Graphic Design Portfolio

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Graphic Design Portfolio Daisha Marquardt | 2018


Full Deck A card deck design concept created in February 2017. Images of some of my closest friends were taken in UNL’s photo studio. Then, they were collaged with images of flowers and insects from various studies. Inspired by the Charles Bukowski quote, “ The free soul is rare, but you know it when you see it—basically because you feel good, very good when you’re near or around them.”







Bee Nice The Bee Nice Project was created by a group of designers in the fall of 2018. It’s goal was to educate students on UNL’s campus about bees, Colony Collapse Disorder, and the simple actions they can take to help project the bee population in an interactive and aesthetically pleasing way.




Bee Populations Rapidly Declining: Winter of 2006-07 bee keepers reported losses of 30-90% of their hives USA bee farmers lost 44% of their bee populations between 2015 and 2016

Bee ice

Sponsor a honeybee hive Places to Donate: http://www.cheerios/weneedthebees.aspx http://www.thehoneybeeconservancy.org http://www.defenders.org

Simple Ways to Help Bees: Plant easy to grow herbs and flowers such as: chives, zinnias, thyme or mums. Support bee farmers by purchasing local, organic honey.

Informational Card Handouts Index cards with information about bees were handed out on campus. They include bee facts, simple ways to help bees, and places to sponsor a honeybee hive.


Bee Characters Bees were illustrated to show their many different behaviors. These illustrations were used throughout the entire Bee Nice pop up display.


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Life in a Hive A honeybee hive holds 20,000 to 80,000 bees, all working together for the hive’s survival. The colony consists of worker bees, drones, and a queen

Queen and Drones Queen is only fertile female, laying all the eggs for the hive. She depends on the worker bees completely.

The Worker Bee Worker bees are females incapable of reproducing, and they do all the work for the hive. Their work includes -hive upkeep -feeding the queen, drones, and larvae -collecting pollen and nectar -making wax and honey

Drones are male bees whose sole purpose is to mate with the queen. They’re otherwise useless so they’re kicked out of the hive during the winter to conserve food.

Honeybees communicate through special dances, performed by wing and body wiggles. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, honeybees pollinate over 15 billion dollars worth of food crops through entomophily. Entomophily: a form of plant pollinatin whereby pollen is distributed by insencts, particularly bees.

Field bees have a particularly special dance, saying, “Follow me!” when they have found food.

Bees collect nectar and pollen from plants, and when they do extra pollen sticks to their hair. The bee travels from flower to flower, and so does the pollen.


Infographic Displays Infographics laid out like honeycombs educated students about bee behavior and what Colony Collapse Disorder is.


Recipe Ingredients 2 Grapefruits, peeled and sliced into rounds about 1/4 inch thick

Instructions 1. Arrange grapefruit slices on four salad plates. 2. Drizzle each plate one teaspoon of Maple Honey.

1/3 Cup Hazelnuts, roasted and coarsely chopped

3. Sprinkle each plate with hazelnuts, micro greens and a touch of salt.

1/2 Cup Micro Greens

4. Serve immediately.

4 Heaping teaspoons of Raw Maple Honey Fluer de Sel or Maldon sea salt

Recipe Card Handouts Index cards with honey recipes along with a variety of different seed packets were handed out to students on campus.

One in every three bites of food was pollinated by a bee!





Arctic Monkeys Publication This lyric book was created in the Fall of 2017. It uses typography as a visual representation of language. It recognizes the tone of what is being written and is designed to express the intended message.



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TYPOGRAPHIC LANGUAGE

‘1


23

17

PROJECT TWO

GRPH 323

Typographic Language

Daisha Marquardt

Fall ‘17





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Elkhorn Grove A brand is more than a logo and a tagline. It’s more than colors and fonts and photos. A brand is the way any organization or company presents itself to its audience, and how that audience receives that image. The logo, colors, fonts, and photos are a means to and end. They are the tools in the toolbox that in this case, a elementary school can tell a story. This is an outline of the framework for the Elkhorn Grove Elementary School brand. What are the tools at our disposal? How do we tell our audience who we are? And more importantly, how can we show them what we can do for them?



