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Students harness the wind Alternative Workouts See Media&Culture Page11 9 See Culture & Media Page

LeBel to fill Where your dining fees are going Dining Services developments: more food or more money? Provost role G permanently > BRANDI JEWETT

The Dakota Student

APPOINTMENT Kelley announces former dean of School of Law as permanent administrative member after 22 months of interim service.

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STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

Former Law School dean Paul LeBel has been appointed as the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs as announced by President Kelley Monday. LeBel served as the interim Provost and VP for Academic Affairs since February of 2009. “This is a unique moment for UND, in which continuity of vision and leadership are of critical importance,” stated Kelley in a press release. “With a $300 million comprehensive fundraising campaign publicly launched earlier this month and a state legislative session beginning in fewer than three months, maintaining the quality of the academic leadership and continuity in the Provost’s position is especially important to sustaining our momentum and realizing our vision.” As explained in the release, LeBel is an established expert of tort law, and before coming to UND in 2004, served as dean and as a legal writing instructor at of the Florida State University College of Law, where he served since 1997. Before his work at Florida State, LeBel taught at the Marshall-Wythe School of Law in Williamsburg, Va. LeBel completed his juris doctorate degree in 1977 at the University of Florida and an Artium Baccalaureatus from the George Washington University I’ve never been in American more excited about Literature. “I am the future of UND honored as I am now. that the Paul LeBel president would trust provost, vp of academic affairs me with a permanent appointment,” said LeBel in the release. “ I’ve never been more excited about the future of UND than I am now. People across campus seem to be energized and confident that their good ideas will play a significant role as we identify initiatives that make a difference.” Kelley continued, “In agreeing to join my team in 2009, Provost LeBel requested that I not begin a search for a permanent provost for at least 18 months, so that he could address three priorities that he had identified from his years as law dean: first, improving the decision-making culture of the campus; second, increasing faculty morale; and third, developing a true partnership between the academic units and the fundraising arm of the university. I made it clear at the time that he had my full support and the authority to exercise all of the responsibilities of the institution’s chief academic officer. In each of those areas, significant progress has been made, and I know that progress will continue under his leadership. When he accepted the interim appointment, Provost LeBel stated that he would not at that time commit to being a candidate for the position, indicating that he doubted that he would enjoy the position or do it well. I am pleased that both of those reservations have been unequivocally dispelled.”

rabbing a bite to eat at the dining centers became a lot easier this year when Dining Services replaced meal-per-week plans with two unlimited plans. This has caused an adjustment to a number of items including dining center use, prices and extended dinner take-out. This journey toward the implementation of unlimited plans and the dismissing of mealsper-week plans for residence hall students began last November. Dining Services distributed a survey asking students to detail their meal plan problems and preferences. “Many were dissatisfied with the meal zones,” reported Orlynn Rosaasen, Director of Dining Services. “About half were in favor of changes and the other half were indifferent.” Dining then visited two residence hall student groups: the Association of Residence Halls (ARH) policy board and the ARH food and fa-

8 Student to appear on ‘Jeopardy!’ NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

SHOW CLS major will be featured on college edition of popular TV game program in California.

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STEPHANIE LIDEN

The Dakota Student

She is the student who will represent the UND community on the 2010 “Jeopardy! College Championship.” Who is Stephanie Gagelin? The sophomore Clinical Lab Science major and Grand Forks native will be featured in the upcoming two-week tournament. Gagelin is one of only fifteen that made it through the grueling nearly year-long application process which all began with an over-the-web exam.

“I heard about the online test last fall. I took it while my roommate was watching TV in the background. But I thought I did really well. After a while, I guess I didn’t expect to hear anything back,” says Gagelin. After a few months with no reply from Sony Pictures Television, Gagelin nearly forgot about the quiz show. It wasn’t until she received an invitation to the windy city that she considered herself a real contender for the program. “I got an email to come to Chicago in May. There they had an in-person interview. We had to do a mock game with the buzzers and everything, too. We also had to do another short test,” Gagelin recalls. “They told us that we would only hear from them if we were chosen for the show.” The now sophomore status student went the entire summer with no word from the show’s producers.

Last applicant visits FORUM Last of three prospective Vice Presidents came to campus.

KYLE SCHROEDER > The Dakota Student

DINE > page

“Summer went by and I thought for sure I didn’t make it. Then in September, I got the call,” says Gagelin. After the call she remembers the feeling of absolute excitement stating, “I could barely eat my dinner because my hands were shaking that much.” When asked if she has always been an avid fan of quiz shows, Gagelin remembers being the at-home audience member with all the right answers. “I grew up watching “Jeopardy!”. My dad really likes it, too. We watched it together while we would make supper a lot of the time. I always knew the questions,” she says. Also an active member in her high school’s knowledge bowl competition,

GAME > page

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

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EMILY JUKICH

The Dakota Student Lori Reesor, a candidate for Vice President of Student Affairs, came to speak in the Memorial Union Monday. The open forum session consisted of a presentation by Reesor titled her “Vision for Creating a Healthy University Community”. The presentation outlined her background and her values and beliefs that make her suitable for the job followed by a question and answer segment between Reesor and the audience. Reesor proved herself a competent candidate given her professional background in education.

THIRD > page

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The Saudi Student Organization held a Saudi Cultural Night Wednesday in the Memorial Union.


DS datebook 02

friday october 22, 2010

DATEBOOK

today, october 22, 2010

> lecture: The UND Department of Physics and Astrophysics will be having a free lecture by Larry Rudnick at 7:00 p.m. in 100 Leonard Hall He is a faculty member in astronomy from the University of Minnesota. The topic of the lecture is “Are We Alone.” saturday, october 23, 2010

> event: The North Dakota Museum of Art will host its annual Autumn Art Auction at 6:30 p.m. at the Museum of Art. Tickets are $30 for members, $35 for non-members in advance and $40 for non-members at the door. There will be live music, appetizers and wine served. > seminar: Pre-med day will take place at the School of Medicine with registration starting at 9:30 a.m. and lectures from 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Anyone interested in a career in Medicine or Health Sciences is encouraged to attend. Tell us what is happening on campus > Submit information via email to dstudenteditor@und.edu or call 777-2677

GAME >

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Gagelin is used to the thrill of on-thespot trivia contests. Of that past experience she states, “It’s a little different. It’s like “Jeopardy!” with a team.” Despite her background in academic challenges and her fandom of game shows, Gagelin felt the need to prepare for the competition in her own way. “Its nerve wracking because they can ask you anything about anything. I took some online quizzes. I’m weak at Shakespeare, so I definitely needed to study that. I also tried to stay up on current events,” says Gagelin. Besides being a pro at knowing fun facts, Gagelin is an active student at UND and a member of Phi Eta Sigma honor society and hopes to one day get a job analyzing signs of diseases. With her position as one of fifteen gifted students on the “Jeopardy!” show, Gagelin is representing a side of this University that not many people identify nationally. “Typically, UND is recognized for its talented ice hockey program, but I hope that I can shed some light on the academic side of the university as well,” she says. While embodying the University’s intellectual student base, Gagelin will be playing for the grand prize of $100,000. Second place will receive a minimum of $50,000 and third place a minimum of $25,000. Semifinalists receive $10,000, and players eliminated in the first week receive $5,000. The “Jeopardy! College Championship” episodes featuring Stephanie Gagelin will be broadcasted nationally Monday November 8 through Friday November 19.

DS

> Stephanie Liden is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at stephanie.liden@und.edu

The Dakota Student editorial

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Tell us what you think: What’s your favorite way to stay in shape? > Jogging/Running > Lifting at the Wellness Center > Sports > Aerobics and yoga

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Editor-in-Chief Alex Cavanaugh > alex.cavanaugh@und.edu Managing/Opinion Editor Erin Lord > erin.lord@und.edu News Editor Rachel Smerer > rachel.smerer@und.edu Features Editor Josh Brorby > joshua.brorby@und.edu Sports Editor Joel Adrian > joel.adrian@und.edu Photo Editor Nathan Twerberg > nathan.twerberg@und.edu Web Editor Luke Johnson > luke.m.johnson@und.edu

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Business Manager Sue Litzinger > 777-2677 Graphic Designers Fawn Fettig > Kylene Fitzsimmons > Advertising Representatives Marissa Bukowski > marissa.bukowski@und.edu Natalie Cassell > natalie.cassell@und.edu Ryan Senn > ryan.senn@und.edu Justin Flones> justin.flones@und.edu Office Assistant Fawn Fettig > 777-2677 All staff members can be contacted at their email addresses, at 701-777-2677 or in McCannel Hall 170. Mail can be sent to P.O. Box 8177, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8177

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> The Dakota Student is published every Tuesday and Friday during the academic year except during holidays, vacation breaks and exam periods. Subscriptions are $25 per year. > The Dakota Student is printed at Morgan Printing in Grafton, N.D. on FFC Certified paper using soy-based inks. > The Dakota Student welcomes feedback regarding articles and photographs, and prints corrections for articles containing factual errors.


DS World Brief Sudan opposes UN deployment on border

NAIROBI, Kenya—A spokesman for the Sudanese army has rebuffed United Nations plans to station peacekeepers on the border between northern and southern Sudan in the run-up to a contentious referendum in January, the Sudan Tribune reported Saturday. A deployment on the demarcation line to the partly autonomous southern region is not covered by the mandate of the UN Missions in Sudan (UNMIS), AlSawarmi Khalid Sa’ad was quoted as saying. He added that the Sudanese army can ensure security in the country on its own. The exact location of the border in the oil-rich region has been one source of tension between the north and the south. Skirmishes have repeatedly erupted along the demarcation line despite a 2005 peace treaty between the two halves of the country. The referendum is a key piece of the peace treaty, which ended two decades of civil war that had left more than 2 million people dead.

