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Page 6 — THE LACONIA DAILY SUN, Wednesday, August 1, 2012

LETTERS Giving freely of one’s own choice is bad? Yes, he really said that

Fact is, the Democrats are every bit as fat cats as the Republicans

To the editor, I give you E. Scott Cracraft’s latest letter to the editor as the most perfect and prescient example of liberal magical thinking that would give any modern day progressive type a real thrill. Let’s put aside his less than veiled attempts at smearing Christians and conservatives for the moment. Let’s put aside his patented and patently false social justice refrain of tax the rich, that’s the fix. It’s never been the fix throughout the history of mankind, but Scott seems absolutely and positively convinced it will work this time. Throughout the presentation of his scholarly discourse, he used the words Christians, conservatives and corporations a combined 15 times. This learned and wise academic who longs for a kinder, gentler and fairer nation, proceeded to aim his wordsmith AK47(Academic King, able to leap 47 cruel conservatives with a single bound) at non-progressives and commence firing away. Allow me to share a few with you, some paraphrased: we should be kinder to immigrants; refrain from executing evil monsters; force corporations to treat people more fairly; care more about children than parental rights; take care of the poor, hungry, homeless and less fortunate; show some compassion for the hungry and naked; and don’t allow the rich to “eat up the poor”. As a Christian conservative, I’m just not feeling the love from this man. Of course, these are just biblical analogies cultivated from his fertile mind and searing liberal patronization. It’s not like he really believes those on the right are that callous and uncaring. Does he? The professor goes on to say that he just can’t understand how conservative Christians(CC) often think that individual charity is more moral than giving one’s money to the government so it can help the needy. Yes, he really said that. He then said that he wanted to know if it made CC’s feel morally superior to give that way. Yes, he really said that. Giving freely of one’s own choosing is bad. Being coerced to give to the cult of collectivism is good. Yes, he apparently really believes that. Without actually saying it, Mr. Cracraft insinuated that only CC and Republican types are associated with

To the editor, Barring some sort of cataclysmic event, I’ll be voting for Mitt Romney this election and here’s why: our economy is in the worst state that I’ve seen in my 37 years of existence, and I believe that Romney will help right that ship. I’m willing to concede that Bush (and Clinton) both contributed to this state of current affairs, and I even voted for Obama because I, like many independents, was swept up by his wave of enthusiasm and change. However, here we are four years later, and things have only simmered or gotten worse. Obama backed his promises of change by throwing billions down the tubes, paying off the huge investment firms that got us here in the first place as well as playing the race/class card to the point where it has unraveled and set us against each other down to the very pages of this newspaper’s columns and letters. It makes me sick to my stomach to see that the Democrats are still warping poor/middle class (of which I am a member) minds to have them believe that a vote for the Dem’s is a vote for the little guy/girl. That they are the saviors of the less fortunate. Fact is , the Dem’s are every bit as fat cats as the Republicans if not more so and being the “poster child” of the poor while having fifteen thousand dollara-head dinners in some posh Hollywood home for re-election campaign funds just makes me ill to my core. The Democrats reap a dragon’s hoard of gold while making the poor think they really give a damn. They are 10 times the hypocrites of any Republican (like Al Gore flying around in his jets with his three mansions telling us to reduce our carbon footprint)! Republicans aren’t much better, but at least they are more straightforward in their motives, and it seems as though they get more done without taking advantage of those who are desperate. I have to say, I thoroughly enjoy

corporations. Yes, he really insinuated that. Go re-read his letter and let me know if you think he was inferring otherwise. Here is a quote from him that fairly synthesises the progressive mind: “What is more individually anonymous than paying taxes for social programs?” Yep, he really said that. Ignoring our current president’s troop expansion in Afghanistan and his new title as the “Drone King”, the professor made an obvious reference to the Republicans and the CC’s as the war mongers. He even came up with some wacky reference that appears to have come from someone named, Ashim Chatterjee of the Communist Revolutionary League of India (I am not making that up). The referenced phrase is “national chauvinism” and some loopy analogy to communal fascists in the guise of “patriotism”. And you know, I think he really believes that because conservatives don’t think having 46-million people on food stamps is a good idea, that equates to the CC’s not caring about the young, poor and needy. Judging by the letters of Dr. Thomas Dawson and Nancy Parsons, I believe they really think that way too. I think David Harsanyi, a columnist for Human Events, sums up just how the progressive movement has used distractions to get the citizens of this country to move beyond the worry of whether or not we should have just a really big government or a bureaucratic behemoth that looks and acts like Tyrannosaurus Rex stomping on everyone’s freedoms and gobbling up everyone’s wealth in it’s path. He says, “The president’s central case rests on the idea that individuals should view government as society’s moral center, the engine of prosperity and the arbiter of fairness”. I say, that is a case of progressive “magical thinking”. Of course, it is pure poppycock and apparently emanates from a growing number of graduating classes from the Semantic School for the Terminally Arrogant. I mean who else can believe such nonsense, attack those who disagree with them while feigning peaceful co-existence and do it all with a straight face and a clear conscience? Russ Wiles Tilton

