleven more reportedly froze to death at a retirement home in Kesennuma six days after several dozen of their fellow residents were killed by the tsunami. Morimitsu Inawashida, the facility’s owner, characterized those who survived as “highly stressed.” Nowhere is Japan aging more visibly than in the rural, northern prefectures struck by the quake. This part of the country is characterized by towns and villages now the preserve of the elderly, many of their children gone to live and work in Tokyo and other big cities, leaving them without the family support that was an anchor of traditional Japanese society. “I’ve lived here 60 years and you’re seeing fewer families all living together,” said Yamane, whose son lives in Tokyo and whose married daughter works several miles away. “And without jobs, more young people are moving away.” Even farming has become an elderly profession in many cases. Yaegashi Takashi, 74, said his house had survived the quake and its aftermath, but his tractor was lost, a huge blow. He only heard from his children, living in Tokyo, a week after the earthquake. “They were worried about me,” he said. “Without my tractor, I can’t farm. There’s no insurance for it.” In the absence of sons and daughters, much of the care has been meted out to caregivers outside the family who themselves are getting on in years, a phenomenon known as rorokaigo. Evidence of this senior tragedy

BRIAN VAN DER BRUG> Los Angeles Times Earthquake refugee Yoshie Sasaki has a quiet meal of rice in the gym at the Yamaguchi Elementary School.

could be seen in those who had retreated to the Miyako school where Yamane sought shelter. More than half appeared to be in the 60s-to80s range. This is a generation that grew up in the devastation of postwar Japan, saw the country modernize into a place synonymous with high-tech comfort and now see their lives bookended by disaster. “I can’t really compare this to World War II,” said Kiyoshi Kikuchi, 80. “Both are hard times, but I never saw my house so damaged like this during the war.” There is much talk here of the toughness of the older generation. Having spent a childhood amid postwar deprivation, they see themselves as resilient, self-sufficient, not soft like today’s youth with their electronic gadgets. But Japan’s elderly are catered to as well. Electronics companies are developing robots that talk to and do chores for them, including Riba, an electronic nurse that lifts

people out of bed. Car companies have crafted large-print dashboards and easy-exit swivel seats, while toilet-maker Toto is working on medical commodes that transmit daily urine and stool analysis data from isolated communities to distant medical centers. A tea kettle with wireless technology can warn distant offspring if a parent doesn’t use it every morning, a warning to call in. And yet there are signs of strength. Many of the elderly leave shelters during the day to clean and search for precious items, returning to the evacuation centers at night. Most houses that are still standing have a pile of possessions out front, seen in Japan not as an invitation to steal but a pragmatic way to start digging out. Bulldozers have pushed debris into the side streets to clear the main avenues, leaving piles up to 10 feet high. Between them, in the ruins, elderly women can be seen pushing shopping carts with a few possessions.

Support voiced for El Salvador VULNERABILITY President Obama pledges drug-fighting assistance for unstable country.

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TIM JOHNSON MCT

SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador—Reflecting on America’s role in another war-torn country, El Salvador, President Barack Obama paid homage Tuesday evening at the tomb of a Catholic archbishop gunned down by U.S.-linked death squads more than three decades ago. Obama, who is facing questions from anxious lawmakers about U.S. military intervention in Libya, scrapped a visit to Mayan ruins on the schedule for Wednesday morning, and a spokesman said he would depart for Washington at 11 a.m., a few

hours earlier than scheduled. On the last leg of a trip that also took him to Brazil and Chile, Obama pledged $200 million to Central America to battle a new menace: drug cartels. He hailed President Mauricio Funes, the first leftist leader in El Salvador’s modern history, for his moderate policies and efforts to “overcome old divisions” still visible in this tiny nation. Narcotics, public security and immigration were the main topics as Obama and Funes met in the ornate presidential palace, surrounded by tropical gardens. But so was the weight of history, and Cold War forces that turned this nation into a proxy battleground in which 75,000 people died during the 1980-1992 civil war. Moments before heading with Obama to a crypt beneath the Metropolitan Cathedral to honor slain Archbishop Oscar Arnulfo

Romero, Funes thanked him for paying tribute to a prelate he called “the spiritual guide of this nation ... and the universal validity of his message.” Helicopters flew over the cathedral as Obama and Funes arrived. Obama, looking somber and occasionally shaking his head, listened as Funes spoke to him before a bronze reclined image of the slain archbishop. Obama lit a votive candle. Shortly after the arrival of Obama and first lady Michelle Obama on a day of brilliant blue skies, Funes noted that his country, like Chile and Brazil, had moved in recent decades “in a very orderly and peaceful manner” toward democracy. El Salvador’s vulnerability to drug gangsters was underscored by a full-page newspaper ad by the Nationalist Republican Alliance, the right-wing opposition party that governed the nation for

the past four presidential terms. It appealed for U.S. help “to avoid El Salvador from becoming the territory of drug traffickers as has sadly happened in nearby countries.” As much as 80 percent of the cocaine from the Andean region passes through Central America, and drug gangs from Colombia and Mexico have moved heavily into the region, particularly neighboring Honduras and Guatemala. Obama voiced determination to “confront the narco-traffickers and gangs that have caused so much violence in all of our countries, and especially here in Central America.” He said the $200 million anticrime package would “strengthen courts, civil society groups and institutions that uphold the rule of law” and address “the social and economic forces that drive young people towards criminality.”


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commentary

coMMEntary

DS View Crisis

JaPan Philanthropy a must during international time of need. While many students scattered for Spring Break, news channels all over the world flashed with reports of the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan. The earthquake was the largest in recorded history for Japan, so large that it was recorded in North Dakota, and the tsunami was over fifty feet high, wiping Sendai and several small fishing towns nearly completely off the coast. In the following days the news reports were of the nuclear concerns that led many to evacuate their already damaged homes, and many others to leave Northcentral Japan. With the media hype over the damaged nuclear power plants, attention was shifted to the uncertain situation, leaving Japanese officials not only responsible for responding to the areas directly affected by the earthquakes and tsunami, but also in charge of treating an unstable nuclear situation, with the whole world watching. For most in Japan, however, the concern was not for the nuclear power plants, which they know have security measures in place in the event of damage or meltdown. Rather, their concern has been a nationwide food shortage, as after the initial earthquake and tsunami, nearly all of the bread and rice from the rest of the country was purchased to sustain those in the affected areas. Furthermore, shelter is becoming an issue for those who lost their homes or were forced to evacuate the area around the nuclear power plant in Fukushima. Now, many of these survivors are staying in shelters and school gyms. Relief efforts have finally been able to construct shelters, but these temporary buildings are ill equipped to protect people from the cold—not to mention those who are confined to homes without electricity. Even these physical hardships are nothing compared to the loss of life and the number of families that have been separated by the disaster—mothers, fathers, children, brothers and sisters washed away by the tsunami or missing after an earthquake in a populated area. Some of these victims, who have lost much more than just their homes, still wander the streets lined with overturned cars and piles of rubble that used to be houses, looking for their children or husbands or wives. For them, this disaster is immeasurable and unending. As Japan begins the immense cleanup and rebuild of the cities hit by the tsunami and continue to monitor the nuclear power plant issue, what is needed most is food and blankets—two crucial resources anyone can provide. There are just over 14,000 students at UND— imagine if each student gave up coffee for one week and donated that money, a mere ten dollars, to the American Red Cross or another charity organization. That would be $140,000. Something as minor as ten dollars from an individual means a lot more to a disaster victim—and this is one very real way for us to make a difference.

