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California State University, Northridge

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Monday, February 13, 2012

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issue

Students highlight the benefits of working on campus p. 3

Volume 53 Issue 73 • A financially Independent student newspaper

OPINION A new reason to buy Girl Scout cookies p. 6

SPORTS Women’s basketball: Matadors fall to LBSU in 2OT p. 8

Shining a light on LGBT bullying New law requires universities to protect students and improve queer programs tanya ramirez daily sundial

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new law requires public universities and colleges to enforce new policies that protect LGBT students from harassment and bullying. With the 2010 suicide of Rutgers University student Tyler Clementi, LifeScience news is calling gay suicide a U.S. epidemic. The Center of American Progress has also given much attention to campus bullying in association with LGBT suicide. According to a 2011 study conducted by Columbia University, 20 percent of LGBT students admitted attempting suicide. The LGBT Equality and Equal Access in Higher Education law, effective January, asks campuses to strengthen queer studies programs and provide safety codes of conduct for LGBT students. Hugo Valencia, president of the CSUN LGBTA student organization, said CSUN does not particularly have a bullying issue. “I’m so happy to be on a campus that is so accepting and diverse,” Valencia said. “I came from a very small town where acceptance was scarce and I was always alone. But when I came to CSUN, I finally felt like myself.” The law requires each campus to appoint a faculty member or faculty body with the responsibility of overseeing harassment cases.

LGBT students would report acts of bullying or maltreatment to this figure and in return, the appointed faculty would provide necessary counseling and alert authorities in cases of violence. No current CSUN employee or entity assumes this role. Gregory Knotts, CSUN professor of education and faculty advisor of CSUN LGBTA, said the USU board and LGBTA are the best contacts for questions or concerns. The law also suggests universities and colleges educate their faculty by enforcing queer studies seminars or training programs. “Though CSUN is an accepting campus, I think the faculty tends to be ill-informed” Knotts said. “Professors are the face of CSUN and we need to be proactively educated. Crash courses like these will force gender issues on faculty radar and ultimately strengthen the university.” Diego Flores, CSUN senior majoring in psychology and LGBTQ peer mentor, said he would like to see more diversity training among the student body. “Whether it’s pamphlets, a few words at student orientation or open forums, I think any step is a step in the right direction,” Flores said. Flores said CSUN and young people in general especially need to put an end to the phrase, “That’s so gay.” “They don’t realize that it’s not funny and sometimes it can hurt our feelings,” Flores said. “Simple comments like these are in a way bullying and I think anything our campus can do to properly inform students would be helpful.” Another issue the law addresses is data collecting on gender identity. The law aims to include sexual orientation in the same manner

See lgbta, page 4

Improving the look of Reseda

Volunteers spend the day cleaning the streets Matthew Ashman daily sundial

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olunteers from the Northridge Sparkle Campaign met Saturday morning to pick up trash and pull weeds to help improve the look of the neighborhood. A n d r e a Alvarado, a representative of the Northridge Sparkle Campaign, is hoping to take things Misael Virgen / Daily Sundial

to the next level by cleaning up and calling it the Northridge beautification project. "We are going to be placing six signs along the boulevard between Nordhoff and Parthenia that say ‘Northridge Village,’" Alvarado said. "We are going to try and get federal funding and to do so we have to show that there have been improvements made." They are also trying to get more of the businesses involved with the project by having them donate or by having them help clean up in front of

See sparkle, page 4

Farah Yacoub / Daily Sundial

On Feb. 9, the USU set up a Valentine’s Day Crafts Corner, where students painted hearts and teddy bear cutouts. They feature new crafts every Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m..

Scan this QR code to view a video of last Thursday’s USU Craft Corner


2 News February 13, 2012 • Daily Sundial • CSUN • city@sundial.csun.edu

Calendar of Events

february 2012

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15 (cont.)

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Scavenger Hunt

Flying High & Loving Israel

Cinematheque

time: 7 - 9:45 p.m. Where: Armer Screening Room Description: Le Amiche (The Girlfriends), 1955, 104 minutes. Clelia (Eleonora Rossi-Drago) leaves Rome to set up a fashion salon and soon finds herself in unpleasant company.