This baseless attack on Mr. Youssef needs to be condemned To the editor, I am writing in response to Ms. Goldstein’s letter, and I find it most unfortunate that the level of discourse in this state has been reduced to ad homonym political attacks made on good people with no evidence to prove their claims, let alone any attempt to provide evidence. I don’t know if Ms. Goldstein is working for someone, or of her own accord, but her baseless attack on the character of Mr.Youssef (And any attacks like this on any can-

didate) should be condemned not only because they lack a level of ethical responsibility, but also from a logical standpoint as they perpetuate the use of fallacy and petty argumentative tactics to dilute the political arena. Shame on Ms. Goldstein and any else involved should be ashamed of themselves for resorting to such tactics. Troy “Epic” Brown Von Epic Industries Laconia

the letters that are well-written and thought- provoking, whether written from the left (Vareeka) or the right (Wiles). It’s the letters written by the people who obviously have the wool pulled so far over their heads that they either don’t care to know the whole facts concerning social policies and agendas or they do not have the brain power to fully comprehend something that make me sad to see their letters over and over. Just two random examples: Tony Boutin, I enjoyed your letters at first, but the reoccurring theme of your ALL CAPS makes me feel like I’m being yelled at, now I skip your letters. Nancy Parsons, anytime I prepare to read your letters I get out my tall boots, because it gets deep fast. Your letters are the perfect examples of why I find myself voting more and more for Republicans. Woe is me, and it’s all your fault. I’m sure you’ve had some bad stuff happen to you in your life, most of us do. But if you have half a brain you should make decisions to better yourself or your situation rather than rely on finger pointing and blaming those who have more then you. Though I digress, the main reason why I will vote Romney this year is because our economy is bad and for once I want a brilliant economist in office. It’s that simple. I do not understand our country’s obsession for voting lawyers into office while at the same time ridiculing lawyers for being bloodsuckers. Let us vote in a president who understands big business and free enterprise, not someone who will just take billions of our hard earned tax payer’s dollars again and throw it down a vacuum of shady back room deals and payoffs for Billionaires, all in the name of helping the little man. A vote for Romney is a vote to keep America from turning into Greece, because that’s where we are headed with these policies. Thomas Lemay Laconia

Time’s a wasting, we want to hear the candidates face-to-face To the editor, Correct: the senate races merit full debates between the parties’ candidates, not a stage shared with the other candidates for office. Jeanie Forrester should be in debate with Bob Lamb, several places throughout District 2: Alexandria, Ashland, Bridgewater, Bristol, Campton, Center Harbor, Danbury, Dorchester, Ellsworth, Grafton, Groton, Haverhill, Hebron, Hill, Holderness, Meredith, New Hampton, Orange, Orford, Piermont, Plymouth, Rumney, Sanbornton, Tilton, Warren, Wentworth, and Wilmot. I attended the candidates’ night in Meredith, 2010 election, and too easily the senate candidates might not give in-depth answers to audience questions. No time! A moderator from

League of Women’s voters fulfilled the duty of time-sharing, so the many candidates on stage each had some exposure. That’s fine, so long as the senate candidates have their full exposure at debates, other times. As I heard Rep. Seth Cohn (R), Canterbury, say at a recent court hearing for Occupy arrestees (Manchester’s Veterans’ Park had them overnight a few nights, so they were violating a curfew law), our New Hampshire’s senators (24) are “the most important people” in our Statehouse. He told us that lobbyists head for our senators, to curry favor for legislation. The 400 House members are less individually powerful (except for that notorious majority speaker). Please, time is passing; we are now see next page

from preceding page while they try to wait out until after the elections. They have refused to do anything for the country going so far as to vote against their own bills. We do we have to pay them? If any of us refused to do the work we were hired for we would be fired immediately and

not be paid. Talk about a waste of taxpayer time and money. Being elected for these jobs should be an honor but when I see people like Michelle Bachmann on an intelligence committee I wonder if it really isn’t a joke. Jon Hoyt Bridgewater

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The Laconia Daily Sun, August 1, 2012  

The Laconia Daily Sun, August 1, 2012

The Laconia Daily Sun, August 1, 2012  

The Laconia Daily Sun, August 1, 2012

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