Top UN official in Iraq escapes bomb attack

BAGHDAD—A roadside bomb hit the convoy of the top U.N. official in Iraq after a meeting with revered Shiite cleric Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani in Najaf on Tuesday. U.N. envoy Ad Melkert was unhurt, but the blast killed an Iraqi policeman and wounded three others. A U.N. spokeswoman said the bomb went off as Melkert’s convoy, accompanied by an Iraqi security detail, headed to the Najaf airport Tuesday afternoon on the outskirts of the city. “It was after meetings were concluded with Sistani,” she said. Melkert, the special representative to the U.N. secretarygeneral, is one of the few Western officials with whom Ayatollah Sistani meets. The cleric, who does not appear in public, has played an influential role in Iraq. Although he avoids direct involvement in politics, his edicts helped lead to direct elections in 2005 and strong voter turnout, including by women. He has also directed followers not to retaliate after sectarian attacks that have rocked the country. Melkert was shown on Iraqi television emerging from the meeting at Sistani’s modest home, urging political leaders to quickly come to an agreement on forming a new government. Seven months after Iraqis went to the polls, a deadlock among political leaders has prompted fears that violence could increase if a government which includes Shiites, Sunnis, and Kurds isn’t formed soon.

world news report friday october 22, 2010

> Inside:

Why Frolf? UND club gives good reason

Millions protest reform in France DEMONSTRATION Rallies continue over President Sarkozy’s proposed pension amendments.

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SIEGFRIED MORTKOWITZ MCT

PARIS—Some 3.5 million people marched in the streets of France Tuesday to protest against President Nicolas Sarkozy’s pension reform, unions said. The sixth day of nationwide protests against the measure since early September was accompanied by job stoppages and a growing number of service stations running out of gasoline as a strike at France’s 12 oil refineries went into a seventh day. While the Interior Ministry put the number of demonstrators at only 1.1 million, Environment Minister Jean-Louis Borloo said about 4,000 service stations, out of a total of 12,500, were in need of re-supply. The government began to act to ease the gasoline shortfalls, with an emergency meeting held in Sarkozy’s offices at the Elysee Palace to draw up appropriate measures. The protests were marred by renewed violence Tuesday as secondary-school students again took part in the movement. A middle school in the city of Le Mans burned down overnight following a student protest during which the gates to the school were blocked. Police suspect arson, France Info radio reported. There were clashes between police and protesting youths in several cities, such as Nanterre and Lyon, with protesters hurtling projectiles and setting cars on fire, and security forces replying with teargas. Several police officers and a

MICHEL CLEMENTZ > Abaca Press Protesters during a demonstration against pension reforms in Perpignan, France.

news photographer were injured in the skirmishes. In addition, a 15-year-old girl was taken to hospital in Paris after being injured when a motor scooter was set on fire and exploded. In the center of Lyon, stores were ransacked by hooded youths. The interior ministry said more than 1,150 protesters were arrested in the past week following violent incidents. A police spokesman told BFM television that the violence was primarily the work of “anarchists” and young people from poor suburban ghettos who were using the demonstrations as a pretext to attack police.

In the coastal resort of Deauville, where he met with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, Sarkozy said he would take measures “to guarantee order.” A strike of railway workers also went into its seventh day Tuesday. The state-run railway network SNCF said about one-half of all scheduled trains were not operating. The French civil aviation authority DGAC said that 50 percent of all flights originating at Paris’s Orly Airport had been scrubbed Tuesday with 30 percent canceled at other French airports. The DGAC said that there

would be more flight cancellations on Wednesday, with about one in four scheduled flights canceled at Orly. The pension reform will gradually raise the retirement age from 60 to 62 by the year 2018. It has been approved in the National Assembly and is set to be voted on in the Senate later this week. With the measure almost certain to become law, it was unclear Tuesday what the unions’ next step would be. In 1995, a 24-day general strike that paralyzed the nation moved then Prime Minister Alain Juppe to drop his plans to reform the pension system.

Former leader’s legacy falling apart

DISARRAY Yitzhak Rabin’s efforts for peace in shambles 15 years after his death.

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SHEERA FRENKEL

McClatchy Newspapers JERUSALEM—Fifteen years after the assassination of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, his legacy of seeking peace with Palestinians is in disarray, his Labor Party appears to be in shambles and the country seems much less willing to make concessions for peace. Ceremonies were held around the country Wednesday to remember the Nobel Peace Prize laureate, but many of those who honored him also mourned the state of the causes he championed. Rabin was shot on Nov. 4, 1995, by Jewish extremist Yigal Amir, who opposed the peace negotiations that

Rabin had undertaken with the Palestinians. Speaking at a Jerusalem event to mark the Jewish calendar anniversary of Rabin’s death, Israeli President Shimon Peres said, “Don’t be deterred from peace efforts, even under difficult circumstances.” He stressed that those peace efforts were “Rabin’s legacy.” In the years immediately after his death, Rabin was hailed as the martyr of the peace movement and the great hero of his left-of-center Labor Party. The current round of peace talks is stuck over a dispute between Israel and the Palestinians over the government’s support for expanding Jewish settlements. Few Israelis are confident that President Barack Obama can reach his goal of a peace deal within one year, and many are asking whether the legacy of the peace movement is still relevant.

The agreements Rabin reached with the late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat to bring about Palestinian statehood are still on hold after a decade of violence, and Israel’s rightwing newspapers mock the Nobel Peace Prize the two shared in 1994 in a series of satirical cartoons. “There is a feeling that the Israeli left is rudderless, there is no one to stand up for us, to lead us, while the right wing grows stronger and stronger,” said Hagai el Ad, the head of the Israeli Association for Civil Rights. The Labor Party may not be able to muster the three seats it needs to maintain a parliamentary faction in the next elections. For months, el Ad and several hundred other Israeli activists have taken part in demonstrations in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Sheikh Jarrah to defend the Arab families fighting to keep their homes. Few Israeli leaders back the protest-

ers, however. “This is one of the most important causes that the Israeli left has rallied around, but we have no backing. There is no political party in the government today that is really left wing,” said Avner Inbar, one of the organizers. “So, without a leader we get smaller, and we have no representation in government.” The Meretz Party, which traditionally has been left of Labor, has shrunk to three members in the 120-seat Knesset, the Israeli parliament. The Labor Party, which was considered the mainstay of the leftwing Israel in Rabin’s day with 44 seats, now holds 13. Recent polls by Israel’s Channel Two news station show Labor dwindling to four or five seats in future elections.

RABIN > page

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commentary

COMMentary

DS View Midterms

time Crunch We’re halfway through the semester, and it’s a straight shot now. Here they are again—mid-term examinations. We have tests, papers and projects oh my! We usually label finals week as the hardest times of the semester, but midterms are just as bad, if not worse. At least during finals, thoughts of sugarplums, evergreen scented department stores and holidays are nearby. After midterms, all we have to look forward to is regular homework that is worth ten percent of our grade instead of thirty. There is a way to break the mid-semester blues, however. For one, consider how much more comfortable your classes are now compared to the beginning of the semester. You have probably talked to you professor at least a couple times on a human level now, and it’s nice to know that they can speak in language not related to algebraic equations. Also, you can chat with your neighbors more freely by this point, even if that just means discussing your wishful paper grade before the professor hands them back. These new found friends can help you take notes or form study groups. Surviving mid-terms is all about time management and prioritizing, firstly based on the importance and difficulty of the exam, secondly on when the exam will take place. Don’t spend all of your time studying for one test, but don’t understudy for a test that is fifty percent of your grade by giving equal attention to a mid-term that is worth twenty percent. Also, don’t smother yourself with studying—your brain will work more efficiently with proper nutrition, including sleep, exercise and proper eating. Take care of yourself, as there is nothing worse than sitting in an exam while sick. We hear this all the time, and we know it can be a tad annoying (how are we supposed to get enough sleep and exercise when we have two projects and an essay due)? But really, your homework will benefit from your clarity of mind. If you’re sleep deprived and pent up from sitting at your desk all day, your work will be sub-par, and your grade will ultimately suffer. Do yourself a favor and get out in the fresh air while the weather is still decent and go for a jog or a bike ride. Then, get to bed at a decent hour. Your report on the organelles of the cell will thank you. Use study aides and campus services like department tutors, the student success center, the Writing Center and any resource you can. That’s what they are here for, and the student that takes the initiative is the student that will do better on the exam. When it comes time for the test itself, don’t over think it. Get a good night’s sleep before, eat breakfast that morning and try your best not to stress too much—your brain will go into “panic mode” and you wont’ be able to access any of the information you have studied. Think of the exam as a way to use the information that you have learned, and if you have done the proper preparation in class through reading and attending lectures and discussions, you will be fine. So just keep your head in the game, relax a little and get through it!

editorial Board Alex Cavanaugh editor-in-Chief Erin Lord Opinion editor

Rachel Smerer news editor

editorial Policy

The Dakota Student is dedicated to the free exchange of ideas. Opinion columns and letters to the editor will not be edited for content reasons, except in cases of criminal or civil liability. The Dakota Student reserves the right to edit or reject columns or letters for various reasons. The ideas expressed in columns and letters reflect the views of the writer and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the staff of the Dakota Student.

Letter Policy

The Dakota Student encourages readers to express their opinions on the editorial pages. Letters to the editor are published based on merit, general interest, timeliness and content. All letters must be limited to 250 words. > Letters may be mailed to 2891 2nd Ave N. Stop 8177, Grand Forks, N.D. 58202-8177 or dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall. > Letters must be typed and must include the author’s name, major or profession and telephone number. > All letters will be edited to fit the allocated space. Writer may be limited to one letter per month.

Pageantry: Beyond the stereotypes

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eMiLy BUrkLanD

The Dakota Student

A little less than a year ago, I tried something new; I competed in the Miss Grand Forks pageant, which led me down a path filled with hard work, new opportunities, personal realizations and much more. Affiliated with the Miss America Organization (MAO), winning a title at the Miss Grand Forks pageant gave me the opportunity to go on to the next level of competition and compete at the Miss North Dakota pageant last June. Yet, my experiences with the “beauty pageant” world have been much more than a sparkling smile and a glinting crown. When I first decided to compete, I still wasn’t entirely sure what to think about the process. A selflabeled feminist who highly values my intellectual traits, I had cultural stigma flying at me from all directions. My family, the media, my friends and members of the academic environment all seemed to think of reasons that pageants are pointless, demeaning and/or archaic. Yet, after doing some research and after observing the process firsthand, I decided that this was not true. In fact, I found even more reasons in favor of participation in the Miss America Organization, including service opportunities, leadership skills, scholarship money and more. Today, about a year after being initiated into the pageant world with a crown and a title, these reasons are all still relevant. As the world’s leading provider of academic scholarships for young women, the Miss America Organization prioritizes education for its participants, emphasizing the importance and value of higher education for women. With my local title, I have also had opportunities to take a leadership role in the community and speak to local service groups about my platform, arts advocacy.

