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NEWS: THE BUFFALO 25 AND IMMIGRATION POLICY

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ART: MILLIE CHEN'S WALLPAPER AT BT&C

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CENTERFOLD: MARY WYRICK AT BLUE PLATE STUDIO

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FAMOUS LAST WORDS: MASON WINFIELD ON HOLIDAY SPOOKINESS


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Poland’s legendary composer and conductor has won multiple Grammy Awards and international recognition across a variety of musical genres, from classical to opera to films. He conducts BPO concertmaster Dennis Kim, and principal cellist Roman Mekinulov, in his own Concerto for Violin and Cello on a program that also features works by Dvorˇák and Beethoven.

THIS WEEK

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ART: At CEPA Gallery, Biff Henrich explores the structures of digital photography.

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SPOTLIGHT: Meet Athena Kouimanis of Curly’s.

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ARTISTS SEEN: Artist, activis, and write Sylvia Coles.

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FILM: Seasons, plus capsule reviews and cinema listings.

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MUSIC: The Weepies come to Tralf Music Hall on Thursday, December 1.

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ON THE COVER MILLIE CHEN: The conceptual artist’s new work opens at BT&C Gallery this weekend. Read more on page 6.

MARKETS: Queen City Market returns to Karpeles on Saturday, December 3.

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CONTRIBUTING EDITORS ENVIRONMENT JAY BURNEY THEATER ANTHONY CHASE ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER SPECIAL ACCOUNTS EXECUTIVE CY ALESSI ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES MARIA C. PROVENZANO, BARBARA FISHER PRODUCTION MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNER AMANDA FERREIRA

COVER IMAGE MILLIE CHEN COLUMNISTS

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NEWS LOCAL

THE BUFFALO 25, IMMIGRATION, &  ENFORCEMENT BY JAKE STEINMETZ

LOCAL RAIDS ENCOMPASS COMPLEXITIES OF UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS AND RAISE QUESTIONS ABOUT TRUMP ADMINISTRATION POLICY IN OCTOBER, four popular Mexican restaurants in Buffalo were the subject of the biggest workplace raid conducted under the Obama administration. The events since the raid highlight the complexities facing undocumented immigrants, but may also point to new enforcement tactics and legal recourse, which advocates fear will become more common in the future. 

The raids were the product of a two-and-halfyear investigation that targeted the business practices of restaurant owner Sergio Ramses Mucino, who ran Don Tequila, Agave, El Agave, and La Divina Mexican Store. That investigation—led by Homeland Security Investigations (HSI)—resulted in the arrest of Mucino and two of his managers, but also led to the discovery and apprehension of 25 undocumented workers among the four restaurants. In the month following the raids, a whirlwind of events transpired. The deportation charges against these 25 individuals—some of whom have spouses and children—drew an outpouring of support from various community members. Enter Movimiento Cosecha. The nascent nonprofit —whose mission is nationwide—was contacted by members of PUSH Buffalo to take up the cause.  Movimiento Cosecha has spearheaded the campaign to pressure immigration officials to terminate the deportation charges against these individuals, since referred to as the “Buffalo 25.” Movimiento Cosecha has relied on publicity, the pressuring of public officials, and legal tactics to achieve their goal. Although the Buffalo 25 is their highest-profile case, the organization plans to organize a nationwide strike in two years for all undocumented workers, to demonstrate the country’s economic reliance on this workforce.  The weekend prior to the presidential election, Movimiento Cosecha led several of the workers on a sit-in at the campaign headquarters of then-candidate Hillary Clinton in Pittsburgh, demanding the deportation charges be terminated. As the workers were wearing GPS an-

kle bracelets monitoring their whereabouts, they risked apprehension for having crossed state lines. “Our primary goal was to get the Democratic Party to support the cause,” said Movimiento Cosecha volunteer Carlos E. Rojas. Leading up to the election, Hillary Clinton was perceived by many as the imminent victor. The shock and uncertainty caused by Donald Trump’s victory on election day has been perhaps most palpable among the immigrant community, particularly among those without legal status. Trump’s hardline immigration rhetoric may signal new enforcement tactics and legal recourse that could become common under the new administration. 

WORKPLACE RAIDS AND CRIMINAL CHARGES  In addition to their public advocacy, Movimiento Cosecha has worked alongside University at Buffalo law professor Nicole Hallett. Hallett’s legal team is consulting directly with Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Office of Chief Counsel to drop the deportation charges before the case goes to immigration court.  At the crux of their argument, Hallett—who herself is representing three of the individuals— maintains that the workers should not have been arrested in an investigation that targeted the business owners. She explains that the Obama administration largely abandoned the use of workplace raids around 2009. 

A rally in Niagara Square in support of 25 undocumented workers swept up in raids on a group of locally owned Mexican restaurants.

is called “cancelation of removal.” The individual would qualify if they had resided in the US for 10 years before receiving the removal order and had a qualifying family member who “would suffer an exceptional or unusual hardship,” according to Kolken. Kolken explains they might also be eligible for asylum, or else “administrative closure of the case,” where the case would simply be taken off the court’s active docket. “It’s like the pot still being on the stove, but it’s put on the back burner with the stove turned off,” Kolken says.  In addition to the use of workplace raids, advocates are concerned with another facet of the case. Two of the 25 workers were issued felony charges of illegal reentry following a deportation.  Presently, immigration and criminal matters are outlined under separate sections of federal law. Violations of immigration law would not necessarily result in criminal prosecution, but criminal charges can have serious impacts on a non-citizen’s status. 

“These investigations were to target employers,” Hallett says. “But by apprehending individuals, you would make them less likely to report labor abuses in the future.” 

According to Kolken, these felony charges would eliminate the individual’s ability to “pursue defense against deportation in a fresh immigration court setting.” 

Given the president’s previous directives, Hallett maintains the workers were unfairly targeted: “[The charges] never should have been issued in the first place,” Hallett says. 

In addition, Kolken explains that this felony charge could result in jail time, after which these individuals would then be deported. Prosecution on these grounds has been steadily increasing under the Obama administration, Kolken says, and he believes The Trump administration will maintain that trajectory. 

If Hallett is unsuccessful, the case will enter immigration court, where Hallett will argue on other grounds that these individuals be permitted to stay. She declined to outline her specific legal tactics.  Immigration attorney Matthew Kolken explains that, in general, deportation proceedings can be terminated, “depending on the facts of the individual case.” He explained one form of relief from deportation

FUTURE ENFORCEMENT UNDER TRUMP Obama has shifted away from the use of workplace raids, both because of the fears it instilled in workers and because his priority for immigration enforcement shifted to criminal offenders. (To be sure, the Obama administration did not

abandon the use of raids altogether. During the past several years, ICE has frequently used raids to apprehend the wave of undocumented children and families who have fled here from Central America.) Trump’s immigration plans outlined thus far maintain Obama’s focus on criminal violators, but his pledges to deport between two million and three million criminal offenders immediately—and all 11 million eventually—indicate that the Buffalo 25 may be a microcosm of what’s to come.  Workplace raids could become more common, and advocates believe this will push the undocumented workforce further underground. As Hallett explained, the tactic may unfairly target the undocumented workers, making them more susceptible to labor abuses and deterring them from reporting these abuses to law enforcement.  Others, such as Kolken, believe the situation is simply a continuance of already broken policy: “You can’t push the undocumented workforce underground, because they’re already working in the shadows.”  Some advocates have also speculated that the Republican-controlled White House and Congress could result in legislation that changes current immigration violations into criminal offenses. They fear this, especially given the high number of criminal violators Trump has aimed at deporting.  While future policy remains hypothetical, if the Buffalo 25 are any indication of the mindset of undocumented workers at large, they are fearful of what’s to come. The Public’s request to interview several workers—who previously agreed to the interview and had already spoken to various news outlets—was turned down following the election. According to Hallett, they remain “spooked” and no longer want to draw attention P to their plight. 

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LOCAL NEWS

LOOKING BACKWARD: HOTEL BUFFALO Ellsworth Milton Statler threw open the doors of his “skyscraper hotel” on January 18, 1908, the Hotel Statler (called the Hotel Buffalo after 1922) would be instantly regarded as one of the country’s finest. As a local architect reportedly stated, “The atmosphere was one of confidence; there was nothing tentative about this hotel.” The interior of the hotel “throbbed with plaster grapevines, floating pond lilies, militant cattails, crystal-bead chandeliers, putti (figures of unclad Cupidlike children), dolphins, and gargoyles,” according to a 1967 Buffalo Courier Express account. The lobby was a “medley of old leather, Flemish oak, leaded glass, old brass fixtures, and electric lights.” The Arbor Room, initially called the Palm Room and seen here in an undated photograph, was described in 1908 by the Buffalo Express as “a dream of mural decoration and electric light.” The hotel where John D. Rockefeller and William Jennings Bryan were guests went into decline after the Depression, and when it was demolished in 1968, it was called the “last stand of romantic elegance in the city’s lower downtown section.” P -THE PUBLIC STAFF PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BUFFALO HISTORY MUSEUM.

ON VIEW THROUGH FEB RUA RY 19, 2 017 O P E N U N T I L 9 P M O N T H U R S D AY S

This exhibition was made possible through the generosity of M&T Bank. Additional support has been provided by Ferrero USA Inc. and Fondazione Ferrero Onlus; Superior Group; The Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation Funds at the Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo; Amy and Harris Schwalb; Woods Oviatt Gilman LLP; C2 Paint; and by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973). Three Musicians, 1921. Oil on canvas, 80K x 74V inches (204.5 x 188.3 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art; A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1952. 1952-61-96 © 2016 Succession Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / THE PUBLIC

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ARTS REVIEW

MILLIE CHEN: UN-PAPERING OVER CRACKS

Prototype 1970 by Millie Chen.