Elkhorn Grove School Logos The Elkhorn Grove Logos not only represent the brand of Elkhorn Grove Ekementary School, but are also a long standing icon for the growing community. A logo is important for any brand. There is one primary Elkhorn Grove Elementary School Logo and two secondary logos. Each logo comes in a five or two primary color scheme. The logos can also be colored using each individual color in the Elkhorn Grove color palette


1/2 in


1/2 in

1/2 in


Hex #41959D

Hex #A4C04A

Hex #F7941D

Hex #F7C648



Elkhorn Grove School Iconography With all the different components to the Elkhorn Grove Elementary School, it can be difficult to distinguish between certain things. Iconography is great way to add organization and separation to complex brands. It is also a quick and efficient way to tell a story or visually cue someone to find what they are looking for.





Elkhorn Grove School Wayfinding Elements

The Elkhorn Grove Elementary School wayfinding system is composed to icons that hang from the ceiling or the door next to the room that it is indicating. Each EG icon will do this is correspondence to the room it serves as well as numbers and letters for each grade.


Elkhorn Grove User Experience Design The Elkhorn Grove Elementary School App is personalized for all Elkhorn Grove members. It allows parents, students, teachers, and vistors to access multiple things such as events, grades, attendence, lunch schedules, assignments and more!







Coffee With Demons The Coffee With Demons concept was created in the Spring of 2018. For our final project we had the option to create beautiful web design in Wix. I chose to compose a new site for Coffee With Demons. CWD is home to aesthetics of the eye and the mind, from beautiful photographs and design, to discussions about the demons we face everyday. It was created as an outlet, a hub, for art of many kinds, with no limits to be set and the purpose to spread love and find beauty in the mundane. Coffee With Demons is not simply a blog or a podcast, or a template for art, but a home for the lost souls that can use these mediums to find new growth. No matter what political beliefs you hold, the color of your skin, whether you believe in a higher power or not, you deserve love. The hope is that through CWD you can find love through connection, art, intelligence, and compassion alike.



Coffee With Demons Logos



Coffee With Demons Flash Designs Flash designs are created with the same style as the logo and are released with every blog post and pod cast. They will later be used on CWD merchandise.



Coffee With Demons Web Design The CWD website explains the companies message to its audience. It is also the home to the blog and pod cast written and hosted by members of Coffee with Demons.





Virology Exhibit The 2018 class project was “The Original Sucrose Density Gradient Swinging Bucket Rotor� in honor of Myron Brakke, the first Nebraska scientist to be inducted into the National Academy of Sciences. The exhibit showcases Brakke’s life and work, the density gradient centrifugation technology he invented, as well as the viruses studied, and the achievements of the Nebraska Center for Virology. Density gradient centrifugation continues as a globally significant technology in molecular biology and virology. The exhibit is located in the North Atrium of the Ken Morrison Life Sciences Research Center on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Campus. Our goals were to display the original swinging bucket rotor, present the scientific context for the development of the density gradient centrifugation technology, highlight the contributions of Myron Brakke, and Center of Virology. An important part of the process was our extensive research conducted to fully understand the rotor, Myron Brakke, viruses, and design solutions for displays and production materials that will work in our given space. We collaborated ideas and inspiration to begin and intermingled them throughout our process to form our final designs and exhibit.



Swinging Bucket Rotor Display The exhibit features the original sucrose density gradient swinging bucket rotor used by Myron Brakke. This display is interactive, giving users an opportunity to visualize the operation of the swinging buckets on the rotor. The evolution to the final product is shown starting with the first sketches.



E

Virology Center Rough Floorplan

4’9” X 5’11” Window

N S

15’8”

W

8’11”

3’7.5” Rounded

2’4”

7’ 2’10”

18’3” 15’5” X 9’1.5” Height of Bricks

5’6” X 9’7.5” Rounded 18’

8’11”

Height of Room 11’7.5”

Wall Above Cabinets 2’6.5”

Top of Fire Alarm to Ceiling 4’11”

Height of Benches 1’6”

Top of Fire Alarm to Floor 4’2.5”

Top of Thermostat to Ceiling 3’11”

Space Layout and Display Blueprints Careful measurements were taken of the exhibition space and blueprints were made for a mock-up of the rotor display.


12”

50”

22”

Top Hexagon

Panel Section Measurements 24”

120 degrees

6 Panels 12”

12” 14”

14”

Bottom Hexagon 24”

48”

120 degrees

Top View

24”

120 degrees

24”

14” 12”

24” 14”


A foam core mock-up was created to visualize the final displays size and appearance. Then, parts for the final product were cut and assembled. Lazy Susan like mechanics were added to allow the viewer to spin the rotor.