Editorial board Alex Cavanaugh Editor-in-chief Erin Lord opinion Editor

Rachel Smerer news Editor

Editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

Education, tuition and research

Letter: Schneider discusses the missed opportunities in senate “Serit ut alteri saeclo prosit.” have used interest from a rarely- vided economic opportunity for our Meaning “one sows for the benefit touched state fund to permanently highly-educated graduates by zeroing of another age,” this phrase was the provide merit-based college scholar- out funding for Centers of Excellence choice of a group of students from ships to talented North Dakota stu- across our state. Centers of Excellence, like those Fargo North High School to become dents. in my district, Like Wyothe state’s Latin motto. reArguably the most have helped bring In spite of being a Fargo South ming’s the private and graduate and almost entirely unfa- nowned Hathadisappointing has public sectors tomiliar with Latin, I wholeheartedly way Scholarship been the treatment gether to engage agree with these bright young lead- program, this in cutting-edge ers that our state’s focus should be on l e g i s l a t i o n of our students... research and comhave the next generation and not just the would provided meannext biennium. Mac Schneider m e r c i a l i z a t i o n assisThough the Senate recently gave ingful representative in areas ranging from life sciences favorable consideration to adopting tance to cover to unmanned airthis motto, the Legislature can cer- college tuition tainly do more to live up to its terms for some of North Dakota’s best and craft systems. While we should always look for by investing in those who will be- brightest, keeping them in the state come our future leaders and job cre- for their higher education and, quite opportunities to improve results and provide accountability, scrapping possibly, for good. ators here in North Dakota. Despite receiving bipartisan sup- this initiative is entirely the wrong One missed opportunity involves some of our very youngest citizens. port from the interim Workforce approach. In speaking with my Republican Earlier this session, the North Da- Committee, the proposal was deand Dem-NPL colleagues in the Senkota Senate rejected a proposal that feated. Arguably most disappointing has ate about the importance of these iswould have funded–at minimal cost to the state–a pilot project aimed at been the treatment of our students by sues, I am hopeful that in the remainimplementing pre-kindergarten edu- my friends across the political aisle in ing days of the session we will be able to restore this funding to maintain the House of Representatives. cation in North Dakota. Tuition and mandatory fees have our grip on college affordability and Pre-kindergarten has been shown to lead to higher scores in reading and increased by 106% since I graduated improve access to opportunity for young people here in North Dakota. math and also increases the chances from UND less than a decade ago. Failure to make these investYet, the House majority voted to that a child will one day graduate strip funding identified in the execu- ments would be like eating our seed from college. That’s why all but a handful of tive budget that would have limited corn, and as any high school student further tuition increases at four-year from the north side of Fargo who states have alschools to 2.5% has studied Latin can tell you, those ready adopted seeds should be sown for the benefit ...our state’s focus or less. pre-kinderSadly, the of future generations. garten for should be on the next House version of their kids. generation and not the higher educaUn f o r t u budget also nately, North just the next bien- tion Mac Schneider contains reducDakota will nium... tions in funding continue to Mac Schneider for college schollag behind the representative arships and needSchneider represents north Grand rest of the nabased financial Forks’ District 42 in the North Dakota tion in this important area until at least next ses- aid, hitting students from both sides Senate and serves as Assistant Leader of the Dem-NPL Caucus. of the college affordability equation. sion. The House majority has also takAlso before the Legislature was an innovative proposal which would en aim at an initiative that has pro-


the Dakota Student

friday march 25, 2011

05

Libya revolution defined by media’s language > Mitch molstad

The Dakota Student

What are the stakes of the words and labels we use in our political discussions? Given the same set of circumstances, the way that we, and the media, define the terms of a situation can have serious effects on how it is perceived. The words used to describe people and events carry implications, which affect the way we feel toward them (consciously or not). Over the past month, we’ve been witnessing a real-world case study attesting to this phenomenon unfold in Libya. The Libyan populist uprising began during the second half of February, in the wake of other revolts in Egypt and Tunisia. At first, the movement seemed to mirror those in nearby countries—we were seeing largely nonviolent protests against deeply entrenched authoritarian regimes, staged by the youth or common people rallying around ostensibly democratic principles. The journalistic narrative and the discussions held by most western observers were relatively uniform concerning the several countries in which uprisings had taken place, including Libya. These movements were nonviolent, protest-centric backlashes supported by the masses. The media at this time defined participants as “demonstrators,” a term which most certainly carries some attachments. Demonstrators camp out in town squares.

And, of course, as one NPR commenDemonstrators make signs. Demonstrators tator argued, what do Americans love more do not carry AK-47s. Several weeks ago, however, the narrative than an underdog? That’s an interesting way to look at the about Libya split from discussions surrounding Tunisia and (particularly) Egypt. In the situation, and perhaps it may apply in some stories of major world media outlets, from cases. Does it apply to Libya, though, or to NPR and the New York Times to the BBC the majority of popular political movements? and Al Jazeera, participants of the movement I don’t think so. Instead, I think in Libya experienced when we use or hear an almost universal word “rebel” in redefinition—labels ...the word “rebel” the America, particularly shifted, as “demonimplies a story of in the context of a strators” and “protesas far away as tors��� became “rebels.” the underdog ver- country Libya, we tend to deThat shift seemed to sus the establish- tach ourselves from it. happen almost overWe associate the term night, and it rapidly ment... spread through the Mitch Molstad with violence and with layers of journalism columnist political ambiguities. It’s the kind of thing and public opinion. we hear about, and Our question here is, how does this redefinition affect the largely ignore, in the news every day. It beopinions of Americans and other Westerners comes another remote foreign rebellion to toward the developments in Libya? There are throw on the endless pile of other remote a couple ways to interpret this change in per- foreign rebellions, and most of our emotional and philosophical attachment gets diluted in spective. Some commentators have argued that the the process. Demonstrators in Egypt were never redefinition of the resistance movement as a “rebellion” could be a positive development, ferred to as rebels. The protestors in Tahrir particularly in the context of support from Square were seen as idealists, a force fighting western observers. Usage of the word “rebel” for the spread of democratic principles and implies a story of the underdog versus the against the injustices of tyranny. These are establishment—it comes attached with no- themes onto which a western audience can tions of nobility and righteousness, while also latch, and they did so in Egypt’s case. In the case of Libya, however, we’re seeing staging the incumbent regime as some sort of a much foggier and varied reaction, especially undesirable thing.

now that western governments have reached an impasse of whether or not to intercede militarily. Sentiments toward involvement are mixed—some are for support, others warn of continued American imperialism, and many more, I’m sure, have begun to tune the situation out entirely. This is mostly due to the comparative complexity of the situation in Libya: while it wasn’t at all clear three weeks ago, it may seem completely reasonable now to identify the situation in Libya as a rebellion. Colonel al-Gaddafi’s army has responded with violence against the uprising, and the resistance, now loosely organized, has taken up arms and has established strongholds in the eastern part of the country. But consider also how language has affected, and will continue to affect, outside reactions to these events. Interpretations of terms like “demonstrator” versus “rebel” matter—will governments, or, more importantly, the people they represent, view the uprising in Libya as a farremoved rebellion, or as an essentially democratic (and therefore a more sympathetic) movement? It’s an important question, because their stances will play a big part in how America and other western powers respond, and, in turn, on the overall result of the Libyan revolution.

DS

> Mitch Molstad is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at mitchell.molstad@und.edu

North Dakota nice MLB complications

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effort to find free parking (stick it to the man!), and, to make a long, dull story short, The Dakota Student I happened upon an opportunity to test my In times of distress, people of ancient parallel parking skills outrageously close to Greece seemed almost assured sweet relief, my residence hall. My attempt was successthrough rescue by one of their many gods ful, the sort of inch by inch, cranking the or heroes. According to their legends, we see steering wheel every which way parking job. tales of many a rescue in the stories of Per- Aglow with my triumph, I walked only ten seus saving Andromeda and Jason rescuing feet before seeing the two-hour parking sign the old woman in the sea. Accounts of Norse that was to spoil my mood. A few expletives hero Beowulf are consistently read at every later, I was back in my vehicle and realizing level of our education and romanticized that the same efforts that secured my once narratives of Disney princes and princesses fabulous parking spot were the same efforts are speckled throughout most of our child- that culminated in my being stuck on a dehoods. Although rooted in literature and art, serted street late at night. Within minutes of these epics tales are establish, shared, and spinning my wheels, a car filled with three perpetuated in legend. While inspirational good Samaritans drove down the street and and exciting, such stories seem tremendously proceeded, without hesitation, to pull over. inaccessible (and you They rushed to the back ...the most striking of the vehicle to push me know, mythical) for the average UND college aspect of the situ- free. I was in a grateful student in want of a state of shock, amazed ation was the atti- at how short a time has little rescue. What of our own, tude of those to the passed from the time I real-live rescuers? I was solitarily frantic to rescue. cannot speak for most Erin Barta when I was in unstuck people, but when things and in good company. columnist When I thanked them break, get stuck, or are going poorly, I either they evenly told me that try to remedy them myself in an exercise of they just lived down the street in a manner independence, or I call my dad. I never gen- that seemed to downplay their kindness and uinely count on some hero-like figure mate- demonstrate a sort of obvious sense of oblirializing out of the mist, saving me from my gation, a sense of responsibility for those in distress. However, recent vehicular troubles distress on the street where they live. have illuminated a new kind of active rescue, When I later recounted my adventure, I one that is alive and well. was flooded with countless other stories of We all know that our fine state has had timely rescue on the road. Whether it was its fair share of generalizations made about need of a tow rope or a push or a ride, willit. Our penchants for hard work or genu- ingness and selfless people crawled out of the ine kindness are often the subject of many woodwork to lend a hand. Shortly after, I a claim of praise. In fact, it is most often the found myself in similar circumstances—this people (not the nice weather) that garners time muddy, and the phenomenon occurred our state its fine acclaim, and it is exactly out once more. And once again the most striking of these qualities I believe our very own heroes of rescue have been born. I was roaming around the streets of campus the week before spring break in an ERIN > page