BY BRUCE ADAMS

AT BT&C GALLERY, THE ARTIST DOCUMENTS THE TURBULENT 1970S IN WALLPAPER DESIGNS CONSIDER WALLPAPER. Once a staple of home décor, it still sheathes the

interiors of many well-appointed households. An ever-present white noise motif, it is the backdrop against which domestic life plays out. Stripping off wallpaper layers is like traveling back in time, glimpsing the fashions, preoccupations, and perceptions of bygone eras. Wallpaper also serves as a metaphor for covering over inconvenient truths; when we conceal problems rather than deal with them, we “paper over the cracks.”  Not Millie Chen.  The artist has a history with wallpaper, one that darkly recalls past events that Chen does not want papered over. For a 2014 exhibition in the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, she underscored wartime horrors by creating a wallcovering pattern derived from the etchings of French artist Jacques Callot, collectively titled The Miseries and Misfortunes of War. In 2007, Chen installed slyly modified Chinoiserie wallpaper in public places in Paris, to throw into relief European stereotypes of Chinese culture.  In her most recent exhibition, Millie Chen: Prototypes 1970s, now on view at Body of Trade & Commerce Gallery (BT&C), she documents the turbulent events of the 1970s, in 10 original wallpaper designs. Many of the tumultuous social changes we associate with the decade of the 1960s actually occurred or peaked in the 1970s. The Vietnam War escalated with the Cambodian Invasion, stirring widespread protests in America. The trial of Lieutenant William Calley for the My Lai Massacre, and napalm bombing—personified by the indelible image of a severely burned and naked child running down the road in terror—were among the events of that period. The Kent State shootings, China’s Lost Decade, the Soweto Uprising, Bloody Sunday, Black Panthers, Wounded Knee, Love Canal, and the Jonestown Massacre all contributed to a decade of dramatic cultural upheaval. From Hendrix and the Stones to Patti Smith and the Sex Pistols, bell-bottoms to drainpipes, psychedelia to punk aesthetics, the 1970s provided the backdrop, the cultural wallpaper, for Chen’s passage from child to young woman.  Each of her wallpaper prototypes are original works on paper, rendered in various combinations of watercolor, gouache, graphite, ink, and acrylic paint. They are designed as standard pattern repeats, meaning the sides, top, and bottom match so they can be printed in rolls and pasted on a wall in a continuous configuration. Not all are equally successful in this regard; Prototype 1972 would be jarringly wonky as a pattern. No matter; these won’t be mistaken for ornamentation intended to recede into the background of a room.  Though they are displayed as discrete works of art at BT&C, they can be used to produce actual wallpaper should the opportunity arise. For the exhibition, Chen has had Prototype 1977 printed onto rolls, which she uses to paper a corner of the gallery. A lamp, couch, and other furniture items complete the effect, forming a spare approximation of a 1970s-era living room. All that’s missing is a TV set playing Happy Days.  Each prototype represents a single year, referencing events—often horrific ones—that occurred during that period. The year 1970, for instance, goes by the full title Prototype 1970: War, children, it’s just a shot away, Four dead in Ohio, I love Beijing Tiananmen, Excuse me while I kiss the sky. The 31-by23-inch work is dominated by a fleet of Blackhawk helicopters set against a sun pattern from a vintage Chinese Cultural Revolution poster. A stringy mass of purple haze rises up behind 14-year-old Mary Ann Vecchio, who kneels in her familiar extended-arm posture from John Filo’s iconic Kent State photograph. Next to her, a row of men stand on chairs with their backs to us holding signs, heads bowed in humiliation—enemies of the Cultural Revolution.  Some of the works incorporate vintage design elements: circles and curves, the color orange. One that projects a distinct 1970s vibe is Prototype 1974.

IN GALLERIES NOW = ART OPENING FF   = FIRST FRIDAY 1045 Elmwood Gallery for the Arts (1045 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-228-1855,  photographics2.com/store/welcome-to-our-studio-1045gallery-store): Thu & Fri 11-6, Sat 11-4 and by appointment.  FF  Albright-Knox Art Gallery (1285 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 882-8700, albrightknox.org): Rosalyn Drexler: Who Does She Think She Is? through Jan 29. Picasso: The Artist and His Models through Feb 19, 2017.  Claudia Joskowicz: Every Building on Avenida Alfonso Ugarte—After Ruscha, on view through Feb 5, 2017.  Stop if You’ve Heard This One Before: humor and satire from the collection, through Mar 19. Matt Hoyt: Recent Past, 2010–2016, through Feb 5, 2017. Tue-Sun 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays (free) until 10pm. 

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In it, Letebirhan Haile, Mairéad Farrell, and Patti Smith stand at the base of a circle that dominates the 17-by-17-inch format, backed by progressively smaller circles of alternating avocado and mauve, evoking both a black hole and kitchen décor.  Through her career, true to the conceptual artist credo, Chen has placed traditional artistry second to the underlying concepts that define her work. She has produced audio, video, and olfactory installations, made temporary wall drawings, built mazes, and painted with pig blood. Her work carries intellectual and political gravitas, with varying degrees of social desolation and apocalyptic apprehension. Conventional aesthetics are beside the point.  Chen’s wallpaper design prototypes are no less politically trenchant or intellectually probing, but they are, perhaps unexpectedly, pleasingly attractive, at times even striking. This adds to their subversive nature, as the visual appeal of the work ironically belies the often heartrending stories they represent. In Prototype 1973, for instance, rolling pastoral countryside is rendered in sinuous brushwork of verdant terrain. A picturesque country church sits off in the distance. Initially, it passes for a pleasantly accomplished landscape. But the tiny solders in the corner inform us that this is no simple bucolic scene, and the title tells us it’s Wounded Knee, site of a bloody standoff between the American Indian Movement and the US Government. Another small figure represents the ill-fated, American supported, Chilean coup that brought Augusto Pinochet to power.  In Prototype 1971 the subtitle says it all: Bangladeshi women freedom fighters smuggle grenades under water hyacinths while May Day protesters congregate in West Potomac Park. Chen renders these disparate and disquieting historical vignettes with restraint and grace, invoking tranquility rather than trouble. This decision to draw interest with ocular palatability, while furtively inserting cold reality, subverts the roll of wallpaper as coverer of inconvenient cracks. We are drawn in, made to recall and ponder extraordinary events, P and then perhaps to question.

Amy’s Place Restaurant (University Heights Arts Association) (3234 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214,  716833-6260,  uhartsgroup.com/amysplace):  Every day: 7am-9pm. Art Dialogue Gallery  (5 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14209, wnyag.com):  Transitions, work by Joyce Hill. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Artists Group Gallery (Western New York Artists Group) (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, 716-8852251, wnyag.com): 22nd Annual Artful Gifts Exhibition through Dec  30. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat  11am3pm.  FF  Ashker’s on Elmwood (1002 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-886 -2233, ashkersbuffalo.com): Buffalo Imprints, Gary Wolfe & Rita Argen Auerbach, on view through Dec 4. Mon-Sat 7am-10pm, Sun 9am5pm. Betty’s Restaurant  (370 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 362-0633, bettysbuffalo.com): Revealing Intimacies, New work by Cindi O’Mara. On view through Jan 22. Tue-Thu, 8am-9pm, Fri 8am-10pm, Sat 9am10pm, Sun 9am-2pm.  FF  Benjaman Gallery (419 Elmwood Avenue Buffalo, NY 14222, thebenjamangallery.com): Artist to Artist,

paintings by  Robert & Jeanette Blair, Ray Bonilla, Tricia Butski, Charles Burchfield and Alberto Rey, on view through Dec 17. Thu-Sat 11am-5pm. Big Orbit (30d Essex Street, Buffalo, NY 14222, cepagallery.org/about-big-orbit): Together We Can Carry the Weight, a solo exhibition by Zack Boehler.  FriSun 12-6pm. Blue Plate Studio  (69 Keil Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120): Mary Louise Wyrick and Eric Evinczik.   FF    BOX  Gallery  (667 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203):  Untitled Film Stills, new work by Brian Milbrand on view through Dec 31. Open 4pm-10pm daily.  FF   BT&C Gallery (1250 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183, btandcgallery.com): Prototypes, wallpaper designs by Millie Chen. Fri 12-7pm select Sat 12-4pm, or by appointment. ¡Buen Vivir! (148 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201, photolangelle.org): If Voting Changed Things, photographs of protests at the 1972 Republican National Convention and the 2004 Democratic and Republican National Conventions by Orin Langelle, on view through Dec 2. Tue-Fri 1:30-4:30pm, Fri 6-8pm, Sat 1-3pm.