Panel Designs Collage designs of typography, articles, historical and scientific photos cover six panels around the rotor display. This encourages the viewer to walk all the way around the rotor to learn about it.






Virus Designs Different viruses were illustrated to be added to the space. All of them have been studied with the technology at the UNL campus center.




Final Exhibition The exhibit opened in the Nebraska Center for Virology on April 25, 2018. It is the center piece of the buildings social area and travels to different virology conventions.



Museum Builders: A Story of Fossils and Friendship A new Morrill Hall exhibit titled “Museum Builders� highlights the rich history of the museum itself. The interactive experience focuses on the creation of the museum and the accomplishments of its founders, Charles H. Morrill and Erwin H. Barbour. The exhibit connects the past to future and includes a preview of the new exhibits featured in the redevelopment of the fourth floor for the Cherish Nebraska exhibit. The exhibit features its own app using AR and iBeacon technology, an escape room, and many important fossils among the first collected by the museum.



Exhibit Color & Type Treatment Color and type was choosen for aesthetics and visitor readablity. This color and type treatment is uniform throughout the entire exhibit.

The Museum Builders A Story of Fossils and Friendship

DARK BROWN C40 | M65 | Y90 | K35

DARK GREEN C58| M36 | Y100 | K18

LIGHT ORANGE C10 | M59 | Y77 | K0

BARBOUR BLUE C54 | M35 | Y30 | K1

CREAM C4 | M2 | Y11 | K0

LIGHT GREEN C42| M25 | Y96 | K3

DARK ORANGE C19 | M80 | Y99 | K8

LIGHT BROWN C43| M56 | Y64 | K23

LIGHT GRAY C13 | M11 | Y20 | K0

CRATE TAN C0 | M27 | Y52 | K0


The Museum

Builders

A Story of Fossils and Friendship

Welcome! This exhibit is equipped with interactive audio and augmented reality content. To access this content, please follow these instructions: 1. Open or download the app titled “Museum Builders” from the IOS App Store. 2. When prompted, allow Museum Builders to access your iPhone’s camera to enable augmented reality content. 3. If you’d like to to participate in an interactive audio tour, allow the Museum Builders app to access your location. This can be changed later in your iPhone’s settings. If you wish to access UNL’s Wi-Fi Network please follow these instructions: 1. Go to your iPhone’s Settings, and open Wi-Fi 2. Under Wi-Fi , choose “UNL-Conference”. 3. When prompted, enter the username “Barbour” and the password “Barbour123”, then submit (username and password are case-sensitive). (Sorry, the Museum Builders app is for iPhones only)

Bree Serif:

URW Grotesk:

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNO PQRSTUVWXYZ

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNO PQRSTUVWXYZ

abcdefghijklmno pqrstuvwxyz

abcdefghijklmno pqrstuvwxyz


Cooper Gallery Layout The Cooper Gallery space was carefully measured out so that an overhead layout of the exhibit could be made.

West W

18’ 7”

Case: Marsh’s pick

ST EHB: Father of NE Paleo

Photo: Ft. Rob

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Object: locust

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Photo: Morrill in 1891

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Interpretive information for a rich label or for a group label for related specimens natistisque idelluptatet lab ium sitae sitassuntur, quo odit hario eum s natistisque idelluptatet lab ium sitae sitastuerum re verum ut est, nonsequos sandis doloreh endestio.

EC Finding A Passion

14"w x 30"h

Tough Times

14"w x 30"h

Success

Photo: OC Marsh

EC Failed Farmer

Finding a Passion

ESCAPE ROOM

EC Into the Fire

9’ 2.5”

Moveable Wall 11’ X 17”

Failed Farmer

Early fossils collected prior to meeting Morrill

AREA 2.0: TWO VISIONARIES

EC Tough Times

NEBRASKA STATE MUSEUM DEPARTMENT OF PALEONTOLOGY | 00.0000.000.0

Case: Titanothere skull/jaw

EC Museum with No Money

EXTENDED CAPTION

EXTENDED CAPTION

OBJECT LABEL Dating information | Location information

EC Making of a Paleontologist

EC Success

Photo: Badlands Toadstool

EXTENDED CAPTION

Photos: wagon & horses

Case: Barbour/Marsh fossil

ST Charles H. Morrill

G Morrill Photo

MT Two Visionaries

11’

21’ 7”

Moveable Wall 11’ X 17”

4.5”

EC Nebraska’s Famous Fossils

KEY TAKE-AWAY OR HOOK STATEMENT ABOUT THE SUBSECTION TOPIC. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate velit esse molestie consequat, vel illum dolore eu feugiat.