Another positive aspect has been the numerous new and unique community service opportunities that may have otherwise passed me by. After immersing myself in the pageant world, I eventually won over most of my family, friends and peers based on the positive impact the program had on me. More difficult was helping those around me overcome their stereotypes of the rest of the women I met that also participated in the pageant system. Through movies like Miss Congeniality, the media has successfully convinced society that all or most women participating in pageants are not goal-oriented or are

...these women proved that in the end, people are just people...

Emily Burkland Columnist

unintelligent. However, this stereotype, like all other stereotypes, does not hold true. The young women I met through my participation in pageants were much like any other sampling of young women I have met throughout my life. Some of them were kind, others were smart, some of them were rude, a few had made great accomplishments in their lives and others were not very easy to get along with. In short, these women proved that in the end, people are just people, whether they wear a crown on a stage or they are someone you meet in line at the grocery store. One aspect of the pageant system that makes many people squirm is the lifestyle and fitness, or “swimsuit,” portion of the competition. Many complain that this area of competition objectifies women by judging them based on their looks. However, not only does this portion of the

Miss America Organization pageants comprise the smallest percentage of each contestant’s total score, it also is a reflection that the pageant process seeks to award a crown to a woman who is a total package. My physicality is as much a part of myself as my intellect or talent; it is something that I can neither ignore nor deny. As a modern young woman in the United States, I choose to embrace and display my physical appearance because I am free to do so, not because I am forced to. There are many places in the world where women have no choice but to deny their physical appearance and hide their bodies, hair or even faces from society. Of course, there are also women in the world and in the United States that choose to cover most or all of their body or heads. Ultimately, all women deserve respect whether they are wearing a burqa or a twopiece swimsuit. Had I not won a pageant, I would still have opportunities to perform community service, to develop my leadership abilities and to earn scholarships for my education. I didn’t have to walk across stage in a swimsuit, answer questions in an interview, or perform a talent to do those things. In fact, I would still value myself in all capacities if I did not participate in or win a pageant, because the process surprisingly did not change me. If anything, my experiences have only enhanced aspects of myself that were already present, supplemented by a few new life lessons. This Saturday, the 2011 Miss Grand Forks pageant will take place at the Empire Arts Center. I will be there, along with eighteen other young women who are taking a chance, putting their best foot forward, and learning something about themselves along the way.

DS

> Emily Burkland is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at emily.burkland@und.edu


the Dakota Student

tuesday october 19, 2010

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Jaeger is avoiding the issues UND pilots

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David Barta

The Dakota Student

I have long considered both political parties in North Dakota to generally be above the fray. That’s why I’m so surprised and dismayed by the shameless and ridiculous allegations our GOP has made in an attempt to smear Secretary of State Candidate Corey Ray Mock. This manufactured “controversy” surrounds two Dakota Student editorials in which, according to Adam Jones, the executive director of the ND GOP, Mr. Mock states that he is “Godless” and encourages students to avoid voting. This amateurish and sophomoric attack is clearly a deliberate and dishonest attempt to undermine the character of Mr. Mock and to distract voters with sensationalistic arguments devoid of merit and substance. The reason this upsets me so much is that I was the opinion editor who ran the articles in question, and I take great pride in the fact that I performed my job with due diligence. To willfully misrepresent his editorials with such obvious and nefarious intent doesn’t merely insult the intelligence of Mr. Mock, but also his editor and everyone who worked at the Dakota Student at that time. Mr. Jaeger, along with his counter parts in the state GOP, says he doesn’t agree with the messages of those two articles. As the editor who published them, I am very familiar with their content, and with that being the stance of Mr. Jaeger and the ND GOP, that begs two questions: (A) What does Al Jaeger and the GOP have against the rigorous questioning and constant

search for Truth that I, and by his article, was that an individual should actively quesMr. Mock believe underlies the formation tion and search for ‘The Truth’, by quesof a strong and robust faith, regardless of tioning the teachings of religion as it perreligious affiliation? and (B) Why is it that tains to your understanding of that Truth. the GOP and Mr. Jaeger don’t want college Such a questioning of religious teachings students voting? goes back to antiquity within the JudeoAs to the first question, I am strongly Christian tradition and finds ample supCatholic and certainly believe that there is port in the actions of Christ. As a Cathoa God. Corey Mock lic, we are called to is agnostic, which, grow and cultivate our That is why the faith through rigorous according to the Me r r i a m - We b s t e r GOP would rather questioning, prayer dictionary is “a perand self-reflection, as talk about the Da- this search for Truth son who holds the view that any ultiwill allow us to come kota Student... mate reality (such into greater commuDavid Barta nion with God. While as God) is unknown Columnist Mr. Mock and I might and probably unknowable.” From a not agree on the end, narrow, superficial we certainly agree on characterization, the path, and the fact you could say we don’t agree. While I that he is open and understanding enough would say these beliefs are not exclusive, to acknowledge that speaks volumes about neither our religious affiliation nor point his respect for and ability to empathize of view on the matter has any relevance to with other points of view. the debate over who is best able to serve as Mr. Mock might be agnostic, but to Secretary of State of North Dakota. portray this fact as an indictment of his However, I am not just a Catholic. personal character, as the GOP have so As a scientist as well, I realize (as I believe shamelessly done, is irresponsible and Mr. Mock and Mr. Jaeger would both ac- wrong. I have had the pleasure of working knowledge) the existence of God is not with Corey Ray for much of my college something that can be objectively proven. career, and I would go before the pope and This is not contrary to my Catholic faith. vouch for his sincerity, integrity and moral Objectively, God is unknowable, but that character. He is a good person who genudoesn’t mean God doesn’t exist. As such, inely cares about what’s best for North Dathis issue is clearly a matter a matter of kota, and I would stake my reputation on faith, not science, making it something that each individual must struggle and come to terms with. The message of Mr. Mock’s editorial DAVID > page

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Celeb fascination indicative of society

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Madi whitman

about Bieber and his decisions, or, for that matter, a Taylor Swift-based holiday. The Dakota Student I struggle a bit with the attention placed on While browsing CNN’s website recently, these celebrities, especially the younger ones, I could not help but notice the multiple links and the insistence that at least some of them referencing celebrities. I am aware that CNN might be role models for a younger generation, has an entertainment section, but some of the even though more experienced and legitimate headlines seem to be slightly irrelevant in terms members of society often go unnoticed. of breaking news. For example, on the list of Recently, Gloria Steinem, a prominent news stories was a title about young girls who feminist and person you should know about, are petitioning for a national Taylor Swift day spoke at a university in Canada. Granted, so they can skip school and buy her new al- when I asked around, the majority of the surbum. veyed had no idea who she was and thus held Frankly, I am a little troubled that this no real interest in attending her lecture. Even idea made the front page, although if we have though her location in Canada was not para holiday recognizing Manifest Destiny and ticularly far away, the event received little to no colonialism, I suppose vying for a declaration media attention in our bordering state. Howof a national holiday for ever, Facebook told me Taylor Swift is not terribly Their popularity is multiple times a day for farfetched. several weeks that Brisprobably reflective tol Palin was speaking Also gracing the headlines was Justin Bieof our desires to in Fargo. Britney Spears’ ber, although his moment performance in Grand acheive similar sta- Forks was publicized for of fame on CNN was for a less innocent reason; tus. Madi Whitman months. If Justin Bieber apparently, he recently were to schedule a city in Columnist the region as a location punched a boy in the face. I avoid Bieber like the on a tour, we would no plague and make a pointed effort to steer clear doubt hear about it considerably more than we of hearing his music or about him unless he is would like. involved in the latest 4chan project, like their These people probably are talented, but failed attempt to send him to North Korea, so I have difficulty in justifying the amount of I will be honest and explicitly say that I am not notice celebrities like Bieber receive when our a fan. Therefore, I am concerned that I know youth are incapable of locating foreign counthat Bieber punched a boy in the face. tries on a map or cannot name their state senaI will admit that I can get fixated on of pop tors; for example, Justin Bieber, in an interview culture and enjoy reading about it, but I sim- that spread across the internet like wildfire, ply do not understand why I should care about when asked about something German, stated the life of Justin Bieber. Furthermore, I cannot that he didn’t know what the term meant and comprehend why CNN thinks I should know followed with “we don’t say that in America,”

although he later redeemed himself. I know that the famous, on occasion, do use their powers for good, like the recent surge of anti-bullying activism and the “It Gets Better” campaign. I suppose having a positive cultural influence may offset some of the attention given to mundane activities. But what about the people who are famous for being famous? What does Jersey Shore contribute to society, if anything? Who decides that the members of the cast of Jersey Shore should receive media attention? Why do we allow them to be successful? What implications does this success have for our society? More specifically, what does the success of Justin Bieber and Snooki state about us? Their popularity is probably reflective of our desires to achieve similar status; after all, one could easily argue that these celebrities were discovered and led relatively normal lives prior to their involvement in pop culture. Their merit, or lack thereof, enabled them to obtain cultural value and financial triumph, and we, as a society, played our part in their achievements, although the powers that be must also receive credit. I think I may have just named myself as culpable for knowing that Justin Bieber punched a boy in the face, but I think I also demonstrated our agency as a culture in influencing cultural trends. In that case, hope is not lost and maybe, one day, CNN will feature not stories in their breaking news lists about Taylor Swift Day and Justin Bieber’s everyday activities, but stories about people engaged in their culture in a beneficial manner.

