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MARTIAL ARTS IN CLE ELUM

BUSY DAY IN THE NFL

Business, Page B1

Sports, Page A6

Good afternoon

Thursday March 22, 2012

H: 49 L: 26

Vol. 111, No. 70

50 cents

Published in the Heart of Washington / DailyRecordNews.com

The suspects

Sippin’ for the Seven

A wildlife whodunit Necropsy at CWU teaches how to distinguish between predators

Head to Roslyn on Saturday and support the Cle Elum Seven chimpanzees during a benefit for Sanctuary Northwest. Weekend Life, Page B8

Inside today A study in contradictions: A profile of Afghan shooting suspect Robert Bales details the life of a self-proclaimed “proud patriot” who acquaintances say had a darker, troubled side. In detail, Page A8.

Coming this week

Brian Myrick / Daily Record

Carter Niemeyer performs a necropsy on a domestic sheep as part of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Depredation Training at Central Washington University last week. The goal of the clinic was to determine what kind of predator — among a suspect list that included (above from left) wolves, bears, cougars and domestic dogs — killed the sheep. In this case it was a cougar.

Training guides investigators in livestock losses By MIKE JOHNSTON senior writer

T

he rural site where domestic livestock have been killed by a predator should be treated as a crime scene, and the facts — not biases or assumptions — should lead the investigator to what wild animal did the deed. That’s one of the maxims taught by longtime wolf predation expert Carter Niemeyer, who gave intensive training last week to nearly 80 wildlife biologists and field enforcement officers during a daylong session at Central Washington University. “Just like in the death of a human, the person investigating must see the entire area like a crime scene,” said Niemeyer, 65, of Boise, Idaho, recounting the training earlier this week. “Get rid of any biases you might have about certain predators and any prejudicial thoughts that may be raised by what you hear from others while you’re out there that isn’t based on absolute fact.” The training’s aim was to sharpen the investigative skills of personnel who are called on to determine the cause of death to livestock and what predator did

Wolf info on the Web Details about the state of Washington’s wolf recovery management plan and conservation efforts can be accessed online at www.wdfw.wa.gov/ conservation/gray_wolf/ it. The training looked at attacks by wolves, cougars, black bears and domestic dogs. Niemeyer, after indoor workshops on March 15, brought attendees outside into the parking lot of the Student Union Recreation Center and performed necropsies on dead sheep and deer killed by predators. A necropsy is to dead animals what an autopsy is to deceased humans. Wildlife officials said losses can include calves, cows, sheep, dogs, cats and, sometimes, horses and other larger livestock.

lot, Niemeyer slowly cut into the animals and spoke to the personnel crowded around watching his every move. “Right away you have to isolate where the most trauma occurred,” he said earlier this week. “Was there lots of hemorrhaging under the skin at the site of the wounds? What kind of bite wounds are there? What’s their location and characteristics? Check this all out carefully.” He pointed out that an animal with not much blood in its flesh from a wound may not have died from a predator. During a predator attack, the livestock’s blood pressure and heart rate quickly elevate causing wounds to bleed excessively, he said. The size and type of puncture or teeth wounds and where they’re located provide other clues. Cougars tend to go for the neck and throat, he said, and seek a quick kill. State wildlife officials bringing the killed animals from Eastern Washington counties didn’t give hints to Niemeyer what they thought took the animals down.

Looking for clues Under a portable canopy and on a table in the parking

concluded it likely was killed by a mother cougar with her young offspring. There were wounds at various locations on the deer. “It looked like she (the female cougar) was out to give the young ones training in hunting,” Niemeyer said, indicating scattered wounds were from the offspring, but the wound killing the deer was from an adult cougar. As he did a necropsy on another deer, he correctly surmised it had been hit by a vehicle and dispatched by a gunshot. He found the bullet during his investigation. “There’s tremendous pressure from those around an investigator, like the livestock owner, to come to a quick decision on what predator is involved,” said Niemeyer, especially if the attack and animal death was not witnessed. “That pressure, those emotions and anger over the loss of livestock are to be expected from the owner. You have to respect that sense of loss, but still be patient, calm and cool in investigating step by step.”

Hunting After he examined a deer, he

See Predators, Page A3

Let’s go for a ride: Ellensburg’s Spirit Therapeutic Riding Center gives people with physical, emotional and learning disabilities a chance to saddle up. The benefits of riding and interacting with horses are both physical and emotional. Read more in Saturday’s Daily Record.

SHOULDER PAIN?

WE CAN HELP!

LASER, SPINE & DISC CHIROPRACTIC 509-925-PAIN (7246) 2211 West Dolarway Rd

VISIT US AT WWW.925PAIN.COM

INDEX Business Events calendar Horoscopes, comics Obituary Sports Weekend Life

B1 A3 B6 A5 A6 B8

Local news serving Ellensburg, Cle Elum, Roslyn, Kittitas, Easton, Suncadia and all of Kittitas County.


Weather

A2 - Thursday, March 22, 2012

Ellensburg Almanac

Ellensburg Forecast

Ellensburg: Tonight we will see mostly cloudy skies with an overnight low of 28 degrees. North wind at 8 mph. The record low temperature for tonight is 17 set in 1912. Friday, skies will be mostly sunny with a high temperature of 49, humidity of 40%. East wind 8 to 11 mph. The record high temperature for Friday is 76 set in 1939. Skies will be partly cloudy Friday night with an overnight low of 29. Northeast wind 7 to 9 mph.

Tonight:

Friday:

Saturday:

Sunday:

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

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Precip Chance: 10%

Precip Chance: 5%

Precip Chance: 10%

Precip Chance: 20%

Precip Chance: 20%

49 / 29

53 / 31

56 / 31

52 / 33

28

Tonight we will see mostly cloudy skies with a slight chance of snow, overnight low of 25 degrees. North wind at 6 mph. The record low temperature for tonight is 13 set in 1966. Friday, skies will be partly cloudy with a high temperature of 47, humidity of 65%. East wind 10 to 13 mph. Skies will be mostly cloudy Friday night with an overnight low of 27. East wind 7 mph.

Tonight: Precip Chance: 20%

City

Hi

ABERDEEN ANACORTES BELLINGHAM BREMERTON CENTRALIA CHENEY ENUMCLAW EPHRATA EVERETT KENNEWICK LONG BEACH LONGVIEW LYNDEN MOSES LAKE NEWPORT OCEAN SHORES OLYMPIA PORT ANGELES PUYALLUP RICHLAND SEATTLE SHELTON SPOKANE SUNNYSIDE TACOMA VANCOUVER WENATCHEE YAKIMA

55 48 51 49 53 46 52 52 53 55 48 53 51 52 46 53 54 46 53 56 52 52 46 55 53 50 53 52

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Monday:

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Precip Chance: 10% Precip Chance: 10%

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56 / 30

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Cle Elum 47/27

Tacoma 53/36 Olympia Ellensburg 54/35 49/29

Mt. Adams Yakima River at Ellensburg Latest Level Flood Stage Tomorrow 31.52 35.5 31.45

UV Index Scale 0-2: Low, 3-5: Moderate, 6-7: High, 8-10: Very High, 11+: Extreme Exposure

www.WhatsOurWeather.com

Wenatchee 53/34 Moses Lake 52/36

Otilio Herrera wants to be an auto mechanic, or maybe work with air conditioning units. The 50-year-old lost his job as a boilerman when Snokist Growers declared bankruptcy late last year, and has been looking for work ever since. He’s married and has two kids, one in college in Seattle and one finishing up at Davis High School. Without his job at Snokist, where he worked for 23 years and earned $17 an hour, Herrera is relying on unemployment benefits as his only income. “Unemployment isn’t a lot to be able to live on,” he said. Herrera was one of about 60 workers attending an information session Wednesday to learn about special benefits under a Trade Adjustment Assistance grant obtained for Snokist workers by the Washington State Labor Council. The grant, through the U.S. Department of Labor, provides up to $20,000 per person for education or job training for workers who have lost their jobs to foreign competition.

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Ritzville 49/31

How strong have thunderstorm winds ever been without evidence of a tornado?

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ANCHORAGE ATLANTA BOISE BOSTON CHICAGO DENVER HONOLULU HOUSTON

30 77 61 70 64 73 81 83

20 58 42 47 53 41 70 61

35 74 66 58 61 76 81 83

17 51 40 42 47 44 68 63

636353.03.20.12.cnr

Obstetrics

627773 03.06.12 GP

(USPS 1737-60)

Tyler Miller Publisher tmiller@kvnews.com

Published daily except Sundays, July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s by Kittitas County Publishing Co., 401 N. Main, Ellensburg, Washington 98926. Periodical postage paid in Ellensburg, Washington. Postmaster send address correction to 401 N. Main St., Ellensburg, WA 98926-3107

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A politically independent newspaper, published by Kittitas County Publishing LLC.

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This map shows high temperatures, type of precipitation expected and location of frontal systems at noon.

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Warm Front

OLYMPIA

Deadline to remove studded tires extended to April 16 The Washington Transportation Department has extended the deadline to remove studded tires to April 16. The department says it wants to accommodate Easter weekend drivers who may encounter winter driving conditions in Cascade passes. Typically, studded tires are legal in Washington from the beginning of November to the end of March, but they have to be removed because of damage to highways and bridge decks.

ELLENSBURG

The Western Art Association’s 40th show is May 18-20 The Western Art Association’s 40th annual National Art Show and Auction is planned May 18-20 in Ellensburg, and organizers are looking forward to the event, said coordinator JoAnn Wise. Wise said misinformation was being circulated by email and through a fake Inter-

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net site. The show is not canceled, she said. “In fact, we’re looking forward to the biggest and the best Western Art Association show this year,” she said. “After 40 years, we certainly aren’t going to cancel our anniversary show.” The show features quick draws and demonstrations by western artists, and a live auction. The show’s website is westernartassociation.org and the email is waa@ fairpoint.net. Call 962-2934 or visit the Goodey Gallery at 309 N. Pearl St. for more information.

TACOMA

Anonymous donor gives money to clean Tacoma Dome roof

An anonymous donor has given the City of Tacoma money to clean the Tacoma Dome roof. The News Tribune reported the donation covers up to $103,835 and the work must be completed by May 8. City spokesman Rob McNair-Huff said crews will begin cleaning Monday. The mayor said the gift shows how much people of Tacoma care about the community. —staff and wire reports

THE BLOTTER Sponsored by: Police report Kittcom received the following calls from March 21-22 (calls are made to both the 911 emergency line and the non-emergency business line):

The finest in collision repair.

skateboarding on Dean Nicholson Boulevard.

A dead Pomeranian reportedly was in front of a residence near Ronald.

An Ellensburg resident

A loud scream reportedly

reportedly received harassing phone calls from a collections company that is looking for the person who used to have the same cell phone number.

was heard at Central Washington University.

A prescription for Fentanyl reportedly was stolen on Manitoba Avenue.

A person reported that there was a disagreement over payment of boarding horses on Hemingston Road.

A trailer and two houses

A gas pilot light reportedly was A person reportedly was unable to close a window on the second floor of a building on North Chestnut Street.

A man in a gray hoodie reportedly stole several electronics from a store on South Main Street.

A vacuum reportedly was stolen on South Pearl Street.

Loud music and loud bass reportedly were vibrating a person’s residence on Manitoba Avenue.

A man reportedly was unable to access his property on Sixth Street through an alley because a vehicle has been blocking it for three or four years. reported on Third Avenue.

Fire calls Fire and ambulance crews responded to the following calls from March 21-22: A 27-year-old Ellensburg man reportedly was having a diabetic problem.

A 20-year-old man reportedly was having convulsions in Ellensburg.

out on Tacoma Avenue.

reportedly were burglarized on Stevens Road. with snowmobile trailers reportedly went through a locked gate on Manastash Road.

stumbling before she got into the driver’s seat of a vehicle on Fifth Avenue.

Two men reportedly were

A 30-year-old Ellensburg man reportedly had a headache due to tooth pain.

Smoke reportedly was coming from a business on U.S. Highway 97.

Arrests The following people were booked into Kittitas County Jail from March 21-22: A 24-year-old Yakima woman was arrested by Ellensburg police officers for third-degree theft and obstructing a public servant. She was booked and released.

A person on West Second Street in Cle Elum reported that he is having issues with his neighbors shooting things at his vehicle and setting off its alarm.

A stalled vehicle was

716 Manitoba Ave., Ellensburg (509) 925-3151

DAILY RECORD

LOS ANGELES 65 MIAMI 82 MINNEAPOLIS 68 NEW YORK CITY 71 PHOENIX 86 PORTLAND, OR. 50 SAN FRANCISCO 59 WASHINGTON, D.C. 81

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The drivers of three trucks

Primary care in family medicine and obstetrics

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people to feel overwhelmed, says Bill Messenger, a program administrator with the Labor Council who helped oversee Snokist’s grant application. “Most people, I think, would rather work; they don’t want to sit out or go back to school,” he said. “It’s a transition, and it’s an uncomfortable transition for most people.” Snokist has been around since 1903 and was once a fruit powerhouse in the Yakima Valley, but declared bankruptcy in December amid a pile of debt and food safety problems cited by the Food and Drug Administration. While the layoffs were a shock, Herrera feels his prospects are good: He has experience as a mechanic and repairman, and says finding a job won’t be a problem. But to be eligible for higher pay, he plans to seek better training through WorkSource and take advantage of the grant money. The grant money can be used at any school or training program, and WorkSource staff will meet with each Snokist worker to help them enroll in English classes, GED classes or any other desired schooling, as well as training in any field they wish to pursue, such as being a teacher’s assistant or an electrician. Messenger said he was encouraged by Wednesday’s turnout; each class was full. The workers were most anxious about finances, asking question after question to ensure they’ll still receive their unemployment checks if they enroll in training, and about how much training or school they could get with the grant.

Women’s Health

Friday

Saturday

Answer: The highest recorded thunderstorm wind ever clocked was 149.5 mph.

The Valley Clinic Pediatrics

Last 4/13

High: 89° in Valdosta, Ga. Low: 8° in Alamosa, Colo.

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Sunnyside Kennewick 55/35 55/36

Grant helps former Snokist workers The grant, which is given in services, not cash, also includes money to help workers relocate for a job, as well as subsidized health insurance options. Snokist worked closely with the Labor Council to complete the detailed application process and secure the benefits for its approximately 650 unemployed workers. Officials said Snokist faced competition from canneries in China and Latin America, where wages are lower. On Wednesday, staff from WorkSource Yakima held four meetings at Yakima Valley Community College for the company’s Spanish speakers, providing an overview of the services they can now access. WorkSource is a publicprivate venture of employment and training groups. The workers, who were members of the Capenters Industrial Council union, were eager to hear about their options, but not everyone was convinced the program was for them. “It all depends. Not everyone has the same ability to learn,” said Ana Bodinas, 55, who was a machine operator at Snokist for 20 years. With so much information all at once, it’s normal for

Full 4/6

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US Extremes

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Yakima River at Cle Elum Latest Level Flood Stage Tomorrow 8.40 9.0 8.32

UV Index

Moon Phases

City

River Levels

Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; fl/flurries; pc/partly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy

By MOLLY ROSBACH YAKIMA HERALD-REPUBLIC

Friday

Mt. Rainier

Yakima 52/32

5 mph

Recorded at Ellensburg

Across The Nation Chelan 50/35

Seattle 52/39

Average wind speed yesterday

Yesterday’s Temperatures & Precipitation High Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Low Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Normal High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Normal Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Record High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 in 1940 Record Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 in 1935 Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00" Tomorrow's Moon Information Moonrise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6:39 a.m. Moonset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:55 p.m.

Ellensburg Regional Forecast

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Cle Elum Almanac

Friday:

Mostly Cloudy

Peak gust for past 24 hours

Tomorrow's Sun Information Sunrise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:00 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:19 p.m.

Cle Elum Forecast

Cle Elum:

NEWVIVW934NM

Monday:

Wind Conditions

Yesterday’s Temperatures & Precipitation High Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Low Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Normal High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Normal Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Record High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 in 1915 Record Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 in 1913 Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.00"

A 20-year-old Turlock, Calif.,

A woman reportedly was

CARRIER DELIVERY

1 month ..................$11.25 3 months.................$33.75 6 months.................$66.00 12 months ............$132.00 EZ Pay ..............$9.65/mo.

MOTOR ROUTE

1 month ..................$11.75 3 months.................$35.25 6 months.................$69.00 12 months ............$138.00 EZ Pay ............$10.15/mo.

MAIL DELIVERY

In-Depth Forecast

Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

KITTITAS COUNTY

1 month ..................$15.75 3 months.................$47.25 6 months.................$94.50 12 months ............$189.00

OUT OF COUNTY

1 month ..................$20.75 3 months.................$62.25 6 months...............$124.50 12 months ............$249.00

CURRENT PRICES BECAME EFFECTIVE MARCH 1, 2011

man was arrested by Ellensburg police officers for thirddegree theft. Bail $500. News, Ad and Circulation telephone: (509) 925-1414 Fax: (509) 925-5696. E-mail letters to letters@kvnews.com. Business Hours: 8 am-5 pm Monday-Friday

ALL RATES ARE BASED ON PAYMENT IN ADVANCE.


Local

Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

Thursday, March 22, 2012 - A3

Out with the old, in with the new

Second reading

The lead paragraph in a front-page story in Wednesday’s Daily Record should have said the Ellensburg City Council conducted second reading and adoption of the ordinance amending the highway commercial zone.

Old Canyon Road Subway demolished; New store to open in four to six weeks By JUSTIN PITTMAN staff writer Crews with Belsaas and Smith Construction demolished the old Subway restaurant building on Canyon Road Tuesday, and a new, two-story Subway building is expected to open on the site in about four to six weeks. Work began on Subway’s new building after Labor Day last year, and the old building closed its doors for the last time Monday. Subway Regional Manager Josh Jorgensen said construction crews still need to finish pouring concrete for sidewalks and connecting sewer, water and electrical systems to the building. The new building’s second story will feature nice views, Jorgensen said, and the new building also will include larger restrooms and an enlarged kitchen to improve drive-through efficiency. The Ellensburg Subway at the south interchange has been considered one of the chain’s highest volume locations in Washington. When combined with the Subway in the Love’s truck stop at Ellensburg’s west interchange and the Subway on University Way, local sales have consistently ranked in the top 10 percent in Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho. “It’s always been a very good spot,” Jorgensen said, and he expects business will only improve with developments like the area’s newly opened Carl’s Jr. and proposed developments like a water park and outlet mall.