Image: Charles Morrill

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OBJECT LABEL Dating information | Location information Interpretive information for a rich label or for a group label for related specimens natistisque idelluptatet lab ium sitae sitassuntur, quo odit hario eum s natistisque idelluptatet lab ium sitae sitastuerum re verum ut est, nonsequos sandis doloreh endestio.

ST Golden Age of Fossils

Images: Civil War

Image: Marcuson mastodon illustration

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NEBRASKA STATE MUSEUM DEPARTMENT OF PALEONTOLOGY | 00.0000.000.0

20"w x 30"h

Into the Fire

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Image: Early UNL SUBTEXT KEY TAKE-AWAY OR HOOK STATEMENT ABOUT THE SUBSECTION TOPIC. Que quam consectis natistisque idelluptatet lab ium sitae sitassuntur, quo odit hario eum re verum ut est, nonsequos sandis doloreh endestio. Rio blatetu rionsequae arum, conec tam esto endem doloremporem elit liquia parchil magnia.dit hario eum re verum ut est, nonsequos sandis doloreh endestio. Rio blatetu rionsequae arum, conec tam esto endem dolodit hario eum re verum ut est, nonsequos sandis doloreh endestio. Rio blatetu rionsequae arum, conec tam esto endem dolo. 75 words OBJECT LABEL Dating information | Location information Interpretive information for a rich label or for a group label for related specimens natistisque idelluptatet lab ium sitae sitassuntur, quo odit hario eum s natistisque idelluptatet lab ium sitae sitastuerum re verum ut est, nonsequos sandis doloreh endestio.

G Early UNL

Image: Early paleos working in NE

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MT Origin of the University Museum

20"w x 30"h

ST Golden Age of Fossils

EC Nebraska’s Famous Fossils

12’ 5”

NEBRASKA STATE MUSEUM DEPARTMENT OF PALEONTOLOGY | 00.0000.000.0

Moveable Wall 11’ X 17”

SOUTH WALL

MAIN TEXT

MT Origin of the University Muse

Explana AR app 37.5”

24”

Barbour & Archi 24’ 6”

ENTRANCE


Wall • 68’ 6”

48’ 6”

MT Two Visionaries Come Together

ST Early Expeditions

Case: Discovery fossil, EHB & Morrill

Case: Fossils TBD

EC Early Expedition 1

Case: Fossils TBD

ST Building Morrill Hall

EC Early Expedition 2

G EHB mounting skeletons EHB gallery sketch

EC Morrill’s Legacy

Case: Dedication program EHB/Morrill letters

ST Barbour Grows the Museum

Original plans & contract for Morrill Hall

AREA 3.0: TWO VISIONARIES COME TOGETHER

G Carrie Barbour

EC Carrie Barbour

EC EHB’s Legacy

AREA 4.0: GROWING A FOSSIL COLLECTION

MT Growing a Fossil Collection

51”

3 Antique cases: All fossils & images TBD

EC Later Expedition 1 Devil’s Corkscrew

27”

EC EHB’s Other Contributions

▸ Physical Interactive: Paleocastor Chutes and Ladders

NORTH WALL

EC Later Expedition 2 TBD

▸ Augmented Reality Interactive: Paleocastor Corkscrew Burrow with real burrow section

▸ Augmented Reality Interactive: Barbour State Capitol Mosaics

27”

21’ 7”

51”

▸ Physical Interactive: Dinohyus Layered Bone Puzzle with Marcuson muscle layer and final painting

EC Later Expedition 4 TBD

51”

EC Later Expedition 5 TBD

AREA 1.0: A GRAND MUSEUM ON THE PLAINS

EC Later Expedition 3 TBD

27” EC Later Expedition 6 TBD

0

Case: Fossils TBD

▸ Physical Interactive: Fossil Sketching

eum

ation panel for p and beacons

AREA 6.0: CHERISH NEBRASKA

AREA 5.0: MUSEUM BUILDINGS

9’ 5”