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Kirby graff

The Dakota Student

A few weeks ago I wrote about how I was excited for spring based on the patch of warm February weather that we were experiencing. I guess that I should have tempered my expectations until after spring break. Nevertheless, next Friday marks the beginning of the 2011 Major League Baseball season. Sports in general have been called the “opiate of the masses.” Its existence helps people forget the problems they face everyday—an escape of sorts. I know that I am excited for my escape when the MLB season begins. I love to debate about which team is better and of course I love to see which team ends up winning it all (hopefully the Minnesota Twins). However, that will not be the biggest storyline this year. The biggest MLB storyline of 2011 will be the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA). The combined influences of the United States economy and the other major sports leagues in the United States having labor issues will lead to the overshadowing of the 2011 season. The first part is the big picture issue, and that is the economy. In the United States there is growing concern with where the country is at economically. Some believe that we are in a depression and others believe we should be prepared for a crash similar to the one in 1929. The rest of the world is not immune to these influences as well. With the civil unrest in Libya and Egypt, the global economy is on high alert, and thus far the results have been negative. The price for a barrel of oil is currently over 100 dollars a barrel. This trickles down to nervous consumers in the marketplace. When these consumers don’t spend money, the MLB does not make money. The second issue is related of the first. When the market is down the owners are not making as much money and therefore

do not want to spend as much on the player’s salaries. At the same time the players want to maintain the status quo with their salaries. Currently the NBA and the NFL are looking at lockouts because of the failure to sign a new CBA based on the current economic conditions. While those battles are raging this spring (NFL) and this summer (NBA) it will overshadow the current labor talks in the MLB. While the CBA does not expire until next December, there have already been small battles that Major League Baseball should be aware of. The recent contractual struggles between the Cardinals and Albert Pujols mirror that concern. With the unknown that is the economy and the new CBA, the Cardinals do not want to commit the rumored 30 million dollars a year that Albert Pujols reportedly requested. However, on the other hand Albert Pujols has been one of the most productive players in his first ten seasons in the history of baseball, and the projection of growing salaries throughout time have suggested that someone of his caliber possibly deserves that kind of money. While that situation has yet to be resolved, its overlying theme is something that should worry baseball fans. Even though this will be a major concern in the league, it can be remedied. If a new CBA is struck soon the overwhelming problems in the other leagues can bring new fans to MLB and create a better long term situation for baseball. So while most people are excited for home runs and pitching gems, the cynic in me is worried about the future of baseball. Currently, all of the NFL news is based on labor talks and the lockout. Even the current NBA season has hints of a lockout. I believe that this MLB season will mirror this year’s NBA season—great quality with the sense of impending doom.

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> Kirby Graff is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached kirby.graff@und.edu


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itching to get to a powwow!” explained Deanna Rainbow, Vice President of UNDIA. There are two kinds of powwows, traditional and contest. UNDIA’s Wacipi is a contest powwow. Attendants can watch dancers compete in men’s and women’s Traditional and Fancy Dances as well as the men’s Grass Dance and the women’s Jingle Dress Dance. They can also shop at the many vendors selling t-shirts, artwork, crafts and beadwork. Many dancers, if asked, are happy to pose for pictures. B.J. Rainbow, former president of UNDIA and now general member explains that people who come to Wacipi, especially for the first time, always leave impressed. “When we tell people [who have never before attended a powwow] to go, what we usually tell them to see is the Grand Entry,” said Rainbow. “It is the most colorful thing a person can see.” Each day of Wacipi kicks off with the Grand Entry. The Grand Entry is a parade of all the dancers lead by war veterans and honored guests carrying flags and eagle staffs, all wearing traditional Native American dress. Following the Grand Entry the contest powwow begins. Spectators unfamiliar with Native American culture may have questions about what they are seeing so UNDIA sets up an information table to answer any questions attendants may have about Native American culture, dances, music, beadwork, etc. UNDIA encourages people to attend the week’s events, too. During Time-Out Week there is a conference with many speakers focusing on issues Native Americans currently face as well as Native American history. Past speakers include the first Native American astronaut and first Native American dentist. B.J. Rainbow explains that the conference is important because American Indian culture is very diverse and so fluid, with many different tribes, taught a lot of different ways; it helps people not to generalize or trivialize American Indian people. “That’s why it’s called Time-Out, take a time-out

friday march 25, 2011

from whatever you are doing in your daily life and go experience a different culture, something new,” Rainbow explains. Time-Out Week and Wacipi is very expensive and proceeds collected during the event are never enough to pay for it. When UNDIA is not hosting Wacipi they are fundraising. “Fundraising is the biggest thing we do,” said Janie Schroeder, Social Activities Coordinator for UNDIA. UNDIA spends a lot of time writing letters to local businesses, writing grant proposals and soliciting student government. In addition, some of UNDIA’s biggest fundraising events are a taco sale, bingo, and selling raffle tickets. If they don’t raise enough money then there isn’t a powwow, and that has happened in the past. “Trying to raising $100,000 in 9 months, or even a year, is hard. We couldn’t even be students, we could just be full time fundraisers, and it would still be hard,” described Rainbow. “Full time undergrad and graduate students put this on because they care.” In addition to funds, UNDIA is always looking for volunteers to help mainly with Wacipi but also many other events throughout the year. To volunteer anyone can go to the American Indian Center to sign up. Membership in UNDIA is available to any student regardless if they are Native American, but all Native Americans are considered general members upon admission to UND. UNDIA meetings are every Wednesday at 3 p.m. at the American Indian Center and free soup is offered to anyone at the center every Friday for lunch. Time-Out Week is April 4-10. For information regarding events contact the Indian Studies Association at 701-777-4314. Wacipi is April 8th-10th at the Hyslop Sports Center beginning at 7 p.m. Friday and 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free for children 5 and under, people 60 and over, and all UND students with a student ID. For everyone else admission is $10 for the weekend, or $6 per day.

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> Thomas Carpenter is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at thomas.carpenter@und. edu

Interfaith week successful MISSION UND hosts several days of events dedicated to fostering religious diversity.

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katie bachmeier The Dakota Student

March 21st-27th, 2011 was the first official Interfaith Week held at the University of North Dakota. The week was filled with a variety of cultural events showcasing different beliefs found around the world. The major events included a Tibetan Monk presentation, along with presentations of Islam, Native American faiths and a Muslim service opportunity, along with a variety of other informational sessions, all of which are provided to the UND campus under one goal—to allow students to be more accepting of those around them. “It’s never been done on the UND campus before,” said University Programming Counsel Diversity Chair Matt Finely. “We’re making

history. It has the potential to be something big in upcoming years.” The journey began in the fall semester of 2010 to form a program for UND students to be more aware of other faiths in comparison to those they were knowledgeable about already. Christus Rex began to work with Muslim students in the fall of 2010 to form an ongoing conversation on the different faiths. As this first step seemed to be a success, Christus Rex pastor Chad Brucklacher, along with other involved students began to investigate possibilities of the making the same sort of conversation on a grander scale to appeal to more audiences. Brucklacher had previously attended a seminar in which Interfaith Youth Core’s founder Eboo Patel gave an inspiring message. “Interfaith Youth Core’s primary goal is to provide diversity in social action,” Brucklacher said, “All major religions believe in making the world a better place, while having a dialog with each other.” President Barack Obama recently called for an international faith

dialogue, cooperation and understanding to be incorporated on more college campuses in order for students to be more aware and accepting of their surroundings. Funding from this promotion helped make the events at UND during this week possible. Along with these funds, UND’s University Programming Counsel has made the Tibetan Monk program possible. As UPC diversity chair, Finely saw the Tibetan monks at a conference he had attended earlier in the year and decided it was a must see for UND students. Finely sees this collaboration as one of many to come. “[This week] is definitely a stepping stone to the idea out and people thinking about it,” Finely said, “It definitely [supports] a more diverse campus.” Along with UPC and Christus Rex, the UND Wellness Center has also made events possible. Most notably, the Interfaith Youth Core has provided UND with topics to discuss