CORRECTION

EVENTS CALENDAR Submit events to the Daily Record through the online calendar at www.dailyrecordnews.com or by email to newsroom@kvnews.com. Events in this column are listed on a space-available basis.

Today, March 22 Ellensburg Toastmasters meeting, 5:15 p.m., Hal Holmes Community Center, 209 N. Ruby St.

Zumba Gold, 6:30 p.m., Stage Brian Myrick / Daily Record

A crew with Belsaas and Smith Construction cleans up debris after demolition of the old Subway sandwich shop at the corner of Umptanum and Canyon roads in Ellensburg on Tuesday. The demolition will make way for a parking lot to serve the new Subway building next door which will open in four to six weeks.

Door Dance Studio, 200 N. Pine St.

Friday, March 23 Zumba, 7 a.m., Stage Door Dance, 200 N. Pine St.

Kittitas County commissioners meeting, lodging tax, 10 a.m., Kittitas County Courthouse

Saturday, March 24

State rolls out online wolf reporting system By MIKE JOHNSTON senior writer The state Department of Fish and Wildlife has a new online system for the public to report information about the state’s growing wolf population, according to a news release. Anyone who believes they have seen a wolf, heard one howl, or found other evidence of wolves anywhere in the state is encouraged to file a report on WDFW’s website at http://wdfw.wa.gov/ conservation/gray_wolf/ reporting/. Donny Martorello, the wildlife department’s carnivore section manager, said the information will help wildlife managers document wolf activity and build a database on wolves in Washington. “Our state’s wolfmanagement efforts depend on knowing how many wolves are here, where they are, and where they’re going,” Martorello said in the release. “By filing reports on wolf activities, the public can help us direct our monitoring efforts.” The online system for wolf activities does not replace the phone line livestock owners can call to reach the state Department of Fish and Wildlife’s enforcement office if they suspect that wolves are preying on their livestock. In those cases, livestock owners can call 1-877-9339847 or reach local wildlife department enforcement officers through the Washington State Patrol, according to the release. Virtually absent from the state for more than 70 years, gray wolves are now dispersing into Eastern Washington and the North Cascades from adjacent populations in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and British Columbia. During spring and summer, state wildlife managers will use citizen reports to help locate new wolf packs and pups, Martorello said. As part of that effort, they will capture and fit wolves with radio collars to monitor their movements.

If you report Those who file a wolfactivity report using the new online system are asked to provide their name and other identi-

fying information, along with an account of their observations. An interactive map allows users to determine and log the latitude and longitude of the activities they have observed. “The online system has some real advantages when it comes to gathering and correlating information from throughout the state,” said Martorello, noting that it also holds promise as an educational tool. By early summer, the site will include a map displaying areas of the state where wolf activity has been reported, he said.

More wolves In a field survey conducted last summer, the state wildlife department confirmed the presence of five wolf packs in Washington, and observed at least 27 members of those packs, including three successful breeding pairs. Wildlife biologists believe there also is growing evidence of unconfirmed packs near Kettle Falls in northeastern Washington, in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington and in the North Cascades, as well as transient, single wolves. Gray wolves are listed as endangered under state law throughout Washington, and under federal law in the western two-thirds of the state. Under the state’s wolf conservation and management plan, adopted late last year, wolves will be removed from the state’s endangered species list once 15 successful breeding pairs are documented for three consecutive years among three wolf-recovery regions (four pairs in Eastern Washington, four pairs in North Cascades, four pairs in South Cascades/Northwest Coast, and three pairs in any recovery region). The plan also gives WDFW the option to initiate action to delist gray wolves if 18 breeding pairs are documented in a single year. Under that option, at least four pairs must be in Eastern Washington, four pairs in North Cascades, four pairs in South Cascades/Northwest Coast, and six additional pairs in any recovery region.

Chick Days, 9 a.m., Arnold’s Ranch and Home, 615 S. Main St.

Sippin’ for the Seven: Wine, beer and cider tasting to benefit Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest, 5-8 p.m., NWI building in Roslyn

Monday, March 26 Art After School, 3 p.m., Gallery One, 408 N. Pearl St.

Weight watchers, 6:30 p.m. weigh-in, 7 p.m. meeting, Upper County Centennial Center, 719 E. Third St., Cle Elum

Zumba Gold, 6:45 p.m., Stage Door Dance Studio, 200 N. Pine St. Brian Myrick / Daily Record

Al-Anon, 7 p.m., Community of Christ church, 306 N. Anderson St.

Carter Niemeyer, at left, measures the distance between bite marks during a necropsy on a domestic sheep performed as part of the WDFW depredation training last week. He concluded the sheep was killed by a cougar.

Ellensburg Women’s

PREDATORS

Tuesday, March 27

Continued from Page A1

Free food distribution

Niemeyer began his wildlife career with the federal government in the mid-1970s and has worked as a federal predator damage control officer who trapped and removed problem wolves from rural areas. He’s also done numerous investigations on livestock deaths by predators and has led the wolf recovery program for the federal government in the Northern Rockies. He started giving training sessions in 1989.

Renewed emphasis Niemeyer is now retired and has written a book on his wolf experiences entitled “Wolfer.” Although last week’s training focused on state Fish and Wildlife department personnel, the CWU session attracted other wildlife-related employees from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Yakama Nation and Colville, Nez Pierce and Umatilla tribes. Niemeyer gave similar state-sponsored, daylong sessions last week in

Spokane and Ephrata. He was only paid for his travel expenses and costs for three days on the road. This kind of training was last given by Niemeyer to local-area wildlife personnel about five years ago, according to Steve Pozzanghera, the state wildlife department’s Region 1 director based in Spokane. Region 1 covers 10 counties. “This time we have broader participation with other agencies,” said Pozzanghera who was appointed in January to direct the state’s implementation of its wolf recovery plan.

Wolf packs grow Although the training focused on four types of predators and other ways livestock can die in the field, Pozzanghera said there’s a renewed emphasis on accurately investigating all livestock kills as wolf packs in the state grow in number. “We know there are lots of concerns, lots of interest about wolf recovery,” he said earlier this week. “It’s been a driver in sponsoring more of this kind of

Chorus, 7 p.m., EHS choir Room A102

training.” The training emphasized that investigators must keep an open mind in examining the facts around an unwitnessed livestock kill or death. Livestock can also die from age and other natural causes, during birthing or acts of cruel vandalism, he said. He said sometimes evidence from predator attacks can be confused with wolf activity, especially if wolves have been seen in the surrounding area. “And we can never forget or minimize the fact that this is a traumatic event for the livestock owner, whether it’s a calf from a big or small ranching operation, 4-H sheep or the family pet,” Pozzanghera said. “It’s a loss, all the way around, and we must always recognize the impact.” He said the state wildlife department will take the lead in investigating predator or suspected wolfrelated livestock attacks, but a team approach will be taken. Federal agencies also will be called in to investigate.

event (including beef), noon-2 p.m., Washington Cattlemen’s Association office parking lot, 1301 N. Dolarway Road

Art After School, 3 p.m., Gallery One, 408 N. Pearl St.

TOPS weight loss group, 3:30-5 p.m., Chestnut Street Baptist Church, 609 N. Chestnut St.

Weight Watchers, 5 p.m. weigh-in, 5:30 p.m. meeting, Adult Activity Center, 506 S. Pine St.

Thorp School Board, regular meeting, 6:30 p.m., Thorp School

Raised-bed gardening workshop, 7 p.m., Upper County Centennial Center, 719 E. Third St.

Overeaters anonymous, 7 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 1307 E. Third Ave.

Zumba, 7:30 p.m., Stage Door Dance, 200 N. Pine St.

Kiwanis bingo, 6:45 p.m. to 9 p.m., Moose Lodge

Singing Hills Barbershop Chorus, 7:30 p.m., Adult Activity Center, 506 S. Pine St.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY March 22 Allie Kopczynski

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A4 - Thursday, March 22, 2012

DAILY RECORD Local news serving Ellensburg, Cle Elum, Roslyn, Kittitas, Easton, Suncadia and all of Kittitas County. www. dailyrecordnews.com

Est. 1909

PUBLISHER TYLER MILLER MANAGING EDITOR JOANNA MARKELL ASSISTANT EDITOR MICHAEL GALLAGHER

IN OUR VIEW

No excuse for criminal behavior

H

ow much is too much when it comes to political debate: Spreading rumors? Twisting the facts in campaign ads? Name calling? Throwing a punch? What about vandalizing someone’s car and spray-painting insults on it? That happened to Central Washington Tea Party leader Kirk Groenig last month. His 1994 Jaguar XJ6 had its windows broken out, and tires and upholstery slashed. Insults were spray painted on the hood and doors. He called the incident a hate crime in a news release to the media on Tuesday. The Kittitas County Sheriff’s Office has been investigating. Groenig is a conservative activist and an outspoken opponent of gay marriage and illegal immigration. A week before the incident, he submitted Web comments to another newspaper about the Democratic Party leadership and gay marriage legislation. He has received hateful phone calls and letters in the past. Groenig certainly has his detractors, but it isn’t appropriate or legal to threaten a person and destroy property. Vandalism is a crime, simply put. The First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution gives people the right of free speech. Whatever the motivation, and no matter how much two people might disagree, it’s not permissible to break the law.

Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

Daily Forum

The real climate change hoax story W

e are scientists who agree with critics such as Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., that there is a climate change “hoax” being perpetrated on the American people. We just don’t agree on what the hoax is and who is being fooled. Sen. Inhofe and his associates want us to believe that the science of climate change is the contrived “hoax.” Their claims cannot withstand even the most cursory scrutiny. Does this “hoax” date back to 1896, when Nobel Laureate Svante Arrhenius presented his findings that human activities releasing carbon dioxide to the atmosphere could change Earth’s climate? Did it start when scientists Charles Keeling and Roger Revelle demonstrated in the 1950s that a large part of the carbon dioxide released from the burning of coal, oil and gas was remaining in the atmosphere because the oceans couldn’t absorb it fast enough? Did an evil cabal of “warmists” trick a science advisory panel into warning President Lyndon Johnson in 1965 of the dangers of adding greenhouses gases to the atmosphere?

GUEST COLUMN Andrew J. Gunther and James J. McCarthy Union of Concerned Scientists In 2009, the National Academies of Science of the world’s major industrialized nations (including China, India and Brazil) issued an unprecedented joint statement on the reality of climate change and the need for immediate action. Do those who claim climate change is a hoax expect us to believe this was a put on by an international bunch of con men with doctoral degrees? The U.S. Evangelical Environmental Network tells us that global warming is one of the major challenges of our time, and Pope Benedict XVI has called for coordinated global action to address dangers of climate change — have they too joined the conspiracy? Of course not. The real hoax is the claim that a scientific debate exists about the reality of climate change. It is promoted by organizations

that benefit from our current energy choices and groups that are opposed to any regulation whatsoever, even the most sensible safeguards that help protect our children’s health. The hoaxers claim climate scientists are “in it for the money,” a ludicrous proposition as pointed out by Jon Koomey. Dr. Koomey used his expertise in mathematical modeling to study the economic impacts of climate change for two decades at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. If Koomey and his colleagues were in it for the money they would have taken their analytic expertise to Wall Street long ago, where their salaries would have been five to 10 times what they can make working for the government. The hyped rhetoric around this issue is an attempt to convince Americans that accepting the scientific evidence will require taking actions inimical to our shared values of liberty, freedom, community and entrepreneurship. But one need look no further than the studies of America’s military and intelligence officials who understand how disruptive

human-caused climate change could be to our nation’s interests both at home and abroad (in 2009 the CIA established a Center on Climate Change and National Security). Putting our head in the sand about climate change is a sure way to undermine American liberty, economic prosperity and national security. Of all the alterative paths before us to address this problem, doing nothing to reduce the threat of serious climate change is a dangerous and expensive option. There’s a climate change hoax all right, but it is Sen. Inhofe and his science-denying associates who are trying to do the fooling. We are all going to pay a price if we don’t call-out their campaign of misinformation and get down to the real work before us. The question now is what will be the cost of inaction to our health and our pocketbooks? The longer the hoaxers can prevent serious action, the higher the price we will all pay. Andrew J. Gunther and James J. McCarthy are scientists who sit on the Board of Directors of the Union of Concerned Scientists.

TWO CARTOON VIEWPOINTS MALLARD FILLMORE

By Bruce Tinsley

Letters

DOONESBURY

By Garry Trudeau

Civil discourse

One question is how civic discussions dissolved to a point of criminal behavior in this county. It’s an extreme jump, and one that is concerning. It’s hard to speculate whether this is a sign of a bigger problem in Kittitas County. We’ve written before about civil discourse in the community, and we occasionally notice a break-down in manners at meetings and other public forums. Tempers flare at times, but it’s not the norm. In a Daily Record survey in February 2011, 85 percent of local respondents said debates and discussions at the local level are mostly civil. A total of 63 percent said local political races are mostly civil. Last year we interviewed a local professional mediator who said the casual nature of today’s culture may contribute to incivility. People might not think twice about typing a vitriolic message on Facebook, and might not understand how to behave in a formal public settings. It’s not a good excuse — playing nicely with others is something that is taught before kindergarten. Name calling, rumor spreading and lying aren’t allowed in kindergarten, either. Politics is a rough game, and it can be even more tough at a local level where people have to live in the same town. The key is to remember that we all live in the same town.

Have a thumb?

If you have an idea for a thumb (up or down) contact Joanna Markell at 925-1414 or via email at jmarkell@kvnews.com. A thumbs form is available at www.dailyrecordnews.com under the opinion category.

Editorial Board

The Daily Record Editorial Board works together to debate issues before jointly forming an opinion that stands as the viewpoint of the Daily Record as a newspaper. Members of the Editorial Board: ■ Publisher Tyler Miller ■ Managing Editor Joanna Markell ■ Assistant Editor Michael Gallagher Community members: ■ Nancy Clarke ■ Tedd Hansen

WE CAN HEAR YOU In Your View letters to the editor must include a name, address and telephone number. Each letter must have a single author. We request that letters be limited to 400 words and reserve the right to edit letters. Only one letter per person, per calendar month. Thank you letters will not be published. Send Letters to Assistant Editor Michael Gallagher at the Daily Record, 401 N. Main St., Ellensburg, WA 98926, or e-mail to letters@kvnews. com. E-mailed or typewritten letters are appreciated.

Guest columns

A tough decision on Doonesbury O A T he Daily Record didn’t run last week’s Doonesbury comics strips about abortion and a 2011 Texas law that forces women to undergo an ultrasound before they can get an abortion. We weren’t the only ones, and it’s been a hot topic in newsrooms across the country. We’ve received two thoughtful responses from readers objecting to our decision. We’ll probably receive more on both sides after this runs. Publisher Tyler Miller, Assistant Editor Michael Gallagher and I had a long conversation about the strips before they were slated to appear, and we went back and forth several times before coming to a conclusion. It wasn’t an easy decision, and I can see both sides of the issue. Our concern wasn’t the subject matter. While our editorial board doesn’t usually take positions on national issues such as abortion, the topic frequently is debated in letters to the editor. It is a subject that should be discussed in newspapers, and I think the Doonesbury strips are encouraging a broader discussion across the nation about abortion and political satire. The story line focuses on a woman who goes to an abortion clinic and is confronted by men who try to shame her into changing her mind, including

UT AND BOUT

Joanna Markell managing editor

a male state legislator and a doctor who reads a message from Gov. Rick Perry of Texas. We’re running the first panel (see below) to give you an idea. Mandated pre-abortion ultrasounds also have been under debate in Virginia and Idaho. Our issue with the Doonesbury comics was the language and graphic images presented in some of the panels. We also were concerned the Thursday strip made light of rape. Doonesbury doesn’t shy away from controversial topics, and it’s why readers love and hate the cartoon. We run Doonesbury and Mallard Fillmore on the editorial page for a reason. A strip that has one reader chuckling out loud may inspire someone else to spit out her coffee in disgust. Our editorial board doesn’t always agree with everything that is printed on the editorial page. (We also don’t always agree with each other). If we can’t figure out why someone holds the ideas they have, we’ll never find any

common ground. At the same time, we try to do what’s best for our general readership, and that was a major part of last week’s decision on Doonesbury. We also know that the strips are widely available on the Internet and in other publications (www.doonesbury.com). If you agree or disagree with our decision, we’d like to hear your opinion. Write a letter to letters@ kvnews.com.

More on language Language can be a tough issue, and some words have loaded meaning. We quoted a derogatory term for tea party members in a news story on Tuesday after local conservative activist Kirk Groenig’s car was vandalized and spray painted with the insult. In this case, we felt we needed to use the word to explain the incident and why Groenig sees it as a hate crime. The phrase is offensive to some, and tossed around loosely by others. It’s not a word we would normally allow in print, but we felt it was a part of the story in this case. Sometimes running a newspaper is a crash course in contradictions and inconsistency. It certainly has felt that way this past week. Joanna Markell can be reached at jmarkell@kvnews.com.

Columns must be approved by the Daily Record prior to publication. Guest columns should be close to 600 words and should include a headshot photograph. The Daily Record views this page as a public forum for community discussion. We do not publish views that are hateful or preposterous, and we do not publish petitions or solicitations.

News items Other ways to interact with the Daily Record besides the Daily Forum page can often meet your needs. Clubs, organizations and individuals can send news and most any written material and photographs for Scrapbook. We also run engagements, weddings, births, birthdays, and anniversaries. Call (509) 925-1414 or e-mail announcements@kvnews. com. Obituaries and death notices:obits@ kvnews.com. Local page briefs: Mike Johnston at mjohnston @ kvnews.com. News tips and feedback are welcomed. Call (509) 925-1414 or e-mail Managing Editor Joanna Markell at jmarkell@kvnews. com.