IN GALLERIES NOW ARTS Buffalo Artspace Gallery (1219 Main Street, Buffalo, NY, 14209): Group 263: Brian Boutin, John Lloyd, Kathleen Corff Rogers, Gethyn Soderman, Rick Steinberg. On view through Nov 19. Fri 6-9:30pm, Sat & Sun 11-2pm. Buffalo Arts Studio  (Tri Main Building 5th Floor, 2495 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, 833-4450, buffaloartsstudio.org): GatherX25  holiday art sale. On view through Dec 22. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm. Buffalo Brush Paint & Sip (2533 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216, buffalobrush.com): Painting classes taught by Julia Douglas.  Buffalo & Erie County Central Library  (1 Lafayette Square, Buffalo, NY 14203, 858-8900,  buffalolib. org): Celebrating 400 Years of Shakespeare: Reflecting on the Life of the Bard.  Milestones on Science: Books That Shook the World!  35 rare books from the history of science, on second floor.  MonSat 8:30am-6:00pm, Sun 12-5pm. Burchfield Penney Art Center  (1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 878-6011, burchfieldpenney.org): Jozef Bajus: Nothing Is Going Away through Jan 29, 2017. Babs Reingold: The Last Tree through Feb 26, 2017.  Artists Seen: photographs of contemporary artists by David Moog. Sequel on view through Nov 27 18.  The Birthday Party: A Community of Artists, on view through Dec 11. 10am-5pm & Sun 1-5pm. Admission $5-$10, children 10 and under free.Café Taza (100 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201): New paintings by Bobby Griffiths. Casa de Arte  (141 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201, 240-9248,  casadeartegallery.com):  Mexican Movements:  Carlos Mérida  and his  Compañeros. Mon, Wed, Fri 10-3pm, or by appointment.  Castellani Art Museum (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200, castellaniartmuseum.org): Sara M. Zak: An Overwhelming Familiarity,  on view through Jan 11, 2017. Tue-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. CEPA  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 8562717, cepagallery.org): The Structure of Things, Biff Henrich.  monument, photographs by bobCollignon, both on view through Dec 17. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Daemen College, Tower Gallery of the Haberman Gacioch Art Center (Daeman College Center for Visual & Performing Arts, 4380 Main Street, Amherst, NY 14226, 839-8241):  Buffalo Society of Artists Past Presidents Exhibition. Daily Planet Coffee Company (1862 Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216, 716- 551-0661): Works by Walter Terpin. Dana Tillou Fine Arts (1478 Hertel Avenue Buffalo, NY 14216, 716-854-5285,  danatilloufinearts.com):  The Old and the New: 180 Years of Painting and the Arts. Wed-Fri 10:30am-5pm, Sat 10:30am-4pm.   FF    El Museo (91 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 464-4692,  elmuseobuffalo.org): Stacey Robinson: Branding the Afrofuture, on view through Dec 30. Opening reception Fri  Dec  2,  7–9pm.  Tue-Sat  125pm. Enjoy the Journey Art Gallery (1168 Orchard Park Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 675-0204, etjgallery.com): Member’s Exhibit on view through Dec 30. Opening reception  Fri  Dec  2, 7-9pm.  Tue-Fri  11-6pm, Sat  114pm. Hallwalls (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694,  hallwalls.org): Wayne Hodge:  Skin Like Distant Stars, Tue-Fri 11am-6pm, Sat 11am-2pm.  FF   Indigo Art Gallery (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572, indigoartbuffalo.com): Jozef Bajus, Lily Booth, Linda Collignon, Jack Edson, Ani Hoover, Barbara Murak, Dennis Nahabetian, Andrew Ooi, Kurt Treeby. On view through Dec 17. Wed & Fri 12-6pm, Thu 12-7pm, Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sundays and Mondays.  Jewish Community Center of Greater Buffalo Bunis Family Art Gallery (2640 N Forest Road, Benderson Family Building, Amherst, NY 14068, 688-4033, jccbuffalo.org): On view Nov 1-Dec 31, an  exhibit  of art work, created by JCC staff. Reception: Mon Dec 5, 5-8pm.  Mon-Thu 5:30am-10pm, Fri 5:30am-6pm, Sat-Sun 8am-6pm. Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall) (220 North St., Buffalo, NY  14201):  The invention of the telegraph and the railroad. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall)  (453 Porter Ave, Buffalo, NY 14201):  Maps of the United States. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.  Lockside Art Center  (21 Main Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 478-0239,  locksideartcenter.com):  Niagara Arts Guild Exhibition through Nov 19. Fri-Sun  124pm. Main Street Gallery (515 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203): Mind, Spirit and Vision, paintings by Kerima Collier.  Meibohm Fine Arts (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940, meibohmfinearts.com): James Sedwick:  The Amaryllis in Palladium, open Nov 26Dec 31. Tue-Sat 9:30am-5:30pm. Native American Museum of Art at Smokin’ Joe’s  (2293 Saunders Settlement Road, Sanborn, NY 14123, 2619251) Open year round and free. Exhibits Iroquois artists work. 7am-9pm. Norberg’s Art & Frame Shop (37 South Grove St., East Aurora, NY 14052, 716-652-3270,  norbergsartandframe.com): Local artists: Kathleen West, Bradley Widman, Peter Potter, and Miranda Roth.  TueSat 10am–5pm.   FF    Parables Gallery & Gifts (1027 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY, parablesgalleryandgifts.com): Niagara Nature, photographs by James Johnston, on view through Nov 30.  Tue-Thu, 11am-6pm, Fri 11am-7pm (11am-9pm on first Fridays), Sat 11am-5pm. Pausa Art House (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 697-9069, pausaarthouse.com): Paintings by Gary L. Wolfe. Live music Thu-Sat. See website for more info.  FF   Pine Apple Company (224 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-275-3648,  squareup.com/store/pine-apple-company): Work by Thomas James Holt, Yames Moffitt, Esther Neisen, Mickey Harmon, Mike West, and  Sarah Liddell.  Wed & Thu 11am-6pm, Fri & Sat 11am-11pm, Sun 10am-5pm.

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Give the gift of Western New York Art this year. Join us Friday, December 2 (5—9 pm), Saturday, December 3 and Sunday, December 4 ( 11 am—6pm), and explore the Holiday Open Studios at The Center, featuring a diverse group of more than 45 artists. www.BurchfieldPenney.org

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10 NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / THE PUBLIC

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ARTS REVIEW

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A n n ua l

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tH

CzurlES-NElSoN GAllErY uptoN HAll 10:00 Am - 7:00 pm

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BIFF HENRICH: THE STRUCTURE OF THINGS

tH

tHurSDAY CzurlES-NElSoN GAllErY uptoN HAll 10:00 Am - 4:00 pm

BY JACK FORAN

A Vocális

A Vocális tradition continues, as we once again return to the glorious acoustic of the Karpeles Manuscript Museum in Buffalo to celebrate the season. Relax to the sweet sounds of an intimate choral Christmas. Friday, December 2, 8:00 pm S.S. Peter and Paul Church 5480 Main Street, Williamsville Saturday, December 3, 7:30 pm Karpeles Manuscript Museum 220 North Street at Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo Adult - $15, Student - $10

Vocális Chamber Choir, a select ensemble of dedicated professionals based in Western New York, is committed to performing great a cappella music of all eras. www.vocalischamberchoir.org

Vocális Chamber Choir is supported in part with cultural funding from the 2016 adopted Erie County Budget, Mark C. Poloncarz, County Executive.

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THE PUBLIC / NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

AT CEPA GALLERY, AN EXAMINATION OF THE NATURE OF DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

THE STRUCTURE OF THINGS PARTS I & II

DIGITAL CAMERA MAGIC of two sorts on display in two segments of photographer Biff Henrich’s exhibit currently at CEPA. In the downstairs gallery, manipulation painterly abstracts edging into and out of representational. While upstairs, natural light nocturnal landscapes. So time exposures. About time and space as integral aspects of the photo. All done in-camera—all the manipulations, all the magic—according to a flier accompanying the exhibit. Not an artist’s statement. Henrich prefers that the photos make the statement. 

856-2717, CEPAGALLERY.ORG

And all lush and beautiful, upstairs and down. Large-format, deeply colorful, and handsomely printed. In the downstairs segment, the nominal subject matter—where you can make out subject matter—architectural interiors and exteriors. The real subject matter being digital photography. The structure—pixel nature—of digital photos. And capabilities and limitations of digital photography in capturing form and color and light, sometimes at visibility limits. (Like aural frequency limits. Where dogs can hear but humans can’t.) Photography that explores limits, borders.  A misty image of the upward-expansive fluted-drum Temple Beth Zion building on Delaware Avenue, as if levitating. A montage photo of a portion of the Darwin Martin House campus, including, in focus, lower right, the gardener’s cottage, and lower left, a fragmented view of the new addition glass house reception building, transitioning above to a blurry stretched image of what looks like some other structure somewhere else, but what other structure and where not immediately clear. Something like the new 250 Delaware Avenue building. Or the currently under construction UB Medical School building on Main Street.  In several examples, digital fabrication scrim curtains—or maybe light blankets—concealing and partially revealing underlying architectural forms. Or in one case a vaguely human form, like an analog intruder into the digital technology world. While on extremely close inspection, a wildly colorful micro-mosaic of barely perceptible pixels. The actual fabric. 

CEPA GALLERY / 617 MAIN ST., BUFFALO

One of the limits of visibility photos shows an office building elevator short corridor, and extreme foreground floor inset metal grating, and high background apocalyptic blinding white light effect. Luminous apparition beyond the capacity of the human eye to perceive it or the camera to record and represent it.  Another consists of a scatter of pixelation disintegration imagery—including bending the color spectrum toward lurid unnatural shades of magenta and lime green—in one lower corner of the photo, the rest blank, black. Mysterious lit darkness and space and time integration effects in the upstairs night scene spectacular landscapes. Time enabling representation of space. The capture of subject matter that wouldn’t be possible in the standard photographic instant. Stars in the night sky are smudges not dots. More like shooting stars. And other illumination sources of whatever nature—reflective or actual sources—light-colored blossoms amid meadow dark grasses, or some of what must be fireflies—magnified by time exposures as startlingly bright points of light. Sporadic bare twigs amid thick tree foliage look like flying snakes. A photo taken from the south shore of Lake Erie looking northwest across a thick pack of shoreline rotten ice and open water transforms the generator windmills on old Bethlehem property into sentry beacons on guard before Buffalo and suburbs, a thin horizontal smear of bright light fading gradually upward into infinite night sky.  An alternate world photo of a stand of trees on a golf course—it looks like—under a full moon. Night shadows on a manicured landscape. Nature denatured. And an eerie view of a tract of what looks like Tifft Farm swamp, complete with decaying wood pile remnants. You can hear the night chorus of frogs and crickets.  The title of the exhibit is The Structure of Things, Parts I & II. It continues until December 17. P


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Join us for this once-in-a-half century cultural happening celebrating the Burchfield Penney’s 50th anniversary. Live music will fill the galleries, hallways, and elevators. Site-specific installations by artists will appear in spaces you’d least expect. Come experience Western New York art and find yourself at The Center. GOLDEN is free and open to the public. For info on all that’s going on, visit www.BurchfieldPenney.org.

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Sylvia Coles is a photographer, writer, activist, and arts patron. Born Sylvia R. Meyn, she �was PROOF OKin(NO CHANGES) raised Perryville, Missouri. While attending a jazz club in St. Paul, Minnesota, in the 1950s, she met her future husband, Buffalo-born architect Robert Traynham Coles. After �traveling PROOF OK (WITH CHANGES) the world, the couple settled in Robert’s hometown, and Sylvia received an MBA from SUNY Buffalo in 1980. She is a member of the Buffalo Society of Artists. In 2013 she published a memoir, Living with an Architect and Finding Myself, chronicling their marriage over theSignature course of sixty years, including the opposition the interracial couple faced early on. Advertisers They have two children. For more information on Sylvia Coles, visit burchfieldpenney.org. 

____________________________ Artists Seen: Photographs of Artists in the 21st Century is an ongoing project by Date _______________________ photographer David Moog in partnership with the Burchfield Penney Art Center at SUNY Buffalo State. Moog has set out to make portraits of every self-identified working artist MARIA / Y16W46 and arts professional in Western New York. To be included in the project, call David Moog Issue: ______________________ directly at 716-472-6721 or contact the center at 716-878-4131. Artists working in all media are welcome; visit burchfieldpenney.org for more information. -THE PUBLIC P

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Queen City Gallery  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 868-8183, queencitygallery.tripod.com): Neil Mahar, David Pierro, Candace Keegan, John Farallo, Chris McGee, Tim Raymond, Eileen Pleasure, Eric Evinczik, Barbara Crocker, Thomas Bittner, Susan Redenbach, Barbara Lynch Johnt, Kisha Patterson, Sara O’Brien, Michael Mulley. Tue-Fri 11am-4pm and by appointment. Revolution Gallery (1419 Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216, revolutionartgallery.com):  Inception, work by Jennybird Alcantara, DK Burger, Vincent Castiglia Jeremy Cross, Jason D’Aquino, Katy D’Aquino, Daniel Martin Diaz, Damian Echols, Scott Holloway, Jack Howe, Craig LaRotonda, Mara Pabic LaRotonda, Sean Madden, Michael Mararian, Chris Mars, Fred Stonehouse. Opening show on view through Jan 2, 2017.  RO Home Shop  (732 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 240-9387,  rohomeshop.com): Keith Walters, photography, through Dec 31.   FF  Sports Focus Physical Therapy (531 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY, 14202, 332-4838,  sportsfocuspt.com): Jill Gustafson Glunz:Paintings and Drawings. Dec.1Feb 28. On view through Feb 28. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, 6-9pm on first Fridays.  Squeaky Wheel (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, squeaky.org):  Soft Science: Science Fictions by Kathy High  on view through  January 10th, 2017. Tue-Sat, 12pm-5pm.  FF  Starlight Studio and Art Gallery (340 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, starlightstudio.org): Cocoa, Cookies & Doughnuts,  Starlight Studio &  Art  Gallery Holiday  Open  House, Sat  Dec  3,  1-4pm.  MonFri 9-4pm. 