Cherish Nebraska AV promo 32” Touchable monitor

GALLERY INTRO 46.5”

32” TV Monitor

ST Morrill Hall 1927-Present

EC 1925–1926

ie photo mural

ENTRANCE

EAST WALL

EC Fire of 1912

ST The Museum Building

24’ 2”

EC 1893–1905

ST Old Nebraska Hall

ST University Hall

MT Museum Buildings 1871–Present


Exhibit Interactives Interactives focus on expanding on topics in each section of the exhibit. These sketches show the many different ideas we considered to further educate visitors about Barbour and different specimens mentioned in his stories.



Dinohyus Puzzle Table Dinohyus (di-no-hi-us) is the largest of the North American entelodonts, with bulls weighing nearly a ton. More of them were found in the waterhole bonebed at Agate Fossil Beds in Nebraska than at any other location in the world. This interactive educates visitors about Dinohyus size, diet, range, muscle and skeletal structures. It uses original sketches done by Barbour himself.


APPROVED_Dinohyustable.pdf

1

6/1/18

10:08 AM

Entelodont Dinohyus

Dinohyus (di-no-hi-us) is the largest of the North American entelodonts, with bulls weighing nearly a ton. More of them were found in the waterhole bonebed at Agate Fossil Beds in Nebraska than at any other location in the world. Although plant-eaters, their teeth suggest C

that they scavenged carcasses and may have been the

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

principal “garbage disposal� of the Great Plains from

CMY

K

34 to 17 million years ago. Entelodonts were undoubtedly good runners and would have been a formidable adversary to any challenger on the open plains. The complete skeleton of a large male found in 1908 is on exhibit on the first floor at Morrill Hall.

Dinohyus was quite intimidating at 12 feet long (3.6 meters) and 6 feet tall (1.8 meters) at the shoulder.


Paleocastor Chutes & Ladders Paleocastors lived in Nebraska 23 million years ago. This Chutes and Ladders game helps visitors understand the relationship between them and their predators.

What is a Paleocastor?

How to Play!

Paleocastor (pey-lee-oh-kas-ter) lived approximately 23 to 22 million years ago in colonies like those of modern prairie dogs. First discovered in 1891, their spiral burrows are preserved in the badlands of western Nebraska. Long claws, strong jaws, and large incisor teeth helped this animal dig the burrows. Small carnivores, like Zodiolestes, probably preyed on Paleocastor.

The number of squares that a player advances is determined by the roll of a dice. If a player lands on the bottom of a burrow with no predator awaiting, they immediately climb to the top. However, if the player lands on a square shared by Zodiolestes, they immediately run down the burrow and up into the den for safety. The game is over when a player lands exactly on the finish square.

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Paleocastor

FINISH

START


How to use the Museum Builders App 1. Open or download the app titled “Museum Builders” from the IOS App Store. 2. Scan the white silhouette at the bottom of the display with your iPhone’s camera to active augmented reality enabled content. (Sorry, the Museum Builders app is for iPhones only)

AR Daemonelix Corkscrew Paleocastors burrowed in corkscrew formations to escape their predators. Through this interactive visitors can use AR to view a 3D rendering of what the full size burrow would’ve looked like over it’s cast.


Capitol Rotunda AR Interactive Barbour’s original drawings for the design of Nebraska’s Capitol Rotunda Mosaic were recovered and images were patched together to create an overhead view of the entire floor. Through an app using AR technology visitors can interact with the floor to see the original drawings and more information about the mosaic.


(Sorry, the Musuem Builders app is for iPhones only)

3. Tap on boxes as they appear for Barbour’s drawings and more information. 2. Scan the mosaic with your iPhones camera to activate AR enabled content. 1. Open or download the app titled “Museum Builders” from the IOS App Store.

Scan here for more drawings!

How use the Museum Builders App Barbour was not only an accomplished scientist, but he was also a telented artist, author, inventor, muscian, and civic leader.

1. Open or download the app titled “Museum Builders” from the IOS App Store.

Erwin H. Barbour, The Artist

How use the Museum Builders App 2. Scan the mosaic with your iPhones camera to activate AR enabled content. 3. Tap on boxes as they appear for Barbour’s drawings and more information.