Local and Region

Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

OBITUARY DON A. ZETZSCHE

Don A. Zetzsche, 69, of Ronald passed away March 16, 2012, in Ellensburg after a lengthy illness. He is survived by his wife, Sharon (Ekiss) Rusch, Ronald; son, Shannon, Marysville, Tenn.; brother, Jerry, Cle Elum; stepmother, Barbara Wehr, Seattle; stepsister, Carole Jenny, Arizona; stepbrothers, David Hopkins, Kansas; Timothy Hopkins, Washington; four grandchildren; stepson, Kenny Rusch, Ellensburg; and numerous other stepchildren and step-grandchildren; also many nieces, nephews and cousins. He was preceded in death by his parents, Edmond and Gloria Zetzsche, and grandparents, Will and Bertha Zetzsche. Don was born Nov. 8, 1942, in Ellensburg to Edmond and Gloria Zetzsche. He was schooled in Ellensburg, graduating in 1961 from Ellensburg High School. He also obtained a USAFI degree in June of 1967. Don joined the Marines in 1962 and served in the Marine Corps Air Wing in Vietnam. He left the Marines with an honorable discharge in December 1968. He received the National Defense medal, Vietnam Service medal, Vietnam Campaign medal and a Good Conduct medal. Don retired in June 2001, as an air traffic controller for the Federal Aviation Administration working in the tower at the Orange County airport in Orange, Calif. While working for the FAA, he joined the Air National Guard and retired from that organization as a Master Sergeant. Don spent most of his adult life in California but returned to the Kittitas Valley when he and Sharon were married Aug. 9, 2002. Don enjoyed solving crossword puzzles, reading, working on his Jeeps and spending time with family and friends. Funeral services will be held May 18, 2012, at 2:15 p.m. at Tahoma National Cemetery 18600 S.E. 240th St., Kent. Though no funeral service is planned locally, a celebration of his life will be held on May 19, 2012, at 2 p.m., at the home he shared with his wife, Sharon, on Lake Cle Elum, address: 310 Sandelin Lane, Ronald. Donations may be made to Hospice Friends, in care of Affordable Funeral Care 101 E. Second Ave. Ellensburg, WA 98926. Affordable Funeral Care is entrusted with arrangements.

LOTTERIES Wednesday lotteries: Daily Game: 8-5-0 Hit 5: 04-06-15-22-33. Estimated jackpot: $130,000. Lotto: 01-14-18-22-4049. Estimated jackpot: $7.4 million Match 4: 13-17-20-24 Powerball: 32-43-53-5556, Powerball: 6. jackpot: $70 million

Thursday, March 22, 2012 - A5

State unemployment drops

CHEMULT, ORE.

Washington jobless rate down to 8.2 percent

Mudslide halts Amtrak train

unemployment benefits will likely be reduced from 99 to 73 in April because federal benefits-extension programs are triggered by states’ unemployment rates. The state added an estimated 4,200 jobs from January to February, federal numbers show. The state saw a total gain of 54,900 jobs from February 2011 to February 2012. The state has added jobs four months in a row, and in 17 of the past 18 months, officials said. Dave Wallace, a department economist, said the state’s February numbers

OLYMPIA (AP) — The state’s unemployment rate dropped to 8.2 percent last month, an improvement that likely will shorten the number of weeks people can receive unemployment benefits. The new rate for February was down from a revised rate of 8.4 percent in January, the state’s Employment Security Department announced Wednesday. February’s jobless rate was the lowest since January 2009, when it was 7.7 percent. Officials said that as a result of the improvement, the maximum weeks of

were “in line with what we’re seeing at the national level.” “It’s not a champagne, popping the cork kind of thing, but it’s a continuation of a trend,” he said. Industries that had the most job growth in Washington last month included leisure and hospitality, construction and retail trade. Leisure and hospitality led all sectors with 2,500 jobs added. Industries that saw the most job losses included government, manufacturing, and financial services. Government lost more jobs than any other sector, down about 1,400.

An estimated 288,000 people in Washington were unemployed and looking for work last month, and about 197,000 claimed unemployment benefits. State officials said that as of last Saturday, more than 76,000 workers in the state had exhausted all unemployment benefits. The highest unemployment rate in February was 14.9 percent in Ferry County in the northeast. Whitman County in the east, home to Washington State University, had the lowest rate at 5.8 percent. King County, the state’s largest county, was at 7.4 percent. The national unemployment rate for February was 8.3 percent.

Emergency contraceptives appeal planned Judge: The way the state’s rules were applied was unconstitutional OLYMPIA (AP) — State officials announced Wednesday they will appeal a federal judge’s ruling that Washington state cannot force pharmacies to sell Plan B or other emergency contraceptives. Gov. Chris Gregoire issued a statement announcing the action, saying she “fully supports” the appeal that will be filed by the office of Attorney General Rob McKenna on behalf of the state Department of Health and the state Board of Pharmacy. “Any decision that puts patients at risk by delaying or denying them lawful and lawfully prescribed medications should be carefully

reviewed by a higher court,” Gregoire said in a written statement. Wa s h i n g t o n’s r u l e s require that pharmacies stock and dispense drugs for which there is a demand. The state adopted the dispensing regulations in 2007, following reports that some women had been denied access to Plan B, which has a high dose of medicine found in birthcontrol pills and is effective if a woman takes it within 72 hours of unprotected sex. U.S. District Judge Ronald Leighton said in his ruling last month that the state’s true goal in adopting the rules at issue was not to

promote the timely access to medicine, but to suppress religious objections by druggists who believe that such drugs can have an effect tantamount to abortion. State lawyers argued that the requirements are legal because they apply neutrally to all medicines and pharmacies, and because they promote a government interest — the timely delivery of medicine, including Plan B, which becomes less effective as time passes. But a pharmacy and two pharmacists sued, saying the rules infringed on their religious freedom, and the judge agreed.

Exemptions Leighton, however, noted that the state allows all sorts of business exemptions to

the rules. Pharmacies can decline to stock a drug, such as certain painkillers, if it’s likely to increase the risk of theft, or if it requires an inordinate amount of paperwork, or if the drug is temporarily unavailable from suppliers, among other reasons. His ruling did not strike down Washington’s stocking and dispensing rules for pharmacies, but said simply that the way they were applied to the plaintiffs in this case was unconstitutional. The state remains free to try to enforce the law against other pharmacies that violated the stocking and dispensing rules, whether for Plan B or other drugs. The appeal of his ruling has been filed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Anti-gay marriage group to boycott Starbucks OLYMPIA (AP) — A national group opposed to gay marriage called Wednesday for a boycott of Starbucks in response to the company’s public support of a new samesex marriage law in Washington state. Following a shareholders’ meeting of the Seattle-based coffee giant on Wednesday, the Washington, D.C.-based National Organization for Marriage announced a “Dump Starbucks” protest. The group says it will place ads throughout the country, as well as in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, urging consumers to boycott the company. The group is supporting a referendum effort to overturn a recently passed law legalizing same-sex marriage in Washington. “We will not tolerate an international company attempting to force its misguided values on citizens,” said the group’s president, Brian Brown, in a written statement announcing the boycott. Phone and email messages left with Starbucks

seeking comment on the threatened boycott were not immediately returned on Wednesday. CEO Howard Schultz defended the company’s stance on gay marriage during the shareholders’ meeting, saying it was made “in our view, through the lens of humanity, and being the kind of company that embraces diversity.” Schultz received loud applause when he told the group that the decision to support gay marriage was “not something that was a difficult decision for us.” Starbucks is just one of several prominent Pacific Northwest businesses that have expressed their support for same-sex marriage,

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including Microsoft Corp. and Nike Inc. Schultz was asked by three shareholders about the company’s stance, with one asking: “Is it prudent to risk the economic interests of all the shareholders for something that might affect the private lives of a very small percentage of our

employees?” Schultz responded that he believed the success of the company, “which is linked to shareholder value, has a great deal to do with whether or not our people are proud of the company they work for and feel they are part of something larger than themselves.”

IN BRIEF

An Amtrak spokeswoman said a train bound from Los Angeles to Seattle hit a tree lying across the tracks in southern Oregon’s stormy Cascade Mountains, triggering a mudslide that derailed the baggage car and stalled the 246 passengers for hours. Spokeswoman Christina Leeds said no one was injured Wednesday. A freight train engine was dispatched to haul the passenger cars back to the station in Chemult, a small community about 165 miles southeast of Portland. Leeds said passenger cars were without power for several hours. Passengers got sandwiches and beverages as they boarded buses Wednesday evening for the trip to Portland. Among the passengers was Regina Fraser, a cohost of the PBS travel show “Grannies on Safari.” In a brief phone interview she said the passengers’ mood was “very positive” and credited the train crew with helping keep everyone calm.

SEATTLE

Seattle trees to be painted blue for art

A King County arts organization said 56 trees in Seattle and Kenmore will be painted blue starting April 2 in a temporary art project. 4Culture says volunteers will paint 16 trees at Seattle’s Westlake Park and 40 trees along the Burke-Gillman bike trail. The group said “The Blue Trees” is intended to make people more aware of global deforestation. The project will use a water-based paint that will slowly allow the trees to revert back to their natural color. — Associated Press

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Sports

A6

Wednesday baseball twinbill postponed Central Washington University’s baseball doubleheader with Whitworth, scheduled for Wednesday, was postponed due to inclement weather in the Spokane area. The teams have agreed to make it up at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 10, CWU announced Wednesday. The Wildcats will take a six-game winning streak into a four-game Great Northwest Athletic Conference home series against 22nd-ranked Western Oregon. The teams will play doubleheaders at 1 p.m. Saturday and noon Sunday. — staff report

PEORIA, Ariz. (AP) — Forget the outing Wednesday, Felix Hernandez declared he was primed for his next start, on opening day. Hernandez was roughed up for eight runs in the Seattle Mariners’ final game in Arizona this spring, a 13-8 loss to the Chicago White Sox. “They hit everything I threw,” Hernandez said. “I feel strong. I'm ready. I threw 92 pitches and got my work in, and I'm ready to go 120 or whatever.” The Mariners leave for Japan Thursday and will play two exhibition games there before a two-game regular-season series against the Oakland Athletics on March 28-29. “It's time to be serious,” Hernandez said.

White Sox 13, Mariners 8 Saturday: Seattle at Hanshin Tigers (exhibition), 8 p.m. Wednesday: Seattle vs. Oakland in Tokyo, 3 a.m. (ROOT) Hernandez had dominated hitters all spring, posting a 1.38 ERA before Wednesday's start. He gave up seven earned runs and 10 hits in five innings, struck out four, walked one and hit a batter. “Sometimes it's good to get some of that stuff out of the way while we're down here before it counts,”

Wedge said. “Everybody's anxious and anticipating tomorrow, and we had a lot of meetings about Japan this morning.” Ichiro Suzuki had two hits, including a solo homer. For the White Sox, Brent Lillibridge hit two doubles off Hernandez. Alexei Ramirez went 3-for-4 with three RBI. The Mariners had 38 players in camp Wednesday but will take 30 to Japan. They will play two exhibition games against Japanese teams on Saturday and Monday. The Mariners are expected to bring three Japanese players on the trip — Suzuki, utility infielder Munenori Kawasaki and pitcher Hisashi Iwakuma. Kawasaki likely secured a spot on

the team, playing second and third base and shortstop and hitting .387 this spring. “There's much more to do from here on, and that's what I look forward to doing,” he said. Suzuki hit his second home run of the spring off left-hander Eric Stults in the first inning. Suzuki is hitting .400 and moved to the third spot in the lineup this spring after batting leadoff nearly all his career. “He's had a great spring,” Wedge said. “He's hitting the ball with authority. We just want him to define that 3 hole, how he sees fit, and it looks like that's what he's doing.” Justin Smoak and Alex Liddi of the Mariners hit doubles.

National Football League

Tim Tebow shipped to Jets for picks

FRIDAY, MARCH 23 High school baseball Interlake at Ellensburg, 4 p.m. High school softball West Valley at Ellensburg, 4 p.m. SATURDAY, MARCH 24 College baseball Western Oregon at Central Washington (DH), 1 p.m. College softball Central Washington at Simon Fraser (DH), 1 p.m. High school baseball Toppenish at Ellensburg (DH), 11 a.m.

$10,000 to any player who knocked then-Vikings QB Favre out of the 2010 NFC championship game. The Saints were flagged for roughing Favre twice in that game, and the league later said they should have received another penalty for a brutal high-low hit from Remi Ayodele and Bobby McCray that hurt Favre's ankle. He was able to finish the game, but the Saints won in overtime en route to the franchise's only Super Bowl. “The bounty thing is completely unprofessional. I'm happy the league has made it known it won't be tolerated,” said left tackle Jordan Gross, Newton's teammate on the Carolina Panthers. “To think that something like that would happen — guys trying to hurt someone to make a few extra bucks — is just appalling.”

NEW YORK (AP) — Tebowmania's headed to New Yo r k , a n d the drama has already started for Jets fans. It began the moment the Jets pulled off the deal for Tim Tebow the Broncos quarterback. Or thought they did. Eight hours and one huge snag later, the trade was on again. But not before the Jets added to the franchise's already lengthy list of embarrassing moments. Sure, Tebowmania is coming to New York, but it certainly wasn't a smooth deal. And it didn't come without some controversy — something this Jets season could be filled with the moment Mark Sanchez struggles and restless fans call for Tebow to replace him. “Mark Sanchez is, has been and will be our starting quarterback,” general manager Mike Tannenbaum said on conference call late Wednesday night. But the Jets have opened themselves — and Sanchez — to added pressure by bringing in Tebow. New York recently signed Sanchez to a three-year contract extension after falling out of the hunt for Peyton Manning, a vote of confidence for a quarterback whose pride took a serious shot at the end of last season as the Jets finished 8-8 and out of the playoffs. Some players questioned his leadership abilities, but Sanchez recently vowed to be the guy the franchise can lean on. Turns out, Rex Ryan's Jets now have two of those guys, including one in Tebow who might automatically be the biggest star in New York right now. Not Sanchez. Not Derek Jeter. Not even Jeremy Lin.

See Saints, Page A7

See Tebow, Page A7

ON TELEVISION

FRIDAY, MARCH 23 Boxing 6 p.m.: Junior middleweights, Antwone Smith (21-31) vs. Roberto Garcia (30-3-0), ESPN2 8 p.m.: Junior welterweights, Yordenis Ugas (11-0-0) vs. Johnny Garcia (11-0-0); super featherweights, Diego Magdaleno (21-0-0) vs. Miguel Beltran Jr. (26-1-0), SHOWTIME GOLF 8 a.m.: European PGA Tour, Trophee Hassan II, second round, GOLF 9:30 a.m.: Champions Tour, Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic, first round, GOLF Noon: PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational, second round, GOLF 3:30 p.m.: LPGA, Kia Classic, second round, GOLF Men’s college basketball 4 p.m.: NCAA, Division I tournament, regional semifinals, doubleheader, Baylor vs. Xavier and Kentucky vs. Indiana, CBS 4:45 p.m.: NCAA, Division I tournament, regional semifinals, doubleheader, North Carolina vs. Ohio and N.C. State vs. Kansas, TBS National Basketball Association 5 p.m.: Boston at Philadelphia, ESPN 7:30 p.m.: Denver at Utah, ESPN Soccer 7 p.m.: MLS, Houston at Seattle, NBC SPORTS

ON THE WEB Like us, follow us Stay current on CWU and Kittitas County sports. Go to Facebook and like Ellensburg Daily Record Sports to get updates before the paper hits your doorstep, and follow us on Twitter @EllensburgDR to receive live score updates from the events we cover.

March 22, 2012

Felix roughed up in final spring start

SCHEDULE

TODAY Golf 3:30 p.m.: LPGA, Kia Classic, first round, GOLF Major League Baseball 4 p.m.: Preseason, N.Y. Yankees vs. Boston, ESPN Men’s college basketball 4 p.m.: NCAA, Division I tournament, regional semifinals, Wisconsin vs. Syracuse and Cincinnati vs. Ohio St., CBS 4:15 p.m.: NCAA, Division I tournament, regional semifinals, doubleheader, Louisville vs. Michigan St. and Florida vs. Marquette, TBS

Thursday

Seattle Mariners

CWU SPORTS SPOKANE

DAILY RECORD

MCT file

New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton is carried off the field after beating Indianapolis in Super Bowl XLIV. Payton has been suspended by the NFL for a year after an investigation into a bounty system that paid defensive players for injuring opposing stars.

SAINTS PUNISHED NFL drops hammer for New Orleans’ bounty pool By HOWARD FENDRICH AP Pro Football Writer

T

he New Orleans Saints’ crush-for-cash bounty system already cost them head coach Sean Payton for all of next season and general manager Mickey Loomis for half of it, plus two second-round draft picks and a $500,000 fine. Former Saints defensive coordinator Gregg Williams, who oversaw and contributed money to the illegal fund, was suspended indefinitely. Unforgiving and unprecedented penalties Wednesday from an NFL determined to rid its sport of hits that aim to knock opponents out of a game. Now Commissioner Roger

Goodell will turn his attention to possible punishments for two dozen or so defensive players the league's investigation found were involved in the extra payouts that he called “particularly unusual and egregious” and “totally unacceptable.” “We are all accountable and responsible for player health and safety and the integrity of the game. We will not tolerate conduct or a culture that undermines those priorities,” said Goodell, whose league faces more than 20 concussion-related lawsuits brought by hundreds of former players. “No one is above the game or the rules that govern it.” The league is reviewing the case with the NFL Play-

ers Association before deciding what to do about players who were part of the Saints' scheme from 2009-11. “While I will not address player conduct at this time, I am profoundly troubled by the fact that players — including leaders among the defensive players — embraced this program so enthusiastically and participated with what appears to have been a deliberate lack of concern for the wellbeing of their fellow players,” Goodell said.

Rodgers, Favre targeted Targeted players included quarterbacks Aaron Rodgers, Cam Newton, Brett Favre and Kurt Warner. “Knockouts” were worth $1,500 and “cartoffs” $1,000, with payments doubled or tripled for the playoffs. According to the league, Saints defensive captain Jonathan Vilma offered

NCAA Division I men’s basketball tournament

In-state rivals’ paths finally intersect again in tourney CINCINNATI (AP) — George Wilson scanned the NCAA tournament bracket quickly, his eyes focusing on the lines that included Cincinnati and Ohio State. He followed them toward the middle of the page to see if they intersected. Yes, they did. In the round of 16. Finally! It's been 50 years since Wilson's Bearcats beat the Buckeyes for the NCAA championship, a moment commemorated by one of two giant banners hanging from a wall behind a basket

in Cincinnati's on-campus arena. Wilson and his teammates were honored at midcourt during halftime of a game this season. Fittingly, the attention is extending to the tournament. “When the brackets came out and I saw there's a possibility it could be at the Sweet 16, I really started thinking about it,” Wilson said, in a phone interview from his home in Cincinnati. “The other night when they won, it was, ‘Oh, oh!’ It came true for the first time in 50 years.”