10 THE PUBLIC / NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

 FF  Studio Hart (65 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 536-8337,  studiohart.com): Art Toy invitational, holiday whimsy by Bruce Adams, Mary Begley, Bob Collignon, Linda Collignon, AJ Fries, Barbara Hart, Ani Hoover, Billy Huggins, Candace Keegan Masters, Amy Meza Luraschi, Kate Stapleton Parzych, Deborah Petronio, Chuck Tingely, Adam Weekley. Tue-Fri 11:30am-3:30pm, Sat 12-4pm, and open every First Friday 6-9pm. Sugar City (1239 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213,  buffalosugarcity.org):  Vispo: visual poetry exhibition with work from Charlie Best, John W. Bateman, Jordan Brown, Alana Kelley, Mark Laliberte, Jocelyn Marshall, Cole Pawlowski, Eric Schmaltz, Kevin Thurston, and Rachelle Toarmino. Open by event.  UB Anderson Gallery (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 829-3754, ubartgalleries.org): Situations: Lydia Okumura on view through Jan 8, 2017.  Cravens World: The Human Aesthetic, on view through Dec 31. Wed-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm.  UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Lower Art Gallery) (201 Center for the Arts, Room B45, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 645-6913, ubartgalleries.org):   The Measure of All Things,  sixteen artists  on view through Dec 10. Situations: Lydia Okumura on view through Jan 8, 2017.  Screen Projects:  Rodney McMillian on view through Nov 13. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm. Western New York Book Arts Center (468 Washington Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 348-1430,  wnybookarts. org):   Roll the Bones, work by Tom Holt.  On view through Dec 15. Wed-Sat 12-6pm. m. 

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Buffalo Chamber Players at the AK

An Evening with Krzysztof Penderecki

The Buffalo Chamber Players hosts renowned Polish composer Krzysztof Penderecki during his historic visit to Buffalo. Requested

Thursday, December 1, 2016 7:30 pm

by Maestro Penderecki himself, the program includes his Cadenza for solo viola, Quartet for clarinet and string trio, and Sextet for clarinet, horn, violin, viola, cello, and piano.

Photograph by Marek Suchecki

TICKETS are available at www.albrightknox.org/buffalochamberplayers.

Albright-Knox Art Gallery 1285 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, New York 14222-1096 | 716.270.8292

Buffalo Chamber Players at the AK is a partnership between the Albright-Knox Art Gallery and the Buffalo Chamber Players. Buffalo Chamber Players concerts are made possible by a grant from the Cullen Foundation, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, the support of Buffalo Chamber Players donors, and the generosity of Albright-Knox Art Gallery patrons. We thank ABC-Amega, Inc. for its generous corporate support.

albrightknox.org NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / THE PUBLIC

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12 THE PUBLIC / NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


MARY WYRICK’s 15 Contestant, part of the artist’s show at Blue Plate Studio (69 Keil Street, North Tonawanda). NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / THE PUBLIC 13


EVENTS CALENDAR PUBLIC APPROVED

ULYSSES Studies for an Indeterminate Journey album Recommended if you like: Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Terry Riley

Released last month on Erie Niagara Records, Studies for an Indeterminate Journey is an electronic music album by the artist Ulysses. The album unfolds as a series of “studies” or synth tone experiments. Highlights include “Study #1” which introduces the album with an arpeggiated electronic tone rhythm, eventually layered by a second rhythm and a droning synth line; and “Study #5” 15+ minute-long a minimal piano piece that eventually transforms into a synth odessey. 

THE WEEPIES THURSDAY DEC 1 7PM / TRALF MUSIC HALL, 622 MAIN ST. / $24 [FOLK] You’ve heard The Weepies, even if you’re not consciously aware of it. The duo’s buoyant melodies, topped with Deb Talan’s addictive warble, have sound-tracked our lives for over a decade now, flowing from the speakers at coffee shops and embedded in the plots of shows like Grey’s Anatomy and How I Met Your Mother. They’ve provided tunes for ads from JC Penny and Old Navy and contributed music to a 2008 campaign message from President Obama. Despite their folksy foundation, they usually tour with a supporting band, but not this fall. Instead, they’re opting to go it alone, stripping down their show to its organic root and traveling to some uncharted territory: their gig at the Tralf Music Hall on Thursday, December 1, is their first time playing in Buffalo.

WEDNESDAY NOV 30 Country Night with Krash Party

COVE “No Fat Diet Pho” single Recommended if you like: Madlib, J Dilla, Knxwledge

The latest track from instrumental hip hop producer Cove is titled “No Fat Diet Pho,” and was released on Soundcloud earlier this week. The dreamy hip hop beat glitches in and out of chill, jazzy atmospherics. 

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6:30pm Armor Inn Tap Room, 5381 Abbott Rd. [COUNTRY] Known for a wide selection of beers on tap as well as its award-winning barbecue, Armor Inn Tap Room hosts Country Night every Wednesday. This particular night, Buffalo’s own local band Krash Party will perform. Self-styled as “Buffalo’s Party Band,” the group provides a mix of rock and country classics. This 21+ event will host promotional drinks and a special country night platter. There will also be free line-dancing lessons and giveaways throughout the night. -SA

Pretenders 7pm Town Ballroom, 681 Main St. $69.50 [ROCK] Unlike so many of her contemporaries, Chrissie Hynde has never made the same record twice. Not even close. On Alone, the Dan Auerbach-produced tenth Pretenders studio set that dropped earlier this fall, she continues the anti-tradition with a set of bluesy tunes that mostly simmer rather than assault, but her punchy personality remains indelible. It’s a far cry from 2008’s country-rocking Break Up the Concrete, and even further afield from 2004’s Loose Screw. At 65, Hynde is less interested than ever in pleasing anyone but herself and, like usual, her fuck-youcome-hither stance works more often than not. Perhaps for the first time in her career, the aging in her voice is slightly audible. But the rawness feels entirely appropriate within Auerbach’s do-it-on-the-fly recording tact, which had Hynde laying down her vocals in a 48 hour marathon. The amusing title track finds her unapologetically reminding us that she’s never been much of a joiner. On the

14 THE PUBLIC / NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

The last time I spoke with Talan, I woke her out of sound sleep to do an interview about her solo disc, A Bird Flies Out (2003), and The Weepies’ debut, Happiness, to be released shortly thereafter. It was a starting gun moment since the years between have been anything but restful. Talan and her husband Steve Tannen — the other half of The Weepies — have since sold about a million discs (their five releases combined). They’re raising three children that were homeschooled through their early years and have migrated from Massachusetts to California to Iowa. And just three years ago, Talan discovered she had stage two breast cancer. Although she’s been in remission since summer 2014, the couple remains forever changed. The gravity of their experience informed the tone of Sirens (2015), which is the most recent Weepies release to date. As the duo heads out for their “Completely Alone and Acoustic Tour” and Talan readies her first solo collection in thirteen years, she reflected on the aftermath of her health crisis. “There was a whole cascade of life stuff — a series of things that happened that were completely out of my control,” she said over the phone. “I really had to rely on the kindness and love of other people, and it was wonderful to feel that support. But for someone that doesn’t like to lean on others so much, a part of it was also really uncomfortable for me. I definitely got the blessing, the positive part, but as I was emerging from this whole experience, I started feeling a need to prove that I could step forward on my own a little bit. I just needed to get my wings back and flex them a little. I wanted to know, can I still do this?” Indeed she can. As of this June, she’d raised $57,000 to fund the making of Lucky Girl, the tentative title for her forthcoming release, which is comprised of songs she’d been tucking away over the years. It was Tannen that gave her the final nudge to start formally working on it after years of focusing solely on The Weepies. In part, the practicality and openair of the couple’s Iowa home allowed her the space to balance ongoing motherhood with a daunting creative project. It’s a far cry from the rented bungalow they shared (and remember fondly) while building their careers in California. “We’re both from ‘gypsy Jew’ heritage, so settling in like this isn’t necessarily second nature, but this feels like a really good spot right now,” she said. “We have a studio in our house here, and I had a few hours each day when the kids were all out to work, which actually felt like a guilty pleasure. Everything lined up when we started making plans to move here. It’s a college town, but not so overrun that people are crushing one another. There’s plenty of room for our boys to spread out. There are instruments and Legos in every room.” Perhaps it’s all that extra space that spawned the desire for a back-tobasics fall tour after years of playing with a backing band. Talan says the caravan feel of the big bus tours they’ve done is great fun, but wonders if a full band presentation might fuzzy the emotional connection between artist and audience some. And maybe, like her new disc, it’s a bit of a personal test. “This tour is very parallel to the solo project, since we’ve been leaning on these other musicians,” she said. “We thought ‘let’s step up in this other way and also have the benefit of making a deeper connection,’ and that means with each other as well as listeners. It’s a very naked presentation. We did a little tester set of shows over the summer, and being alone on stage allows us to listen to each other differently. It feels nourishing.” -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

whole, the album title reflects a double entendre: initially conceived as a follow up to her solo debut, Alone only became a Pretenders project as an afterthought. Hynde is the only true Pretender on the record, though drummer Martin Chambers joins her on the tour that pulls into Town Ballroom on Wednesday, November 30 for one in a small handful of headlining shows amid the band’s co-bill run this fall with Stevie Nicks. Alone works best when Auerbach and Hynde mine the depths of rock history together, using some of his pals from The Arcs and some Nashville session players to create the slinky beach-pop of “Roadie Man,” the gritty, heated, soul-stomp of “Gotta Wait” and percussive, spy b-movie feel of “One More Day,” all of which are well decorated with retro organs and enough reverb to transport us through time. Elsewhere, she conjures her tender/tough persona, aided by a guest spot from guitarist Duane Eddy on “Never Be Together,” and carries the torch of self loathing to new depths with, “I Hate Myself.” If there’s an overarching tone, it’s a rudimentary one culled from early rock’n’roll basics, which seems entirely appropriate given Hynde’s punk roots and Auerbach’s predisposition for lo-fi blues. Yes, it could rock a little harder and nobody would complain, but it still feels like a blessing to have this new music from one of our most distinctive and enduring musical artists. -CJT