Women’s Basketball vs. UC Davis

time: 5 - 7 p.m. Where: CSUN Hillel, 17729 Plummer St. Description: CSUN students for Israel will be hosting a panel of flight attendants from the Isreali Airline, El Al. Event is open to all CSUN students and dinner will be provided free of charge.

Men’s Basketball vs. Cal Poly

USU Red Rally

Men’s Basketball -. ESPN Bracketbuster

Where: Online at http://www.studentvoice.com/csun/cashcoursechallenge When: through Feb. 27 at 12:00 a.m. Description: The financial aid and scholarship’s invites students to take the online scavenger hunt challenge for the chance to win one of four $50 gift-cards to the Matador Bookstore.

A.S. Finance Meeting

Time: 2 - 4 p.m. Where: Grand Salon Description: Associated Students meet to discuss the financing of A.S., clubs and organizations.

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time: 7 - 9 p.m. Where: Matadome Description: The Matadors face Cal Poly

GRL Bowling Night

time: 9 - 11 p.m. Where: Matador Bowl Description: The queer-based all inclusive sorority gives GRL and other students an opportunity to test their bowling skills.

A.S. Senate Meeting

Time: 2 - 4 p.m. Where: Grand Salon Description: Associated Students meet to discuss the current issues facing students, faculty and the university at large. An open forum at the beginning and end of the meeting allows for student input to let representatives know the issues students face.

15 New Officer Workshops

time: 2 - 3 p.m. Where: Matador Involvement Center Conference Room Description: Topics include: clubs and organization resources, university policy overview, responsibilities and privileges.

U N I V E R S I T Y

16 EOH Symposium

time: 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Where: University Student Union Description: EOH holds their sixth annual technical symposium. The event is open to the public. The topic is regulating environmental pollutants. CSUN faculty and students along with other distinguished speakers will make presentations on the dangerous effects of environmental pollutants on thyroid.

Women’s Basketball vs. Pacific

time: 7 - 9 p.m. Where: Matadome Description: The Matadors take on Pacific.

S T U D E N T

time: 2 - 4 p.m. Where: Matadome Description: The Matadors take on UC Davis. All fans wearing pink to support Breast Cancer Awareness will receive free admission.

time: 7 - 9 p.m. Where: Matadome

time: 7. - 9 p.m Where: Matadome Description: The Matador Men’s Basketball team hosts the ESPN Bracketbuster. Free admission with valid CSUN I.D.

17 The Vagina Monologues

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time: 7 - 9 p.m. Where: Plaza del Sol Perfomance Hall Description: The CSUN theater department puts on Eve Ensler’s classic play where women talk about women’s issues all relating to their vaginas, whether they are positive or negative experiences. Throughout the monologues, the vagina is expressed as a tool of female empowerment and an expression of each woman’s individuality. Tickets can be purchased at the A.S. ticket office for $10.

A.S. Finance Meeting

Time: 2 - 4 p.m. Where: Grand Salon Description: Associated Students meet to discuss the financing of A.S., clubs and organizations.

A Wormhole in the Attic

submit your event

time: 8 - 10 p.m. Where: USU Theater Description: A showcase of short films, 200 seats are available on first-come, first-serve. There will be no cover charge. Donations will be accepted. Snacks will be sold at the door. The event is one hour long with a few short films leading into the featured short.

U N I O N ,

Go online to DAILYSUNDIAL.COM to add your club or organization’s upcoming event to the calendar for free.

I N C .

LIVING THE MATADOR LIFE EVENTS TODAY MATADOR MALL - CLEARY WALK - 8 A.M. - 4 P.M.

TUESDAY, FEB. 14 MATADOR MALL - CLEARY WALK - 8 A.M. - 4 P.M. TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT - GAMES ROOM, USU - 4 - 5 P.M.

– . 13 B E F 16 DAY, Y, FEB. N O A M . RSD U 4 P.M ONT H T – . 8 A.M ALK IN FRHALL W IAN ARY CLE AYRAM OF B

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15 MATADOR MALL - CLEARY WALK - 8 A.M. - 4 P.M. BILLIARDS TOURNAMENT - GAMES ROOM, USU - 4 - 5 P.M. ESPRESSIONS - GAMES ROOM, USU - 8 - 10 P.M.

THURSDAY, FEB. 16 MATADOR MALL - CLEARY WALK - 8 A.M. - 4 P.M. CSUNOPOLY - PLAZA DEL SOL, USU - 11 A.M. - 2 P.M.