A lot of folks all around the state will be watching on Thursday night when they go at it again — finally! — in Boston. “Obviously, I'm rooting for Ohio State,” said Jerry Lucas, one of the Buckeyes' former stars. “But I think it'll be a good game.” They've played a few of those. The Final Four was their turf back then. Cincinnati reached the Final Four with Oscar Robertson in 1959 and 1960, finishing third both years.

See Ohio, Page A7

MCT file

Cashmere Wright (1) and the Cincinnati Bearcats will face Ohio State in an NCAA East Region semifinal tonight in Boston.


Sports

Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

Thursday, March 22, 2012 - A7

College Basketball Invitational

Wazzu beats Beavers, advances to CBI final series CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) — Abe Lodwick set career highs with 23 points and 12 rebounds Wednesday to lead Washington State to a 72-55 win against Pac-12 rival Oregon State in a College Basketball Invitational semifinal at Gill Coliseum. Reggie Moore added 22 points for Washington State (18-16). Eric Moreland had 14 points and 11 rebounds for Oregon State (21-15). Washington State advances to the CBI's best-of-three championship against Pittsburgh, which beat Butler 68-62 in overtime in the other semifinal Wednesday.

Motum injured The Cougars played most of the

Cougars 72, Beavers 55 Monday: Washington State (18-16) vs. Pittsburgh (20-16), finals Game 1 (best-of-three series) game without all-conference senior forward Brock Motum, who was helped off the floor less than two minutes in with a right ankle injury. Motum is the conference’s scoring leader, averaging better than 18 points per game. “I thought our guys really rallied, knowing that our first team all-league

OHIO Continued from Page A6 Ohio State beat California 77-55 to win the title in 1960. The Bearcats pulled off what was considered a major upset in 1961, beating Ohio State 70-65 in Kansas City to win the title. A year later, they had a title rematch, this time in Louisville. With Wilson guarding John Havlicek and Lucas playing on a bad leg, Cincinnati won 71-59. Havlicek was only 5-of-14 from the field for 11 points. “When we played Ohio State, my job was to stay with Havlicek,” Wilson said. “I had nothing else to do that night but stay with Havlicek. If he went to get a drink of water, I was supposed to stay with him. He was one of the greatest players ever so if he got the ball, you're in trouble.” Lucas second-guesses his decision to play with an injured left leg, hurt in the semifinal game. He went 5-of-17 for 11 points against Cincinnati, but had 16 rebounds. “I probably shouldn't have played,” Lucas said, in a phone interview. “I was taped from ankle to crotch. I hobbled and played anyway.” Cincinnati reached the title game again in 1963, but blew a 15-point lead and lost to Loyola, Ill., 60-58 in Louisville, ending the Bearcats' run of titles. “We were going to win three in a row until we got to the Loyola fiasco,” Wilson said. A year later, UCLA beat Duke under coach John Wooden, starting its run of domination. UCLA would win nine titles in 10 years. And, remarkably, the two Ohio teams that once dominated were reduced to history. They've played only once in the last 50 years, with Ohio State winning 72-50 in 2006 in a game played in Indianapolis as part of the Wooden Tradition.

guy was down and out for the game,” Washington State coach Ken Bone said. “Our guys were able to manufacture points in different ways. They did a great job. I thought they showed a lot of character, a lot of heart.” Oregon State played without starting guard Ahmad Starks, who sat out with an illness. Lodwick, a senior forward from Bend's Mountain View High School, also recorded his first collegiate double-double. The Cougars finished with a 41-34 rebounding advantage. Washington State led by 10 at halftime and extended that to 49-34 lead on Mike Ladd's offensive rebound and basket with 15:21 left. The Beavers got within 49-40 on

Jared Cunningham’s 3-pointer. The Cougars later went on a 9-0 run — holding Oregon State scoreless for more than five minutes — to go ahead 60-42 on Patrick Simon's 3-pointer with 8:55 remaining. Oregon State scored the next seven straight to close within 60-49 on Cunningham’s steal and dunk with 5:41 remaining. But the Beavers would get no closer. Cunningham finished with 13 points in the fourth game between the two teams this season. Washington State won both games in the regular season, by five points at home and 10 on the road, before Oregon State won the Pac-12 first-round matchup 69-64 March 7 in Los Angeles.

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Pro basketball NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 26 21 .553 — Boston 24 21 .533 1 New York 23 24 .489 3 Toronto 15 32 .319 11 New Jersey 15 33 .313 11½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 34 11 .756 — Orlando 30 18 .625 5½ Atlanta 27 20 .574 8 Washington 11 34 .244 23 Charlotte 7 37 .159 26½ Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 39 10 .796 — Indiana 26 18 .591 10½ Milwaukee 21 24 .467 16 Cleveland 17 27 .386 19½ Detroit 16 30 .348 21½ WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 30 14 .682 — Memphis 25 19 .568 5 Dallas 27 21 .563 5 Houston 25 22 .532 6½ New Orleans 11 35 .239 20 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 35 12 .745 — Denver 26 21 .553 9 Utah 24 22 .522 10½ Minnesota 23 25 .479 12½ Portland 21 25 .457 13½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 29 18 .617 — L.A. Clippers 26 20 .565 2½ Phoenix 23 24 .489 6 Golden State 19 25 .432 8½ Sacramento 17 29 .370 11½ Wednesday’s games Chicago 94, Toronto 82 Orlando 103, Phoenix 93 New York 82, Philadelphia 79 Atlanta 103, Cleveland 102, OT Washington 108, New Jersey 89 Oklahoma City 114, L.A. Clippers 91 Golden State 101, New Orleans 92 San Antonio 116, Minnesota 100 Denver 116, Detroit 115 L.A. Lakers 109, Dallas 93 Today’s games

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Indiana at Washington, 4 p.m. Golden State at Houston, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Boston at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Utah at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Memphis at Portland, 7 p.m. Friday’s games Milwaukee at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Indiana, 4 p.m. New York at Toronto, 4 p.m. Cleveland at Orlando, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Miami at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Boston at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Dallas at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Portland at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Denver at Utah, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s games Memphis at L.A. Clippers, noon Atlanta at Washington, 4 p.m. Charlotte at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m. Detroit at New York, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 5 p.m. Dallas at Houston, 5 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Sacramento at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

Washington State 72, Oregon State 55 CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-3) Monday, March 26 Pittsburgh (20-16) vs. Washington State (18-16), TBA Wednesday, March 28 Pittsburgh vs. Washington State, TBA Friday, March 30 Pittsburgh vs. Washington State, TBA NCAA DIVISION II CHAMPIONSHIPS At Highland Heights, Ky. QUARTERFINALS Wednesday, March 21 Stonehill 91, West Liberty 90 Western Washington 64, Midwestern State 63 Bellarmine 82, Alabama-Huntsville 73 Montevallo 67, Metro State 65 SEMIFINALS Today’s games Stonehill vs. Western Washington, TBA Bellarmine vs. Montevallo, TBA CHAMPIONSHIP Saturday, March 24 Semifinal winners, 10 a.m.

College basketball

Pro hockey

NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENT QUARTERFINALS Tuesday, March 20 UMass 72, Drexel 70 Washington 90, Oregon 86 Wednesday, March 21 Minnesota 78, Middle Tennessee 72 Stanford 84, Nevada 56 SEMIFINALS At Madison Square Garden, New York Tuesday, March 27 UMass (24-10) vs. Stanford (24-11), 4 p.m. Washington (24-10) vs. Minnesota (22-14), 6 p.m. CHAMPIONSHIP Thursday, March 29 Semifinal winners, 4 p.m.

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-N.Y. Rangers 73 46 20 7 99 201 161 Pittsburgh 72 45 21 6 96 239 184 Philadelphia 73 42 23 8 92 232 206 New Jersey 74 42 27 5 89 201 191 N.Y. Islanders 73 30 32 11 71 174 218 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 72 42 27 3 87 236 178 Ottawa 74 37 27 10 84 221 214 Buffalo 74 35 29 10 80 190 207 Toronto 74 32 34 8 72 210 232 Montreal 74 28 33 13 69 191 206 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Florida 73 36 24 13 85 183 201 Washington 73 37 30 6 80 198 208 Winnipeg 73 34 31 8 76 196 211 Carolina 74 30 29 15 75 197 218 Tampa Bay 72 32 33 7 71 202 247 WESTERN CONFERENCE

COLLEGE BASKETBALL INVITATIONAL SEMIFINALS Wednesday, March 21 Pittsburgh 68, Butler 62, OT

Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA x-St. Louis 74 46 20 8 100 192 146 Detroit 74 44 25 5 93 225 181 Nashville 73 42 23 8 92 209 192 Chicago 75 42 25 8 92 229 214 Columbus 73 23 43 7 53 167 236 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 73 43 21 9 95 224 184 Colorado 75 40 30 5 85 196 196 Calgary 74 34 26 14 82 183 201 Minnesota 72 30 32 10 70 155 199 Edmonton 73 29 36 8 66 196 216 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 73 40 28 5 85 193 195 Los Angeles 73 36 25 12 84 172 160 Phoenix 74 36 26 12 84 194 192 San Jose 73 36 27 10 82 199 191 Anaheim 75 32 32 11 75 189 209 Note: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot Wednesday’s games Buffalo 3, Montreal 0 Carolina 3, Florida 1 N.Y. Rangers 2, Detroit 1, OT Chicago 2, Vancouver 1, OT Anaheim 4, St. Louis 3 Today’s games Washington at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Nashville at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Edmonton at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Calgary at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at Phoenix, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Boston at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s games Toronto at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Winnipeg at Washington, 4 p.m. Carolina at Columbus, 4 p.m. Ottawa at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Edmonton at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Saturday’s games Calgary at Dallas, 11 a.m. Minnesota at Buffalo, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Toronto, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 4 p.m. Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m. Carolina at Detroit, 4 p.m. Winnipeg at Nashville, 4 p.m. Boston at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 7 p.m. Phoenix at San Jose, 7 p.m.

SAINTS Continued from Page A6 “I mean we have a lot on the line, every single one of us. ... You don't want to see anyone taken out a game.”

All payouts illegal All payouts for specific performances in a game, including interceptions or causing fumbles, are against NFL rules. The NFL warns teams against such practices before each season, although in the aftermath of the revelations about the Saints, current and former players from various teams talked about that sort of thing happening frequently — just not on the same scale as was found in New Orleans. In a memo to the NFL's 32 teams, Goodell ordered owners to make sure their clubs are not offering bounties now. Each club's principal owner and head coach must certify in writing by March 30 that no pay-for-performance system exists. Payton is the first head coach suspended by the league for any reason, while Loomis is believed to be the only GM to be. Goodell also suspended assistant coach Joe Vitt for the first six games. Payton, whose salary this season was to be at least $6 million, ignored instructions from the NFL and Saints ownership to make sure bounties weren't being paid. The league also chastised him for choosing to “falsely deny that the program existed,” and for trying to “encourage the false denials by instructing assistants to 'make sure our ducks are in a row.’” All in all, Goodell's ruling is a real blow to the Saints, a franchise that Payton and quarterback Drew Brees revived and led to an NFL championship after decades of such futility that fans wore paper bags over their heads at home games. Brees reacted quickly to the news on Twitter, writing: “I am speechless. Sean Payton is a great man, coach, and mentor. ... I need to hear an explanation for this punishment.” The Saints now must decide who will coach the team in Payton's place — his suspension takes effect April 1 — and who will make roster moves while Loomis is out. There was no immediate word from the Saints, but two candidates to take over coaching duties are defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo and offensive coordinator Pete Carmichael Jr. Spagnuolo has NFL head coaching experience; Carmichael does not, but has been with the club since 2006.

TEBOW Continued from Page A6 “I’m just excited for him and to see what he does,” Lin said in Philadelphia, where the Knicks beat the 76ers. “We’ll see what happens next year.” Just a few weeks after “Linsanity” swept New York and the rest of the NBA, “Timsanity” now will take over New York after the Jets acquired the polarizing quarterback and a seventh-round draft pick from the Denver Broncos for fourth- and sixthround picks. Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Namath, who led the Jets to their only Super Bowl title in 1969, was among many who were unhappy about the deal. “I’m just sorry that I can’t agree with this situation. I think it’s just a publicity stunt. I can’t go with it. I think it’s wrong,” Namath told 1050 ESPN Radio on Wednesday. “I don’t think they know what they’re doing over there.” The trade was completed hours after the sides initially agreed to a deal, which was hung up when the Jets balked at repaying Denver more than $5 million for a salary

MCT file

Tim Tebow throws a pass as a member of the Denver Broncos last season against Kansas City. Tebow was traded to the New York Jets on Wednesday, presumably to back up Mark Sanchez and run the Jets’ Wildcat packages on offense. advance due Tebow. The two sides agreed to split that cost, and Tannenbaum said the team was “comfortable with the compensation.” He said there was a disagreement about how to handle the salary advance after Denver received the papers. “We knew what the contract was,” he said. “We had read it. ... We felt it was one

way; they felt it was another. Based on that, they were well within their rights to assess their different possibilities of what to do and their alternatives. And they did so throughout the day.” So the Jets waited and waited — and looked as if they had botched the big deal. Despite ultimately pulling off the trade, it’s just another

bizarre moment for the Jets, conjuring memories of Bill Belichick’s hiring as coach and his resignation one day later. “I’m thankful they stuck with me through this whole crazy process,” Tebow said, repeating several times that he was “excited” to be a member of the Jets. But the deal also raised questions about the Jets’ commitment to Sanchez, who received a $40.5 million contract extension, with $20.5 million guaranteed, earlier this month. During a call late Wednesday night, Tannenbaum repeatedly referred to Sanchez as “our guy” and the team’s unques-

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Nation and World

A8 - Thursday, March 22, 2012

Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

Massacre suspect a study in contradiction A ‘proud patriot’ with a dark side

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Robert Bales boasted of being one of the good guys, a proud patriot who enlisted in the Army just two months after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and engaged in some of the fiercest fighting in Iraq. But the gung-ho military volunteer had a darker, more troubled and contradictory side — which surfaced over and over during his sometimes turbulent life. He is a portrait of opposites. A doting father of two now suspected in the cold-blooded slaughter of children. A one-time stockbroker who left financial disaster in his wake as he headed off to war with a huge monetary judgment and accusations of fraud hanging over his head. A devoted breadwinner straining to keep up payments on his house.

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Through it all, masking his troubles with a cheerful grin and good-guy persona. Today, the 38-year-old Army staff sergeant remains locked in an isolation cell in a maximum-security military prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., accused of killing 16 Afghans, including nine children. “Sergeant Psycho� screamed one tabloid headline as family and friends struggled to reconcile their memories of a good-natured, hardworking father and trusted soldier, with the lone gunman who, military officials say, went on a horrific nighttime shooting spree, setting some of the victims’ bodies on fire.

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Had their consummate good guy somehow become a monstrous rogue soldier? Did he snap under the mounting pressures of multiple combat deployments (this was his fourth tour), financial troubles (he and his wife had walked away from one house and had just put another on the market), and the sheer hell of war? His lawyer, John Henry Browne of Seattle, said a fellow soldier’s leg had been blown off days before the rampage and Bales had seen the wounds. And, Browne said, Bales had suffered injuries during his deployments, including a

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serious foot injury and head trauma. Still the questions swirl. What brought this ordinary, well-regarded soldier, who seemed never quite able to make his mark in life — not in school, or business, or the military — to this terrible place?

Youngest of five The youngest of five brothers, Bales is still referred to as “our Bobby� in Norwood, Ohio, the working class suburb of Cincinnati where he grew up. The family was all about “God, country, family,� said Michelle Caddell, who lived

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across the street from what is still known as “the Bales’ house�, a two-story, maroon brick home on Ivanhoe Avenue. She described a cheerful, all around good guy, who took care of a neighbor with a disability and was respectful to young and old alike. Her mother, Faye Blevins reacted to the news by saying: “That’s not true. That’s not Bobby� — a sentiment that seemed to echo through the neighborhood. At Norwood High School Bales had the same big-hearted reputation. He was considered a good student, a military history

buff and a “happy-go-lucky� member of the football team, said retired physical education teacher Jack Bouldin. “He was a great guy with a huge heart,� said teammate Steve Berling. But while Bales was a staunch member of the team, he was never its star. That honor went to Marc Edwards, a future running back at Notre Dame and later NFL teams including the 2002 Super Bowl champion New England Patriots. Bales was gracious about being second-best, but it would be a tag that would dog him in many aspects of his life.

High school years Details of Bales’ years after high school are sketchy — though a pattern of sorts emerges — of not completing his goals, of never distinguishing himself, of never being the star. He spent a year at St. Joseph’s, a small, private liberal arts school in Cincinnati, but didn’t earn a degree. He went on to attend Ohio State University from 1993 to 1996 and majored in economics but didn’t graduate. His career as a stockbroker in Ohio imploded in 2000 when he was accused of defrauding an elderly couple from Columbus. An arbitrator later ordered Bales and the owner of the firm that employed him to pay $1.5 million — about half for compensation and half in punitive damages. The punitive damages were allowed because Bales’ conduct was deemed “fraudulent and malicious.� Bales never paid, the couple said. He briefly ran an investment company in Florida with his brother, Mark, and former teammate, Edwards, but the business appears to have failed. And so he decided to try to reshape his life — maybe

reshape his luck — by joining the military. In 2001, two months after the attacks on the World Trade Center, Bales enlisted in the Army. He would serve with the 3rd Stryker Brigade stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord and be dispatched to Iraq three times.