In 1927, he composed at least 51 drawings for mosaic designer Hildreth Meiere to incorporate into the unique tile floor in the Nebraska State Capitol rotunda. His artwork depicting the rich fossil record of the Nebraska territory is still there today!

(Sorry, the Musuem Builders app is for iPhones only)


Drawing Table Interactive This drawing table displays real fossils and encourages visitors to draw what they thought the animal would look like. The graphics are some of Barbour’s original field sketches.

What in the World? Dr. Barbour was a great artist as well as a great scientist. He could draw all the animals he discovered! How did he know what they looked like when they were alive, though? With careful study, paleontologists combine their knowledge of fossils and modern animals to figure out what prehistoric animals may have looked like in real life! Look at these fossils. What do YOU think these animals looked like when they were living? Can you draw them? Try tracing some of Dr. Barbour’s sketches.


AREA 1.0: GRAND MUSEUM ON THE PLAINS

AREA 1.0: GRAND MUSEUM ON THE PLAINS

9.5 ft East Wall

96” 8’

108” 9’

12.5 ft South Moveable Wall

84” 7’

ALL SENT TO PRINT

SENT TO PRINT

A S TO R Y O F FO S S ILS A N D FR IE N DS H IP

SENT TO PRINT

This is the story of two extraordinary men who shared the same vision of building a “Grand Museum” in Nebraska. Charles H. Morrill and Erwin Hinckley Barbour led fascinating lives as individuals, but when they became friends in 1891, they formed a partnership to preserve the state’s fossils for generations to come.

IMAGES OF YALE INDIVIDUALS, CA. 1750-2001 (INCLUSIVE). MANUSCRIPTS & ARCHIVES, YALE UNIVERSITY

The Bone Wars

1871

Scientific name FISH VERTEBRA, CRETACEOUS PERIOD 1881 | Nebraska This fish vertebra is one of the very first specimens in the State Museum collections. It was collected in 1881 by the Museum’s first Director, Samuel Aughey.

Three toed horse foot. ERWIN H. BARBOUR, MUSEUM PHOTOGRAPHS SERIES (RG 32-01-01) ARCHIVES & SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN LIBRARIES

Nebraska’s Famous Fossils

This period of competitive fossil collecting sparked the famous “bone wars” rivalry between two pioneers in paleontology, Edward Drinker Cope of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences and Othniel C. Marsh of Yale University.

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA STATE MUSEUM DIVISION OF VERTEBRATE

1871. THE NEW CAPITAL CITY, LINCOLN, NEBRASKA. The University campus occupied four blocks just north of the planned downtown. For the first fifteen years, University Hall, seen in the distance above, was the only building. ERWIN H. BARBOUR, MUSEUM PHOTOGRAPHS SERIES (RG 32-01-01) ARCHIVES & SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN LIBRARIES

Nebraska’s location downslope from the Rocky Mountains was ideal to capture stream sediments, like sand and gravel, eroding from the mountains. Sediments buried and preserved fossil elephants, horses, camels, and rhinos. Nebraska’s remarkably complete fossil record documents the last thirty-seven million years of mammal evolution better than anywhere else in North America.

60” 5’ 36”

48”

Othniel C. Marsh (standing in center) and his 1872 expedition party.

As the Museum was being established, the transcontinental railroad opened the West to paleontologists. Easier access to the fossil-rich badlands of western Nebraska and South Dakota initiated a steady flow of fossils being shipped back east to established museums.

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Their dream lives on today with Cherish Nebraska, a new floor of exhibits opening in 2019.

1872

At its 1871 inaugural meeting, the Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska established the University Museum as one of the first departments on campus. With one-time funding, a small collection of the state’s plants, animals, and minerals was acquired and housed in corridors and science classrooms of University Hall. The “Museum Cabinet,” as it was called then, was a study aid for students in the natural sciences.