DS

> Madi Whitman is a columnist for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at madi.whitman@und.edu

face prejudice

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Andy kinnear

The Dakota Student

This past Sunday, a Pinnacle Airlines jet flying from Minneapolis to Grand Forks was diverted to Fargo. Initial reports said that there was a mechanical problem and the plane landed to check it out. No big deal. Then more information was released. According to the Fargo Police Chief, the flight was diverted due to a “suspicious condition in the lavatory.” Once again, no big deal. Idiots try to smoke in airplane bathrooms all the time because they can’t go two hours without having a cigarette. Later, the Grand Forks Herald reported that the “suspicious condition in the lavatory” was a Saudi Arabian student going to the bathroom. It turns out that the flight was carrying three Saudi Arabian students who were on their way to UND. The trio are part of a new contract that UND Aerospace has with the Saudi Arabian government to train pilots. They were on their way to UND to begin studying English and learning to fly. UND already trains Saudi Arabian students, so this is nothing new. Apparently three young Middle Eastern men speaking Arabic is enough to make Midwesterners nervous. The three were questioned in Minneapolis, and police checked their passports and student visas before they even got off the ground. Once airborne, one of the Saudi Arabian men visited the airplane’s lavatory. He wasn’t the only person to visit the bathroom, but he was the only Middle Eastern person to take a leak. The Fargo Police Chief stated that it looked like somebody had tampered with the smoke detector in the lavatory. This caused the flight crew to jump to red alert, or terror level pink, or whatever the TSA calls it. The plane landed in Fargo, and the three Saudis were put in squad cars to be detained and questioned for hours. According to the FBI, nothing happened and it was all a big mix-up. Nothing on the plane had been tampered with, and everything was fine. The pictures of the incident show the three young men dressed in baseball caps and hooded sweatshirts huddled under blankets to keep warm while waiting to be interrogated by police. If you ask me, they look like pretty average college students. The only difference is that they are from Saudi Arabia and speak a foreign language. But America is supposed to take pride in its diversity. I can’t imagine what these three were thinking during the whole ordeal. Students travel internationally all the time, but apparently speaking Arabic and going to the bathroom on an airplane is enough to get you thrown in the back of a police car. Their first experience with American culture was being treated like criminals. It’s sad that we still won’t allow Middle Easterners to board an airplane without treating them like a ticking time bomb. It’s almost unbelievable that a college student can’t relieve himself on an airplane without the FBI getting involved. Yes, it’s true that Middle Eastern

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friday october 22, 2010

NEWS

Student Government: ‘Just Say Hi’

COMMUNITY New contest encouraged students to improve neighbor relations.

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ALLEE MEAD

The Dakota Student

The old saying goes that good walls make good neighbors, but last weekend UND students and the city of Grand Forks learned that good photographs make even better neighbors and a stronger community. On Sunday from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Student Government held Just Say Hi: The Good Neighbor Program, which encouraged UND students, especially those who live off campus, to introduce themselves to their non-student neighbors and send in a picture including the names of everyone featured. The first 100 students who submitted their photographs receive Just Say Hi T-shirts, which will be available at the end of this week.

RABIN >

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Speaking at an Israeli Defense Forces memorial to honor her father, Dalia Rabin said his death was “just a page in the history books,” and that young Israelis already can’t recall where they were the night of his death. In an interview with Israel’s biggest newspaper, Yediot Ahronot, she said the current peace negotiations had little to do with the movement Rabin started. “They don’t speak anymore about two peoples who want to cooperate and work out a system for living together,” she said. These talks are coming from a different place, and that, in my opinion, is the difference. They call it a peace process, but it’s not the peace that they spoke of in the ‘90s. It’s separation.” She added that she tours the Rabin Center, dedicated to his life’s work, nearly every day— but that fewer people come each year. In the streets outside Tel Aviv’s Rabin Square, where the assassination took place, few Israelis said they could define the former prime minister’s legacy. Neta Gauli, 32, said she wasn’t sure what the “effect of Rabin’s leadership” was, but she remembered exactly where she was the night of his death. “I was preparing for my first week in the army. It was such a crazy time. We all felt so patriotic, so united. Even though it was one of our own that had been the assassin,” she said. “I was so proud to be joining the military, even though I was left wing! I remember almost everyone was left wing then.” Today, Gauli votes for Kadima, a middle-road party that is currently lead by Tzipi Livni, the former foreign minister. “I don’t know what ‘left’ means anymore. Everyone negotiates for peace, but nobody gets it,” she said.

The top two pictures will go head to head in a future DS issue; readers will vote for their favorite photograph, and the winning picture will become the face of Just Say Hi: The Good Neighbor Program 2011. Student Government and the city of Grand Forks invented the Just Say Hi program a few years ago, but the program did not take place every year and did not receive much attention. This year Student Government was determined to improve the program by adding incentives like T-shirts and advertising more heavily. This was also the first year that the program was really publicized by both UND and the community and was even featured in the Grand Forks Herald. The goal of Just Say Hi: The Good Neighbor Program is to improve relations between UND students and the Grand Forks community. The program was also a chance for Student Government and UND in general to show their gratitude for the community’s hospitality toward the students and for the city

of Grand Forks to see a more positive and friendly view of college students. “By encouraging cooperative relationships between the two parties,” City Governmental Affairs Coordinator Chelsea Stone said, “we can really make Grand Forks a successful, friendly city that is cohesive in its population.” Stone added that the program was very successful this year and she hopes that next year’s program will be even better. Just Say Hi had quite a large number of participants and the submitted photographs turned out better than Stone expected. “I thought we’d get a lot of pranksters, but really the majority of the pictures we got were smiling, cheerful faces,” Stone said. Even though this year’s event is over, being friendly with one’s neighbors shouldn’t be. Students should consider helping their neighbors with such things as raking

SAY HI > page

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NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student


the Dakota Student

NEWS

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Child soldier talks Mid-semester check-up about experiences PERSEVERANCE Man tells of the suffering in his early life and about human rights.

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JOE CATANZARITI

The Dakota Student

The “metowe” website, the official page for a group of traveling speakers to which former child soldier Michael Chikwanine belongs describes his tumultuous life. “A former child soldier, Michael Chikwanine has already endured and overcome unimaginable pain and struggles,” the page explains. “His passion and belief in the possibility for change makes him a truly remarkable individual and humanitarian.” The University of North Dakota was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to bring Mr. Chikwanine to campus, where he spoke from 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. at the Lecture Bowl in the Memorial Union. In a talk billed as “The Experiences of a Child Soldier,” Mr. Chikwanine spoke at length about the experiences

Spencer, Residence Life and Education Director. “Studies have shown that students who get engaged will be much more productive and successful.” While UND Residence Halls house over 90 percent of freshCARTER HILL man students, Spencer added, The Dakota Student “We also train our [Residents Assistants] RA’s to look for sympIt has been months since they toms of homesickness.” have chosen to attend the UniWith most freshman having versity of North Dakota and now never lived away from home, bemonths since they have packed ing homesick is also one of their up their rooms and moved into main fears. a brand new world. With worries “I was scared that I’d be reof ‘will I fit in’ ally homesick or ‘can I do my We really try to and end up high own laundry’ work to get students missing school,” said filling their Alexis Kelsch, heads, college connected. freshman psyfreshmen are chology major. mostly worrying about how Cindy Spencer “It was true for the transition director, Residence Life a few days, but after I started from home and Education doing things, and high school life to the fast pace busy having fun, meeting people and getting involved, I ended up lovschedule of college will be. Now that freshman have a ing college more than ever.” Another issue for freshman half semester under their belt, it is the hope of UND that all transitioning to college is having freshman have found their place to share a bedroom. “[Some] Students coming into college have within campus. “We really try to work to get never had to share a bedroom,” students connected,” said Cindy Spencer said. “This is are largest

FRESHMEN How are new students dealing he had as a young man living in with their new lives and the Democratic Republic of the homesickness? Congo amid the terror of the Great War of Africa. As the “metowe” webpage explains, “[Chikwanine] witnessed the torture of his father, who was singled out for his political beliefs, the rape of his mother and endured torture of his own.” Mr. Chikwanine, at the time only eleven years old, was left without a home or family, and, with no other recourse available, left the DRC as a refugee, subsequently traveling throughout Africa. Mr. Chikwanine’s invaluable perspective and ideas concerning human rights and sufferings, perspective and ideas often accompanied alongside the description of unimaginable suffering, offer a unique level of insight into the nature and horrors of war. The event at the lecture bowl on Wednesday evening was positively received. UND student and graphic designer Tom Hadlick, who himself had been responsible

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transitioning problem; living in a community and living together.” Spencer went on to explain to help make this transition easier roommates must sign a roommate agreement. Each roommate comes up with certain things he or she wants in a roommate and what he or she would expect of a roommate. After the agreement is created and signed it must be followed. Homesickness and roommates could be causing enough trouble in the ease of transitioning for freshman, but academics may be one of the largest stress factors in transitioning. “As college professors, we have to explain what it means to be an independent college student before we can even begin to teach,” said Linda Bips, assistant professor at Muhlenberg College. “As parents, teachers and coaches we should expect young people to meet challenges. To encourage them in this direction, we have to step back and let them fail and pick themselves up and move forward. This approach needs to begin at an early age so that college can actually be a passage to independent adulthood.” If students are having trouble with their academics they should visit with their professors. “As far as professors go, they make themselves easily available,” said Kate Berg, freshman engineering major. “Studying for tests in college is very different than studying for tests in high school. I have to spend so much more time studying. Other than that, the transition from high school to college wasn’t that bad,” added Kelsch. If freshman are still having trouble transitioning to college and still do not feel like they have been successful, UND offers many options to help students. Contact your RA or talk with an advisor or professor; they will lead students to where they need to be to ultimately make the transition to college a successful one.

DS

> Carter Hill is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at carter.hill.2@und.edu


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RIGHTS > From page

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who himself had been responsible for designing the gripping and beautiful poster that accompanied the event, a poster featuring a map of Africa composed of different firearms, felt as though the event represented a great opportunity for UND students to experience and understand important world events that they otherwise may not have been privy to. “I absolutely feel as though Michael Chikwanine’s talk was a very positive experience,” Hadlick said of the event. “He spoke to some very important ideas that many people simply do not know of, and he did so very eloquently.” Students at the University of North Dakota are hardly the first group to have had the opportunity to appreciate Mr. Chikwanine’s intense story and startling life lessons: the metowe webpage explains that Mr. Chikwanine’s is

a story that has garnered national interest. According to the page, “Sharing his personal story, Michel has captured the attention of national media, including CBC, CTV and major daily newspapers as he inspires people to believe in their ability to create change. Michel leaves audiences with a new perspective on life, a sense of hope through social responsibility and a desire for change.” Certainly Mr. Chikwanine’s talk at UND embodied many of these phenomena: for simply sitting back and listening to the depth and viscera of what Mr. Chikwanine has gone through leaves one with many conflicting emotions, but, thanks entirely to Mr. Chikwanine’s delivery and power of communication, the emotions that most win out in the end are those centered in a desire for change.