Jeffery Foucault 7pm The 9th Ward, 341 Delaware Ave $15-$20 [FOLK] Depending on how you count ‘em, 2015’s Salt As Wolves, with its Othello-derived title, is either Jeffrey Foucault’s fifth or 10th record. The Wisconsin native, now situated for many years in Western Massachusetts with his wife, fellow singer/songwriter Kris Delmhorst, loans as much of his time to side projects as he does to his own: There are mul-

tiple releases with poetess Lisa Olstein under the moniker Cold Satellite, as well as a pair of albums in a folkie supergroup, Redbird (with Delmhorst and Peter Mulvey), and a one-off duo disc with Mark Erelli. While his collaborations all carry a similar air of spontaneity, Salt as Wolves—his indie debut after years with Signature Sounds—is an example of Foucault’s more musically meticulous side, cloaked in a ragged blues exterior. Foucault will feature material from Salt as Wolves along with old favorites and maybe even some new material from the disc he just finished recording at the 9th Ward, downstairs at Babeville, on Wednesday, November 30. -CJT

Midnight Snack 8pm Nietzsche's, 248 Allen St. $7-$10 [INDIE] Led by brothers Jack Victor and Mike Henry Johnson, Midnight Snack is an indie-pop band from Asheville, North Carolina. The five-piece band shares a house where they’ve constructed a recording studio, in which they recorded their latest album, Child’s Eyes. The record artfully merges folk, psychedelic, indie rock, and dance music to create a dream-like, contemplative album. The band will make a stop at Nietzsche’s on Wednesday, November 30 as part of their East Coast tour. The show, presented by Sunbeam Entertainment and NYS Music, also features the solo-act-turned-full-band Ellen Siberian-Tiger, out of State College, Pennsylvania. Led by guitarist/vocalist Ellen Tiberio-Shultz, the band is a seven-piece indie rock band with a penchant for experimentation. The band’s drummer Jon Cox also brings in tow his full band, Mother Moses, for which he transforms into lead guitarist/vocalist and Shultz picks up a banjo. Locals Dreambeaches round out this eclectic lineup. -CP


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8PM ◆ $5 [ROCK] Hailing from Canada, the Sam Roberts Band is an alternative rock outfit known for ◆ WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7 ◆ their eccentric melodies and unique instrumentation. With the recent release of their sixth studio ComingCANNOT of RAGE Productions album, Terraform, they take on the role of the savior of a APPROVE damaged ERRORS earth. With their “IfPROOF, You THE PUBLIC IF YOU WHICH AREsingle, ON THIS BE HELDPresents: RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINE THE AD Death Metal From Topeka, Kansas Want It,” already climbing the alternative charts, THOROUGHLY Roberts aimsEVEN to cement his place as a voice for IF THE AD IS A PICK-UP. a dying world, creating their art with urgency and conviction. The album is a call to its listeners + Seplophile, Nethergrave, Disrepair Advertisers Signature to renovate their lives. Sharing the stage at TownMESSAGE BallroomTO thisADVERTISER Thursday, December � 1 with CHECK COPY CONTENT 8PM ◆ $8 (21+)/$10 (18-20) fellow Canadian band Hollerado, Sam Roberts Thank is sure toyou please. brings their special for Hollerado advertising with ◆ THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8 ◆ integration of soulful harmony and abrasive punk, which will only elevate specialyour series of three THE PUBLIC. Pleasethis review ____________________________ Bold Folly, Sonny Baker, ad not andtoo check anytickets errors. concerts. Nights one and three are sold out, but it’s late toforgrab for The the Thursday � CHECK IMPORTANT DATES Deadwolf From Detroit Handgrenades original layout instructions have night show. -SCHONDRA AYTCH 8PM ◆ $5

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5PM / LARKIN SQUARE, 745 SENECA ST. [HOLIDAY] Kicking of the winter season in its fifth year, Larkin Square hosts its holiday-themed live concert. Teaming up with KeyBank and Independent Health, the free community event will have handmade works and a variety of food trucks. Local all-star, seasonal-only, charity-minded band-with-special guests Robot Holiday will be on hand, performing their alternative holiday jams. Along with hot chocolate, BFLO Distilling Company will feature its seasonal apple brandy. Heaters will be spread throughout the square to warm up the guests as well as a weather-protected boardwalk. All donations will support the Food Bank of WNY. -SCHONDRA AYTCH

THURSDAY DEC 1 Peace Love and Grant Street 5pm Gypsy Parlor, 376 Grant St.

[HOLIDAY] This special holiday market takes place not in one building, but down an entire street. A slew of stores, restaurants and pop-

up shops will be participating in the block-party type event which will also feature live outdoor music, holiday arts and crafts, food trucks, a petting zoo, and an appearance from Santa, this Thursday, December 1. There’ll also be a special trolley available to transport shoppers from one end of Grant Street to the other. -THE PUBLIC STAFF

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WORLD AIDS DAY All Day, Worldwide

And international day of observance meant as an opportunity for people to unite in the fight against HIV, show support for people living with HIV, and commemorate people who have died. The locally crafting Healing of the Hearts Memorial Project, a fabric collage fashions after the National AIDS Quilt, will be on display from 5pm-8pm at Evergreen Commons, 262 Georgia St.

FRIDAY, DEC 2 - SUNDAY, DEC 4

QUEEN CITY MARKET SATURDAY DEC 3 11AM / KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY PORTER HALL, 453 PORTER AVENUE [MARKET] This annual market has become one of the biggest pop-up markets in the city and the go-to market for lovers of locally produced arts and crafts. The list of items that’ll be for sale is lengthy, so we’ve done a little bit of research and picked out a handful of artists and vendors to start you on your path through the market, which will take place in the beautiful Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum Porter Hall on Saturday, December 3. The Queen City Market will also offer a chance to donate your non-perishable food items to the Food Bank of WNY.

AMANDA BEAULIEU Amanda Beaulieu is a metalsmith from Buffalo. You may have seen some of her work at Wild Things, the artisan gift shop on Lexington Avenue. Look for her fun, memorable, metalwork designs at the market this Saturday.

BGMC PRESENTS: SING THE SPIRIT! Various times at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 724 Delaware Ave.

The Buffalo Gay Mens’ Chorus’ annual holiday concert. Performances at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday night, and at 3 p.m. on Sunday afternoon. Tickets: $20, available at buffalogaymenschorus.org or at the door.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3

LIP-SYNC ROULETTE: THE SECOND SPIN

RUST BELT THREADS Run by market organizer Amanda Ferreira, Rust Belt Threads sells a finely curated selection of vintage clothing, barware, and shoes. There’ll be a lot of very giftable options at this prominent vendor station.

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After Funk Tribute to Jimi Hendrix 9pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $10 [TRIBUTE] Toronto based funk band After Funk returns to Buffalo for a unique set this Thursday, December 1 at Buffalo Iron Works. This time around they won’t be playing their power-funk originals, but instead a set of classic Jimi Hendrix tunes in tribute to the influential artist. Expect, of course, mega hits like “Purple Haze,” “Foxy Lady,” and “All Along the Watchtower” as well as some deeper cuts too. -CP

6PM-10PM. at Q, 44 Allen

The Imperial Court of Buffalo offers up the most fun you will have at a competition all year. Prizes for first, second and third place at a total value of more than $400. Enjoy an appetizer and holiday dessert buffet, plus basket raffles.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6

RIQSE: SHIBARI EDITION 6PM at Dreamland, 387 Franklin St.

This installment of Radical Inclusive Queer Sex Education features a workshop on Shibari rope bondage. Engage in discussions around consent, safety, negotiation, and an introduction to using rope for bondage play. RIQSE is an intentional safe space for queer and trans people of color, women differently abled people and their allies to discuss sex and sexuality.

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12th Planet 9pm The Waiting Room, 334 Delaware Ave. $20 [ELECTRONIC/DANCE] 12th Planet is John Dadzie, a Los Angeles-based electronic music producer known for his relentless dubstep, trap, and jungle sets. Not a stranger to huge music festivals, the 34-year old selector will bring his bombastic set to the more intimate Waiting Room on Thursday, December 1, presented by MNM Presents and Factory Host. 12th Planet will be joined by Lumberjvck, another California-based electronid music producer known for his “filthy hybrid” of trap and dubstep. -CP

FRIDAY DEC 2 Squeaky Wheel: Not of This Earth 7pm Hallwalls, 341 Delaware Ave. $7 [EXPERIMENTAL FILM] The fourth installment of Squeaky Wheel’s OTHERWORLDS sci-fi series hits the cinema at Hallwalls this Friday night with a 76-minute program guest-curated by the experimental film scholar Herb Shellenberger. Shellenberger, among many things, is also the curator of the exhibition Independent Frames: American Experimental Animation in the 70s + 80s, which is set to open at the Tate Modern in February. The lineup of five short films projected from rarely seen 16-millimeter prints promises to be a real trip into cosmic landscapes, alternate realities, and space/time travel. The

16 THE PUBLIC / NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

WRAFTERBUILT This woodworking company helmed by Sean Wrafter is not the only one in Buffalo, but it’s becoming one of the most widely known. You’ve probably sat at a Wrafterbuilt bar or table in one of your favorite restaurants. At this market, look for small-scale items from Wrafter, from wood-art to beautiful, functional pieces.

WEST SIDE STITCHERY Launched in 2013, West Side Stitchery sells hand-crocheted pieces. You’ll likely find something from a hat to a pair of socks that’ll look good and be perfect for Buffalo’s winter weather.