Solid reputation In the Army, Bales honed a reputation as an eventempered, hardworking soldier who had enlisted for all the right reasons — one of the good guys. “It was the attacks; he just wanted to serve,� said Army Capt. Chris Alexander, 32, who spent three years as Bales’ platoon leader. “I’ve always admired him for that.� Alexander called Bales “one of the best guys I ever worked with,� a soldier who was solid and competent and brave. He described one incident when Bales shot at a man aiming a rocket-propelled grenade at his platoon’s vehicle in Mosul, Iraq, sending the grenade flying over the vehicle. It was just one occasion, Alexander said, when Bales undoubtedly saved lives. “He is not some psychopath,� Alexander said. “He’s an outstanding soldier who has given a lot for this country.� After one particularly brutal fight in Najaf province in 2007, Bales told a base newspaper he had never felt such pride. “For the simple fact that we discriminated between the bad guys and the noncombatants and then afterward we ended up helping the people that three or four hours before were trying to kill us,� Bales said. “I think that is the real difference between being an American as opposed to being a bad guy.� Bales’ words seem eerily haunting now.

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TOULOUSE, FRANCE

Suspect in French terror spree may be dead

The suspect in an radical Islam-linked killing spree in southern France has stopped communicating with authorities and may have committed suicide, the interior minister said Thursday, as a standoff between the gunman and hundreds of police entered a second day. Claude Gueant said suspect Mohamed Merah, holed up in an apartment in the southern city of Toulouse, has not contacted negotiators since Wednesday night. “We hope that he is still alive,� Gueant said, stressing that authorities’ priority is to capture him alive. He said the gunman earlier told negotiators that he wanted to “die with weapons in his hands.� Elite police squads set off sporadic blasts throughout the night and into the morning —

some blew off the apartment’s shutters — in what officials described as a tactic aimed to pressure 24-year-old Merah to give up. Two or three gunshots were heard from the area of the apartment building overnight. The interior minister said the source of the gunshots was unclear.

MIAMI

Florida’s ‘Stand Your Ground Law’ being questioned Florida is among 21 states with a “Stand Your Ground Law,� which gives people wide latitude to use deadly force rather than retreat during a fight. The self-defense law helps explain why a neighborhood watch captain has not been arrested in the shooting death of an unarmed teenager. The Florida law lets police officers on the scene decide whether they believe the self-

defense claim. In many cases, the officer’s defer to making the arrest, letting the courts work out whether the deadly force is justified. In this case, however, police have said they are confident they did the right thing by not charging 28-year-old George Zimmerman, a white Hispanic. The shooting’s racial overtones have sparked a national outcry and debate over whether the shooting was warranted. And like many self-defense cases, two sides of the story have emerged. Zimmerman told police he was attacked by 17-year-old Trayvon Martin after he had given up chasing the boy and he was returning to his truck. He had a bloody nose and blood on the back of his head, according to police. Martin’s family questions Zimmerman’s story, and believes if their races were reversed, there is no doubt a black shooter would be jailed, even if he claimed self-defense.

“They are making it look like Zimmerman is the victim and their son is in the grave,� said Benjamin Crump, attorney for Martin’s parents. “It’s about equal justice.�

LOS ANGELES

Americans want a solution to gas prices Families canceling vacations. Fishermen watching their profits burn up along with their boats’ gasoline. Drivers buying only a few gallons of gas at a time because they can’t afford to fill the tank. From all corners of the country, Americans are irritated these days by record-high fuel prices that have soared above $4 a gallon in some states and could top $5 by summer. And the cost is becoming a political issue just as the presidential campaign kicks into high gear.

Some blame President Barack Obama. Some just cite “the government,� while others believe it’s the work of big, greedy oil companies. No matter who is responsible, almost everyone seems to want the government to do something, even if people aren’t sure what, exactly, it should or can do. A Gallup poll this month found 85 percent of U.S. adults believe the president and Congress “should take immediate actions to try to control the rising price of gas.� An Associated Press-GfK poll last month showed 71 percent believe gas prices are a “very� or “extremely� important matter. Chris Kaufman, who spends $120 a week on gas to travel the 60 miles between his two jobs, at the University of South Dakota in Sioux Falls and at a hotel in Vermillion, S.D., blames the price spike on threats from Iran to cut off oil shipments through the Strait of Hormuz. — Associated Press


DAILY RECORD

Classifieds/B4-5

ECONOMIC INDICATORS

Thursday

Comics/B6

March 22, 2012

Jan. ‘12 unemployment

Jan. ‘11 unemployment

Dec. ‘11 unemployment

Nov. ‘11 unemployment

9.6 percent — January 2012

10.5 percent —January 2011

8.8 percent — December 2011

7.8 percent — November 2011

Kittitas County

Kittitas County

Kittitas County

Kittitas County

Ask good questions during interview YOUR JOB Diane Stafford McClatchy Newspapers

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Justin Pittman/Daily Record

Tae kwon do master Matt Hughes leads a class at his school, Cascade Mountain Martial, Arts March 20. The school opened in January and already has 40 to 50 active students.

In their (self) defense Local martial arts studio grows by leaps and bounds By JUSTIN PITTMAN staff writer

C

LE ELUM — As a child living in the Philippines, martial arts helped Matt Hughes lead a more normal life. Now he hopes to impart those same skills to community members in Cle Elum. Hughes lived in the Philippines, where bullying was a part of life, while his father served in the U.S. Navy. He took his first kempo karate class there to learn self defense after being stabbed at the age of 4. “I basically had to learn to take care of myself,” Hughes said. “It was either that or hide.” Hughes, a fifth-degree black belt in tae kwon do and nationally certified instructor, taught his first class at the age of 12. He taught for seven years at his academy, Focus Martial Arts, in Yakima and briefly opened a school in Ellensburg before moving to Cle Elum. Hughes also holds black belts in several other martial arts disciplines. Hughes’ school, Cascade Mountain Martial Arts, opened Jan. 1 of this year. He estimates that he’s seen 80 students in the school and has 40 to 50 students who attend classes on a regular basis.

“When everybody comes into the door, it’s a level playing field. They all put their pants on one leg at a time. It’s all the same. ... We’re not just teaching martial arts here, we’re teaching citizenship.” MATT HUGHES, INSTRUCTOR AT CASCADE MOUNTAIN MARTIAL ARTS IN CLE ELUM

“It’s been growing with leaps and bounds,” Hughes said.

How it works Students pay a $50-per-month membership fee and can attend any class held at the school. Attendance is voluntary, but Hughes recommends attending at least two lessons each week. He also offers a free first lesson to interested students. The classes attract an eclectic mix of students, and Hughes said he likes the fact that a wide variety of people can find common ground at his school. “When everybody comes into the door, it’s a level playing field,” Hughes said. “They all put their pants on one leg at a time. It’s all the same.” Participants in Hughes’ class vary in age from elementary school students to middle aged professionals. In some cases, the members of an entire family will train alongside one another. Hughes stresses that his classes aren’t solely about fight-

ing either. “We’re not just teaching martial arts here, we’re teaching citizenship,” Hughes said. He hopes his classes will teach students values such as teamwork, determination, forgiveness and scholastics. Hughes teaches two separate hour-long tae kwon do classes Monday, Tuesday and Friday from 6-7 p.m. and 7-8 p.m. and one Brazilian jiu jitsu class Monday, Tuesday and Friday from 8-9 p.m.

Other classes The jiu jitsu classes — a favorite amongst teenage boys — often include elements of boxing and mixed martial arts, and Hughes hopes to add a mixed martial arts class as his students’ skill levels improve. The jiu jitsu classes require more physical exertion than the tae kwon do classes and include a high level of physical contact. Hughes’ tae kwon do classes, his most popular offering amongst the general

public, require only moderate physical contact. Hughes, a devout Christian, plans to leave for a two-weeklong mission in April. He is part of a team from Cle Elum Alliance Church that will minister and work with local church leaders and orphans. Hughes has invited an instructor to fill in at the school in his absence, and plans to add a fourth evening of lessons to the school’s schedule after he returns. In addition to his regular classes, Hughes plans to have a sexual assault defense class from 9 a.m. to noon on April 14. The defense class will teach skills such as joint manipulation, pressure point control tactics, stun and run techniques, jiu jitsu sweeps and the psychology of dealing with a predator. It is open to students 12 and older, and a $35 registration fee is required. The class includes a lunch buffet. Those interested in taking the class should call Hughes at 509985-8264 to pre-register.

eel free to ask questions in a job interview. Just make them good ones. Don’t waste an interviewer’s time by asking what the job pays or how much vacation you’ll get. Save those for after you get an actual offer. Well-researched questions about the company or the job are entirely appropriate. In fact, they may help you stand out from other applicants. It’s a given that you should go into a job interview with practiced responses to questions you expect to be asked. But you also should be ready to turn the tables. Then sit back and listen for sincere, complete responses. If your questions get blown off or the answers are evasive or troubling, you may want to reassess the job’s desirability. Consider asking: ■ Could you describe the corporate culture here? ■ What are the lines of communication like? ■ Do employees feel empowered to make decisions? ■ What is turnover like in this company (or job)? ■ What are this organization’s biggest strengths (or weaknesses, or challenges, or opportunities)? ■ What personal growth opportunities exist in this position? ■ What do you like most about working here? ■ What types of personalities tend to thrive here? ■ Why would I prefer to work here instead of your competitor XYZ? ■ If you’re interviewing two candidates with comparable experience, what would give the edge to one of them? Be ready, too, to ask about the factors fueling current growth in the industry, business or job. And do they expect the trend to continue? If it’s not clear, ask who you’d be reporting to. Is it possible to meet that person? Judging from that response, you might even ask if you could meet your prospective peers who report to that person. Choose the queries that are most relevant and helpful to you. Don’t sit mum. Good questions show you’re informed. Their answers will help your decision. Contact Diane Stafford at dstafford@kcstar.com.

BUSINESS BRIEFS ELLENSBURG

Local chiropractor gains ART masters certification

Local chiropractor D.B. Bridgeman recently completed his 5th ART (Active Release Technique) masters certification. ART is a hands-on soft tissue mobilization technique for the treatment of athletic and repetitive strain injuries. To become certified in ART, the practitioner must have extensive knowledge of anatomy, attend training seminars, then pass written and technique examinations, according to a news release. “With this type of advance training I find that my patients are getting faster and better results,” Bridgeman said.

Bridgeman has also been chosen to be part of the official ART treatment team for the Ironman Triathlon series throughout 2012. For more information, go to www.activerelease.com or contact Bridgeman’s office at 925-PAIN (7246). Laser, Spine and Disc Chiropractic is at 2211 West Dolarway Road in Ellensburg.

ELLENSBURG

New nail salon opens on Fourth Avenue A new nail salon opened earlier this month on Fourth Avenue in Ellensburg. Tony’s Nails is across from Safeway at 312 E. Fourth Ave. Owners Tony and Lena Nguyen worked as nail technicians in Cle

Elum and Yakima before opening a shop in Ellensburg. They offer manicures, pedicures, waxing, UV gel, acrylic and nail design. Walk-ins are welcome; the phone number is 933-1038.

OLYMPIA

State changes wording on assisted living facilities Gov. Chris Gregoire signed legislation earlier this month updating how the state refers to assisted living facilities — a change advocated by the Washington Health Care Association and its Center for Assisted Living and other consumer groups and caregivers. No longer will Washington law refer to “boarding homes,” an outmoded term used since 1958

when the state began licensing facilities providing housing and services to more than seven residents, according to a news release from the Washington Health Care Association. The law changes the designation to assisted living facilities. Rich Miller, president of WHCA, a statewide trade association that represents assisted living communities and skilled nursing facilities, said the term “assisted living facilities” better reflects the modern services our communities provide. “Our facilities are evolving to meet the needs of our elderly population — a population that’s growing. We’re not ‘boarding homes’ and, honestly, haven’t been so for decades,” he said. Miller thanked the bill’s spon-

sors, Reps. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim; Barbara Bailey, R-Oak Harbor; Eileen Cody, D-West Seattle; Norm Johnson, R-Yakima; and Judy Warnick, R-Moses Lake. “We have nine assisted living facilities in my district that provide a whole range of services for our elderly citizens,” Warnick said. “Changing how these facilities are referred to in state law really brings us up-to-date, and will help consumers understand the services offered by these facilities.” — staff and wire reports ■■■

Email jmarkell@kvnews.com or go to dailyrecordnews.com and look under “B section” to submit information for the Daily Record’s business page.


Business

B2 - Thursday, March 22, 2012

Wireless health monitors spreading

Starbucks to make coffee for rival’s machine

Send vital stats straight to medical offices

By MELISSA ALLISON The Seattle Times

By STEVE JOHNSON San Jose Mercury News

SEATTLE — Less than two weeks after scorching Green Mountain Coffee Roasters with news that it will market a competing singleserve coffee machine, Starbucks said Wednesday it will also make coffee packets to fit in Green Mountain’s new Vue-brewed coffee machine. Starbucks still plans to sell a machine with Germany-based Krueger that will make single-serve espresso and brewed coffee drinks. When the Seattle chain announced that news earlier this month, Green Mountain’s stock fell as much as 25 percent in one day and has struggled ever since. Two years ago, Starbucks ditched its relationship with Kraft, which also markets an at-home brewing machine, and last year partnered with Green Mountain on singleserve coffee. Green Mountain’s machines focus on brewed coffee, which requires lower pressure, although the Vermont company sells coffee packets with espresso-roasted coffee for its machines. The cups used in Starbucks’ new Verismo machines will not fit in Green Mountain machines. Starbucks’ relationship with Green Mountain was shaky from the start. Last year, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz said in a memo to executives that just having a patent did not ensure Green Mountain’s continued primacy in the single-serve category. The memo came amid rumors that Starbucks hoped to buy Green Mountain. One analyst suggested at the time that Starbucks may have been playing games by releasing the memo. “We are amused at the public battles Starbucks finds the need to wage when it cannot get its way in private negotiations,” wrote Janney Capital Markets analyst Mitchell Pinheiro, who covered Green Mountain but not Starbucks.

SAN JOSE, Calif. — It’s hard to find a better example of how technology is revolutionizing patient care than the tiny edible sensor Proteus Biomedical of Redwood City, Calif., plans to begin selling this fall in the United Kingdom. When the grain-of-sand-sized sensor is integrated into a drug tablet or capsule and activated by stomach fluid, it signals when the medicine was taken to a patch on the patient’s body. Then the patch relays the information along with the person’s heart rate and other medical details to a caregiver’s phone — all without a visit to the doctor. “We’re seeing an enormous surge in demand for health services across the globe,” said Proteus CEO Andrew Thompson, noting that he plans to offer a similar product in the United States. To meet that need inex-

MCT

Eric Nagel checks his blood pressure in his Los Gatos, Calif., home. pensively, he added, “health care must digitize. It must move into the 21st century.” Some experts predict that in the near future, tens of millions of Americans will be tethered to gadgets that will automatically send their vital signs to medical professionals, relatives and concerned friends. The technology already has generated an indus-

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By MICHAEL MUSKAL Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES — Safeway Inc. is dropping the beef product derisively called “pink slime” from its fresh meat cases, the nation’s second-largest supermarket chain announced Wednesday. The company linked its decision to the recent negative publicity about the product. The action affects only fresh ground beef sold in Safeway stores, not foods prepared by other companies. Safeway stores operate under

a variety of names — including Vons in California and Nevada, Randalls and Tom Thumb in Texas, Genuardi’s in Philadelphia, and Carrs in Alaska. The company announced its decision to stop selling the product, known in the industry as “lean finely textured beef,” in an email to reporters; the decision was first reported by ABC News. “Safeway is committed to providing our customers with the highest-quality products,” the company said in a statement. “While the USDA and food industry experts agree that lean

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finely textured beef is safe and wholesome, recent news stories have caused considerable consumer concern about this product. Safeway will no longer purchase ground beef containing lean finely textured beef.” The product is made from lower-quality meat scraps treated with an agent, such as ammonia, to prevent the growth of microbes. The meat industry has repeatedly defended the product, saying it’s safe and that the antimicrobial agent is not an additive and therefore doesn’t need to be noted on food labels.

Recent media reports, however, raised questions about the use of the product and whether ammonia is an additive. The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced last week that it will disclose which of its suppliers use the product so that school officials can make their own decisions about usage. Safeway has 1,702 stores, according to the company’s website, second only to Kroger. Publix, HEB, Whole Foods and Costco have said they will sell only ground beef that is additive-free.

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try worth well over $1 billion a year. And despite concerns that the data transmitted by patients could overwhelm doctors and be spied on by hackers, the trend is widely expected to transform the relationship between patients and physicians. Eric Nagel, a 57-year-old semiconductor analyst who lives in Los Gatos, Calif., generally takes

his blood pressure readings in the morning with a monitor made by iHealth of Mountain View, Calif. The device sends the data in an easy-to-understand form to his iPhone and every few weeks, he emails the data to his doctor, who became concerned about his high blood pressure a year ago. “She wanted to put me on medicine,” Nagel said. But he worried about the possible side effects and chose instead to exercise more and improve his diet. “It’s been a very positive thing for me,” he said. “I’ve been able to get my blood pressure down. The device was able to show me what changes I was making that were positive and which ones weren’t.” Lots of patients could benefit by sharing their medical data more regularly with a physician, said Dr. Joseph Smith of the West Wireless Health Institute in La Jolla, Calif., which seeks to lower health care costs in part through new innovations. “The notion that your needs for health care are best met by seeing a doctor a couple times a year, when you live every day, is probably wrong,” he said. “There is obvious value in knowing more.”