(818) 677-4306

POKER TOURNAMENT - GAMES ROOM, USU - 4 - 5 P.M.

USU.CSUN.EDU

RED RALLY - WOMENS BASKETBALL VS. PACIFIC - MATADOME - 7 - 9 P.M.

LEADERSHIP TOOLBOX Are you Living the Matador Life? Get that extra professional training that will get you ahead on campus and in life with the Leadership Toolbox Podcast Series! Topics include public speaking, time management, goal setting, networking, and conflict management. Visit usu.csun.edu/toolbox and download the podcast today!

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Features 3

Campus jobs provide valuable experience

February 13, 2012 • Daily Sundial • CSUN • city@sundial.csun.edu

Alexandra Riggle

daily sundial

W

ith a population of over 35,000 students, CSUN is a veritable town unto itself—a town that requires a workforce to run smoothly. CSUN students represent a significant portion of that workforce, filling hundreds of jobs across campus, from the Matador Bookstore to the Student Recreation Center to the Oviatt Library. “The USU alone employs 288 students at last count,” said Kristen Pichler, human resources officer for the University Student Union. One of three auxiliary non-profit organizations on campus that also includes The University Corporation and Associated Students, the USU works to expand the college experience through various programs, employment and involvement opportunities. Students at the USU work as customer service attendants, building managers, meeting room attendants, and in various positions at the Student Recreation Center, among others, Pichler said. CSUN’s Career Center cites that among the benefits of working on campus are mentoring and management opportunities, convenience, variety and summer employment opportunities. Students who work on campus report a number of additional benefits. “The hours are flexible. My boss is really understanding about school demands, and he works with our

schedules,” said Dulce Angel, a double major in sociology and Chicana/o studies senior and an event staff supervisor for the athletics department. Angel has worked off campus in the past and said, “It’s a completely different ball game.” Dealing with a long commute, traffic, longer work hours, a less flexible schedule and less understanding employers were all disadvantages, she said. With the grand opening of the new SRC in January, around 150 new student jobs were added on campus, according to Kaila Lavin, membership services coordinator at the SRC, who oversees 42 student staff members. “Almost all of our staff members are students,” Lavin said. The only non-student positions at the Center are those that require specialized skills, such as group exercise instructors, she added. “There were so many applicants for jobs at the Student Recreation Center that we conducted a hiring fair. It was almost like a speed dating event, with five to six people at a table,” Lavin said. Each candidate had only a few minutes to highlight their talents and skills, Lavin added, making it especially challenging. Job scarcity coupled with high unemployment and the current economic situation mean that students are challenged with developing a competitive edge. “We tell students that we receive a lot of applications, and ask them to really think about what qualities they can bring in,” Pichler said.

Trisha Sprouse / Daily Sundial

Komal Sen, graduate student, engineering management, works as a cashier at The Edge located inside the Matador Complex. Students on campus are generally allowed to work up to 20 hours a week.

“We’re really looking for students who are not just simply looking to earn money. We’re looking for those who are trying to gain work experience, and soft skills—how to work with people. What I hope for them (students) is that they gain knowledge and skills needed for their careers beyond CSUN,” Pichler said. Lavin also spoke of the kinds of qualities she looks for in prospective student employees. “In my department my students are the face of the recreation center. We’re looking for people with a positive attitude who are energetic and knowledgeable about a magnitude of

information,” Lavin said. She added that when visitors enter the SRC they often have many questions, which membership service employees must be able to answer. Along with the perks of working on campus—like priority registration, according to Pat Ordonez, a senior majoring in sociology, students report that they are better able to manage a hectic school schedule with work when they are employed on site. “Off campus I’m more detached from school,” Ordonez said. “My priorities are school today, work tomorrow.” Ordonez has two jobs on campus, one as a student assistant in the math

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department and as a supplemental instruction leader at the SRC. She enjoys working on campus and said it gives her a more authentic college experience. “Working on campus gives me a sense of community. It feels more integrated. It’s fun and less stressful.” To search for jobs with the University, Associated Students, the University Student Union or The University Corporation, visit CSUN’s Office of Human Resources website. Students are generally allowed to work up to 20 hours per week during the academic year, subject to minimum GPA requirements.