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the Dakota Student

Newman House vandalized by this means. CRIME Student house The Newman House is a Catholicism-guided residence has pronographic imfor females and is run by the St. ages posted on the walls Thomas Aquinas Newman Cenover Spring Break. ter. Its director, Kristie Unterseher, confirms the code to the door lock has since been changed. brandi jewett Once inside, the suspect proThe Dakota Student ceeded to hang pornographic Several university students material on walls, mailboxes, and awoke to a shocking sight of van- even on the ceiling, leaving them dalism on the morning of March to be discovered the next morn16. ing by residents staying in the Sometime during the night or house over spring break. early morning, someone entered “It’s very disappointing,” Unthe Newman House and placed terseher said, regarding the bepornographic images throughout havior of the vandal. the house while the five residents The crime is considered more slept. The pictures were accom- serious than other vandalism inpanied by relicidents occurgious-themed on camNo other crime this ring text. pus. According “No other year has included to UND Police crime this year unlawful entry. Chief Duane has included Czapiewski unlawful enthere were try,” he said. Duane Czapiewski no signs of N o t h Chief of Police, UPD ing forced entry at inside any doors or the residence windows. He was removed suspects the intruder may have or damaged. The photographs known the code to the key-less found at the scene were printed door lock and accessed the house in black and white. UND Police

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NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

believe the source of the images is a website featuring religiousthemed pornography. Czapiewski says the investigation is ongoing but few details have emerged since the incident. Suspects arrested in the case could be charged with criminal trespassing. Additional charges are also possible. The motive for the crime re-

mains unclear. More evidence or the arrest of a suspect could lead to the conclusion of whether the vandalism was a prank or a hate crime directed at the Catholic Church. “The determination will be made at the end of the investigation,” Czapiewski said. If the Newman House vandalism is determined to be a hate crime, it will not be the first to plague the campus. In April 2008, a UND student fled from the residence halls after becoming the focus of antiSemitic taunting and vandalism. Scott Lebovitz said students were drawing Swastikas in the stairwell near his room and wrote “Scott is a Jew” in ice cream in an elevator in his residence. Lebovitz moved into a fraternity to escape the harassment and was refunded approximately $460 in rent costs by the university.

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> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu

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three voters,” stated DeMolee. She says students not voting at the sites may have already voted on their own electronic device. Student Government elections were available online. “If you wanted, you could have voted from an I-Pod Touch through Wi-fi while in the Culver’s drivethru,” said DeMolee. The election results will not be official until reviewed and approved by Student Senate on March 27. Next week the election committee will review a claim brought forward by DeMolee in regards to a candidate campaigning on election day. The elections code forbids campaigning on the day of elections. She says he would not be removed from his position if found in violation of the rule. “He may have to pay a $50 fine, with the money going to the elections committee,” she stated. “Or he may have to complete community service.” If the candidate chooses to appeal the committee’s decision, then the election’s appeal committee would meet and make the final decision regarding the matter. DeMolee and other committee members are now compiling a document outlining the steps they have taken in order to make the process easier for next year’s election committee. “I’m concerned with the process, time-line and schedule,” said DeMolee. “Having a time-line doesn’t make it easy.” According to DeMolee, the complexity of the code creates difficulty in preparing information and applications for candidate and students. She hopes the committee’s changes and stepby-step instructions make the job easier for next year’s chair and committee.

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> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu


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president ordered all employees to leave Tokyo, which again prompted concern. After contacting him, she From page learned that the company’s president three days. “When I couldn’t contact is French, basing his judgments off my family, I was only crying and news reports from France on the sitwatching the T.V.,” Yamamoto ex- uation. “There are some misunderstandings about the radiation issue,” plained. “I felt helpless.” Yamamoto’s family lives in Kori- she said. Eguchi then spoke of one yama, near Sendai, where the Tsuna- victim from Fukushima who was unmi struck. The city was moderately able to return to his home prefecture damaged by the earthquake, and the after the earthquake, and was refused Yamamoto family found their house a room at a hotel just because he was also damaged. “When I saw the from Fukushima, and the hotel staff house on Skype, there were many thought he might have been exposed cracks in the wall,” Yamamoto said. to radiation. “This confusion is The roof was also damaged, and cab- caused by misinformation,” Eguchi stressed. “We need correct informainets toppled over inside the house. While many houses in the city tion.” “One good thing,” contrasted were damaged, the growing nuclear dilemma had many evacuating the Yoshimura, “is that we’ve already area. Koriyama is about forty miles started to recover.” He explained from the damaged power plant. “My that the difference between the 1995 family was afraid,” Yamamoto said, Kobe earthquake and this one is that “because they didn’t have much in- at that time rescue teams didn’t use formation. People were concerned helicopters, but now they have been in heavy use. for their safety.” “Things are returning to norThe plant officials recommended a 15-20 mile evacuation zone, but mal,” Yamamoto added. “But people many civilians did not think that was still feel scared and nervous.” She exenough. Yamamoto’s family has yet plained that she “still feels helpless,” to leave the city because of her fa- and has been thinking about how ther’s status as a city hall official and to help Japan. This has also been on her mother’s role as an elementary the mind of Eguchi, who is working with other Japschool teacher. ...these three-story anese students Back in the plan a special U.S., Yamamobuildings [were] to culture night to to and UND’s just disappearing. solicit funds for other Japanese those affected students reIt was pretty sad. by the disaster. mained glued to The stuthe news. Kou Omori dents planning “It was so UND student the event will much more than work in coorI expected,” said Aviation student Kou Omori, from dination with relief efforts in Japan, Tokyo. “With most earthquakes, which are currently accepting donasome things just fall off shelves. With tions to provide blankets, medicine, this one, the shelves themselves were food and shelter for those whose falling—I don’t know how to de- homes and families were lost in the scribe it.” Omori explained how he tsunami and who have spent the felt watching footage of the devas- weeks since the disaster in crowded tated areas and the tsunamis. “The shelters. More information on the videos of the tsunamis were pretty event will be provided when it is freaky,” he said. “There were these available. For now, anyone who is three-story buildings just disappear- able and willing to help is encouraged to contact donation services ing. It was pretty sad.” “It was just terrible,” said like the American Red Cross, Save Yoshimura. “My concern was about the Children and MercyCorps. the power plants.” Both Yoshimura and Eguchi felt > Alex Cavanaugh is the Editor-inirritated by the Japanese Government Chief for The Dakota Student. He and news sources’ lack of timely and can be reached at alex.cavanaugh@ accurate information. “The Japanese und.edu Government was slow in providing information—only after something major happened,” explained Eguchi. Yoshimura spoke of the Japanese government’s initial refusal of aid from other countries, including the U.S. military and a German rescue team. “The Japanese Government didn’t take it too seriously,” commented Eguchi. Besides these frustrations, Eguchi was distressed by the lack of clear, accurate information from news sources. She explained her panic after seeing reports of radiation passing through Tokyo. “I became crazy when I heard the radiation passed through Tokyo,” she said. “I heard the news, and was worrying about my parents, so I called them.” It turned out that the level of radiation was not harmful to humans. “The information was not clear,” continued Eguchi. “So I worried about them being exposed; I called them and told them to go South. My mother comforted me, even though she is in Japan.” Eguchi then explained that a friend who works in Tokyo posted on his Facebook that his company’s