DS

> Joe Catanzariti is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joseph.catanzariti@und. edu

NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

SAY HI >

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leaves, fixing broken-down cars and shoveling that pesky snow. Not only will these students help promote a more positive image of UND, they may even find that neighbor is ready to help when they need it. Next up on Student Government’s list of events is a new program called Monster Patrol, which will take place this Halloween. From 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 31, UND students with the help of Grand Forks police officers can volunteer to patrol some high-traffic trick-ortreat areas in Grand Forks to help keep children safe on this spooky night. All volunteers will receive pizza afterwards. Registration forms for Monster Patrol are due Wednesday, October 27. Students can sign up or receive more information either by going to the Student Government office in the Memorial Union or by emailing Student Government at stugovgovaffairs@ mail.und.edu.

DS

> Allee Mead is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at allee.s.mead@und.edu

DINE >

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facilities board. Student leaders from each group were asked to discuss the proposed changes with their constituents. Student feedback pointed to the need for more access than traditional meal plans with zones allowed. According to Dining’s website, meal zones were a requirement of the 19, 14, and ten meals-a-week plans available last year. Meal times were divided into four meal zones: breakfast, brunch/lunch, late lunch, and dinner. Student were only allowed to eat once within one of these designated times. Students with unlimited plans last year were not required to abide by the meal zones. The unlimited plans are based off of a 19 meal-a-week plan. The price is determined based on the 19 meals plus dining dollars and guest passes. Students pay $1,800 for the basic unlimited which includes 50 Dining Dollars and 3 guest passes, and $1,890 for the unlimited plus which includes 150 Dining Dollars and 12 guest passes. The price per meal is undeterminable. “There is no price per meal,” explains Rosaasen. “This is plan is based on access.”

friday october 22, 2010 This ease of access has lured more people to the dining centers this year than any other year. Prices have risen to cover the increasing amount of food required by the growing masses. “We’re serving more people, causing the cost per plate to fall. Students are no longer trying to fill their plates with as much food as possible because they can’t come back,” states Rosaasen, referring to the limits placed on eating by the previous years’ meal zones. Dining has also observed students coming back with friends for small items, such as desserts or beverages, creating a place for not just eating but social gathering as well. The unlimited plans also caused an adjustment to extended dinner. A new project launched this year to increase recycling awareness was the introduction of the reusable take-out boxes, called Eco Clamshells, provided at this meal. Dining Services purchased 1,200 clamshells at approximately four dollars each, putting the program start-up cost around $48,000. The boxes can be purchased for five dollars (non-refundable) and can be exchanged for a new one daily at extended dinner. If a box is returned before extended dinner, the student receives a

token to redeem for a box later. Students are expected to clean out the boxes and prevent the clamshells from acquiring extensive damage. If one is returned in a condition beyond normal wear and tear, the student is required to purchase a new box. If students do not wish to rent a box, they are allowed one smaller box composed of biodegradable material. Last year students were able to take out up to two Styrofoam boxes and one cup. Though it may seem like students are getting cheated, Rosaasen points out that with the unlimited plans, students can come back to late night as many times as they want. Students have pointed out that take-out cups have downsized since last year. “We’re actually going through inventory. We have to order things by the case,” explains Rosaasen. He says they started the year with 100 cases containing 1,000 cups each. “If we didn’t use them they would be thrown away. We’re being financially responsible.” Students can expect larger, biodegradable cups once the previous cup supply is exhausted.

DS

> Brandi Jewett is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at brandi.jewett.1@und.edu


the Dakota Student

THIRD >

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tolerance, it’s about incorporating diversity into everything we do.” Reesor is highly dedicated to this From page ideal as well as developing a wellShe began her journey through rounded healthy university commuhigher education at the University nity. There are several characteristics of Wisconsin-Whitewater getting which Reesor focuses on, to name a her Bachelor’s in Management and few are physical wellbeing, financial then on to Iowa State where she re- well-being, community well-being ceived a Master’s degree in Educa- and career well-being. All these ention and Advancement. She is cur- close her passion and goal which is rently employed at the University of to serve the large spectrum of stuKansas-Missouri. With all this edu- dents from the over-achieving to the cation under her belt, teaching has ones who may need some help. Her also been a huge part of her career. plans are to tie her categories of well“Its very important to connect what being with improving the student students do in the classroom to what engagement in their own commuwe do out in the nity and teachworld,” Reesor I know enough to be ing them better said. If elected, ways to take of dangerous...to cre- themselves and she plans to take this same ate a healthy, thriv- each other. A major kind of idea to ing community. issue and sore her work here at UND. Lori Reesor spot for ReeBut why candidate, VP of Student Affair sor is alcohol UND? Reesor’s consumption ultimate feeling and the dangers toward UND is that “it feels like a that it poses on college campuses. It real good match.” It reminds her is no secret that college and underof her home in Wisconsin; a mid- age drinking coincide. It is however western girl herself, she seems to be the abuse of both alcohol and drugs very comfortable in North Dakota. that have not just Reesor but college Reesor also appreciates that UND is administrations across the couna comprehensive research university try concerned. Reesor became very and possesses a shared commitment involved in the alcohol problem at to diversity and multiculturalism. the University of Kansas after two “Diversity and excellence go togeth- students died from alcohol related er,” she explained. “It’s not about accidents.

NEWS

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KYLE SCHROEDER > The Dakota Student

This took place only two years ago, and it has upset her how quickly the student population seemed to forget about the tragedy. She became involved in many prevention and educational outreach programs with the hopes of curbing the dangerous trend that exists on nearly all college campuses. Some of these things include creating an alcohol task force as well as KU requiring all undergraduates to complete a program/ class called Alcohol Edu.

She also worked with the KU school of journalism conducting surveys which produced surprising information to Reesor’s colleagues. “Students know about the dangers (of alcohol) and are tired of hearing about it.” It isn’t enough to constantly pump information out there. Reesor understands that as administration, different approaches must be taken to change students’ decisions and behavior so as not to have a repeat of the KU tragedy. To accomplish this,

Reesor brings a unique perspective having experience in enrollment, student management and life and wellness. “I know enough to be dangerous,” she said, “and to connect the dots between those things (refers to her categories of wellness) to create a healthy, thriving community.”

DS

> Emily Jukich is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at emily.jukich@und.edu


10 NEWS UNDER CONSTRUCTION Construction on the Grand Forks International Airport’s new $23 million Byron L Dorgan passenger terminal has been under way since 2009, and is expected to conclude mid-2011.

Right: A bulldozer clears the space where the new parking lot will be located, with the newly constructed terminal in the background. Below: The current terminal is being replaced to update airport facilities.

friday october 22, 2010 Photos by NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student

New online programs unveiled

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STAFF REPORT

The Dakota Student

UND has announced two new distance programs for graduate students to develop skills necessary to work with second language speakers, The two programs, which offer a Graduate Certificate and Master of Education in ELL Education, respectively, are online and will be available this coming spring. This program meets the requirements for ELL teacher endorsement in North Dakota and many other states, and demand for teachers of English as a second language has been on the rise in North Dakota and the midwest. “What makes ELL education unique in rural states such as North Dakota is that there has been relatively little need for ELL teachers until the past decade,” said Jill Shafer, assistant professor and ELL coordinator, UND College of Education & Human Development in a recent press release. “States such as Minnesota and Illinois have had established programs for decades, which means North Dakota is playing catch-up.” The Graduate Certificate in ELL Education program requirement is 20 credits, and the Master of Education in ELL Education is a 35 credit program. Courses are based on linguistics, second language acquisition and multicultural education, among others. For more information on the program, visit www.distance.und.edu/education.


S ' T N E D U T S A T O K THE DA

! ! t u O k r o W

story by Josh Brorby and Joel Adrian You probably go to the Wellness Center all the time. You’re probably jacked and tan. You know the insand-outs of the elliptical, the incline bench, the seated row, the balance board and even the rollin’-rocker. You get your grunt on. Sometimes, though, the Wellness is just too crowded (at least in all the common areas): too many guys hogging the benches, too many girls clamoring for the exercise bikes, too many young adults clogging up the lines for the bathrooms.

Essentially, the crowd grows so large as to squeeze you out of your work-out routine, out of your comfortable, rigidly-maintained, highly-systematic pattern of running and lifting. The sardine-packed feel of the weight room could end up being too much to handle, and when freshmen first start realizing they need to work out, and students pour in to shed some pounds before the great Thanksgiving season pre-winter bear-hibernation-style weight gain, you might find yourself wishing you could break from the ordinary and work-out in a way that doesn’t involve fighting tooth-and-nail to get a grip on a dinky dumbbell. Well, we here at the DS have just the solution to your people pollution: alternative workouts, as inspired by the real work-out routines of such famed writers as Sports Editor Joel Adrian and Features Editor Josh Brorby. An editorial fitness rundown, you might say. These cardioand-muscle-building routines might be just what you need, young learner, to put the spark back in your step and the pick-me-up in your pecs. Impact training is a great way to train the body that is unlike any other routine. Weights are only a small portion of exercise. Other activities we advise are the basics: push-ups, pullups and sit-ups are only a selected few work outs that are open to personalization and desire. Plyometrics are also an excellent way to build and tone your body, as short explosive movements are used to sculpt and condition the body in such a way that will cause muscle memory and toned contractions (thank you physiology) that will give you the buns of steel you desire. Stair steps, box jumps, kettlebells and diamond pushups are all great ideas to boost your workout results. Personally, we prefer vertical pushups because we look like Arnold afterwards. As avid students of working out and chiseling our statuesque bods, we have found that an array of workouts is more beneficial to the overall wellness rather than the same repetitions of your max bench press. One of us, by being in boxing (not telling who), has learned increased

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friday october 22, 2010

CULTURE&MEDIA

Disc golfers Side project meets expectations proud of StFU DS MUSIC REVIEW

ORGANIZATIONS Tom Hadlich and Co. hit the park for one more round of frolf.