THE VINYL VINDICATOR The Vinyl Vindicator, a.k.a. RiversideSlim, has a collection of vinyl record you won’t find in any local brick-mortar. The online vendor, who has been selling records at record shows and on ebay for 15 years, will set up shop at the Queen City Market. Look for everything from vintage classic rock LPs to 1990s white label house singles. -CORY PERLA

evening will feature Steven Arnold’s The Liberation of the Mannique Mechanique (1967), Scott Bartlett’s Moon (1969), Willy Braque’s Amnesie 25 (1967), Nicholas Brooks and Benedict Drew’s Sump (2016), and Molly Palmer’s Some Shapes Without Edges (2016). And Shellenberger plans to stick around to host a post-screening Q and A. -AARON LOWINGER

An Acoustic Evening with Daughtry

7pm Rapids Theatre, 1711 Main St. $37.50-$42 [ROCK] American Idol runner up Chris Daughtry is currently on a tour that brings the artist through the Rapids Theatre on Friday, December 2, presented by Star 102.5. Daughtry appeared on the 2006 season of American Idol and since then has released five albums, including his self-titled 2006 debut. His latest is 2013’s Baptized, but it’s possible that he’ll play some unreleased cuts as he’s scheduled to release an album on RCA Records in 2017. -CP

Bill Bellamy 7:30pm Helium Comedy Club, 30 Mississippi St. $23-$25 [COMEDY] If you’ve ever had a booty call—well you can thank Bill Bellamy for that. Maybe not for the experience itself, but the comedian is the apparent coiner of the ubiquitous phrase. The 51-year-old comedian launched his career as a VJ on MTV on shows such as MTV Jamz and MTV Beach House. More recently, he’s hosted a couple of seasons of Last Comic Standing, appeared in the TV series Hot in Cleveland, and his own Showtime special, of course titled “Booty Calls.” Bellamy comes to Buffalo’s Helium Comedy Club for five shows, Friday and Saturday, December 2 and 3. -CP

Winter Masquerade Party 8pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $7-$5 [ROCK] Four entertaining local bands are coming together for the holidays—or at least to try to keep warm in Downtown Buffalo for a wintery weekend. Aircraft, First Ward, TJ Zindle, and Church Key Social take the stage of Mohawk Place on Friday, December 2 for a

Winter Masquerade Party. “Take drugs, party, and keep warm by drinking shots of whiskey and cans of PBR,” reads a press release for the show, and although we can only publicly endorse a fraction of those recommendations, we still encourage you check out what should be a fun rock show. Masks are encouraged. Food Bank Donations of non-perishable items will be accepted for $2 off price of admission. -CP

SATURDAY DEC 3 Holiday Intervention 11am Rhode Island St.

[HOLIDAY] By now, some of us already need an intervention from the holidays. Well, the Five Points Business Association is about to make that happen. Take a break at the Holiday Intervention, a block-party-esque event this Saturday, December 3 on Rhode Island Street on Buffalo’s West Side. Expect food, music, art, stuff for the kids, and a host of friendly businesses—including the Essex Street Pub, Paradise Wine, Evolation Yoga, Pilates Art Studio, Press Food & Juice, Providence Social, The Left Bank, Urban Roots, Mama Bear & Cub, and Rudeboyz Art, and more—for shopping and dining. -TPS

WEDNESDAY DEC 7 Buffalo Artists Market 4:30pm Ellicott Square Building, 295 Main St. [HOLIDAY] If your holiday weekends are starting to be overwhelmed with things to do and places to go, then Buffalo Artists Market is pefect for you. This market takes place on Wednesday, December 7, right as folks should be leaving work for the day. It's in an impressive venue, Downtown Buffalo’s Ellicott Square Building, which will host a towering Christmas tree smack-dab in the middle of the vendor market, and there’s also a cash bar here, as well as food trucks, so you could make a whole happy hour of it. -TPS


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VINYL MANIA: POP MANIA SATURDAY DEC 3 3PM / KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS-KENMORE, 1530 KENMORE AVE. [MARKET] Vinyl Mania is popping back up, just in time for the holidays. The semi-regular vinyl record market returns for a new iteration this Saturday, December 3, this time at the Knights of Columbus in Kenmore. The pop-up record market will feature too many vendors to count selling classic, psychedelic, and rare rock records, as well as some funk, soul, disco, and dance records too. This edition promises some new vendors, a DJ, photo booth, free parking and even a costume contest—the theme being “1966.” In addition to a wide selection of records, expect some pop culture merch and memorabilia.-CORY PERLA

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TAKING BACK SATURDAY: EMO NIGHT VOL. 4 SATURDAY DEC 3 9PM / MILKIE'S, 522 ELMWOOD AVE / $5 [EMO] It’s difficult to find a music head who wasn’t in a band in highschool. If you’re a 20 something, or in my case a 30 something now (oh dear lord), then you grew up in a time when emo dominated the underground and the airwaves. When I was 16 I played bass in a pop-punk band called No Looking Back. We scheduled our first show without a lead singer, and as this glaring issue became more pressing, we eventually coerced my then 13-year-old brother, Brett into becoming our lead singer on about 10 days notice. We threw together some melodramatic lyrics and cranked up the distortion on our guitars and drowned out his vocals the best we could and it was probably horrible, but I guess looking back we’d call it emo music. Now, in the wake of what is becoming a full-blown emo resurgence, the local music blog buffaBLOG celebrates this overdriven, melodramatic music that we love, (though most of us now probably won’t admit it) with a semi-regular emo night dubbed Taking Back Saturday at Milkie’s on Elmwood. The next one, this Saturday, December 3, features yours truly and my brother, Brett Perla, also of the indie rock band Mutual Friends. We’ll play tracks back to back from the whole spectrum of emo, but with a focus on the borderline pop-punk stuff from the early 2000s. Derek Neuland of Buffaloshows.net will be on hand spinning classic emo tunes, but he’ll likely dive deeper into the late 1990s—expect some Promise Ring, Texas is the Reason, Jawbreaker and more. Finally, Jon Coric of indie rock band The Traditional will join in on the fun too, playing his favorites, which will probably include some Taking Back Sunday, lest the namesake of this sacred night be betrayed. Attendees are encouraged to wear their favorite discontinued band t-shirt, if it still fits (and maybe even if it doesn’t). P -CORY PERLA NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / THE PUBLIC 17


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ATHENA KOUIMANIS OF CURLY’S BY TIM FENSTER

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MEET THE WOMAN WHO HAS REIMAGINED CURLY’S, DOWNTOWN LACKAWANNA’S DESTINATION RESTAURANT MOST OF US SPEND OUR early to mid-20s enrolled in college or internship programs, building up our résumés and trying to land entry-level positions that we can move up from. It’s the time when we build our professional foundations and simply try to get in the door. Most of us are not already thinking about running the show; even those who are typically expect to wait years before taking that risk. Not Athena Kouimanis.

In late 2014, when she learned of an opportunity to take over a longstanding community restaurant, Curly’s Grille in Lackawanna, she jumped at the opportunity, and became a restaurateur at only 24 years old. And thus far she’s been successful. She’s made some changes both to the decor and menu at Curly’s, business there is booming, and earlier this year she was included in the Buffalo Business First 30 under Thirty list of successful young professionals.

Jumbo lump crab cakes

647 RIDGE RD, LACKAWANNA CURLYSGRILLE.COM CURLYSGRILLE

“It’s been difficult,” said Kouimanis, noting the grueling hours of a restaurant owner. “I know I don’t have years and years of experience, but how many 26-year-olds can say they’ve dived into a business and figured it out?” Perhaps Kouimanis has been able to make it work because she had the right kind of experience going in. I guess you could say it was quality over quantity. From 2010 to 2012, Kouimanis worked as a server at Black and Blue in Williamsville, gaining front-of-the-house experience. She then majored in restaurant, hotel, and tourism management at Ohio University, despite the fact she was initially reluctant to go into the hospitality industry.

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“I always said I wasn’t going to go into [hospitality] and somehow I got sucked into it. I was doing pharmacy, but I really like working with people. I’m a people person,” she said. 

18 THE PUBLIC / NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

CURLY’S GRILLE

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“I love food,” she added. “I’m a foodie. Being a foodie helped.”

came, Curly passed on the restaurant to his son, Paul, who passed it on to his daughter, Krista.

While studying at Ohio, she landed an internship with Acqua Restaurant & Catering (the company that owns and operates the Foundry, the Hatch, and banquet rooms at the Hotel Lafayette). Upon graduating, she received a position at Acqua, where she worked in sales and event planning. 

At the time Krista took over, the restaurant had seen better days (as had Lackawanna, and of course Buffalo), so she decided to shake things up. She had been living in the Caribbean with her husband, Kirk (whom she met at the American Culinary Institute, from which both graduated), before returning home, so Island cuisine seemed like a natural choice. After all, where else could you find Jamaican jerk chicken and Cuban sandwiches in the Buffalo of yesteryear?

She says it was her experience at Acqua that helped her transform Curly’s into the modern, fine-casual dining establishment it is today. Opened in the 1930s under Curly Worthing, the restaurant was for decades a typical bar and grill in a blue-collar steel town. When the time

Before Kouimanis, Curly’s was not exactly subtle about its tropical flair. She says the walls were bright red and adorned with pictures of tropical islands.