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Higher Education. The State Board, on April 7, will discuss the new law and determine what the next action is for UND. The transition process is on hold “until President Kelley receives further direction from the State Board. Until that time we will not know exactly what the directive to UND is from the State Board,” explains Boyd. Though the UND nickname and logo is now state law, it still lands UND athletic teams on the sanctions list with the NCAA. UND currently violates the 2005 policy banning the use of Native American references and imagery at NCAA Championship events. The settlement agreement between the NCAA and UND states that “uniform and other paraphernalia with Native American references or images cannot be worn or displayed at NCAA Championship competitions, and institutions which continue to display or promote Native

friday march 25, 2011 American references are prohib- he provided a statement,” Zent ited from hosting Championship said. events.” Newly elected Student Body UND was given three years to President, Kylie Oversen, said gain tribal approval to keep the she is “slightly disappointed in nickname and logo from the Spir- the actions of the legislature. it Lake and Standing Rock tribes. I  believe that if they felt this The future of UND student strongly  about our logo and athletes is still undetermined. It nickname they  should’ve taken will be dependent upon the ac- this action years ago, as this has tions of the been an ongoState Board of struggle [I’m] slightly disap- ing Higher Edufor a long cation and the pointed in the ac- time.” NCAA. Fighttions of the legisla- ing The Peter JohnSioux bill son, Execu(House Bill ture. tive Associate 1263) passed Kylie Oversen through the Vice President upcoming Student House with for University Relations statBody President a 65-28 vote ed, “At some and in the point there will be conversations Senate with a 28-15 vote, despite with the NCAA. Stay tuned to a ‘do not pass’ recommendation see what happens next.” from the Senate Education ComThe signing of the Fighting mittee. Sioux bill was not made public. Four senators were absent and When asked why not, Governor did not vote. This whole process Dalrymple’s spokesman said there took a matter of months. was no need to make a public event. “The governor had already > Megan Talley is a staff writer for announced what his intentions The Dakota Student. She can be were prior to signing the bill, and reached at megan.talley@und.edu

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culture&media friday march 25, 2011

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Inside: Valentino, Brown and High Risk High

The North Dakota Museum of Art, or NDMoA for short, has been hosting a fascinating artistic and spiritual exhibit this week; as a part of Interfaith Week Celebration, the NDMoA has been hosting Tibetan monks while they create a mandala sand painting. They began work on the painting Tuesday after an 11:30 a.m. opening ceremony and won’t finish the work until today. If you want to see the painting, I suggest heading into the museum and checking it out before noon today. Buddhist mandala sand painting tradition dictates that once a sand painting has been created, it is destroyed in a healing and purification ceremony. The plans are to hold the closing ceremony for the mandala exhibit at noon, when prayers will be said over the completed painting. After the prayers, the painting will be ritually destroyed and spread among the audience, and then carried to a nearby flowing body of water to cleanse the waters and the Earth. The mandala sand painting needs to be created anew in each location and the training and dedication of the monks is awe-inspiring. Mandala sand paintings are a traditional component of Tibetan monk meditation tools. These paintings can be incredibly intricate and can take a group of monks weeks to complete. Literally millions of grains of colored sand are painstakingly placed on a flat wooden pedestal to create the final image. The pattern of the image is drawn from sacred texts and images and took most of Tuesday to inscribe on the platform. The monks then began to layer the colored sand using a chak-pur, a metal funnel with ribs. The monks rub a metal rod along its side and the vibrations cause the sand to flow out of the funnel like a liquid. The chak-purs also fill the NDMoA with a constant buzzing which is peaceful in its droning. I had to write this article well before the final project could truly be seen on Wednesday, but the centerpiece of the mandala appeared to be finished. The layering of the sand gave the image three dimensions, and the image of the Buddha at the center was incredibly detailed for having been poured sand. The monks are a part of an ongoing project called ‘Healing the Earth: A Sacred Art by the Tibetan Lamas of Drepung Loseling Monastery,’ and they toured the United States multiple times. The Drepung Loseling Monastery is a monastery in exile after the invasion of Tibet in 1959 by China. Only around 250 monks survived to rebuild in India. Currently, the Drepung Loseling Monastery has over 2500 monks, but is still not back to its original numbers. We are lucky the monks have come to Grand Forks, and this is a rare opportunity to see an actual mandala sand painting in the United States. The exhibit will be available for viewing up until noon on Friday, when it will be dismantled and swept up as part of the closing ceremony. The closing ceremony is free and all are welcome to participate. The NDMoA charges no admission, but a $5 donation is encouraged. The monks are also collecting donations to assist monks in exile and to create scholarships for monks to learn the craft. You can learn more about the mandala process and see some pictures of finished mandalas at www.mysticalartsoftibet.org.

A Million Grains of Sand Story by Patrick Evans

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Photos by Nathan Twerberg

>Patrick Evans is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at patrick.evans@und.edu


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Brown to speak at Alcohol use investigated coming Conference VETERAN Award-winning author and poet will share experiences and stories next week .

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Matthew Roy

The Dakota Student

The 42nd UND Writers Conference begins next Tuesday, less than a week away. This conference features writers of all sorts who have come to share their views on the current state of literature, as well as share some of their works. One of the authors attending this year is poet and fiction author Sean McLain Brown. Brown, a disabled former Marine who served in the Gulf War, states on his webpage that “much of my writing is evidence of my distrust and disbelief in war as an option, as well as expressions of my personal experiences during and after the Gulf War.” Brown teaches writing at De Anza College and at Western Connecticut State University’s Lower Residency MFA program. He is also currently an active member of Maxine Hong Kingston’s Veterans Writing Workshop, where she gives veterans the opportunity to take the experience of war and “put them through the process of art.” Kingston will also be at the UND Writers Conference. Brown has written poetry and fiction that has been published in many publications, including The San Francisco Chronicle, EM, Indiana Review and Mobius maga-

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Like karaoke? Check out Rhombus Guys on Wednesday nights for music, beer and potential embarrassment.

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

FACEBOOK Multimedia program looks at zines. His work has also been fea- the causes and effects of tured in anthologies My America, college drinking. Veterans of War, Veterans of Peace and An Introduction to the Prose Poem. He has been the recipient of the 2006 Nuclear Age Peace Foundation’s Barbara Mandigo Peace Poetry Prize First Place and two time winner of the Mark Linethal Poetry Award, as well as a Finalist in the Ann Fields Poetry Prize. Sean McLain Brown will be a part of the noon panel “Conflict Zones” on Thursday, March 31 with Loida Maritza Perez, Matt Sienkiewicz, and Jim Castellanos. He will be doing a 4 p.m. reading with Jim Castellanos on Thursday as well.

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> Matthew Roy is a staff writer for

The Dakota Student. He can be reached at matthew.roy.2@und.edu

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Nicholas GOwan The Dakota Student

College and stress often go as hand in hand with each other as college and alcohol. Alcohol is often used to combat the stress brought on by college life. Local media station Prairie Public, along with the Otto Bremer Foundation, the North Dakota Department of Human Services and the Fargo-Moorhead Area Foundation, have come together to bring the multimedia program “High Risk High.” Found at highriskhigh.org, “High Risk High” is targeted at students from middle school through college, teachers and parents and expounds on the dangers of alcohol and substance abuse in a variety of ways.

Suzanne Redekopp, a student at Concordia College in Moorhead who is working on the project, says “Prairie Public created the multi-media series High Risk High to raise awareness about youth drinking in North Dakota. The “High Risk High - College” group [on Facebook] is just one part of the project... Our goal is to get everyone thinking, talking and asking questions about why college students drink.” Alcohol in North Dakota and the surrounding region is a topic that is on the minds of many residents. Recently, a bill that would ban alcohol sales at sporting events if anyone under the age of 18 is present was shot down in the legislation. While this bill would have effectively made collegiate sports “adults only,” it would also have the same effect as banning cigarettes from school grounds, which is seen as an effort to prevent youth from seeing the behavior, effectively hiding it or banishing it to evil places, a la outside bars. For those UND students who

do choose to consume alcohol and would like to be assured of their personal safety, the Cab Crawler Card program is an invaluable resource. With $3 (plus $1 per person) and the Cab Crawler Card (which can be picked up in the Student Government office located in the Memorial Union), you are able to get a safe ride home without having to worry about driving and killing yourself or someone else. Brought to you by Red, White and Blue Taxi, Inc. and the UND Student Government, the Cab Crawler Card program is here to keep you and the community safe. On “High Risk High’s” College link, you will find videos featuring people locally and from around the state covering alcohol related topics. Personal stories, legal issues (and don’t forget the long-term ramifications...), prevention and recovery are topics covered in over twenty videos.

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the Dakota Student

Get to Know Your Editors!

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

Name: Rachel Smerer Position: News Editor Q: Being a vegetarian, which vegetable is the most abusive to your digestive system? A: Not answering that. I think that if you enter foods slowly into the body, you shouldn’t have any trouble with that. Q: What is the one thing you can’t live without? A: It’s difficult. Music...specifically, Frank Turner and Katy Perry... and the Unlovables. Q: What’s the one word to describe your wardrobe? A: Small...no, petite! Put petite! Q: What is the strangest thing you’ve ever cooked? A: Squash pasta. (squeamish face) It was horrible. Q: What coworker would you save in a zombie apocalypse? A: You should never save girls. I’m going to save you [Joel] because I don’t think Nate has shot a gun. I have no experience shooting and I don’t think Alex has been gun hunting. Q: What coworker deserves to be slapped? A: (without hesitation) Nate.