No more ‘pink slime’ in its fresh beef, Safeway says

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Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

Thursday, March 22, 2012 - B3

! D E TEND

Take those studs off and get ready for our EX Studs must be off by

SpringTIRE SALE

DISCOVERER H/T

DELTA MAJESTIC

• Four Wide notched circumferential grooves ooves • High density “Zig Zag” slips P205/15R15 • Solid center rib $ 27

• UTQG 440AB • A Quality step up line • 26 Popular Sizes • Competitively Priced All Around Value

143

SIZES SIDEWALL PLY PRICES 265/70R15 .................. BSW .........SL ...... 174.20 225/75R16 .................. BSW .........SL ...... 152.43 215/70R16 .................. BSW .........SL ...... 150.26 245/70R16 .................. BSW .........SL ...... 169.39 275/65R17 .................. BSW .........SL ...... 234.02 205/75R15 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 143.27 215/75R15 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 143.54 225/75R15 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 145.09 235/75R15 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 149.35 235/75R15XL .............. OWL .........SL ...... 151.23 265/75R15 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 165.92 225/70R15 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 146.50 235/70R15 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 151.87 255/70R15 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 158.37 225/75R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 160.32 235/75R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 162.99 245/75R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 165.48 265/75R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 175.89 225/70R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 157.94 235/70R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 161.46 245/70R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 171.51 255/70R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 173.56 265/70R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 182.23 275/70R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 194.67 255/65R16 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 189.75

PRICE 80 SERIES P155/80R13............... BW ........................ 77.36

245/70R17 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 187.71 265/70R17 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 196.73 235/65R17 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 185.66 245/65R17 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 188.93 275/60R17 .................. OWL .........SL ...... 213.39 LT215/85R16 .............. BSW ..........E ....... 187.20 LT235/85R16 .............. BSW ..........E ....... 195.69 LT225/75R16 .............. BSW ..........E ....... 193.92 LT245/75R16 .............. BSW ..........E ....... 205.59 LT245/70R17 .............. BSW ..........E ....... 226.04 LT235/75R15 .............. OWL ......... C ....... 170.03 31X10.50R15LT .......... OWL ......... C ....... 193.76 LT245/75R16 .............. OWL ......... C ....... 206.53 LT265/75R16 .............. OWL ......... C ....... 213.71 LT265/75R16 .............. OWL ..........E ....... 220.19 LT245/75R17 .............. OWL ..........E ....... 231.79 LT235/80R17 .............. OWL ..........E ....... 222.54 LT265/70R17 .............. OWL ..........E ....... 230.70 LT275/65R18 .............. OWL ..........E ....... 279.96

SIERRADIAL A/S • Spiral shaped grooves and new compound offer longer wear and better handling SIZE PLY PRICE 205/75R15 ............. OWL .........................128.78 215/75R15 ............. OWL .........................130.22 225/75R15 ............. OWL .........................133.68 235/75R15 ............. OWL .........................136.83 235/75R1515 XL .... OWL .........................140.44 265/75R15 ............. OWL .........................153.28 225/70R15 ............. OWL .........................134.49 235/70R15 ............. OWL .........................139.54 225/75R16 ............. OWL .........................144.65 235/75R16 ............. OWL .........................148.00 245/75R16 ............. OWL .........................150.30 265/75R16 ............. OWL .........................162.71 215/70R16 ............. OWL .........................138.82 225/70R16 ............. OWL .........................145.93 235/70R16 ............. OWL .........................150.65 245/70R16 ............. OWL .........................156.48 255/70R16 ............. OWL .........................164.99 265/70R16 ............. OWL .........................172.07 275/70R16 ............. OWL .........................182.58

P175/70R13

$

6963

SIZE

60,000 60 000 MI MILE ILE

205/75R15

$

11641

255/65R16 ............. OWL .........................173.41 245/70R17 ............. OWL .........................164.81 265/70R17 ............. OWL .........................178.05 235/65R17 ............. OWL .........................165.51 245/65R17 ............. OWL .........................171.91 275/60R17 ............. OWL .........................193.04 LT215/85R16 ...........BW ......... 10 ............176.97 LT235/85R16 ...........BW ......... 10 ............184.01 LT225/75R16 ...........BW ......... 10 ............180.87 LT245/75R16 ...........BW ......... 10 ............193.86 LT245/70R17 ...........BW ......... 10 ............210.74 LT235/75R15 ......... OWL ......... 6 .............157.15 LT265/75R16 ......... OWL ........ 10 ............210.47 LT235/80R17 ......... OWL ........ 10 ............210.74 LT265/70R17 ......... OWL ........ 10 ............218.52 31X10.50R15LT ..... OWL ......... 6 .............183.40

75 SERIES P185/75R14...............WW........................ 84.88 P195/75R14...............WW ....................... 87.27 P205/75R14...............WW ....................... 90.27 P215/75R14...............WW ....................... 97.97 P205/75R15...............WW ....................... 99.45 P215/75R15...............WW ..................... 101.04 P225/75R15...............WW ..................... 106.86 P235/75R15...............WW ..................... 108.29 70 SERIES P215/70R14...............WW ....................... 93.47 P205/70R15...............WW ....................... 97.15 P215/70R15...............WW ..................... 100.60 P225/70R15...............WW ..................... 106.96 P175/70R13............... BW ....................... 69.63 P185/70R14............... BW ....................... 76.52 P195/70R14............... BW ....................... 80.50

April 16th!

40,000 MILE P205/70R14............... BW ....................... 90.32 P205/70R15............... BW ....................... 94.69 65 SERIES P175/65R14............... BW ........................ 77.21 P185/65R14............... BW ........................ 79.22 P195/65R15............... BW ........................ 88.21 P205/65R15............... BW ...................... 996.47 P215/65R15............... BW ........................ 98.88 60 SERIES P215/60R16............... BW ...................... 105.65 P225/60R16............... BW ...................... 108.45 55 SERIES P205/55R16............... BW ...................... 113.22

225/70R15

COOPER DISCOVERER A/T3 • Silica based tread compound • Ventless technology

$

15804

• Micro guage zig-zag siping • M+S rated

SIZES SIDEWALL PLY PRICES 235/70R17 ................... BLK ......... XL ........ 205.97 275/60R20 ................... BLK ...................... 263.86 275/55R20 ................... BLK ......... XL ........ 259.70 235/75R15 ...................OWL ..................... 159.21 265/75R15 ...................OWL ..................... 181.02 225/70R15 ...................OWL ..................... 158.04 255/70R15 ...................OWL ..................... 188.86 265/70R15 ...................OWL ..................... 189.54 225/75R16 ...................OWL ..................... 161.77 235/75R16 ...................OWL ..................... 170.62 245/75R16 ...................OWL ..................... 147.43 265/75R16 ...................OWL ..................... 191.85 215/70R16 ...................OWL ..................... 166.22 225/70R16 ...................OWL ..................... 170.54 235/70R16 ...................OWL ..................... 172.16 245/70R16 ...................OWL ..................... 178.45 255/70R16 ...................OWL ..................... 187.07 265/70R16 ...................OWL ..................... 195.66 245/70R17 ...................OWL ..................... 202.07 255/70R17 ...................OWL ..................... 213.55 265/70R17 ...................OWL ..................... 214.35 235/65R17 ...................OWL ..................... 204.96 245/65R17 ...................OWL ..................... 208.21 255/65R17 ...................OWL ..................... 208.68 265/65R17 ...................OWL ..................... 222.44 235/60R17 ...................OWL ..................... 206.32 265/70R18 ...................OWL ..................... 228.02 265/65R18 ...................OWL ..................... 236.85 275/65R18 ...................OWL ..................... 248.33 265/60R18 ...................OWL ..................... 227.10

55,000 MILE LT215/85R16 ............... BLK .......... E ......... 209.06 LT235/85R16 ............... BLK .......... E ......... 215.78 LT225/75R16 ............... BLK .......... E ......... 212.17 LT245/75R16 ............... BLK .......... E ......... 229.17 LT275/65R20 ............... BLK .......... E ......... 343.88 30X9.50R15LT .............OWL .........C......... 182.99 31X10.50R15LT ...........OWL .........C......... 205.24 LT235/75R15 ...............OWL .........C......... 178.82 LT245/75R16 ...............OWL .........C......... 212.37 LT245/75R16 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 255.34 LT265/75R16 ...............OWL .........C......... 221.92 LT265/75R16 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 239.60 LT285/75R16 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 261.95 LT315/75R16 ...............OWL .........D......... 293.86 LT245/70R16 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 219.14 LT255/70R16 ...............OWL .........C......... 243.82 LT265/70R16 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 223.27 LT305/70R16 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 274.74 LT235//80R17 ..............OWL ......... E ......... 251.18 LT245/75R17 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 262.45 LT245/70R17 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 234.17 LT265/70R17 ...............OWL .........C......... 257.78 LT265/70R17 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 268.44 LT275/70R17 ...............OWL .........C......... 265.66 LT275/70R17 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 288.02 LT285/70R17 ...............OWL ......... E ......... 296.42 LT315/70R17 ...............OWL .........D......... 338.37

185/60R15

CS4 TOURING (T) • Coupled Silica Tread Compound • Innovative 4 Rib All-Season Tread Design SIZE.....................................SIDEWALL ...................PRICE 185/70R14 .......................BLK...................106.29 195/70R14 .......................BLK...................114.54 185/65R14 .......................BLK...................107.21 205/70R15 .......................BLK...................124.71 215/70R15 .......................BLK...................130.80 185/65R15 .......................BLK...................116.04 195/65R15 .......................BLK...................117.23 205/65R15 .......................BLK...................122.34 215/65R15 .......................BLK...................127.12 185/60R15 .......................BLK...................115.84 195/60R15 .......................BLK...................116.27 205/60R15 .......................BLK...................121.40 215/60R15 .......................BLK...................128.46 215/65R16 .......................BLK...................139.97 235/65R16 .......................BLK...................154.86 205/60R16 .......................BLK...................139.12 215/60R16 .......................BLK...................142.23 225/60R16 .......................BLK...................143.97 225/65R16 .......................BLK...................148.61

DELTA ESTEM PLUS 185/70R14

$

10629

80,000 MILE 225/70R16 .......................BLK...................153.94 235/60R16 .......................BLK...................156.04 205/55R16 .......................BLK...................147.81 215/65R17 .......................BLK...................171.50 225/65R17 .......................BLK...................188.17 235/65R17 .......................BLK...................190.45 215/60R17 .......................BLK...................169.26 225/60R17 .......................BLK...................176.77 235/60R17 .......................BLK...................177.19 225/55R17 .......................BLK...................170.82 235/55R17 .......................BLK...................195.69 235/65R18 .......................BLK...................211.19 225/55R18 .......................BLK...................198.61

255/55R18 XL

DISCOVER H/T PLUS

$

• Optimized pitch sequence by size • T-Speed Rated • All weather tread

17450

SIZE ........................................................... PRICE 255/55R18 XL ..................BLK...................174.50 275/55R20 XL ..................BLK...................191.76 265/60R18 XL ..................BLK...................178.03 275/60R20 XL ..................BLK...................197.50 285/60R18 .......................BLK...................184.10 285/50R20 XL ..................BLK...................197.42 275/45R20 XL ..................BLK...................187.46 305/50R20 XL ..................BLK...................208.23

WE CAN SERVICE YOUR NEEDS FOR: • Passenger Cars • Sport Utility Vehicles • Pick-Ups • Motorhomes

Tire Center

• Tractors & Farm Equipment • All Types of Trailers • Construction • and Much More

SIZE PRICE 175/70R13 ........................ BW ........................77.74 215/70R14 ........................ WW......................104.70 175/70R14 ........................ BW ........................84.84 185/70R14 ........................ BW ........................86.70 195/70R14 ........................ BW ........................90.34 205/70R14 ........................ BW ......................101.13 175/65R14 ........................ BW ........................86.39 185/65R14 ........................ BW ........................87.40 205/70R15 ........................ BW ......................100.09 215/70R15 ........................ BW ......................103.15 185/65R15 ........................ BW ........................91.97

$

8736

60,000 60 0 MILE

195/65R15 ........................ BW ........................93.93 205/65R15 ........................ BW ........................97.99 215/65R15 ........................ BW ......................106.09 185/60R15 ........................ BW ........................92.57 2153/60R15 ...................... BW ......................110.80 215/65R16 ........................ BW .....................113.04 235R/65R16 ..................... BW .....................129.46 215/60R16 ........................ BW .....................114.66 225/60R16 ........................ BW .....................115.40 205/55R16 ........................ BW .....................117.08 225/60R17 ........................ BW ......................144.24

SIERRADIAL A/T • Popular and versatile tread design agrees • Two rugged steel belts forr with the road and invites the turf extended mileage • Independent tread blocks for superior traction • Strength with two polyester body plies SIZE PRICE 235/70R15 ................................. OWL .............................151.16 265/70R15 ................................. OWL .............................168.83 235/75R15 ................................. OWL .............................141.75 235/75R15 ................................. OWL .............................145.80 265/75R15 ................................. OWL .............................160.85 235/75R16 ................................. OWL .............................157.15 235/70R16 ................................. OWL .............................157.55 245/70R16 ................................. OWL .............................168.24 255/70R16 ................................. OWL .............................172.43 265/70R16 ................................. OWL .............................177.37 245/75R16 ................................. OWL .............................159.16 265/75R16 ................................. OWL .............................174.91 265/70R17 ................................. OWL .............................193.14 265/65R17 ................................. OWL .............................204.16 265/70R18 ................................. OWL .............................206.77

235/75R15

$

14175

236 46 275/55R20 ................................. OWL .............................236.46 31X10.50R15............................. OWL .............................182.30 LT235/75R15 ............................. OWL .............................158.75 LT245/75R16 ............................. OWL .............................210.00 LT265/75R16 ............................. OWL .............................198.94 LT265/75R16 ............................. OWL .............................216.57 LT285/75R16 ............................. OWL .............................226.96 LT305/70R16 ............................. OWL .............................253.67 LT215/85R16 .............................. BW ..............................186.45 LT225/75R16 .............................. BW ..............................189.33 LT235/85R16 .............................. BW ..............................192.46 LT245/75R16 .............................. BW ..............................204.43 LT265/70R17 ............................. OWL .............................226.07 LT265/70R17 ............................. OWL .............................238.83 LT285/70R17 ............................. OWL .............................267.54 LT275/65R18 ............................. OWL .............................269.26

WE CARRY:

WE DO:

• Shocks & Struts • Interstate Batteries • Custom Wheels • New & Used OE Wheels

• Brake Service • Wheel Bearing Service • Farm & Road Service • Free Safety Inspections

FREE Road Hazard Warranty • FREE Rotation FREE Mounting • FREE Rebalance • FREE Air Check 400 W. University Way QUALITY YOU’LL RECOGNIZE v mA D BANK CARDS ACCEPTED 925-1044 SERVICE YOU’LL ENJOY 630878 03.22.12 cnr


B4 - Thursday, March 22, 2012

TO

Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

PLACE

AN

AD

CALL

509.925.1414

Classifieds VISIT

Extreme Value Advertising! 30 Daily newspapers $525/25word classified, 3-days. Reach 3 million Pacific Northwesterners. For more information call (916) 288-6010 or email: maria@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

2 bedroom, close to CWU, with off street parking & coinop laundry, water/ sewer/ garbage paid. $660/month, $450/security deposit. 509-962-6469 or 509-697-4874.

US

ONLINE

AT

Rehabilitation Center

High and dry on scenic Hanson Road (that one with General

Frontier Tavern now accepting applications for experienced Bar Tenders Only. Must be 21 to apply. Apply in person & bring in resume, Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm. General Irrigation store is now hiring for Part Time Seasonal Yard Position. Send resume and references to PO Box 480 Ellensburg, WA 98926 General

Healing of Stress & Pain Massage: Relaxing ~ Deep Tissue ~ Hot Stone

Swedish ~ Hawaiian ~ Thai ~ Reiki ~ Myofascial Release Lymph Drainage ~ Neuromuscular ~ Russian & Others Health Insurance & Auto Accidents Carolyn J. Brunk is our new Massage Therapist 509-929-1200 Yoga, Qi-Gong Therapy Classes & Workshops Counseling/Hypnotherapy Gift Certificates Available

509-962-9656 www.rowanbodymind.com

House for Rent. 3 bedroom 1.5 bath, large bonus room. Fully fenced back yard, Pets OK with deposit. First last and deposit 509-899-1040.

WILDLAND FIRE FIGHTERS LAKE FRONT HOME WITH WORKSHOP 3 bedroom home on serene Twin Lakes, Elk Heights area. Perfect for college employee or vacation rental. Large 2 car workshop, propane heat. Price includes most furniture, including log bed/dining set. $249,000 OBO. Email laurelhair@comcast.net for more pictures or link to website. 425-765-5158

Mobile Home For Sale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, all appliances included with electric lawn mower and weed eater, central heating and air conditioning with extra insulation in the attic and walls, living room has Great wall for a flat screen T.V, freshly painted, full length porch. 600 South Ruby #4 Corner Lot. $14,000 OBO. 509-899-3357

Nice Home For Sale By Owner

3 bedroom, 1.5 bath 1715 Park Lane- $895/month Washer/dryer hook up, garage, fenced backyard. CWP Call 509-962-6469 or 509-6976700

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1,906 Square Feet with Great Room, Hardwood Floors, Master Walk-in Closet, 2 Car Garage, Fenced Backyard Washer/Dryer. $219,000. Available Immediately! (509) 859-3442.

Advertise VACATION SPECIALS to 3 million Pacific Northwesterners! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ESTATE PROPERTY, South Central Washington, Near TriCities. 16,000 Acres, South Slope Rattlesnake Mountain. For Sale June 1, 2012. Once In A Lifetime Opportunity. www.mcwhorterranch.com for information. (PNDC)

4 Bedroom, 2 Bath House Great Neighborhood! Quiet, dead end street, Lower Craig's Hill.

$199,000. 1116 E. 2nd Ave, Ellensburg Please call 509-899-2889

House in Roslyn 309 Nevada Avenue 3 Bedroom, 1 ¼ Bath, Garage under house, $80,000 OBO. Bank or owner contract. Ready to move in. Call 509-674-5789

No experience needed, training provided. 1043 University Way Ellensburg, WA 98926 Apply between 10am-2pm. 509-925-1300 Healthcare

Kittitas Valley Health & Rehab Center RN- CLINICAL REIMBURSEMENT SPECIALIST Kittitas Valley Health and Rehabilitation Center is currently seeking a Washington licensed RN who enjoys patient clinical assessments and case management work. Ideal candidates will be detail oriented, good organization skills, a desire to learn new things and basic computer skills. Long term care experience is highly preferred. A working knowledge of MDS 2.0 or 3.0 is preferred. Qualified applicants may submit resume to: ckirsch@extendicare.com EOE Retail

We are now hiring! Reserve your desired shift, all are currently available! RN's, LPN's and NAC's Due to an increase in census and our on-going commitment to hire excellent staff we are seeking Licensed Nurses and Certified Nursing Assistants to join our team! Successful applicants must have a sincere desire and ability to serve our residents and staff in a positive, dignified, and high quality manner. We offer an industry leading salary and benefits package including: ● Medical, Dental, Vision Insurance ● 7 Paid Holidays ● Sick ● Vacation ● 401K matching .25 per dollar contributed up to 6%! ● $2,500 Annual Tuition Reimbursement. To apply please visit www.extendicare.com or send your resume to ckirsch@extendicare.com and in the subject line please indicate “Kittitas Valley Nursing and Rehabilitation Center” EOE Healthcare

Royal Vista Nursing & Rehab is looking for a full time/part time or on call on our EVE & DAY SHIFT. Must have a valid Washington State NA-C license. The applicant must be hard working, honest and have a joy with working with the elderly. Must pass a background and drug test. Competitive wage and benefits, anyone who is interested please apply on line at prestigecare.com. EEO/AA

Royal Vista Nursing & Rehab

Take the Keys to this Company Car!