4 News February 13, 2012 • Daily Sundial • CSUN • city@sundial.csun.edu

sparkle

Continued from page 1 their store. "All of the trash cans were overflowing," Alvarado said. "It has escalated now from picking up trash to planting new flowers in the planters." Another volunteer who has lived in this neighborhood his whole life is Don Larson and he is trying to "make this whole place beautiful." "There is a group of us that come out here from my house, Das Bauhaus, and help clean up," Larson said. "It's mandatory in my building to work, you want to live in my house you have to come out here and work." Larson said it is quite easy to get people to come out and help because most of the people that live in his complex are already willing and sympathetic to his cause. A tenant in Larson's complex, Michael Lombardi, is hoping that doing this will help make the neighborhood more welcoming for new people to come out and visit Reseda Boulevard. Most of his duties involve

lgbta

Continued from page 1 as race and ethnicity on demographics sections of university forms. Knotts said this practice

going out once a week picking up trash and pulling weeds, along with a few other tenants. Reserve Officer William Schnieder, was on hand during the clean up between 9 and 11 a.m. making sure things went smoothly. He also helped out the week before on his own time keeping the streets clean. Alvarado is hoping that eventually they can turn this area into a new Pasadena or into a new Third Street Promenade now that the Valley Performing Arts Center is around. "Now that we have the Valley Performing Arts Center here we want people to come here, shop, eat and enjoy," Alvarado said. "Little by little we are doing improvements." Once everything is completed they are planning on having a big celebration with food trucks, art shows and more.

Misael Virgen / Daily Sundial

Scan this QR code to view multimedia of the event

Das Bauhaus resident and volunteer Michael Lombardi, 30, scouts the streets of Northridge Village for trash during a street clean up on Saturday. Members of the community came together to volunteer their time to clean the streets of Northridge along Rayen street and Nordhoff street on Reseda Boulevard.

would be particularly beneficial for transgender students that don’t feel comfortable with being labeled as male or female. In terms of financial aid, Knotts said the gender identity option could also benefit LGBT students who have been kicked out

of their homes. “Many argue race, ethnicity, etc. should not even be on financial aid forms,” Knotts said. “But unfortunately, we still live in a time where these factors are often woven with circumstance and financial need. LGBT stu-

dents, for example, may need aid in the first place because their families have denied them any assistance because of their sexual identity.” To create a save haven for LGBT students, CSUN will open its doors to a new LGBT resource

center in the fall. Knotts said the center will be a place for LGBT students and supporters to socially and intellectually interact. The center is still in the process of designing programs that will provide resources, peer counseling and social activities.

“CSUN is out and visibly proud,” Knotts said. “CSUN faculty and students are predominantly tolerant and I think the campus has done an exceptional job so far at maintaining safety, support and resources for LGBT students.”


February 13, 2012 • Daily Sundial • CSUN

5


6

February 13, 2012

pinions

opinion@sundial.csun.edu

Don't boycott Girl Scout cookies JOELLE KATZ SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR

W

ould you like to buy some Girl Scout cookies? Before you say no, read ahead. Recently, a teenager from Ventura County appeared in a YouTube video promoting a boycott of Girl Scout cookies after a troop in Colorado admitted a 7-year-old transgender child into their troop. Soon after, a flier went viral on Facebook, with the title, “You deserve to know what Girl Scout cookies fund,” showing the promotion of LGBT agendas and Planned Parenthood by the Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA). As a former Girl Scout since Daisies (Kindergarten) and an active adult volunteer in the organization, I can say that the Girl Scouts is not an organization based on discrimination and should not be chastised for treating all children equally. While I understand that some parents may be concerned of the privacy of their daughters with a boy in the troop, they obviously don’t understand what it means to be transgendered. It means that young boy feels he was born into the wrong body and has the mindset,