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Patrick Evans

The Dakota Student

This is the third segment in our ongoing 270 (and potentially growing) part series on student organizations at UND. This week we are featuring Student Frolf Unity. For those unfamiliar with the term Frolf, it’s a shortening of the name Frisbee golf. Frisbee golf, or disc golf, is a sport that involves throwing flying discs to a goal post or ‘hole.’ Just like both of its two parent sports, Frolf doesn’t require physical strength nearly so much as skill and finesse. It’s fun to play, especially with friends, and that’s a big part of joining StFU. Thomas Hadlich, a junior in graphic design, one of the founding members and current secretary of StFU, spoke with the Dakota Student about his organization. “Initially the group was... I had just got out of high school and wanted to start a Frisbee golf club; someone else was pursuing the same goal and we deciding to combine forces. Spring 2009 was when we finally got it approved.” The group has grown significantly from their four starting members. “We have over 30 paying members and it’s like five dollars in dues. We give them mini markers, which are needed for tournament play.” Some may look at the club’s initialism and get some different ideas about the club and for what it stands. “We started the group and thought, ‘ha ha’ wouldn’t that be funny. But, now we’re emphasizing that we’re StFU, not STFU.” Tom has been trying to get the organization to be taken more seriously, but it’s been hard. “Disc golf normally has this stereotype of this certain type of people who play disc golf. I won’t lie, I totally honed in on this stereotype at the student involvement expo. I recruited anyone with a long board that I saw.” Despite the stereotype, Tom and his fellow founders, Scott and Shawn Gavett and Tom Hilpisch, have big plans for the organization. Tom explained, “I would like to see in five years a competitive UND team to go against NDSU and other colleges. Hopefully we can get a course on campus within the next five years.” They keep on requesting help from Student Government to get these goals done. “The Nightlife office purchased disc golf baskets, and we’re looking into working with them for a nightlife event.” It’s been a dream for Tom, and in his mind the sky’s the limit. “It’s a really unique experience to be a founder of an organization. There’s no bar for us, so we can aim as high as we want.” Without StFU, there aren’t many opportunities in the Grand Forks area for competitive disc

golf. “There’s a Frisbee golf league, but it’s only in the summer, and that’s a reason we started this group—there was nothing on campus.” Tom enjoys competition in disc golf and takes the game seriously, but there are spots for members of the club who want to just play the game with friends. “I’m the one probably trying to get the most experience out of this. I’m trying to compete more and the rest are mostly casual.” Tom doesn’t have a problem with this, he just wants to see people having a good time playing Frolf. This semester Frolf activity is winding down as the weather begins to turn. “This year’s been great for us; we’ve been out every week, but the season is coming to an end.” Tom says that this week is

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StFU > page

‘Bad Books’

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Matthew Roy

The Dakota Student

Bad Books’ self-titled debut is a collaboration between singer-songwriter Kevin Devine and indie rockers Manchester Orchestra. To fans, this collaboration isn’t much of a surprise since the two artists often tour together and Devine is on Manchester’s Favorite Gentleman label, but it’s a welcome addition to both the artist’s libraries as each artist steps a little out of their usual sound to create something quite unique— an easily accessible indie-folk album in the vein of Fleet Foxes or Bright Eyes. Fans of both Manchester Orchestra and Kevin Devine will definitely want to check this

out; it really is a great introduc- released in the past). tion to the two artists for those The most interesting tracks that have never heard of them on the album however are when before. Devine and Hull team up for The ten tracks on Bad Books harmonies and mix their styles. are pretty evenly split up between The opening track “How This Kevin Devine and Manchester All Ends” does a great job incorOrchestra’s porating both front man ‘Bad Books’ [...] Devine and Andy Hull creating showcases two of Hull with each a memorable of them the best songwrit- start to a memwriting five orable record. ers in music... songs (on On the which they Matthew Roy s t a n d o u t are also the staff writer track “Holdmain vocaling Down The ist, respecLaughter,” the tively). two come together perfectly After listening to the album creating a sound that is reminisa few times, it definitely sounds cent of Songs About Airplanes era more like a Devine album than a Death Cab for Cutie. Manchester Orchestra, and this This track is followed by only makes their tracks more “You Wouldn’t Have to Ask” interesting, since it’s not exactly which is another great meldwhat his fans are used to hearing ing of Devine and Manchester’s from the band (although tracks like “Please Move” and “Texas” sound similar to what they have MATT > page

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the Dakota Student

MATT >

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sounds and almost sounds like a cut from Manchester Orchestra’s debut I’m Like A Virgin Losing A Child. When Bad Books came to a close, all I wanted to do was listen to it over again, and then over again. Kevin Devine and Andy Hull are two of the best lyricists around today, and when they come together they really do create something amazing. The final tracks “Mesa, AZ” and “Texas” are two of the best on the album featuring solo acoustic performances by Devine and Hull respectively. “Mesa, AZ” is one of the best songs that Devine has released in a while and “Texas” reminds the listener just how good of a songwriter Hull is and how unique his vocal styling is and it is without a doubt a great way to bring the album to an end. While it only clocks in at thirty-five minutes, Bad Books is a truly fantastic album that showcases two of the best songwriters in music at the moment. It’s great

CULTURE&MEDIA to hear Devine and Hull sing harmonies and even greater to see Hull’s band Manchester Orchestra create something a little different. It’s easy to believe that Bad Books was never an intended side project because there is something natural about the way that the songs and the album flow. It sounds like a bunch of friends getting together to play music, and in a sense that’s exactly what it is. It will be interesting to see what is next for Bad Books now that Manchester Orchestra is currently working on a new album, but given the constant partnering of the two artists, it’s hard to believe that we won’t hear from Bad Books again. When I first heard about Bad Books, I didn’t think that their release could live up to my expectations, but it definitely did. The album was released by Favorite Gentleman Recordings on Oct. 19.

DS

> Matthew Roy is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at matthew.roy.2@und.edu

The Pedagogue

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NATHAN TWERBERG > The Dakota Student An interview with a UND faculty member

Name: Michael Flynn Department: English Education: BA at Knox College, MA and PhD at Washington University-St. Louis Advice for Students: This is coming from a liberal arts student—students benefit by branching out from their major and taking other courses that aren’t even related to your department. Why teach?: I love having conversations about literature. The more people I can help to love having those conversations, the more people I can talk to about it. I have known that I wanted to be a teacher since I was 20. Your college experience: It was a lot more different than here. The entire student population was about 850. By the end of the first week, I had been invited to a professor’s house for dinner. It was a really close-knit community. It can be hard to get students to even come to your office here, but there are also benefits to a larger population. Recommended reading for students outside of class: I don’t think there’s anything in particular you have to read. You can watch TV or movies so long as you’re watching it critically, trying to figure out what’s going on aesthetically and artistically. You can learn a lot from all media if you look at them critically. Favorite movie(s): The Big Lebowski, The Empire Strikes Back and Apocalypse Now Always on your walkman: 1968-1974, except not what’s on the radio, just album tracks and all the stuff those big bands liked and played with. I always listen to full albums. If you weren’t doing this you’d be...: I could see myself doing Sociology of Sexuality. I can’t really see myself doing anything but teaching, though, just moving to different fields. Thoughts on this year’s MLB playoffs: I think the Phillies are going to be hard to beat. Favorite drink: Non-alcoholic? Mountain Dew, the nectar of life. Otherwise, Brandy Alexanders with ice cream (instead of creme). Favorite Beatle: I don’t like them solo. The best solo album any of them did was All Things Must Pass by George Harrison, but it’s his only good one. If you could have any superpower, it would be: The ability to grade papers instantaneously.

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Grand Forks

Oct 26: Terry’s Ski and Bike Shop 5 - 8 p.m. Oct 27: UND 8 - 2 p.m.

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Oct 28: NDSU 8 - 2 p.m. Oct 29: Scheels Noon - 5:30 p.m.

Bismarck

Oct 30: Savvy Ski Shop 5 - 8 p.m.


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>

Classifieds

friday october 22, 2010

HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT COST: $4.00 for 40 words or less per issue. DEADLINE: Classifieds for Tuesday’s paper are due on Friday at noon. Classifieds for Friday’s paper are due Wednesday at noon. FORMAT: No classified ads will be taken over the phone. They can be dropped off at 170 McCannel Hall, located right behind the Memorial Union. PAYMENT: Payment must be paid in full with cash, check or mailed with payment before a classified will run. Contact the Dakota Student office at 701-777-2677 with questions.

Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs DSclassifieds Local Services EMPLOYMENT SERVICES RENTALS WORK > StFU > From page

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muscular endurance, stamina and self-confidence about oneself. Toning seems to be on the minds of most wellness members, and we suggest a nutritious diet and an occasional dip in the Hyslop. Yes, you will get wet (water is wet), but we believe this is a great exercise that tones the entire body. There are many ways to workout that save you the trouble of visiting the busier parts of the gym. In fact, physicians would probably agree with us (we’re not doctors, no matter what you’ve heard) that it’s actually good for exercisers to mix it up and do some cross-training. Skip your Tuesday run and go for a swim instead; take a break from curls and do a bit of rock-climbing. Really, the possibilities for a good work-out are endless, and what’s really important isn’t what you’re doing but the fact that you’re doing anything at all.

DS

> Josh Brorby is the Features Editor

and Joel Adrian is the Sports Editor for The Dakota Student. They can be reached at joshua.brorby@und.edu and joel.adrian@und.edu, respectively

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the last planned meeting of StFU this year, but next year he’ll try to get things going again as early as possible. “We begin as soon as the snow’s off the ground and the weather’s OK. As soon as there’s an open course, I’ll get some people together and go out.” StFU is always looking for new people who would like to play Frolf. Tom hopes that next year he can become president and help the club grow even more. “The more we grow, the more cool stuff we can have.” If you are interested in StFU or Frolf you can contact StFU on Facebook or visit their website at http://uweb.und.nodak. edu/~Thomas.Hadlich.2/ StFU%20Site/about.html. If you would like your club featured in the DS, please send an email with “DS Stud Org Feature” as the subject to patrick.evans@und.edu.