2003 Ford Escape XLT Trades

WANTED- Well rounded technician for busy shop. Must have 4 years experience with foreign, domestic, and light diesel. Welding experience a plus. Must be self motivated and hard working. Send resume to TECHNICIAN P.O. Box 1163 Ellensburg WA 98926

ATTENTION DIABETICS with Medicare. Get a FREE talking meter and diabetic testing supplies at NO COST, plus FREE home delivery! Best of all, this meter eliminates painful finger pricking! Call 888-739-7199. (PNDC)

Bella Cucina Lunch Buffet and Supper Club Dine in, Carry-out, Catering and Personal Chef Services Monday thru Thursday 11:30 am-2:30 pm 213 W. 4th Ave Suite 104 Ellensburg, WA 509-929-1815

Straw For Sale $5/bale for weed free $4/bale for regular straw Please call 509-306-0435

CUSTOMER SERVICE

4 wheel drive, top of the line tires, leather seats, sunroof, 103K miles, tow package, comes with tire cables, I-POD docking stereo with CD player, power seats/windows/locks, cruise, no body damage. $6,800 OBO. (509) 899-1567

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. 877-2139145. (PNDC)

FREE JUNK VEHICLE REMOVAL No Title / No Problem! McIntosh's Towing 925-3995

ELLENSBURG

320 VALLEY VIEW Past State Patrol off Hanson Road Friday & Saturday 9am - 3pm

ESTATE SALE Wonderful, LIKE NEW Furniture 2 sofa/loveseat sets (1 leather), 8 and 4 chair dining sets, bedroom set, wicker dresser/ nightstand, bookcases, oak computer desk, antique oak buffet, futon, freezer, flat screen entertainment center, exercise bike, cassette towers, Toshiba Theater wide TV, wicker patio set, Bar-B-Q, 8 HP snowblower, riding lawn mower, shop-vacs, rugs, 2X mens quality clothing, kitchen ware, Royal Doulton China, linens, books, records, DVD's camping and much more.

ELLENSBURG

REPS NEEDED FOR Seasonal Openings Duties include: register, cooking & cleaning in a fast paced work environment. Apply in person or pick up application at: Thorp, Arco Am-Pm Exit 101 off I-90 Thorp, WA

Below Blue Book

is looking for a qualified RN who can be flexible with hours and has a valid license. Must pass a background and drug test and be available for all shifts including weekends and holidays. Competitive wage and please apply on line at prestigecare. com. EEO/AA

READERS & MUSIC LOVERS. 100 Greatest Novels (audio books) ONLY $99.00 (plus s/h.) Includes MP3 Player & Accessories. BONUS: 50 Classical Music Works & Money Back Guarantee. Call Today! 1-888-764-5855. (PNDC)

Professional

Annex Building of Old Liberty Theater

Pine Street between 5th and 6th Friday, March 23rd 8AM-4PM Saturday, March 24th 8AM-3PM

Mission Amazon Yard Sale Large INDOOR Multi-Family Sale

Seeking top flight Multimedia Professional

All sales supporting summers mission trip. Too much to list, just come shop with us!

- FOR SALE 2 bed 1 bath single wide, central heat and air, also 2 window A/C, stove, refrigerator, washer/dryer hookups, family park in Ellensburg. Must qualify $390 month space rent. $5,000 obo terms possible. 509-925-1554

93 Single Wide

100 Percent Guaranteed Omaha Steaks - SAVE 65 percent on the Family Value Collection. NOW ONLY $49.99 Plus 3 FREE GIFTS & right-to-thedoor delivery in a reusable cooler. ORDER TODAY at 1888-691-6645 or www.OmahaSteaks.com/family25, use code 45069TVT. (PNDC)

Healthcare

Kittitas Valley Health and

Since 1981

• Up to 5 items, totaling $1000 or less • 8 lines for 8 days • Includes bold line & “New Today” banner • Just $5.00

Healthcare

For Sale By Owner

Affinity Wellness

5 5 for$

DAILYRECORDNEWS.COM

3- Unit building, all rented, two city lots, Kittitas. $125,000. Serious inquires only. 509-304-6194

the large ornamental iron wind catcher in front). 3 or 2 bedroom (with large dorm or rec room) plus bonus heated garage bedroom with closet. 1 ¾ bathrooms, jetted tub, 2 car garage/shop. Solarium den, coy pond, kennel, fenced backyard with storage area and landscaped gardens. Remodeled, new roof. 1/3 acre. $200K. 859-3070 or 607-1036.

This Month’s Special:

3 bedroom, 2 bath in a senior park. Needs TLC. $6,000 or best offer. Please call 509-607-4846

Openings in Cle Elum & Ellensburg

Plantation Porch Rocker, Daily Record Publishing is seeking two dynamic sales professionals for our multimedia organization. Do you believe you have a passion for selling online and print advertising, direct mail and targeted publications? If you're looking for a long-term commitment with a company in an expanding market; we'd like to talk to you. If you are success driven, creative and want to have a positive impact on your local community by joining the areas number one media company-we would like to hear from you. Must possess a winning attitude and have demonstrated success in your prior sales position. Proven self-starter with the ability to attract and build business.

Dr. Thea McFadden Voted Best Veterinarian of Kittitas County 2011 Dr. Ritzenthaler Affordable veterinary services Routine & Urgent Care during business hours Soft tissue/orthopedic surgery Low cost spay/neuter Dentistry Routine equine care MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 8:00AM TO 5:00PM Weekend & Evening Care by Appointment Only

Display Cases $100 & up Shelving Units $50 & up Wooden folding chairs $5 each Miscellaneous items from $1 Call 929-6425.

(hunter green), solid hardwood, new condition, $65. Call 509-952-4124

MANTIS Deluxe Tiller. NEW! FastStart engine. Ships FREE. One-Year Money-Back Guarantee when you buy DIRECT. Call for the DVD and FREE Good Soil book! 877-3575647. (PNDC)

Must thrive in a deadline driven environment. We offer a fun and challenging team work environment along with top-notch benefits and a competitive base salary plus bonus with a draw and mileage reimbursement. We provide a strong sales training program to help make you successful.

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Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

and receive notification of the Community Development Services administrative decision, once made. Appeals to an administrative land use decision may be filed within 10 working days with the board of county commissioners as outline in Chapter 15A.07 of the Kittitas County Code. The current appeal fee is $500.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 1-877-804-5293. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC)

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

Thursday, March 22, 2012 - B5

Designated Permit Coordinator (staff contact): Dan Valoff, Staff Planner: (509) 962-7637; email at dan.valoff@co.kittitas.wa.us Notice of Application: March 22, 2012 Application Received: February 21, 2012 Application Complete: March 15, 2012 Publication Date: March 22, 2012

Project Name (File Number): Frey (VA 12 00001) Applicant: Donald & Terry Frey Location: 13651 Salmon La Sac Road, Ronald, WA in a portion of Section 34, T22N, R14E, WM in Kittitas County, bearing Assessor's map number 21-14-34010-0005, parcel number 216935. Proposal: Donald & Terry Frey, have submitted a zoning setback variance application to reduce the 15-foot side yard setback to 5 feet. The subject property is zoned Rural 3. Materials Available for Review: The submitted application and related filed documents may be examined by the public at the Kittitas County Community Development Services (CDS) office at 411 N. Ruby, Suite 2, Ellensburg, Washington, 98926, or on the CDS website at http://www.co.kittitas .wa.us/cds /current/setbackvariances.asp. Phone: (509) 962 7506 Written Comments on this proposal can be submitted to CDS any time prior to 5:00 p.m. on April 6, 2012. Any person has the right to comment on the application and request a copy of the decision once made. Under Title 15A.03.080 and 17.84.010, zoning setback variances are processed in an abbreviated administrative format, which does not involve a public hearing. All comments will be considered in the decision making process, and any person has the right to comment on this application

CERTIFICATION OF ORDINANCE ENACTMENT CITY OF ELLENSBURG, WASHINGTON 501 North Anderson Street Ellensburg, Washington 98926 The following ordinance was duly and regularly passed by the Ellensburg City Council on 03/019/12:

Ordinance No. 4614 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF ELLENSBURG, WASHINGTON, RELATING TO THE CITY OF ELLENSBURG ZONING CODE ADDING A NEW DEFINITION OF “OUTLET CENTERSâ€? AS NEW SECTION 13.04.845 OF THE ELLENSBURG MUNICIPAL CODE, AND ADDING ÂĄĂˆOUTLET CENTERS¥É AS A PERMITTED USE TO THE HIGHWAY COMMERCIAL ZONING DISTRICT AND AMENDING 13.24.040 OF THE ELLENSBURG MUNICIPAL CODE. The above ordinance is on file with the undersigned, at the office of the City Clerk, where the same is open to the public inspection. A copy of the full text of the ordinance will be mailed upon request. COREEN RENO, CMC City Clerk

y your MCI total charges. If you have any questions, please call MCI customer service at 1-800-444-3333.

Public Notice Kittitas County, Ellensburg WA

More information is online at http://wwwv.co.kittitas.wa.us/ notices/. /s/Julie A. Kjorsvik Clerk of the Board Publish: Daily Record: March 8, 2012 - March 15, 2012 – March 22, 2012

Public Notice Kittitas County, Ellensburg WA

PUBLIC NOTICE Effective April 1, 2012, Telecom*USA ÂŽ will increase 1) your Casual Caller per-minute rate from $1.19 to $1.27, 2) your Operator Service in-state per-minute rate from $0.45 to $0.50, and 3) your Operator Service in-state per-call surcharges as follows: Station-to-Station from $2.95 to $3.25, Station-to-Station Collect from $2.95 to $3.25, Person-to-Person from $3.50 to $3.85, Person-to-Person Collect from $3.50 to $3.85, Third-Party-Billed from $2.95 to $3.25, and Operator Dialed from $0.75 to $0.83. This may increase your Telecom*USA total charges. If you have any questions, please call Telecom*USA customer service at 1-800-728-6161.

Publish: March 22, 2012

STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY YAKIMA, WASHINGTON NOTICE OF APPLICATIONS TO APPROPRIATE PUBLIC WATERS

The Kittitas County Board of Commissioners will meet at 1:30 pm on March 27, 2012 in Room 109 at the Kittitas County Courthouse 205 W. 5th Ave. Ellensburg, WA to consider annexing approximately 322 acres of land in the Badger Pocket area into Kittitas County Fire District No. 2. More information is online at http://wwwv.co.kittitas.wa.us/ notices/. /s/Julie A. Kjorsvik Clerk of the Board Publish: Daily Record: March 8, 2012 - March 15, 2012 and March 22, 2012

ELLENSBURG, WA. The Kittitas PUD Commissioners will have a regular board meeting on March 27th, 2012 at 1:00 P.M., The Board Meeting will be held in the Bldg B conference room at 1400 Vantage Highway. An Executive Session may be called to order per RCW 42.30.110. Thank you, John Hanson, President Publish: March 21, 22, 23, 24, & 26, 2012

The City of Roslyn is currently requesting proposals (RFP) for a grant writer whose primary responsibility will be to write grants for the Old City Hall/Library Historic Building Renovation Project and possibly for other projects as well.

The applicant proposes to rely on two portions of Yakima Basin Adjudicated Court Claim No. 00648, as specifically described in CS4-00648(AA) sb4-b and CS4-00648(AA) sb4-c(A) as mitigation required by WAC 173-539A-050 to offset the uses proposed by these applications. For additional information, please refer to the following website: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wr/cro/sbwb.html

A copy of the full Grant Writer RFP is available on our website at www.ci.roslyn.wa.us or by contacting Roslyn City Hall at (509) 649-3105 or via email at roslyn@inlandnet.com. Complete submittals must be received by 4pm on April 2,

continued next column

PUBLISH: March 15 & 22, 2012

On March 9, 2012, the applicant amended the location of both the proposed places of use and proposed points of withdrawal for each of the 8 applications. The points of withdrawal and the places of use are to be located within Sections 13, 14, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 31, 32, 33, 34, and 35, Township 20 N., R. 17 E.W.M.; Sections 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20, Township 19 N., R. 17 E.W.M.; Sections 1, 2, 12, and 13, Township 19 N., R. 16 E.W.M.; Sections 19 and 30, Township 20 N., R. 18 E.W.M.; and within Section 36, Township 20 N., R. 16 E.W.M.; ALL within Kittitas County, Washington.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

Effective April 1, 2012, MCI will increase 1) your Casual Caller per-minute rate from $1.19 to $1.27, 2) your Operator Service in-state per-minute rate from $0.45 to $0.50, and 3) your Operator Service in-state per-call surcharges as follows: Station-to-Station from $2.95 to $3.25, Stationto-Station Collect from $2.95 to $3.25, Person-to-Person from $3.50 to $3.85, Personto-Person Collect from $3.50 to $3.85, Third-Party-Billed from $2.95 to $3.25, and Operator Dialed from $0.75 to $0.83. This may increase

Protests or objections to approval of this application must include a detailed statement of the basis for objections. All letters of protest will become public record. Cash shall not be accepted. Fees must be paid by check or money order and are nonrefundable. Protests must be accompanied by a $50 recording fee payable to the Department of Ecology, Cashiering Unit, PO Box 47611, Olympia WA 98504-7611, within 30 days from: March 22, 2012.

That J. P. and Jan Roan of Ellensburg, Washington, on December 1, 2011, under Application No. G4-35536 applied to appropriate public waters, subject to existing rights, from up to 100 wells at the combined rate of up to 1,000 gpm for the purposes of incidental irrigation during the irrigation season and continuous single and multiple domestic supply for up to 145 residences. The application was subsequently split into Application Nos. G4-35541, G4-35542, G4-35543, G435544, G4-35545, G4-35546, G4-35547, and G4-35548 to reflect the different groundwater sources in the area.

Regular Board Meeting, Kittitas County PUD Commissioners

PUBLIC NOTICE

g

TAKE NOTICE:

PUBLISH: March 22, 2012

Services continued next column

Amber Shallow, Clerk-Treasurer Published: March 15 & 22, 2012

PUBLISH: March 22, 2012

The Kittitas County Board of Commissioners will meet at 1:30 pm on March 27, 2012 in Room 109 at the Kittitas County Courthouse 205 W. 5th Ave. Ellensburg, WA to consider annexing approximately 52.5 acres of land at the end of the pavement on Manastash Road into Kittitas County Fire District No. 2.

y 2012 and meet the format laid out in the RFP to be considered.

continued next column

continued next column

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Life and Laughs

B6 - Thursday, March 22, 2012

Sorority enriches college life

D

EAR ABBY: I would like to tell EAR BBY “Possibly Paddled Pledge” (Jan. 13) that Jeanne Phillips joining a sorority was one of the best parts of Universal Press college for me. It taught Syndicate me about interpersonal communication, the importance of philanthropy and academics, and networking. I learned skills I would not have gained had I not joined. My sorority had paddles. We decorated them with our symbols and Greek letters, and they were displayed on the wall. We never used them to hit anyone. Our national organization, as well as our university would have been furious. Hazing is illegal and should not be tolerated. I say, give the Greek life a try, but if someone ever lifts a finger toward you, report her to your panhellenic organization and the dean of students immediately. Sororities are supposed to lift you up, not beat you down. — JENNIFER IN ST. LOUIS DEAR JENNIFER: Readers unanimously agreed that paddling should not be tolerated, and stressed that being a legacy does not guarantee acceptance or that a pledge will have a good experience in a particular sorority. My readers comment: DEAR ABBY: My daughter is currently in a sorority, but her experience has been very mixed. She was not automatically welcomed by my sorority. She found the process to be difficult and judgmental. However, she did find a wonderful group of women in a different sorority. “PPP’s” letter spotlighted the snobbish, elitist attitude that turns many eligible young women away from sororities. To say a group is the best-of-the-best and exclusive is offensive. I hope more girls will look beyond the glitz and glamour and give a second hard look to all of the groups. — JANE IN AKRON, OHIO

D

A

DEAR ABBY: My first month in college was wonderful. Then came sorority rush. What followed was hell. I got a paddle with the Greek letters, though it was only a “memento.” Far worse was the social fragmentation of the women there. We immediately began to segregate into our little pledge FOR BETTER or FOR WORSE classes, wore pins that identified our group and were typecast from the very beginning. After wrestling with this psychological social dilemma — even becoming an active member, which would preclude me from ever joining another sorority — I finally deactivated, switched to a much larger school with less emphasis on the Greek system and happily sailed through the rest of my college life with honors. — A HAPPY INDEPENDENT DEAR ABBY: As a member of a sorority, I have never heard of a sorority that used paddles to hit members. What bothers me is TUNDRA the apparent acceptance by “PPP’s” family members of this practice. As a prosecutor for nearly 30 years, I do not condone in any way the use of a paddle, either in fraternities or sororities. A sorority is more than academics and whispers about hazing. “PPP” should visit each chapter on the campus, attend rush and make her own decision. Only she can decide which sorority is right for her. “PPP,” stand up for what you believe. Choose a sorority you like, with women you would be proud to call your sisters, and you will have the time of your life and lifelong friends who BABY BLUES will see you through your old age. I know. I didn’t pledge my mom’s chapter, but a different one. — BEEN THERE IN MONTANA

By Wiley Miller

By Lynn Johnston

By Chad Carpenter

By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott

Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

HOROSCOPE Friday, March 23, 2012

P

NON SEQUITUR

Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

artly due to the influences of two entrepreneurs who are likely to be entering your life in the year ahead, you’ll be far more enterprising and resourceful than you’ve been in the past. You’ll thrive on doing things their way. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Strong determination and fierce boldness make you a force to be reckoned with. Apply this strength to a specific objective and there will be no doubt about achieving success. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — In your own unpretentious but bold way, you’ll get far more done than those who strut and boast about their big intentions. Tenacity is your secret strength. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — One of your best means for achieving success is your ability to see positive elements in all situations, regardless of the negatives involved. You’re likely to put this quality to good use. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — In order to accomplish your aims, you’ll need to be far more assertive than usual. Fortunately, you’ll instinctively know how much pressure to apply without looking pushy. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — You’re likely to have exceptionally strong opinions, and you won’t be bashful about expressing them either. Woe betide those who try to stand up and oppose your views. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Although you’re in an excellent cycle as regards earning capacity, it won’t be so when it comes to handling your funds. Take care not to spend everything all at once. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Your strong inner resolve could make you more overpowering than you intend when dealing with others. Guard against inclinations to dominate everything and everybody. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Unless you use your time industriously and productively, your feelings of self-worth will be greatly diminished. Make sure that whatever you engage in has purpose and value. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — If your social life has been exceptionally boring lately, it may be time to look for new playgrounds as well as new playmates. A change would do you good, as the song says. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — When you’re unhappy, you tend to take it out on your loved ones, who accept your rude behavior with little consequence to you. However, think about what you’re doing to them. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — If you find your usual activities to be a bit boring, seek some close pals who are stimulating thinkers. Using your mind can be more exciting than engaging in physical activities. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Temporarily shelve mundane activities and make this a profitable day by seeking out objectives that are of a financial or material nature. You could do quite well for yourself.