characteristics, and traits of a young girl. He is not any different from those other girls in the troop aside from what’s in his pants. Girl Scouts was not founded as a Christian organization; that is what church is for. It is a place for young girls of various ages, ethnic backgrounds, races, and social classes to make friends and find a place of acceptance. Several other countries allow girls to join Cub Scouts, including Indonesia and Hong Kong, so why should we not allow similar practices if we call ourselves a progressive country? I personally want to support Girl Scouts more after reading the flyer, because it seems to me they have progressed more than our own country has. I appreciate the fact that they support the LGBT community without going around promoting that every girl should be a lesbian, but support those who have come out that they are one. It gives those people a place of acceptance. Though it may have seemed like a long time ago to many people, it was only about 60-yearsago where people of color were discriminated against because they were of a different race. Why should those people who have a different sexual orientation be discriminated against for liking their same sex or being who they are? Why is it that people think they should have a say in what other strangers do with their lives if it isn’t affecting them or hurting those people? And why shouldn’t we support a highly respectable organization for supporting people with all different kinds of gender identities? Girl Scouts is about so much more than whom they support; they develop role models in every

community, empowers children and builds important relationships among people. One of the main motto’s of girl scouting is “to be a sister to every Girl Scout,” which means to accept one another for whom they are, not what they are or what they look like. Girl Scouts teaches morals and life lessons that many other young girls do not get, and sets up a foundation for these girls to become strong, independent women. When you buy girl scout cookies, you are helping that young girl travel to places she otherwise would not be able to, attend workshops where she will learn to become a professional and learn new ways to give back to her community. For example, they learn how to clean up their communities, send care packages to American troops and visit hospitals and elderly homes. I bet you that if you go out into the wilderness and take a Girl Scout with you, there is a good chance she can survive much longer than you ever could. So before you decide to join the boycott or join a Facebook trend, take a moment to think about what buying those deliEditor In Chief cious cookies is really KEN SCARBORO doing for young girls (and editor@csun.edu communities) everywhere.

DAILY SUNDIAL

News Editor ASHLEY SOLEY-CERRO city@sundial.csun.edu

Live News RON ROKHY city@sundial.csun.edu

Features ANGELA BRAZA features@sundial.csun.edu

Sports ALONSO TACANGA ANTHONY CARPIO Opinions KARLEE JOHNSON HANSOOK OH opinion@sundial.csun.edu

Arts & Life CAITLIN MARTIN ane@sundial.csun.edu

Photo Editor MARIELA MOLINA photo@sundial.csun.edu

Multimedia Editor TESSIE NAVARRO photo@sundial.csun.edu

Art Director ABBY JONES Online Editor CHRISTOPHER HO online@sundial.csun.edu

Visual Editor GABRIEL IVAN ORENDAIN-NECOCHEA Social Media JOELLE KATZ Copy Editors PERRY SMITH ABBEY SELTZER JIM MCLAUCHLIN JOE TOMASZEWSKI Staff Reporters JONATHAN ANDRADE MATTHEW ASHMAN

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Published Mon.-Thurs. by the Department of Journalism at California State University, Northridge. Manzanita Hall 140, 18111 Nordhoff St. Northridge, CA 91330-8258

The viral Facebook flyer outlines reasons why not to buy Girl Scout cookies.

ILLUSTRATION BY CARL ROBINETTE COOKIES COURTESY OF MCT

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Sports 7 February 13, 2012 • Daily Sundial • CSUN • sports@sundial.csun.edu

men’s basketball

Bad to worse: Matadors stunned by last-second shot gilberto manzano senior reporter

I

t couldn’t get any worse for CSUN than a 46-point blowout at Cal Poly on Jan. 26. Wrong. The Matadors somehow managed to top their embarrassing defeat to the Mustangs this past week with two grueling losses in the Bay Area, both painful in their own way. First, CSUN fell to the laughing stock of the Big West Conference, UC Davis, a team that snapped an 18-game losing streak on Thursday. CSUN (6-17, 2-10 Big West) became the first Division-I team to lose to the Aggies (2-22. 1-11) this season. It only got worse at Stockton on Saturday. Earlier in the week Matador head coach Bobby Braswell called UC Davis a “trap game,” so maybe he expected a letdown, but what happened against Pacific must have driven the sixteenth-year head coach nuts. Holding on to a 61-60 lead, the Matadors gave up an offensive rebound with one second left and forward Ross Rivera