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as well as sent two representatives to guide the week along with representation for Wednesday and Thursday’s events. The Chicago based nonprofit organization will lead training and visioning sessions during their stay on campus. Another involved student is Mosab Bajaber, who, alongside Brucklacher, helped to plan the events. Bajaber, a native of Saudi Arabia put together the presentation of the Islamic religion along with the Interfaith Youth Core. Bajaber was also involved in last semester’s conversation that was held at Christus Rex that discussed Christianity and Islamic traditions. Bajaber is also optimistic of the outcome of the week’s events. “It’s not about the week itself,” Bajaber said, “But rather the thought of loving your neighbor. It hopefully will allow the campus to be more understanding.” This is the inaugural event at UND which will allow the horizons to be broadened in years to come. It’s goal—to form a table of discussion throughout the week for students to better understand and appreciate other faiths and traditions. In the future Brucklacher and Bajaber both said they would like even more faiths to be represented as a part of the week’s involvement. “Interfaith week is representing all points of view, including agnostic and atheist individuals,” Brucklacher said. “The table is big enough for all points of view—we hope to include these points of view in the future if there are interested individuals.”

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> Katie Bachmeier is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at katie.bachmeier@und.edu

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friday march 25, 2011

Classifieds

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services EMPLOYMENT MEDIA > CAMPUS LIQUOR is now

accepting applications for a clerk position. Please contact Bill after 3pm. NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR SUMMER SEASONAL EMPLOYMENT with the Grand Forks Park District. Applications and job descriptions can be obtained at www.gfparks.org or 1210 7th Avenue South. THE DOWN UNDER PUB is now accepting applications for Bartenders. Please contact Bill after 3pm.

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From page

10 Valentino to visit UND

It is easy to read statistics from a journal or online, but actually hearing from people that have had their lives drastically challenged by alcohol abuse helps drive the reality of the problem home. And don’t forget to check out their Facebook group! YOU may be able to win a gift card by sharing a story on how alcohol has taken its own toll on your life. “Gift cards are awesome, right? Winning one is easy. First, log on to Facebook and join the “High Risk High – College” group. Contribute to the conversation in the form of a comment, post or video and we enter your name into a drawing to win one of several $25 Best Buy gift cards. That’s it! You can put that towards your new iPod, some iTunes, a few cds, or a pair of headphones, all by taking a five minute break to Facebook between classes and homework,” Suzanne says.

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> Nicholas Gowan is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at nicholas.gowan@und.edu

PANEL Writer and translator will be featured at next week’s Writers Conference.

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Megan Sevigny

The Dakota Student

During the final weeks before this year’s Writers Conference, Iowa City-based writer Russell Scott Valentino was added to the lineup. Valentino, a literary scholar, translator and essayist, received a Ph.D. in Slavic Languages and Literatures from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1993. He is a teacher of Slavic and comparative literatures at the University of Iowa, a member of the University of Iowa’s Translation Workshop and the Editor-in-Chief of The Iowa Review. He is also the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Autumn

Hill Books. His blog can also be found on The Iowa Review’s webpage, iowareview.uiowa.edu. Valentino has published eight books, including Vicissitudes of Genre in the Russian Novel (2001), which takes a look at genre mixing in works by several Russian authors. He has published seven book-length translations of Italian, Russian and Croatian works. His own works can be seen in magazines such as The Iowa Review, Two Lines, Circumference, and Slavic Review. Valentino has received two Fulbright research grants to Croatia and two NEA literature fellowships. His work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of State, the Howard Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts. His translations of Italian and Croatian works have been nominated for both the Book of the

Year Awards, given by Foreword Magazine, and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. Valentino will be joining Carl Phillips and Amoussa Koriko on the “Lost in Translation?” panel at noon on Wednesday, March 30. The UND Writers Conference has a national reputation as one of the best of its kind, due largely to its interesting selection of authors, free and open format, and strong audience participation. It is organized by the English Department; however, a large number of local volunteers, support from student organizations and donations from outside parties make it possible. This year’s conference is sure to be an interesting one, so make sure not to miss it.

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> Megan Sevigny is the Features

Editor for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at megan.sevigny@ und.edu


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scores & schedules

friday march 25, 2011

sports

Wrestling Champion Robles, UND >Inside: baseball swept.

WTEN

@ Las Vegas, Nev. 3/25-27

SB

@ GWC Early Tournament Dallas, Tex. 3/25-28

MHKY

vs. Rensselaer NCAA Midwest Regional Green Bay, Wis. 12/3-5

UND gears up for next bracket North Dakota looks to continue winning streak in NCAA tourney

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TIMOTHY BOGER

The Dakota Student

To some extent, North Dakota hopes to exorcise demons of lost NCAA tournaments gone by when they enter Green Bay’s Resch Center for the Midwest Regional semifinals against Rensselaer. Senior leadership remembers all-toowell the losses of the last two years, when they lost—as the higher seeds—in the first round to New Hampshire in 2009) and Yale in 2010. Captain Chay Genoway wasn’t sure if that was any extra motivation for the team, but it helps remind them of the task at hand. “Just try to focus one game at a time,” he said. This season is a far better one for North Dakota, who enters the tournament with their best record under coach Dave Hakstol at 30-8-3. And instead of drawing another difficult travel arrangement—Manchester, N.H. in 2009, Worcester, Mass. in 2010—this year, the path to their first Frozen Four since 2008 leads them to Green Bay, just two states away. Senior defenseman Derrick LaPoint, a native of Eau Claire, Wisc., played in Green Bay at the same Resch Center with the USHL’s Green Bay Gamblers. Playing

in his home state will be exciting, he said. “It’s a great building. It’ll be a fun atmosphere for our team and I think our fans will travel pretty well there.” The turnout in St. Paul for last week’s Final Five was impressive to say the least. UND was well-represented at Xcel Energy Center, and the team was able to build off of that energy. “When you look at St. Paul and the turnout we had down there—it was obviously a big boost for our hockey team seeing the green in the stands.” They face the Rensselaer (RPI) Engineers, a team who backed into the tournament after being upset in the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference playoffs by Colgate three weekends ago. RPI, a small university in Troy, N.Y., had to wait for several things to go their way in the Pairwise Rankings—the criteria for selecting the 16 teams in the NCAA tournament— before they knew they’d be preparing for their first NCAA tournament appearance since 1995. Nonetheless, RPI is 15th in the field of 16, and considering how things have turned out the last few years, North Dakota is certainly taking the Engineers seriously. “We’re not looking past them by any means,” senior Brent Davidson said. “Whether it’s [the 2 seed] versus [the 15

Graphic by NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

seed] or 1 versus 16, it doesn’t matter. Any team at this time of the year can beat any team, so that’s why we’re definitely focused on them.” It’s quite a turnaround season for the Engineers, who have national championships in 1985 and 1951. North Dakota is 7-1 against RPI, but the last meeting was in 1990. UND is studying Rensselaer (20-12-5) as much as they can, but there’s only so much they can learn in a week. RPI is the nation’s seventh best defense in terms of goals allowed, with 2.27 goals allowed. North Dakota won’t worry too much about their opponent, however. The focus is on themselves. “That’s the one benefit of not knowing much about them is that we can focus on us and focus on the things we can control in our team and our team system,” said Andrew MacWilliam, a defenseman. Coach Dave Hakstol said the team is focused on their own game, and their own playoff lives. “We’ve been preparing for this throughout the year, and most importantly, we’ve been preparing since the beginning of playoff action for this mentality. I think we’re ready to go.”

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> Timothy Boger is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@und.edu

North Dakota seeks more hardware this season THIRSTY The UND hockey team has amassed a great season, but wants more.

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TIMOTHY BOGER

The Dakota Student

There’s no hotter team than North Dakota right now. Ranked number one in both national polls, UND (30-8-3) heads into the NCAA tournament this weekend on a 13-game unbeaten streak, a streak that dates back to a January 28th loss to Colorado College. In the meantime, they earned themselves a number one seed in the NCAAs—their first since 2008—and along the way collected some hardware—as the regular season champion as well as the champion of the Final Five, held last weekend at St. Paul’s Xcel Energy Center.