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ERWIN H. BARBOUR, MUSEUM PHOTOGRAPHS SERIES (RG 32-01-01) ARCHIVES & SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN LIBRARIES

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Charles Henry Morrill

SENT TO PRINT

Humble Beginnings

Erwin Hinckley Barbour

ERWIN H. BARBOUR, MUSEUM PHOTOGRAPHS SERIES (RG 32-01-01) ARCHIVES & SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN LIBRARIES

NOT SENT YET

72” 6’

THE MUSEUM BUILDERS

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48”

60” 5’

72” 6’

84” 7’

96” 8’

108” 9’

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48”

60” 5’

72” 6’

84” 7’

96” 8’

108” 9’

CASE for #607-7-81 Fish vertebra collected by Aughey SIZE TBD

AREA 2.0 TWO VISIONARIES 9’ 2.5’ ft South Moveable Wall

EC Tough Times

EC Success

ST Finding a Passion

84” 7’

96” 8’

108” 9’

EC Failed Farmer

60” 5’ 48”

The Morrills and Reminiscences, by Charles Henry Morrill.

The Rocky Mountain locust, Melanoplus spretus, an extinct species of grasshopper.

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA STATE MUSEUM, DIVISION OF PALEONTOLOGY ARCHIVES

MINNESOTA LOCUSTS (GRASSHOPPERS), C.1870S. PHOTOGRAPH BY JACOBY'S ART GALLERY, MINNESOTA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Failed Farmer

Tough Times

After the war, Charles Morrill reunited with his wife and worked to earn enough money to buy a wagon and team of horses so they could homestead in Iowa. In 1869, his crops failed, and he was unable to pay his creditors. When merchants refused to sell him any more goods, Morrill knew farming wasn’t right for him.

As Morrill and his wife started a new life in Nebraska around 1870, they lost a child, and struggled to make money on a land deal. His new attempt to be a merchant also failed, because three summers of locust plagues wiped out farmers and merchants alike. Bankrupt, Morrill set off to join the Black Hills gold rush in South Dakota.

On his way to the Black Hills in 1875, Morrill took a job at Camp Robinson in western Nebraska. There he met a fossil field crew of Yale students working for paleontologist O.C. Marsh.

1868. "Hat full of Bones" collected by O.C. Marsh from Antelope Station (Kimball), Nebraska. COPYRIGHT 2015 PEABODY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, YALE UNIVERSITY, NEW HAVEN, CT, USA. PHOTOGRAPHY BY ROBERT LORENZ.

Charles H. Morrill ERWIN H. BARBOUR, MUSEUM PHOTOGRAPHS SERIES (RG 32-01-01) ARCHIVES & SPECIAL COLLECTIONS, UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA–LINCOLN LIBRARIES

After visiting Yale’s Hat Creek fossil site, Morrill wrote, “Bones of the giant animal called the Titanothere were to be seen at every turn while of the rhinoceros, three toed horse and others often crushed under foot as we walked.” The experience ignited his passion for fossils, and he decided the remarkable creatures should be preserved for his fellow Nebraskans.

Success Charles Morrill transformed himself into a man of wealth and influence when he seized opportunities to work in land trading, livestock, and banking. His success led to service under Nebraska Governor Albinus Nance. In 1891, Morrill was elected to the University of Nebraska Board of Regents, where he served ten years as its president. Type (holotype) skeleton of Brontops robustus (Titanothere) published by O.C. Marsh in 1889.

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COURTESY OF PEABODY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, YALE UNIVERSITY, NEW HAVEN, CT, USA. PHOTOGRAPHY BY W.K. SACCO.

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Yale College Scientific Expedition of 1871. COURTESY OF PEABODY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, YALE UNIVERSITY, NEW HAVEN, CT, USA.

Finding a Passion

Earliest known photograph of Camp Robinson, renamed Fort Robinson in 1878. HISTORY NEBRASKA, RG1517-13-04

"Hat full of Bones" collected by O.C. Marsh from Antelope Station, Nebraska, in 1868. YALE PEABODY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY ARCHIVES

Brontops robustus (Titanothere) skeleton published by O.C. Marsh in 1889.

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1871

BOOK OPEN ON STAND 7.5h X 10.5w

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72” 6’

ALL SENT TO PRINT

YALE PEABODY MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY ARCHIVES

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48”

60” 5’

72” 6’

84” 7’

96” 8’

Exhibit Panel Design Panels were carefully designed with information and images around the exterior wall of the exhibit. They were planned around incorporating original fossils recovered by Barbour.

108” 9’


Final Exhibition The Museum Builders: A Story of Fossils and Friendship opened to the public on June 23, 2018. It can be found on the third floor of Morill Hall until May 2019.