recovered the ball and scored the game-winning layup to lift Pacific to a 62-61 victory at the Spanos Center. The Matadors and Pacific (10-14, 6-6) traded blows down the stretch, but the play of Rivera made the difference in the game. The sophomore scored the Tigers’ final 17 points and had a game-high 26 points. With 4:38 left to play, CSUN held a 57-51 advantage after back-to-back 3-pointers by Josh Greene and Vinnie McGhee, but the Rivera show was just getting started. Rivera scored the next six points (two layups and two free throws) to tie the game at 57-57 with 1:42 left on the clock. CSUN’s leading scorer Stephan Hicks, who only contributed eight points on the night, hit two free throws to put the Matadors back up by two. Rivera continued his hot streak with a 3-pointer to give the Tigers a 60-59 advantage. That was followed by a Stephan Maxwell dunk to hand the lead back to CSUN. Then the best thing happened for the Matadors: Rivera didn’t take a shot. In the final seven minutes of regulation, Rivera had taken every shot for the Tigers before Travis Fulton

went up for a game-winner with one second to go. Rivera then got the offensive rebound that killed CSUN. Greene had a team-high 19 points and McGhee and Maxwell chipped in 11 and 13 points respectively for Northridge. The Tigers opened the second half on a 10-0 run and the Matadors didn’t score until the 14:47 mark. After giving UC Davis its first Big West win this season, it seemed the Matadors were ready to bounce back. In the first half, CSUN was firing on all cylinders, making six of its first 10 shots and taking a 12-5 advantage. Pacific came back to tie the game at 15-15, but the Matadors went on a 10-0 run to retake control of the game. The Tigers opened the game with a three-point basket, but then went on to have a dismal half from long range, shooting 2-of-14. Northridge went into the locker room ahead 33-21 with Greene and Maxwell scoring 11 and eight points, respectively. CSUN returns to the Matadome for a three-game homestand, starting with Cal Poly Wednesday night.

Mariela Molina / Photo Editor

CSUN forward Stephen Maxwell (21) attempts a layup during a loss to Long Beach State on Feb. 4. Maxwell scored 13 points Saturday as CSUN lost to Pacific.

FOR RELEASE FEBRUARY 13, 2012 FOR RELEASE FEBRUARY 10, 2012

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February 13, 2012

Sports

8

sports@sundial.csun.edu

Follow us on Twitter @sundialsports57 for play-by-play coverage of CSUN sporting events

women’s basketball

Ain’t that a Beach?

Big West-leading Matadors unable to stop pesky Long Beach State in double overtime, lose to 49ers at home Anthony Carpio Sports Editor

D

espite rallying from a 10-point halftime deficit to send the game into two overtime periods, CSUN (14-10, 8-3 Big West) came up short in a 75-72 loss to Long Beach State (10-14, 5-6) Saturday night at the Matadome. It was the 49ers’ big offensive push at the beginning of the second overtime period that hindered the Matadors’ chances of coming back. Three layups, two by LBSU guard Chantel Dooley and one by guard Alex Sanchez, put CSUN down 67-61 within the first three minutes of play. “The reality of it is that they shot 55 percent in both overtimes and that’s just terrible defense,” Northridge head coach Jason Flowers said.

Big west Standings Teams

(BW, overall)

1. CSUN 2. Cal Poly 3. UC Davis 4. Pacific 5. UC Irvine 6. LBSU

(8-3, 14-10) (7-3, 11-12) (7-4, 15-8) (7-4, 14-9) (7-5, 11-14) (5-6, 10-14)

“Anytime, as a team in crunch time, you’re giving up layups, you don’t deserve to win. We didn’t deserve to win. (Long Beach) made plays and they got things done.” The rebounding battle between the teams was about even, with CSUN edging out LBSU by one (40-39), but the 49ers collected 20 offensive boards to keep giving themselves a second look at the basket. “Anytime you give up 20 offensive rebounds, there’s a problem, especially against a team that usually gets outrebounded,” Flowers said. “I thought they did a better job at pursuing the basketball and they made plays.” Matador guard Janae Sharpe, who had a 3-pointer and a free throw to help cut the team’s deficit to 32-31 by halftime, thought the team went through a defensive breakdown in the second overtime period. “We weren’t boxing out. We weren’t talking on defense,” said Sharpe, who finished with 17 points. “That kind of messed us up for getting offensive boards and defensive boards.” Being aware of the 49ers’ 3-point abilities, the Matadors did a solid job contesting shots from behind the arc. LSBU shot 39.1 percent from long range.