The MacNaughton Cup (over three feet in height), which was presented to them after their first round playoff victory March 12th, is a prestigious trophy earned by a long season of hard work. The Broadmoor Trophy solidifies North Dakota’s position as the best of the West, that is, the Western Collegiate Hockey Association. Both trophies sit in the lobby of Ralph Engelstad Arena, but both got there without being touched, much less hoisted, by a single player. “It’s kind of one of those things,” senior Derrick LaPoint said. “We decided as a senior class that we weren’t going to touch it. We’re saving it for hopefully the biggest.” It’s a long-held superstition of sorts from the NHL, and to the seven seniors who lead North Dakota into tournament play, leaving the trophies untouched

is a sign of where their focus is: on their unspoken goal of touching a bigger trophy, that of what would be UND’s eighth national championship. “Obviously it’s a tough feat so we’re pretty happy in the locker room right now,” LaPoint said. “There’s still business left to do, but it’s a tremendous accomplishment for our team and we’re looking forward to bigger and better things.” They’re pretty familiar with both trophies. They won the Broadmoor Trophy last year and the MacNaughton the year before. But this season’s Broadmoor victory brings a vastly different feeling. This season, they won the conference tournament – and the Western Collegiate Hockey Association’s autobid into the NCAAs—by winning four games: a sweep over Michigan Tech, then with victories over Colorado Col-

lege and Denver in St. Paul. In 2010, they played a hardfought, high-tension series that went to three games with their hated rivals, the Minnesota Golden Gophers. Then they came into the WCHA Final Five needing to win three games against Minnesota-Duluth, Denver, and St Cloud State to clinch the championship. “Last year we went through a little different process,” said coach Dave Hakstol after their 3-2, double-overtime victory over Denver last Saturday night. “We won a three game series at home that was very emotional and went into the tournament having to win three games. Emotionally it was a great high to win the tournament. But both physically and emotionally, it was pretty draining. “I don’t feel that way this year. It allows us to leave St. Paul with a great feeling and a Broadmoor

Trophy.” North Dakota has developed a mindset throughout the last few weeks that has prepared them for the do-or-die attitude that the NCAA tournament demands from here on out. “We’ve played with a mentality over the last couple weeks in terms of playoff hockey that we’re playing to extend our season,” Hakstol said. Their goal is ultimately to win a national championship. But unlike past years, this team—led by seven seniors that have dictated this team’s success down the stretch—appears to have the poise to do what it takes to meet that goal. “It’s easy to have goals,” Hakstol said. “It’s not quite as easy to be willing to do the things day in and day out to give you an opportunity to reach those goals.”

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> Timothy Boger is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@und.edu


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friday march 25, 2011

SPORTS

Carolina comfort Nebraska swings big for UND track SHAMROCK Impressive results were posted by both men and women over spring break.

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Kyle Rosseau

The Dakota Student

During spring break a lot of UND students get away from Grand Forks and go someplace south. The track and field team went all the way to the Carolinas. During the one week off from school, the team competed in a meet at UNC-Wilmington and another one on the campus of Coastal Carolina University. In the second weekend at the Coastal Carolina Shamrock Invitational, both men’s and women’s teams had some very impressive performances. The invitational was a three day meet which included teams from Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia and South Carolina. On the women’s side, the 4x200 meter relay team had a record breaking performance. The team of Brittney Bolstad, Paige Kuplic, Mikaela Hirst and Sarah Fegley finished in a time of 1:45.51 placing 10th out of 15 teams. The previous record of 1:47.09 was set way back in 1999. The 4x800 relay also clocked in at a fast time, finishing in 7th place. This relay is very common in high school, but rarely raced in college track. The team of Meghan Enabnit, Emily Emerson, Brittany Zander and Kahla Erickson completed the event with a time of 9:29.32. In the 100 meter hurdles, Jessica Butler was able to qualify for the finals finishing in 9th place with a time of 14.56 seconds. Leading the UND women during the final day was Hirst, who took second in the long jump. Her jump was an outstanding distance of 5.15 meters.

PUMMLED North Dakota was recently trounced Emerson took fourth place in in a four-game road trip the 800, clocking in at 2:13.54. against the Cornhuskers. Christine Weinreich also took fourth place in the discus, with a toss of 43.79 meters. Butler, competing in the 100m hurdle finals, took fifth place overall in a time of 14.55 seconds. For the men’s team, senior Josh LaBlanc led UND with a fifth place finish in the 5000 meters. He clocked in with a time of 14:59.14, which was only two seconds off the outdoor 5k school record. During the indoor season, LaBlanc ran a 14:36 5k and has a good chance of getting around that time for the outdoor track season. In the 10,000 meters, Adam Stainiger placed 9th place with a time of 33:38.64. In the field events, Brandon Quesenberry and Creighton Schroyer posted personal best throws in the hammer. Quesenberry threw 45.03 meters, while Schroyer threw 39.69. On the final day, Quesenberry continued his impressive run in the throwing events. He was able to take third place in the shot put with a toss of 15.73 meters. Shawn Johnson also recorded a third place finish with a throw of the discus, recording a distance of 48.08 meters. Away from the field and on to the track, UND had several fine finishes. Chris Stoks competed in the 400 meter dash, taking 7th place. His time was 49 seconds flat, while the winner was 47.06 seconds. Racing in the 1500 meters, Tyler Rose took 8th place. He finished in a time of 4:05.80, which is just shy of his personal best in the event. The UND track teams will take some time off and compete again April 9th. It will be a double duel between South Dakota and South Dakota State down in Yankton, South Dakota.

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> Kyle Rosseau is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at kyle.rosseau@und.edu

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Joel Adrian

The Dakota Student

Missed opportunities and no Irish luck accompanied the North Dakota baseball team to Lincoln, Neb. this weekend. UND was quickly tamed in the first inning of the four game baseball trip, as they fell behind with a 1-10 loss to NU. Infielder Jake Magner managed to scrounge up three of UND’s nine hits. The bats were swinging well, however not at the most convenient of places for North Dakota. North Dakota needed to find a sustainable offense that could withstand the Cornhuskers flurry of runs. With bases loaded three times for UND, runs would surely follow, right? Unfortunately, with double plays and unforced errors by North Dakota, runs seemed to be an elusive commodity. UND starter Cory Baker forfeited seven earned runs on ten hits in only the first five innings. It wasn’t until the eighth inning that Magner ended a 28-inning scoring drought when he smacked a deep ball for a double and eventually tallied the lone run on a wild pitch. To no avail, UND constantly flirted with troubled play while being on the losing end of a double header on the following Saturday. Saturday Game 1 Being shut out doesn’t seem to reflect UND’s loss (0-6) to Nebraska. Sadly, the best and really only shot to score was on a single off of Josh Ray, which caused Ryan Gerber to be thrown out at home plate. North Dakota pitcher Jake Swift held the dangerous Cornhuskers in check until the fifth inning, where the bases were loaded and then emptied by a NU bloop single. Reliever Brandon Baum-

gartner was summoned to take over and prevent any unnecessary hits. Sadly for UND, Baumgartner gave up a base-clearing double which ended the game with a 0-6 loss. Saturday Game 2 Immediately UND was put in the hole as a NU batter ripped out an RBI-triple. The night environment seemed to calm down North Dakota, as Magner answered with his own RB-single in the third. It is worth noting that Magner has base hits in five straight games. North Dakota pitcher Zach Ransom was able to keep NU idle as North Dakota took the first lead of the series in the fourth inning. UND was able to amass an effective strike and scored three in the sixth inning. Unfortunately, doubles and home runs seemed to be the Achilles heel for UND, and most teams I assume. The strike that regained Nebraska’s lead was a grand slam from Nebraska player Kurt Farmer. The blast gave NU a 10-4 victory and a clinch for the series victory. UND pitcher Baumgartner was accredited for the loss, allowing six earned runs on 1.1 innings pitched. Sunday Winning, something that UND has only tasted once, almost found the glory once again. With UND having Nebraska

on the ropes, botched pitching late in the game during the final two at bats gave the Cornhuskers an 8-6 victory. North Dakota notched three runs in the sixth inning, which gave UND a 6-3 lead and momentum late in the game. However, the UND lead was quickly squandered by NU who answered with three runs. North Dakota pitcher David Spies took to the mound in the eighth inning but surrendered a lead off single and a sacrifice bunt to advance the runner into scoring position. This move forced Spies to intentionally walk a base runner, which set the stage for reliever Zac Salfer. Salfer forced the next Husker to hit a grounder, which had potential to become a double play. Errors seem to follow UND, as the grounder was handled by sophomore Kris Kwak, who launched the ball on a bad throw to allow an NU runners to score. The heartbreaking loss was tragic, but the hopes for a successful season are dwindling fast for North Dakota. UND will travel to Creighton for a double header this Saturday and then for another game on Sunday in Omaha, Neb. Hopefully the Cornhusker state will be beneficial in the sec-