SPOTLIGHT FOOD + DRINK “At one point there was an awning over the bar that made you feel like you were at a tiki bar. I liked it, but we wanted to do an all-around menu and bring other flavors as well,” she said. “So I kind of tamed it down.” In her renovations, she was inspired by the history of Curly’s and the city it sits in—a now-rusted blue collar steel city that literally got its name from the Lackawanna Steel Company—by bringing in more wood and darker tones. “I’ve tried to keep all generations of Curly’s— the grill, the Caribbean, and now modernizing it,” Kouimanis said. Though she was well-positioned to take on such a demanding job, there was one area in which she totally lacked experience—Jamaican jerk seasoning. “To be honest, I had never tried jerk chicken until a month before I came here,” she said with a laugh. “It was crazy. I was like, ‘How had I never heard of this before?’” She added that she has also never been to the Caribbean, but assured that she does try every local jerk blend she can get her hands on and has reached the admittedly biased opinion that Curly’s has the best in the area. She also assured would-be diners that their version of the spice blend—which typically includes allspice, garlic, thyme, and hot peppers— goes easy on the heat. Newcomers to jerk should also consider that it offers a much broader range of flavors than, say, our beloved Frank’s and butter. “It’s not like a how a Buffalo chicken wing is,” she said. “You’re going to taste the thyme, you’re going to taste all these [flavors]. You would never think of pineapple, but it’s in the marinade as well. All the flavors come together and it’s just something very different.” Curly’s is so well-known for its jerk that Kouimanis recently introduced “Jerk Thursdays,” when they offer discounts on jerk wings and jerk fries, as well as their black bean soup and other rotating specials.  But she also doesn’t want Curly’s to be pigeonholed as a Jamaican restaurant, and the expansive menu offers unique takes on local pub-food favorites (a beef on weck mac and cheese, a fried polenta poutine) and on dishes from the opposite ends of the Earth—Thai noodles and an Asian chicken salad. Since taking ownership, Kouimanis has tweaked the menu and says she’ll make more changes going forward, including seasonal offerings. But she is careful not to change things too drastically, as she sees Curly’s as deeply rooted in Lackawanna and vice versa. Many of their customers have been regulars for years, and some employees have been with the restaurant for decades—a rarity in the typically high-turnover food industry. One bartender of eight years, Cindy, said Curly’s has a loyal customer base, dedicated staff and praised the changes made under Kouimanis. “This place has been here for quite some time,” she said. “It’s an institution in Lackawanna. It’s like Buffalo’s version of Cheers.” Kouimanis also plans to expand the banquet facility, and has toyed with the idea of opening a second Curly’s. (Though no plans to do so are currently underway.) In some ways, doing so would be vindication against those who doubted her in the early days, simply for being a young woman in a challenging industry. But between her success at Curly’s and the Buffalo Business First 30 Under Thirty honor, it’s probably safe to say she’s already shown the naysayers what she’s capable of. “People have had some doubts. So far I’ve proved them wrong. It’s very frustrating, but I just kind of have to brush it off and show them I can do it,” Kouimanis said. “Making my own decisions, not having other influences. When somebody comes in and says, ‘Let’s go this way,’ I say, ‘Lets go this way; let’s just stick with my gut feeling,’ and it’s been really good. I’ve gotten some very positive feedback.” Curly’s is located at 647 Ridge Road in Lackawanna. The restaurant is open from 9am to 9pm Monday through Thursday, 11am to 10pm Friday, 4pm to 10pm Saturday, and 4pm to 8pm Sunday. For more information, visit curlysgrille.com or search for the restaurant P on Facebook.

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NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / THE PUBLIC 19


FILM REVIEW

BEAR  NECESSITIES

Seasons

SEASONS BY M. FAUST THE BAD NAME THAT DISNEY GAVE to nature documentaries in the 1960s

has been erased in the past two decades by Jacques Perrin, a popular European actor (you may remember him as the adult Salvatore in Cinema Paradiso) who moved into producing. His studio Galatée Films has created some of the most astonishing documentaries of the natural world ever seen, including Microcosmos, Himalaya, Genesis, Winged Migration, and Oceans.

He also directed those last two, in collaboration with Jacques Cluzaud, as part of a trilogy that is now completed by Seasons. Moving from air and water to land, their crew of photographers spent four years around Europe’s forests compiling the footage seen here. Because the creatures of the land are less inherently compelling than unusual birds and bizarre fish, Seasons was assembled with more of a structure than the previous two films. Beginning with a frozen landscape in which little stirs, we are asked to imagine the spread of life after the 80,000 years of winter that once covered Europe. As the land warms and life spreads, every prospect pleases, and only man is vile. (Not to get ahead of ourselves, but you can see that coming.) Early footage of animal birth and youth predictably forms the most pleasing part of the film. A brief shot of an adorable baby fox peering at the camera makes you wonder why the crew didn’t spend more time tracking it: Have they never heard of YouTube? But there are many animals to visit, which they do with astonishing intimacy, particularly given that the makers claim not to have used zoom lenses or other gimmicks. I don’t know whether the DVDs of their previous films containing “making of ” featurettes, but a separate documentary on the working methods of these photographers would probably be every bit as engrossing as the footage itself. Of course, many cute animals live by eating other cute animals, which can be an alarming thing to see. (It’s like watching Game of Thrones: You don’t want to get too attached to any favorites.) A scene of wolves chasing down a boar makes its point without being any more graphic than necessary, though it may still be unsettling to young children and those prone to anthropomorphizing. (A horse fares better, which is good news if you know how wolves deal with that species.) The genuinely upsetting part of the film is the conclusion, which depicts the shrinking of the natural habitat by the encroachment of man, who regards all animals as either useful or pests and not as fellow creatures with as much right to the planet as we claim. The accomplishment of the filmmakers is such that they are entitled to do some preaching to the choir, and it’s a missed opportunity if the National Wildlife Federation or some other conservancy group doesn’t set up donation buckets at every theater where Seasons is playing: You’d have to be made of stone, or Cheetos dust, not to be moved by this. Opens Friday at the Dipson Eastern Hills and North Park.

AT THE MOVIES A selective guide to what’s opening and what’s playing in local moviehouses and other venues

BY M. FAUST & GEORGE SAX

OPENING THIS WEEK SEASONS—Nature documentary from the creators of Winged Migration and Oceans. Directed by Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud. Reviewed this issue. Dipson Eastern Hills, North Park  ALTERNATIVE CINEMA THE BELLS OF ST. MARY’S (1945)—Bing Crosby reprises his Going My Way priest Father O’Malley, this time sparring with Sister Benedict (Ingrid Bergman) as they try to save a run-down parochial school. With Henry Travers, William Gargan, and Ruth Donnelly. Directed by Leo McCarey (Duck Soup). Fri-Sat 11:30am. North Park CASABLANCA (1941)—Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman in what is by general consensus Hollywood’s greatest romance, if not the most popular Hollywood film period. Call it a miracle of studio craftsmanship, a whole that exceeds the sum of its parts, and an almost mythological example of why we love movies so much. Directed by Michael Curtiz (The Adventures of Robin Hood). With Paul Heinreid, Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Peter Lorre, Sydney Greenstreet, S. Z. Sakall, and Dooley Wilson. Fri, Sat, Tue 7:30pm. Screening Room

P

GOSFORD PARK (2001)—Robert Altman directs an all-star British cast in a comedy-mystery set at an English country house circa 1921, where murder disrupts the weekend of both the guests and the household staff in different ways. The plot isn’t terribly complicated, although it may seem to be at first (a few of the characters turn out to be not too significant, so don’t worry about it). But emotionally it’s richly detailed, and no one but Altman could have done such loving work with such a large and talented cast. With Helen Mirren, Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Emily Watson, Kristin Scott Thomas, Charles Dance, James Wilby, Jeremy Northam, Bob Balaban, Alan Bates, Derek Jacobi, Richard E. Grant, Jeremy Swift, Clive Owen, and Stephen Fry. Presented by Cultivate Cinema Circle. cultivatecinemacircle.com. Thu 7pm. Dipson Amherst REMAINS TO BE SEEN: PERFORMING THE ARCHIVE— Document of a 2012 performance by artist Charles Clough and archaeologist Peter Biehl in which a layered scroll created at Hallwalls in the 1970s, featuring work by artists including Clough, Robert Longo, and Cindy Sherman, was opened and unrolled. The event will include a presentation by Clough, Biehl, filmmaker Sarah Elder, and art historian Laura McGough. Free and open to the public. Wed 7:30pm. Hallwalls THE SACRED PATH—The Tragically Hip’s Gord Downie wrote and directed this animated film for the CBC about a First Nations boy who escapes from a residential school during a harsh winter. Thu 9:30pm. North Park THE TOURIST (2010)—Remake of the French film Anthony Zimmer, with Johnny Depp as an American in Paris who has the misfortune to look like a man wanted by Interpol. Angelina Jolie has the Sophie Marceau part; co-starring

20 THE PUBLIC / NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Paul Bettany, Timothy Dalton, Steven Berkoff, and Rufus Sewell. It was pretty much reviled (or at best yawned at) by critics on its release, so it will be interesting to hear why Bruce Jackson and Diane Christian chose it to close out this semester of the Buffalo Film Seminar. Directed by Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck (The Lives of Others). Tue 7pm. Dipson Amherst  CONTINUING  THE ACCOUNTANT—The premise sounds like a Monty Python skit: an action film whose hero is a member of the world’s least dangerous profession. But the result is surprisingly entertaining, with Ben Affleck as an autistic savant raised by a military father who had his own ideas on how to prepare him for survival in a cruel world. The character’s backstory unfolds along with the present-day one that ties in mobsters, government agents, and crooked businessmen, and the result is finally a bit overstuffed: It’s a 130-minute movie that you wish was longer, if only so that every member of the first-rate cast could have more screen time. Along with Affleck, that includes J. K. Simmons, John Lithgow, Anna Kendrick, Jon Bernthal, and Cynthia Addai-Robinson. Directed by Gavin O’Connor (Jane Got a Gun).  –MF Four Seasons, Regal Elmwood, Regal Transit ALLIED—Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard as spies who fall in love during a World War II mission—but is she secretly a German agent? Director Robert Zemeckis, who in the past few decades has specialized in movies exploring new special effects technologies (The Polar Express, The Walk) seems to be trying here to make something that looks like a 1940s thriller, albeit with enough sex and profanity to get an R rating. But the story

lacks both humor and suspense, and the lack of chemistry between Pitt and Cotillard (how did anyone ever think they were having an affair on set?) stymies the movie’s last hope for audience involvement. With August Diehl, Jared Harris, Lizzy Caplan and Matthew Goode. –MF Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria ALMOST CHRISTMAS—A battling family spends their first Thanksgiving without Mom. Starring Gabrielle Union, Jessie Usher, Danny Glover, Omar Epps, Mo’Nique, Kimberly Elise, John Michael Higgins, Romany Malco, and J. B. Smoove. Directed by David E. Talbert (Baggage Claim). Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria ARRIVAL—A linguist (Amy Adams) and a mathematician (Jeremy Renner) are recruited by the government to try to communicate with the occupants of 12 alien spacecraft that have landed around the globe, hopefully before the rulers of any other country decide that the ships are a threat and attack them. This speculative fiction movie by Denis Villeneuve (Sicario) is short on action but long on process, and all the more engrossing for it. The place it takes you to, cerebral and emotional, fills a gap left by the absence of a new Christopher Nolan movie, so pay attention. The ambitious and memorable score is by Jóhann Jóhannsson. Co-starring Michael Stuhlbarg and Forest Whitaker. –MF Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria BAD SANTA 2—Sequel to the movie that started the subgenre of “Bad” comedies (Bad Teacher, Bad Moms, Bad Grandpa, etc.) Starring Billy Bob Thornton, Kathy Bates, Tony Cox, and Christina Hendricks. Directed by Mark Waters (Mean Girls).