DS

> Patrick Evans is a staff writer

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at patrick.evans@und.edu

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Local Classifieds DSclassifieds Local Jobs

StFU members pictured, from left to right: Scott Gavett, Danny Hajicek, Tanner Anderson, Shawn Gavett and Tom Hadlich.

photo contributed by Shawn Gavett


DS >

scores & schedules

friday october 22, 2010

sports

Golfers struggle to find green, > Inside: Football game preview, Hockey ranks

UND vs. Utah Valley

Soccer Bronson Field

10/22 @3 p.m.

UND vs. USD

M&W Swim Hyslop Pool 10/23

UND @ CSU

VBALL Chicago, Ill.

10/23 @ 2 p.m.

WHKY

UND @ MSU Mankato, MN 10/23 @ 3 p.m.

UND bounces GWC rivals USD 3-1 North Dakota trailed by in those last two sets, and quickly they came back and were able to pull away at the end. Overall, North Dakota’s power was too much, thanks in part to a large performance from Annika Smed. The junior notched a Timothy Boger double-double in the match, postThe Dakota Student ing 14 kills—most among both The volleyball team knocked teams—and 17 digs. off Great West rival South Dakota Ellen Krueger helped lead a (5-16, 3-2 GWC) last Thursday, very efficient attack with 42 assists. October 14th 3-1 in conference She also added 15 digs to complete action at the Betty Engelstad Sioux her own double-double. Devin TreCenter. The Dig Pink celebration, fz also broke double digits in kills; a part of Breast Cancer Awareness she had 10 in the match. It was also month, drew a record crowd as a fairly balanced attack, as six hit1,038 filled the arena. ters had kills for North Dakota. North DaErin Joki Ellen Krueger and Ronni kota knocked off the visiting each helped lead a very Munkeby Coyotes for the had nine kills. efficient attack with Munkeby led third time in as many meetings all attackers 42 assists. so far, and the with a .375 tosecond conTimothy Boger tal attack perference meetStaff writer centage. The ing. UND also team overall knocked off had a .177 USD at the Dakota Dome in Ver- mark. million. Erica Turner lead the team with It was the fifth victory in a row 22 digs. for the UND women (15-5, 5-0 The UND team began a four GWC) who have seventeen straight game road stretch Thursday night conference victories. North Dakota in Newark against New Jersey has yet to lose a Great West Con- Tech. North Dakota travels to Chiference game at home. Their last cago Saturday to take on Chicago conference loss came at the hands State. They will play two games in of Minnesota State on November Utah against Utah Valley on Oc10, 2007 in the North Central tober 30th and Southern Utah on Conference. November 1st. Utah Valley was the They have also beaten all of last team to top UND in confertheir conference opponents in four ence action, as they beat North games or less this season. Dakota on October 1st, 2009 in This time the team won in Orem, Utah. four: 25-19, 18-25, 25-23, 25-23. The North Dakota women will North Dakota breezed to a six- then return home for their final point victory in the first set, but two home games: November 4th USD never quit. The Coyotes took and 6th when they host Chicago set two quite decisively, and were State and New Jersey Tech in conon the heels of UND most of the ference play. way. They threatened to pull even in the fourth set, leading 5-1 at > Timothy Boger is a staff writer one point. That was the most that for The Dakota Student. He can be

BUMPED North Dakota won a decisive home victory against the South Dakota Coyotes.

>

DS

reached at timothy.boger@und.edu

photos by Peter Bottini > The Dakota Student


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friday october 22, 2010

SPORTS

WCHA Men’s ice hockey rankings RINK RATS Dedicated staff writer Timothy Boger makes bold assesments for the season.

>

Timothy Boger

The Dakota Student

The addition of two new teams, Nebraska-Omaha and Bemidji State, makes a complex and competitive WCHA even more so. It’s been next to impossible to predict with any real confidence the outcome, and I think that any of the top three have a legitimate chance at the MacNaughton Cup this year. And everything below third place in these rankings is only a guess, since most teams have some variables that could really go two extremely different ways. 1. North Dakota Last year: 4th North Dakota is far and away the most talented team in the conference, returning many of their top scorers. Freshmen Derek Forbort and Brock Nelson are stars in the making, and Forbort has already been a key part of the North Dakota season so far. UND returns a line of Matt Frattin, Evan Trupp and Brad Malone that absolutely tore up the WCHA in the second half of last season and a logjam of talent at the blue line—anchored by, of course, the return of Chay Genoway—figures to put the North Dakota team up on top. 2. St. Cloud State Plays UND: in Grand Forks Dec. 3-4, in St. Cloud Feb 1819 Last year: 3rd Outside of forward Garrett Roe, nobody really sticks out at you, but that’s only because this team has consistent talent up and down the roster. The Huskies won their first NCAA Tournament game in their history last year, and thanks to the return of Roe as well as their goaltending platoon of Dan Dunn and Mike

Lee, St Cloud has the potential to do some special things this year.

But, execution has never been this team’s strong point, at least not in the last four seasons.

3. Minnesota-Duluth Plays UND: in Grand Forks November 5-6 Last year: 5th The Bulldogs managed to take the conference by surprise for the second straight year last season. But the Bulldogs can’t hide their talent anymore. Their top line of Jack and Mike Connolly and Justin Fontaine carried the team last year with the help of goalies Brady Hjelle and Kenny Reiter. Duluth’s offense isn’t as deep as St Cloud’s or North Dakota’s, or perhaps even that of the Gophers, but that top line could carry them far, especially with the help of Reiter in net.

5. Denver Plays UND: in Grand Forks, October 29-30 Last year: 1st It’s hard to see the Pioneers drop this far after dominating the WCHA last year, but Denver lost goalie Marc Cheverie, who put the lid on opposing teams for much of the last season. Losing Rhett Rahkshani and Joe Colborne didn’t help either. Coach George Gwozdecky always puts together a nice team, however, and unless the post-Cheverie era in net doesn’t turn into a disaster, Denver should contend for an NCAA Tournament berth.

4. Minnesota Plays UND: in Grand Forks January 16-17 Last year: 7th The truth is that the Gophers have been underperforming for way too long. It is inexplicable and, frankly, embarrassing to Don Lucia’s name that the Gophers, who have nineteen draft picks on their team (most in Division I hockey), have missed the NCAA Tournament two years in a row and were done playing hockey by Spring Break last year. It seems like this could be a do-or-die year for Lucia, and he has the talent to put together a very nice team.

6. Wisconsin Plays UND: in Madison, November 12-13 Last year: 2nd in WCHA, 37 points (17-8-3) This might be a rebuilding year for the Badgers, who lost a lot of what made up a national runner-up finish last year. It’s true that head coach Mike Eaves always manages to keep Wisconsin formidable, and he has Scott Gudmanson in net to set the tone for Wisconsin. However, there’s a lot of talent in this conference, and Wisconsin might find themselves losing grip in the standings pretty quickly if they can’t

fill holes left by superstars Blake Geoffrion and Derek Stepan.

talent that this conference has right now.

7. Bemidji State Plays UND: in Grand Forks February 26-27 First year in WCHA, placed first in CHA in 2009-10 Bemidji State qualified as an at-large team last year for the NCAA Tournament. There’s no denying that they have quite a road ahead of them if they’re to return there. Senior captain— and NHL free agent—Matt Read turned down several offers to play at the next level and instead will headline a team that also returns goalie Dan Bakala and forward Ian Lowe.

9. Nebraska-Omaha Plays UND: in Omaha November 19-20, in Grand Forks January 21-22 First year in WCHA, placed sixth in CCHA in 2009-10 The Mavericks appear poised to enter their first season in the new conference with a ton of confidence. But confidence is no substitute for talent, and head coach Dean Blais—who won championships as coach at UND—is the only one who knows firsthand how much tougher the WCHA is than the CCHA, UNO’s last conference.

8. Colorado College Plays UND: in Colorado Springs, January 28-29 Last year: 6th The Tigers have quite a young team, but that doesn’t take away from their ability to compete. Freshman forward Jaden Schwartz is the consensus Rookie of the Year, and Joe Howe looks to build off of a great freshman season in net. But, like Wisconsin, Colorado College might be the punching bag for all of the

10. Alaska-Anchorage Plays UND: in Grand Forks February 11-12 Last year: 9th This team is a long, long way from the top. Goaltending is a big question mark. Sure, the speedy Tommy Grant is back, and so are seven other top scorers from last year. But the Seawolves don’t score many goals as a team, and

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the Dakota Student

SPORTS

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UND soccer: road warriors in Southwest an easy task especially on the road, but UND took Utah Valley down to the wire losing 2-1. Both schools were unable to get much going in the first half offensively. Despite the Wolverines controlling play throughout the first Brandon Becker half it was Rhaya Ballon scoring The Dakota Student her first goal of the season unassisted to give UND a 1-0 lead The North Dakota soccer heading into the half. The lead was short-lived as team looked to remain unbeaten Regan Clifford tied the game at October 14th in conference play one-apiece a little over three minwhen they faced off against Utah utes into the second half. Utah Valley. A tough start to the seaValley outshot son has made North Dakota conference Despite being outby three in play a welcoming sign shot in th game 17- the first half and didn’t for the team. 8, UND was able to let up in the UND snapped second half, a nine-game win a 2-0 victory... bombarding losing streak Brandon Becker North Dakota when they Staff writer goalkeeper beat conferMonica Stierence rival man with 13 South Dakota second half shots. 1-0. The Wolverines strategy paid Playing against the Great off in the closing seconds of the West conference champs is not

TUMULTUOUS North Dakota finds mixed results against conference opponents.

>

game when midfielder Lauren Bluth broke the tie to give Utah Valley the win. In what was a hard-fought game UND took the defending champs to the brink, but fell short in the end. It was UND’s fifth straight game that was decided by one goal, and although they’ve only won one of those five games it shows that North Dakota is much better than their record suggests. Houston Baptist North Dakota didn’t have very much time to linger on the loss to Utah Valley as they set out for Texas this past Saturday to take on the Houston Baptist Huskies. Like Utah Valley, Houston Baptist is another Great West conference opponent. Both teams came into the game struggling to come away with wins. The Huskies were looking for their first conference win of the season, and UND was hoping to improve their conference record

RAKESH SUBRAMANIAN > The Dakota Student

to 2-1 on the year. Despite being outshot in the game 17-8, UND attained a 2-0 victory behind Stierman’s stellar play in net. Offensively, North Dakota wasn’t able to get anything going in the first half, but found a spark when Alex Zarling put UND on the board. After assisting on Zarling’s goal, Rachael Loomis added an insurance goal almost exactly 20 minutes later to give North Dakota a comfortable 2-0 lead. UND was able to hold on to the lead after a strong defensive effort. It was a big road win for North Dakota, and now they

will have their turn to host Utah Valley and Houston Baptist this weekend. UND will take on the Wolverines today at 3 p.m., looking for revenge after last week’s loss. Then they will have Saturday off before taking on the Huskies once again. After this weekend’s games, UND only has one more regular season game, which is at South Dakota, before they will head back out to Texas for the Great West Conference Tournament.