“(Long Beach) was six of 10 from three in the first half. I thought we did better after that,” Flowers said. “Part of that was they got some things in transition and in scattered court. We made the adjustments, but we knew they were going to shoot threes.” CSUN center Jasmine Erving, who came off a careerhigh 36 points, continued her dominant play with 20 points and 10 rebounds, but her double-double wasn’t enough for the win. The senior noticed the amount of turnovers the team had and was not pleased with what she saw. “It was rough. They pressed us for almost the whole game,” Erving said. “We just struggled trying to bring the ball up and that’s one thing we need to work on.” It wasn’t the first half Flowers was hoping for. After having relatively good games in the turnover department, CSUN slipped into its old habits and had 15 turnovers (22 overall). The 49ers capitalized on those Matador turnovers by scoring 24 points. Erving had a quiet half, scoring only five points and only one rebound. Forward Camille Mahlknecht did most of the work for CSUN making four of her five shots and finished with 11 points, four assists and three blocks.

Kat Russell / Senior Photograper

CSUN forward Violet Alama (23) goes up for a shot during the second half of her team’s double-overtime loss to LBSU Saturday.The Matadors are still in first place in the Big West.

men’s VOLLEYBALl

Not this time: CSUN downed at home by No. 4 Stanford Alonso Tacanga Sports Editor

I

Kat Russell / Senior Photograper

Stanford’s Brad Lawson (9) puts down one of his 19 kills Saturday night. CSUN lost at home for the first time this season.

t’s not exactly a secret that the Matadors have been a completely different team this season when playing at home in contrast to when playing on the road. Heading into Saturday’s matchup against No. 4 Stanford, CSUN was 3-0 at the Matadome, 1-6 anywhere else. That standard of home vigor remained as true as ever against the Cardinal, especially during an inspiring second set. CSUN dominated Stanford en route to an astounding 25-18 win. “Everything was working,” CSUN senior outside hitter Matt Stork said of the set that tied the match at 1-1. “Passing, hitting, setting, blocking, serving. Everything was going our way.” Against a team like the Cardinal, everything needed to go CSUN’s way for a bit

longer. While the Matadors (4-7, 2-5 MPSF) kept up with the volleyball powerhouse, Stanford (9-2, 6-1) was just skilled enough to spoil Northridge’s perfect home record with a 3-1 win (25-22,18-25, 25-22, 25-19). “We tried as hard as we could,” CSUN head coach Jeff Campbell said. “We gave it our best effort out there, but tonight Stanford was definitely the better team.” While CSUN hit at a better clip overall (.282 compared to Stanford’s .275), it was the Cardinal who came through with the crucial points when they needed it. Following the Matadors’ dominant frame that evened things up, the teams found themselves in a tight third set that saw them trade points all the way into the latter stages of the game. A service error from Stanford outside hitter Brad Lawson had CSUN within 23-22. Northridge couldn’t come

up clutch, though. A kill from Lawson and another one from his comrade, Brian Cook, finished off the Matadors in the set as Stanford took a 2-1 lead. “It was really close all the time,” CSUN freshman Julius Hoefer said. It certainly didn’t help the Matadors’ cause to win the crunch-time battle that Cook and Lawson were on the other side of the net. The outside hitters were on point throughout the night and combined to put down 45 of the Cardinal’s 56 total kills. Cook (26 kills) hit .450 for the game. Lawson (19 kills) hit .342. “They played great,” Campbell said. “We couldn’t stop them.” Stork said: “We definitely tried to at least get a twoman block on them. Cook basically had one person up every time.” The Matadors counterattacked with Stork (11 kills), Hoefer (12 kills) and mid-

dle blocker Jared Moore’s team-high 13 kills. But there was little to be done against Cook and Lawson’s combined 15 kills in the third. It was more of the same in the fourth. Even as CSUN hit .407, Stanford outdueled it. Led by their star duo’s combined 12 kills in the frame, the Cardinal hit .519 and downed the Matadors 25-19 to take the game. “We’re just not stopping or affecting the other team,” Campbell said. “That’s an area we have to get better at and we will get better at.” There were some positives for the Matadors to look at. Besides out-hitting them, CSUN also outblocked the Cardinal 18.08.0. Northridge also committed less attack errors (15) than Stanford (26). “We definitely are getting better,” Campbell said. “It wasn’t good enough tonight, but hopefully the next time we play these guys, it’ll be good enough.”


February 13, 2012  

February 13, 2012 Issue

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