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>Joel Adrian is the Sports Editor for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joel.adrian@und.edu


the Dakota Student

SPORTS

15

ASU wrestler defies odds Softball tours in on Saturday that included over 200 wins and back-to-back Pac10 titles with a thoroughly dominating performance, winning the title match with a 7-1 pounding. The man known for his excessive positive attitude and gracious Devon Roehrich smile had finally completed the The Dakota Student only void on his resume, and had did so in front of 17,000 screamThere are few sports stories ing fans in Philadelphia. Oh yeah, that could have trumped this and he did it without a right leg. past weekend’s NCAA basketball Just when it seems like evtournament for sheer drama and erything we read and hear is suspense, but this Saturday saw about how dishonest and selfish an occasion that simply cannot people in the sports world really be overlooked, even by the Mad- are (NCAA basketball coaches, ness of March. NFL owners, NBA players, etc.), Anthony Robles, a senior at Robles provides us for a reason Arizona State University, became to think about the big picture of the NCAA nacollege athlettional chamand realize Robles provides ics pion of the that for every 125-pound us for a reason, to super-ego jock weight class in there who think about the big out the men’s wrescannot pass tling division, high school picture... defeating the algebra, there Devon Roehrich are ten times defending nacolumnist more colletional champion to cap off giate competia perfect 36-0 tors who are senior season. After only first actually graceful in victory and stepping onto a mat eight years humble in demeanor. ago, Robles culminated a journey Robles would be the one guy

INSPIRE Anthony Robles captured the NCAA Div. I championship at 125-lbs. on one leg.

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who it seems like would have an excuse to be down on himself, a guy who you could see accepting the excuses others always seem to want make for a man born without a right leg. The last thing any athlete wants is pity. The man threw away his prosthetic leg when he was 5 years old. He started playing football—not in a special handicapped league, but a league like any other elementary school kid played in—and worked his butt off to attain incredible amounts of strength for a kid his size. The drive would only grow, as he constantly refused to sit out any athletic competition his peers would do. Mile run? How about doing it in eight minutes —ON CRUTCHES. Push-ups ‘til you simply cannot go any longer? He has never lost that battle; the guy’s chest is like a brick wall (he benches 350 pounds, nearly three times his bodyweight). Many people, like Coach Shawn Charles, have said that shaking hands with Robles is like putting your hand in human vice lock. Saturday was a day for cel-

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was in line for a shutout, until UND’s Brittany Baker took a pitch down the line for a solo shot to knot the game up at 1-1. UND played definition small ball with two walks and a sac bunt to get runners in scoring position. Tadd POwers Kayelle Schoeny had two ducks The Dakota Student on the pond when she came up to bat. Schoeny under pressure The Women’s softball team answered with a hard-nosed three ended a weeklong set of games RBI inside-the-park home run to in California over spring break. put UND up 4-1. The next half UND participated in two tourna- inning Frank finished what she ments which required playing a started in the fourth inning, sealgrueling ten games in seven days, ing the 4-1 win. including the Loyola Marymount Game two didn’t pan out how Marina International Showcase UND had hoped after winning in the city of angels. earlier. They had to play a toughNorth Dakota started the er team, the host of the tournatournament in Los Angels against ment, Loyola Marymount. This the Northern Colorado Bears, a game was hard fought throughstruggling team this season with out; a lot of small ball was played a 1-20 record this season. UND for both teams. Every time UND has already been playing for six would score in the top half of straight days and had only found the inning, Loyola said whatever one win duryou can do, ing the spring do betThis fam was hard Iter,canmatching break tour to California. fought through- the one run UND took a put up out; a lot of small UND little blow earin the first ly on when a ball was played for and two runs defensive error UND put up both teams. led to a run. in the fourth. UND found Tadd Powers It got late themselves staff writer into the game down early in and spectathe first inning 1-0. tors were wondering what team Starting pitcher Freshman could finally pull ahead from the Caralyn Chewning pitched three other. Loyola got a RBI double innings allowing the unearned in the bottom of the 6th to take run and four hits. the lead. Michelle Frank, who would UND had already come from shut the door the last four innings behind the day before; This was only allowing one hit and one a familiar spot. With a few SAC walk replaced her. With Frank’s bunts and two runners on third dominate performance, keeping and second, UND had a chance the deficit within one, she gave to tie or even take the lead once UND a chance to come back and again in the 7th inning. But all get the win. the hopes were crushed when In the last inning, North- Courtney Gonzales came to ern Colorado’s Kelli Henderson pinch hit but struck out looking pitched six scoreless innings prior to end the game. to the final inning of play. With Only minutes after the heartonly three outs away, Henderson breaking lost to Loyola, UND had to forget about it and play another game, this time against Great West Conference rival Utah State. UND came prepared to play and defeated Utah State 8-3. UND’s pitcher Caralyn Chewning pitched a complete game, getting her first win of the season. She also helped the team out on the offensive side with three RBI’s. Kayelee Schoeny also added three RBI’s going 2-for-3 in the game. UND played the fourth and final game of the tournament and lost in another heartbreaker by a score of 4-3 to Bethune-Cookman. That game ended the long road trip to California. UND finished with a record of 2-2 in the Loyola Marymount Tournament and 3-7 overall. UND is idle until Friday March 25th when they head to Dallas for the Great West Conference Early Tournament.

CONQUEST North Dakota recently competed in two tournaments over the spring break.

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> Tadd Powers is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at tadd.powers@und.edu


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friday march 25, 2011

SPORTS

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and it could not have happened to a nicer guy. He never says no to autoFrom page graphs, never frowns or comlike wrestling holds and submis- plains. You can insult him, try to sion combos. No, Saturday was tear him down, but he knows he about realizing that there are ac- has a special purpose for being tually tons of athletes who not here. only excel in their field but do His mother calls him “a blessthings the right way. It’s good ing”, and his high school coach to be confident, but don’t start says that “If you want an ambascounting your sador for the championhuman race He never says no to … I think Anships at a fireworks show autographs, never thony Robles at Miami in is that perfrowns of com- son….He is July. It’s commendable to everything plains. strive to stay good about Devon Roehrich what humans ahead of the competition, columnist are.” but PEDs, the S o cream and the after becomclear, and BALCO shipments are ing the champ, one would think not necessary to prove to others Anthony would finally take a sechow great you are. ond to bask in his hard-earned It’s fine and dandy and try to moment of glory. Try again. “My maximize the amount of dollars coaches prepared me well,” Robyou make, but don’t spend every les said after his title. day crying to the media about “We’ve been working all year, how wrong the other side is just and I couldn’t have done it withbecause you want an extra billion out them. I felt super confident or two to help fund your third out there and it was a team effort. house and seventh Porsche. I want to thank my training partWhen Saturday’s title match ners and my family for supportwas over, Robles knelt on the ing me and it wasn’t just me out ground, seemingly at loss for there. I was doing it for all them, words. Charles came over to give too. It feels great to be a national him a giant bear hug, and his champion.” Mom, Judy, could not contain her emotions. Robles had become a national role model before this > Devon Roehrich is a columnist day, but now people would finally for The Dakota Student. He can be be able to share in this moment, reached at devon.roehrich@und.edu

Photo courtesy of MCT Campus

NCAA>

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Anthony Robles capped off an undefeated season (36-0) en route to claiming a NCAA title. The senior captured the 125-lb. weight class title by defeating the defending champion from Iowa, Matt McDonough, with a score of 7-1.

JUMP >

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aspect of the situation was the attitude of those to the rescue. From my own experiences and those of others, these tales are nothing short of noble and gratefully frequent.

It does not involve cutting off the head of a mythical Medusa, nor does it spring from the adventurous rescue of one damsel or another, but it does actually happen, which, in my opinion, is better. To the good Samaritans who have come to my own rescue, as well as any of you who have come to the

rescue of others—I thank you. In a world where we all need a little rescue sometimes, I know that I, at least, am thankful that such people roam my home state.

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> Erin Barta is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at erin.barta@und.edu


March 25, 2011