DS

>Brandon Becker is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at brandon.becker2@und. edu


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SPORTS

BOGER >

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From page

without an experienced goaltender (both on the roster are freshmen), Alaska-Anchorage will likely end up down at the bottom of the conference once again. 11. MSU-Mankato Plays UND : in Mankato December 10-11 Last Year: 8th Good news: Ben Youds, the Mavericks’ top scorer from last season, returns for another season. Bad news: Youds is a defenseman. Mankato simply didn’t have the offense to match up against pretty much anybody else in the conference last year, and questions will only mount, since they lost eight of their forwards. A new shipment of forwards from the USHL, including Mankato native Corey Leivermann, might help, but probably not much. 12. Michigan Tech Plays UND: in Houghton March 4-5 Last year: 10th When you’re Michigan Tech and you haven’t climbed out of the WCHA cellar since 2007, sometimes it’s tough to find things to be confident about. Jamie Russell’s Huskies took a trip this summer to play some games in Europe, and the going rumor around Houghton is that Russell is ‘trying out a new system’ in his offense. Still, Michigan Tech isn’t going anywhere.

DS

> Timothy Boger is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at timothy.boger@und.edu

*

Date Idea: Take someone to any of the various haunted houses being displayed this weekend!

www.TheDakotaStudent.com

friday october 22, 2010

UND golfers struggle on greens Teams share same results at different locations

FAIRWAY North Dakota had tough shots in two separate invites earlier this week.

>

KYLE ROSSEAU

The Dakota Student

The men’s and women’s golf teams competed in two day tournaments on Monday and Tuesday. UND men were at the Bill Ross Intercollegiate, hosted by the University of MissouriKansas City. The women were across the border over in Kansas at the Shocker Invitational hosted by Wichita State. Sophomore Alex Robb started the first day off strong with a team lead four over par 76. Robb, from Chanhassen, MN finished the day only 5 strokes off the lead and tied for 12th place. After the first round, UMKC’s Will Robson was the top scorer on Monday. He led the competition shooting a three under 69.

UMKC did not only have the with a nine over 225. leader after day one, they also led As a team, North Dakota finin team scoring with 291 points. ished 13th out of 14 teams with UND was in 11th place with a score of 931. Central Arkansas won the team title with a score 307. Other North Dakota golfers of 876. University playing well As a team, UND of Kansas’ Nate and shoottook the ing under 80 finished 6th with Barbee top spot with a were Nick a 644, just 3 points 213. Schaefer UND will (So., Grand out of 5th. complete their Forks, ND) and TyKyle Rosseau fall season Ocler Monda Staff writer tober 25-26th. They will com(Jr., Brainpete in Ederd, MN). Schaefer shot a three over 75 and wardsville, Ill. at the DoubleTree is tied for 22nd, while Monda Intercollegiate. The UND women, playing at shot a 78 and is tied for 46th. During the first day there the Shocker Invitational were led were two delays due to thunder by sophomore Chivas Beaudoin storms in the Kansas City area. (Dickinson, ND). On the first day she was only They only lasted a total of two hours but forced players off the four strokes off the lead with a 76, tied for 5th. course. As a team, North Dakota was On Tuesday the final two rounds were completed with in fifth place out of eight teams Robb finishing in a tie for 20th in the tournament. In addition to Beaudoin, seplace. He shot a team best 77 and nior Lauryn Job (Minnetonka, finished the three round event MN) shot an opening round 79,

tied for 14th. In the final round, Beaudoin continued her impressive tournament run, shooting a 2 over par, 74. It gave her a top 5 finish in the tournament, tying for 5th place. In the final round, she was able to cut two strokes off her score and finish with a 6 over 150. UND finished 6th with a 644, just three points out of fifth. The host school, Wichita State won the team title with an 11 over 587. They also had the top three individual scorers, including tournament medalist Gretchen Huhnerkoch shooting a two under 142. This was the last competition the North Dakota women will see for the fall season. UND will start back up again in March, competing in Primm, NV at the South Dakota State Jackrabbit Invitational.

DS

> Kyle Rosseau is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at kyle.rosseau@und.edu


the Dakota Student

UND Cal Poly preview might say that’s dang good work on my part. UND expects a close battle, but it’s worth noting that North Dakota has recently had an epidemic with football injuries. “Some defensive lineman are goJoel Adrian ing to have to play more reps. DeThe Dakota Student fensively, we’re getting scary thin, For my faithful readers and playing the offensive lineman as randoms, there was no buffet and defensive lineman will be a last my hope wears thin as I starve ev- resort for us,” stated head coach ery Tuesday. Lets start with what Chris Mussman. In an analytical this article is really about, rather approach, it seems that every pothan praising my mediocre, mel- sition on defense has atleast one ancholous memoir of this recent injured player except for outside football media day. linebacker. The North Dakota football With Cal Poly boasting a triteam will be making a visit to ple-option formation, the edges the west coast for their upcom- are the highest priority of seting GWC ting the edge game against Our defensive guys and getting the Mustangs eleven guys to are confident in the ball. “Our of Cal Poly. “It will be combating their tri- defensive guys nice going out are confident ple option. there, but its in combating business; we triple Chris Mussman their have to focus option,” statHead Coaches ed Mussman. on the football game,” stated As for game CB Dominique Hawkins. “We’re preparation, UND is coming off going to be hungry coming out their bye week and are seeking this weekend.” their first conference win in the Mellow moods move miracu- month of October. lously minding the terrible tenJunior DB Mitch Kundra will sion that thumps the thatch tops be returning to the lineup after of our outstandingly frantic foot- recovering from a previous injury. ball foundation. Yes, go back “Its going to be nice to get back and reread that first sentence. It out there,” stated Kundra. In was a stretch but with percever- analyzing the opponents Kundra ance and a little dedication, I mentioned “Its an option team

CALIFORNIA North Dakota travels to the West coast to try and snap a two game losing streak.

>

and we did really well against them last year.” UND upset Cal Poly last year with a score of 3117 in the Hall of Fame game at the Alerus Center. Hopefully UND will be able to finish a complete game and snap a two game losing streak. “We’ve shown it in glimpses every game, but we need to show it for an entire game,” stated Kundra. Senior DB Joel Schwenzfeier told the press “you have to play assignment sharp. When you miss an assignment, that’s when you get burned.” “The deep play has been our Achilles heel. Offensively we have to play at our tempo,” stated Mussman. The one word that resonated throughout Memorial Stadium was “focus.” Mussman stated that “Our entire focus should be on Cal Poly. We stress to our young team that we must maintain focus throughout the entire year.” I expect UND to be highly focused on Cal Poly. The attitude of the Alex G. Spanos stadium will be anything but friendly, with a fan capacity of 11,075. North Dakota brings a series record of 3-0 against the Mustangs, however with Cal Poly toting a record of 4-3, this is not a game for mellow moods.

DS

> Joel Adrian is the Sports Editor

for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at joel.adrian@und.edu

DAVID>

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that fact. As for the second question, the second editorial was clearly satirical to anyone whose sense of humor surpasses that of a common houseplant. It takes either a spectacular bias or supreme cynicism to read Mr. Mock’s essay concerning college students and voting as a serious call to abrogate their civic duty. Based upon some of the comments from the upper level Republican Party members of this state, their disdain for Mock’s obvious parody is only surpassed by their revulsion at Jonathan Swift’s suggestion that the poor sell their children as food in “A Modest Proposal”. The fact of the matter is that these are not serious allegations or issues of any relevance to this race. I know this because a relevant and serious allegation would contain a description of how an unnamed Secretary of State, who has held the said position since 1993, managed to lose the paperwork of a candidate for the ND state primary election, preventing his lawful inclusion on both the primary and general elections. A serious allegation would question how someone with 17 years of experience could allow such a thing to happen when the most important component of their job is to prevent voter fraud and make sure every person who meets the necessary qualifications to run for elected office gets to be on the ballot.

SPORTS

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Of course such an allegation would focus the discussion on whether any Secretary of State who allowed such a thing to happen is actually fit to continue on in that position. That is why the GOP would rather talk about the Dakota Student, and why it is important to consider our fine editorials, even those not even remotely pertaining to the issues or qualifications for office, when

DS

> David Barta is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at david.barta@und.edu

ANDY >

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Muslims perpetrated the September 11, 2001 attacks. But we’re forgetting that the Underwear Bomber was black and the Shoe Bomber was a half-white Brit named Richard. I hope these students have a more pleasant stay for the rest of their time in Grand Forks. A welcome like that would be enough to make me pack up and go home. I’m not optimistic that Sunday’s flight will be the last instance of prejudice against them. I’m not accusing North Dakotans of being xenophobic, but it seems like too many Americans still equate Allah with explosions. Hopefully these three students will bring home a positive image of North Dakota, but that’s up to us.

DS

> Andy Kinnear is a columnist for The Dakota Student. He can be reached at andrew.kinnear@und. edu


20 SPORTS

friday october 22, 2010

Lamoureuxs awarded for Olympic efforts

photos by Nathan Twerberg> The Dakota Student UND hockey players Monique and Jocelyne Lamoureux were recognized by Senator Kent Conrad for their excellence on the 2010 Olympic Women’s Hockey Team. The sisters were presented with the “Yes, We Can” award for leadership and dedication in Vancouver, leading the United States to a silver medal. The sisters also received and American flag from Senator Kent Conrad that was flown over the Capitol building in their honor. The Lamoureuxs played from the University of Minnesota before transferring to UND.

OCT22  

Oct 22 Dakota Student

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