FOR THE RECORD Dishwasher inherits $8 million Daisy Singer Alexander, the only heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, wrote her will, stuffed it inside a bottle and tossed it into the River Thames. She died in 1940. In 1949, a San Francisco dishwasher named Jack Wrum found a bottle with this message: “To avoid all confusion, I leave my entire estate to the lucky person who finds this By Eric bottle.” Wrum Muhr inherited $8 million.

DILBERT

By Scott Adams

PICKLES

By Brian Crane

LUANN

By Greg Evans

BLONDIE

By Chic Young

PEANUTS

By Charles M. Schulz

Covering 11,080 square miles in Canada and 20,600 square miles in the United States, Lake Superior has the largest surface area of any lake in the world.

A Chicago study found that men are more powerfully affected by the smell of baked cinnamon buns than by any known woman’s perfume. Other fragrances that impacted men included the scents of pumpkin pie, lavender, doughnuts, cheese pizza, buttered popcorn, vanilla and strawberries. Women were most likely to respond amorously to the smells of licorice, banana nut bread, cucumber and candy.

Experts estimate that there are at least 600,000 pieces of debris half an inch or larger in orbit around the Earth. These pieces add up to about 4 million pounds of material.

The Business Card Museum in Erdenheim, Pennsylvania, has 50,000 business cards on exhibit.

Eric Muhr is a freelance researcher and writer who lives in Nampa, Idaho. He may be reached at ericmuhr@gmail.com.

BEETLE BAILEY

By Mort Walker


Daily Record - www.dailyrecordnews.com

Entertainment

Thursday, March 22, 2012 - B7

‘Games’ adaptation hits the target Hypocrisy of the story is half the fun By MICHAEL PHILLIPS Chicago Tribune

The hypocrisy at the heart of “The Hunger Games” is irresistible. Novelist Suzanne Collins, whose trilogy has been decreed “awesome” by, among others, my fifthgrade son, indicts violence and organized brutality as tools of mass-audience manipulation. Yet “The Hunger Games” wouldn’t have gotten very far without its steady supply of threatened or actual gladiatorial teen-on-teen bloodshed: death by arrow, javelin, genetically engineered wasp, plus knives. And land mines. And fearsome dogs, conjured by the dogs of the totalitarian state. In hypocrisy, however, one can find some pretty sharp entertainment. “The Hunger Games” was made for the screen, and for franchise glory. I’ve read only the first of the three books (scheduled to be turned into four films), but Collins’ first book, all pace and incident, cries out “Film me! Film me!” on every dread-filled, straighter-thanstraightforward page. Director and co-adapter Gary Ross, whose two

previous features were the comic fantasy “Pleasantville” (1998) and the rosy Depression-era underhorse saga “Seabiscuit” (2003), turned out to be a smart match for the material. He does not pump the action for cheap thrills or opportunities to stoke the audience’s blood lust. Even the score by James Newton Howard, reminding us, subtly, that the key characters come from the land formerly known as Appalachia, shows a kind of mournful restraint in framing the action.

‘Hunger Games’ Review: 3 stars Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Woody Harrelson, Elizabeth Banks, Stanley Tucci Directed by: Gary Ross Rated: PG-13 (for intense violent thematic material and disturbing images — all involving teens) Running time: 2:22

MCT

An honest PG-13

Jennifer Lawrence stars as Katniss Everdeen in “The Hunger Games.” The movie opens with a midnight showing at Grand Meridan Cinema late Thursday.

The movie earns its PG-13 rating. But it earns it honestly. The killings in “The Hunger Games” mean something in emotional terms, and are meant to have a cumulative emotional effect on the crafty, stoical heroine, Katniss Everdeen, played by Jennifer Lawrence. The young actress received an Oscar nomination for her work in “Winter’s Bone,” and her performance here is no less fierce and purposeful. I’d say she carries the movie, except she’s not the only good thing about it. Time: a century or so from now. North America is now called Panem. The nation is ruled by an elegant despot played by Donald Sutherland, which means stock in sinister line readings is at an all-time high. In the land’s 12 remaining

and miserably neglected districts, life among the starving 99-percenters is harsh enough to make “Metropolis” look like a staycation. As part of totalitarian rule, bread and circuses division, two children from each district, between the ages of 12 and 18 (prime age range for Young Adult literature!), must compete each year as “tributes,” to the death, in the annual Hunger Games. The games are televised. Akin to “The Truman Show,” the game’s designer (Wes Bentley) contrives to keep things hopping inside the near-limitless confines of a massive, topographically diverse arena. Viewing of the games is mandatory throughout Panem. The play-by-play color commentary comes from a couple

of weaselly Restoration-era foplike characters played by Stanley Tucci and Toby Jones. (Nothing in “The Hunger Games” is more frightening than Tucci’s smile.)

Stepping for little sister Volunteering her services when her younger sister is picked for the games, Katniss represents District 12 along with a baker’s son, Peeta (Josh Hutcherson). Whisked to the Capitol, these two train together under the boozy tutelage of Haymitch (Woody Harrelson), who along with the frilly Effie Trinket (Elizabeth Banks), coaches the teenagers in the value of gaining sponsors, and of pulling a viewing audience’s strings. “The Hunger Games”

compiles so many teen fantasies and nightmares, it’s hard to keep track of them all. The burden of sudden, unwanted celebrity collides with the difficulty, as we know from the “Twilight” films, of a young woman torn between two fellers, in this case Peeta and the village hunk back in District 12, Katniss’ hunting companion Gale, played by Liam Hemsworth. In the “Twilight” franchise, the heroine carved out plenty of time to mope and brood en route to the most fraught sexual initiation imaginable. “The Hunger Games” has other things on its mind, namely raw survival, in the vein of “The Most Dangerous Game.” When Chris Columbus filmed the first “Harry Potter” book, his job was

At the movies PLAYING THIS WEEK IN ROSLYN

‘John Carter’* Synopsis: The film tells the story of war-weary, former military captain John Carter, who is inexplicably transported to Mars where he becomes reluctantly embroiled in a conflict of epic proportions. Stars: Taylor Kitsch, Willem Dafoe, Lynn Collins Rated: PG-13 *Also playing in Ellensburg Also in Ellensburg: “The Hunger Games,”“21 Jump Street,”“Silent House,” “The Artist,”“Project X,”“Act of Valor,”“This Means War,” “The Vow,”“Journey 2,”“Safe House,”“Chronicle” and “Woman in Black” to get the big ball rolling and shoe-horn in a decent percentage of J.K. Rowling’s wealth of detail. With “The Hunger Games” the task was different; Ross and his fellow adapters Collins and Billy Ray really didn’t have a whole lot to cut. When I heard the film was nearly 2 1/2 long, I thought: Is there really a 2 1/2-hour movie in that book? But there is. The film feels dramatically substantial but not inflated.

12 years before ‘Hunger Games,’ there was ‘Battle Royale’ By CARY DARLING McClatchy Newspapers FORT WORTH, Texas — Here’s the pitch: The state forces kids into a death match where only one is left standing. T h a t’s “ T h e Hu n g e r Games,” right? Yes, but it’s also the storyline for “Battle Royale,” the brutal, harrowing and little-seen Japanese film that beat “Hunger Games” to the plot by 12 years. And that film was based on a 600-page Japanese novel published in 1999. But with “Hunger” hysteria at a high point, “Battle Royale” — which Quentin Tarantino called his “favorite movie of the last 20 years” — might finally get the attention it deserves. This week, Anchor Bay, hungry for some of that “Hunger Games” action, has just released a four-disc repackaging, “Battle Royale: The Complete Collection,” on DVD and Blu-ray. Set in a near-future Japan where youth crime has spiraled out of control, Kenji Fukasaku’s tense, tragic and timely film focuses on a group of 42 students who are taken to a deserted island overseen by the bullying Kitano (played by the always steely Takeshi Kitano). They’re given a deadline (three days), a duffel bag

(each with different weapons and implements), and an order to slaughter each other until there’s just one survivor. If they refuse to cooperate, all will be killed. Imagine “Lord of the Flies” with gunplay and sharp metal objects and you’ve got the idea.

Poorly-timed release But when “Battle Royale” hit the film market in 2000, it couldn’t have been released at a worse time. In Japan, where it was a hit, it was hotly debated in terms of glorifying violence. Though “Battle Royale” played in at U.S. film festivals, it never received theatrical distribution and some speculated that — coming a year after the Columbine massacre and a year before 9/ 11 — that no one in the early 2000s wanted to go near it. A decade on and “Battle Royale” has built up a fierce-

ly loyal following after being released on video a few years back. They came out in force to see it at last year’s Asian Film Festival of Dallas. And there’s been a virtual war online as “Battle Royale” and “Hunger Games” fans go at each other like they’re the last two survivors in this ongoing teenage war that makes the whole vampire vs. zombie vs. werewolf thing so last year. “‘Hunger Games’ is like another ‘Twilight,’ taking a (great) concept and (weakening) it with a love triangle that bores the (life) outta me,” charged one “Battle Royale” fan on a You Tube “Battle Royale Vs. Hunger Games” page. “In every ‘Hunger Games’ post, a ‘Battle Royale’ fan has to pop up and claim it’s a ripoff,” moaned one “HG” loyalist on another blog. Now, with “The Hunger Games” finally hitting the-

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aters and “Battle Royale” getting a renewed push, movie fans will be able to make up their minds about which they prefer.

Out of the shadows Whatever the outcome, it will be good to see “Battle

Royale” — which, it should be noted, is not for the very young or the faint of heart — move out of the shadow world of word-of-mouth cultdom and into the broader daylight of wider circulation. Though Fukasaku may not be consistent (his “Battle

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Royale” sequel, included in “The Complete Collection,” is widely derided), for at least one film he managed to imbue a modern-day horror story with an electric sense of drama and dread. Here’s hoping that is one “Battle” that keeps on raging.

EES FR EAN M

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B8 - Thursday, March 22, 2012

YOUR GUIDE TO THE NEXT 72 HOURS

Visit dailyrecordnews.com/calendar

Thursday, March 22, 2012

Up ahead Spring break is the perfect opportunity to plan ahead, and there’s plenty to do in the Kittitas Valley this spring. Here’s a look at some upcoming events (including Easter activities for people and pets) in Kittitas County. To add an event to our calendar email newsroom@ kvnews.com.

6-7 p.m., Lions-Mountainview Park in Ellensburg, Free. A handler 16 years or older must accompany all dogs, and dogs must remain on a leash at all times.

April 6: Ellensburg Flashlight Easter Egg Hunt, 8 p.m, LionsMountain View Park in Ellensburg. More than 4,000 candy eggs, toys eggs and other surprises will be scattered throughout age-grouped areas. Free for kids age 3-12. Bring a flashlight and basket.

March Brian Myrick / Daily Record file

Foxy (above) and Jody (below) play in the outside play area at the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest in Cle Elum in September 2010. Sippin’ for the Seven, at 5 p.m. Saturday in Roslyn, is a benefit for the sanctuary and the chimpanzees — who are known as the Cle Elum Seven.

Sip for the Seven Saturday event benefits chimps at Sanctuary Northwest By DAILY RECORD STAFF

March 29: “The Mapmaker’s Eye: David Thompson on the Columbia Plateau,” exhibition opening event featuring Jack Nisbet, 5 p.m., Dean Hall lobby, first floor at CWU.

April 6: “1889 - Ellensburgh’s Big Burn” presentation by Milton Wagy of the Ellensburg Public Library, 7 p.m., Hal Holmes Center.

April 7: Cle Elum Easter Egg Hunt, 700 E. Third St., Cle Elum. Sponsored by the Cle Elum Volunteer Fire Department.

March 29: Hope Koehler, guest vocal recital, 7 p.m., McIntrye Music Building, CWU.

March 31: Doggie Easter Egg Hunt sponsored by ARRF Animal Rescue, starts at 1 p.m. (registration at 12:30), Coal Mines Trail at east end of Pennsylvania Avenue in Roslyn.

April 14: 133rd Army Band Performance, 2 p.m., Swauk-Teanaway Grange Hall, 1361 Ballard Hill Road, Cle Elum.

April 14: Magical Evening Gala to support the Kittitas Valley Community Hospital Foundation, 5:30 p.m., CWU SURC, Ellensburg. The black-tie evening features a multi-course dinner, entertainment, raffles and fund-a-need.

March 31: Ropeless Rodeo:

T

he fourth annual Sippin’ for the Seven event is planned Saturday in Roslyn to benefit the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest and the Cle Elum Seven chimps. The event will feature wine, beer and cider, along with live music and art from local and international artists, according to the sanctuary. Anyone can participate in the online art auction. All proceeds support the sanctuary in Cle Elum, home to seven chimpanzees who were released to the sanctuary after being used in medical research. Tastings will be available from Alpenfire Organic Hard Cider, Alpine Brewing Co., Badger Mountain vineyard, Cedergreen Cellars, Charles Smith Wines, Chinook wines, Coyote Canyon Winery, Elegante Cellars, Iron Horse Brewery, Knipprath Cellars, Lantern Brewing, Lost River Winery, NHV, Parejas Cellars, Powers, the Roslyn Brewing Co., SuLei Cellars, Terra Blanca winery, Tieton Cider Works, WelRidge and Yakima Craft Brewing Co.

g Intercollegiate Bouldering m. Competition, 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., at the CWU Climbing Wall. Spectators are welcome.

Roundup Ultimate Disc Tournament, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Alder Sports Complex.

April 20: Gallery One’s annual Soup Line benefit, 5:30 p.m.

April

April 28: 29th annual Cle Ro Elum Roslyn Chamber Feath Feathernester Dinner and Au Auction, 5:30 p.m., The Lo Lodge at Suncadia.

April 1: Central Washington University’s Musica Antiqua will present the music of Josef Bodin de Boismortier, the most prolific French composer of all time, 4 p.m. in the Recital Hall, McIntyre Music Building.

The event is from 5-8 p.m. at the NWI building in Roslyn, 101 E. Pennsylvania Ave. The cost is $35. Attendees must be

21 or older. For more information and tickets, go to www.chimpsnw. org/events.

Area feed stores continue a kid-friendly tradition

Spring has arrived, and local feed stores are getting into the spirit with chick days. Arnold’s Ranch and Home will have its annual Chick Days at 9 a.m. on Saturday. The annual chick giveaway is geared toward children and has been

the Ellensburg Library Book Club Tea, 7 p.m., Hal H Holmes Community Center. Th The event will feature a presentation p by Franki Storli Storlie, author of “Animal Totem Guides Guides.”

March 31-April 1: Rodeo City

Celebrate chick days By DAILY RECORD STAFF

April 16: Friends of

taking place for more than 25 years. The chicks are usually gone by noon. The store is at 615 S. Main St., and the phone is 925-6181. Mid-State Co-op had its Chick Days last weekend, and reported a good turnout for its giveaway. Contact the store at 925-3525 for more information

about poultry or visit 417 W. Third Ave. Old Mill Country Store in Ellensburg also is taking orders for chicks for March and April delivery. People are encouraged to stop by to pick out the breed they want. The store is at 500 W. Third Ave. and can be reached at 925-5397.

April 28: Downtown A Ellensburg CleanUp, 8 a.m. to noon, Rotary Pavilion on Pearl Street.

May May 3: Stan Bassett Ma Day iin Ellensburg.

April 5: Ellensburg on Downtown Association Spring Girls Night Out, 5-9 p.m., downtown Ellensburg.

May 5: Kittitas County Farmers Market begins. Runs each Saturday morning through October in downtown Ellensburg.

April 5: CWU’s Center for Student Empowerment and Women’s Studies presents “Dr. Pepper Schwartz: Why Are We So Afraid of Sex?” at 5 p.m. in the Student Union and Recreation Center (SURC) Theatre. The event is part of Women’s History Month.

April 6: First Friday Art Walk, 5-8 p.m., locations around Ellensburg. ■ Reception for “Atmospheric,” an invitational ceramics exhibition at the Sarah Spurgeon Gallery at Central Washington University. Artist demonstrations are planned from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 6-7 at the CWU SURC Theatre. ■ “Tacoma, Naturally” exhibit opens at Alley Cat Artists, 116 W. Third Ave.

May 4-5: Washington State Fly Fishing Conference, Kittitas County Event Center, Ellensburg. More than 100 fly tiers will demonstrate their skills. http:// washingtoncouncilfff.org/ for more information.

May 18-20: 40th annual Western Art Association National Art Show and Auction, Kittitas County Fairgrounds.

May 18-19: Clymer Gallery Auction and Gala, Swiftwater Cellars.

May 26: Easton Memorial Day parade, festival and car show, downtown Easton.

May 28: Cle Elum Memorial

April 6: Dog Easter Biscuit Hunt,

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Day service, Cle Elum Veterans Cemetery.


Daily Record 3-22-2012