AT THE MOVIES FILM

LOCAL THEATERS AMHERST THEATRE (DIPSON) 3500 Main St., Buffalo / 834-7655 amherst.dipsontheatres.com AURORA THEATRE 673 Main St., East Aurora / 652-1660 theauroratheatre.com EASTERN HILLS CINEMA (DIPSON) 4545 Transit Rd., / Eastern Hills Mall Williamsville / 632-1080 easternhills.dipsontheatres.com FLIX STADIUM 10 (DIPSON) 4901 Transit Rd., Lancaster / 668-FLIX flix10.dipsontheatres.com

Gosford Park

FOUR SEASONS CINEMA 6 2429 Military Rd. (behind Big Lots), Niagara Falls / 297-1951 fourseasonscinema.com

Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quak(and all of the major cast excellent), it lacks too er, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria many seemingly important details. Doss’s personal development is confined to a few scenes BLEED FOR THIS—Miles Teller stars as boxer Vinny that reveal little, and his military career (after a Pazienza, who returned to the sport after a car near court martial that doesn’t make any sense) HALLWALLS accident that doctors said would leave him untakes him right from boot camp to Okinawa 341 Delaware Ave., Buffalo / 854-1694 able to walk. Co-starring Christine Evangelista, three years later. But while the battle sequence Katey Sagal, Aaron Eckhart, Ciarán Hinds, and hallwalls.org is gruesome, Gibson’s presentation is surprisingTed Levine. Directed by Ben Younger (Boiler ly controlled and the film is genuinely moving. ). Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal NiRoom HAMBURG PALACE Starring Andrew Garfield, Teresa Palmer, Vince agara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal 31 Buffalo St., Hamburg / 649-2295 Vaughn, Sam Worthington, Rachel Griffith, and Walden Galleria hamburgpalace.com Hugo Weaving. –MF Regal Niagara Falls, Regal DEEPWATER HORIZON  is a big-budget disaster Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria epic about the April 2010 explosion at the oil LOCKPORT PALACE THE HANDMAIDEN—South Korean filmmaker Park rig in the Gulf of Mexico in which 11 men were 2 East Ave., Lockport / 438-1130 Chan-wook made an international name for killed. The film tries to lay out a complex narlockportpalacetheatre.org himself with a trio of lurid revenge thrillers, the rative, at least until the explosions start and it best known of which is Old Boy (remade by Spike turns chaotic, It’s filled with special effects and Lee). His US debut Stoker didn’t do too well, so likeable characters to root for. But what it lacks, MAPLE RIDGE 8 (AMC) he’s back to Korea for this inflated, twisty hisamazingly, is any mention of the most important 4276 Maple Rd., Amherst / 833-9545 torical drama adapted from a British novel. Set aspect of the incident: the 200 million gallons amctheatres.com in the 1930s, when Korea was under Japanese of oil that spilled into the Gulf over a period of control (the film assumes some historical knowlthree months, doing incalculable damage to one MCKINLEY 6 THEATRES (DIPSON) edge a lot of Americans may not have), it enters of the most fragile parts of the country’s ecol3701 McKinley Pkwy. / McKinley Mall on a plot by a con man to seduce and marry an ogy. One has to wonder if British Petroleum, Hamburg / 824-3479 heiress who has been raised in a secluded eswhich last year agreed to pay $18.7 billion in tate by her kinky guardian, who plans to marry mckinley.dipsontheatres.com fines, exercised pressure over the production to her himself when she is old enough. The story keep that part of the story off the screen. At any is seen from three different perspectives, inrate, it’s a huge disservice to  history. Starring NORTH PARK THEATRE cluding that of the titular servant enlisted in the Mark Wahlberg, Kurt Russell, John Malkovich, 1428 Hertel Ave., Buffalo / 836-7411 plot. But while the production is lavish and the and Kate Hudson. Directed by Peter Berg  (Batnorthparktheatre.org actors suitably intense, the structure is overly tleship). –MF Dipson McKinley complicated and dully resolved, and the filmDOCTOR STRANGE—Benedict Cumberbatch grabs REGAL ELMWOOD CENTER 16 maker seems to regard it all as an excuse for for one of those fat Marvel paychecks, as do Chi2001 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo / 871–0722 softcore naughtiness that both wants to chide wetel Ejiofor, Rachel McAdams, Mads Mikkelsen, and embrace pornographic stereotypes. Starregmovies.com Tilda Swinton, Michael Stuhlbarg, and Benedict ring Min-hee Kim, Tae-ri Kim, and Jung-woo Ha. Wong. Directed by Scott Derrickson (Deliver Us –MF  Dipson Eastern Hills REGAL NIAGARA FALLS STADIUM 12 From Evil).  Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal INFERNO—Ron Howard and Tom Hanks are back 720 Builders Way, Niagara Falls Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal with their third adaptation of the thrillers of Dan Walden Galleria 236–0146 Brown, giving all of you with degrees in art hisregmovies.com THE EDGE OF SEVENTEEN—Hailee Steinfeld as a tory and comparative religions a chance to exhigh school junior having a hard time with life. ercise your educations while waiting for a new With Haley Lu Richardson, Blake Jenner, Kyra REGAL QUAKER CROSSING 18 Peter Greenaway film. In this one Hanks’ Robert Sedgwick, and Woody Harrelson. Directed by 3450 Amelia Dr., Orchard Park / 827–1109 Langdon, professor of religious iconology and Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Kelly Fremon Craig. regmovies.com symbology, searches for a virus whose release Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, will be triggered by the death of brilliant billionRegal Walden Galleria aire Bertrand Zobrist (Ben Foster) whose partREGAL TRANSIT CENTER 18 FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM— ing gift to mankind is to wipe out half of them Transit and Wehrle, Lancaster / 633–0859 Harry Potter spinoff, from an original script by now in order to prevent the inevitable dangers regmovies.com J. K. Rowling. Starring Eddie Redmayne, Gemof overpopulation. (He makes an awfully good ma Chan, Ezra Miller, Colin Farrell, Zoë Kravitz, case.) Struggling with short-term amnesia and REGAL WALDEN GALLERIA STADIUM 16 and Ron Perlman. Directed by HP regular David accompanied by a beautiful and brilliant ER docOne Walden Galleria Dr., Cheektowaga Yates. AMC Maple Ridge, Aurora, Dipson Flix, Retor (Felicity Jones), he uncovers clues to a plot gal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, 681-9414 / regmovies.com that is, as usual, preposterously baroque. HavRegal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria ing excised the faithful-baiting that made The THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN—Positioned to be “this RIVIERA THEATRE Da Vinci Code briefly notorious, Howard has hit year’s  Gone Girl,” this adaptation of a best-sellon an entertaining formula filled with museum 67 Webster St., North Tonawanda ing psychological thriller makes an engrossing porn, juicy casting (Jones, Irrfan Khan and Sidse 692-2413 / rivieratheatre.org cinematic stew out of what in the end is trashy Babett Knudsen are all delightful to watch) and a material. Emily Blunt does sold work with the not-too tongue in cheek approach. If you’ve read THE SCREENING ROOM tricky title role, a woman who sees a clue to a the book, be forewarned that the movie has a 3131 Sheridan Dr., Amherst / 837-0376 murder from the window of a commuter train. completely different ending. With Omar Sy and screeningroom.net The complications, including her link to the Ben Foster. –MF Four Seasons victim and her alcoholism, are exploited for all LOVING—Virginia may be for lovers now, if the they’re worth by scripter Erin Cressida Wilson SQUEAKY WHEEL state’s tourist slogan is to be believed, but it and director Tate Taylor  (The Help).  It doesn’t 712 Main St., / 884-7172 wasn’t for the Lovings in 1958 whet it sentenced take you anywhere memorable, but the trip itVISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILM LISTINGS & REVIEWS >> squeaky.org Richard and Mildred Loving to prison for violatself is worth the ride.  Co-starring Haley Bening the “Racial Integrity Act of 1924” against nett, Justin Theroux, Rebecca Ferguson, Laura interracial marriage. Beginning with their marSUNSET DRIVE-IN Prepon, Allison Janney, Edgar Ramírez, and Lisa riage in 1958 and ending with the 1967 Supreme 9950 Telegraph Rd., Middleport 735Kudrow. –MF Four Seasons, Regal Transit Court case that ended miscegenation laws in the 7372 / sunset-drivein.com HACKSAW RIDGE—The story of World War II AmerUnited States, this enormously appealing film is ican Army medic Desmond T. Doss, a Virginia less about their legal struggles than about the TJ’S THEATRE farmboy and conscientious objector who saved quiet, unexceptional dignity of their life togeth72 North Main St., Angola / 549-4866 the lives of 75 men at the Battle of Okinawa, is er, largely spent in banishment from their rural newangolatheater.com VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR FILM LISTINGS & REVIEWS so compelling that MORE you wonder why it wasn’t home as a condition >> of avoiding jail. It’s this filmed long ago. As directed by Mel Gibson, year’s Brooklyn, a deeply moving film about the whose approach to violence in his previous films TRANSIT DRIVE-IN recent past that resonates forcefully in modern can perhaps best be described as hysterical, the 6655 South Transit Rd., Lockport America. Starring Joel Edgarton, Ruth Negga, result is better than you might expect, if not Marton Csokas, Nick Kroll, Jon Bass, and Mi625-8535 / transitdrivein.com quite as good as it might have been. The faults chael Shannon. Directed by Jeff Nichols (Mud). are in the script: though the dialogue is strong –MF Dipson Amherst, Dipson Eastern Hills

CULTURE > FILM

CULTURE > FILM

THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN is a remake of the classic western from 1960, itself a remake of Akira Kurosawa’s glorious The Seven Samurai, none of which is likely to matter as much to ticket buyers as the fact that the ensemble cast of this western is headed by Denzel Washington and Chris Pratt. The bigger question is, how do you get a modern audience to see a western? Changing the villain of the piece from a bandit to a mine operator certainly helps, because where you have mines you have dynamite, which means you can blow stuff up in the climax. The character interplay is wan—you would be forgiven for expecting more from co-screenwriter Nic Pizzolatto, creator of HBO’s True Detective—but the size of the cast maintains interest until the rootin’ tootin’ finale. With Ethan Hawke, Vincent D’Onofrio, Haley Bennett, and Peter Sarsgaard. Directed by Antoine Fuqua (Southpaw). –MF Dipson McKinley MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN—A new film by Tim Burton. Remember what that was something to look forward to? Starring Eva Green, Asa Butterfield, Samuel L. Jackson, Judi Dench, Rupert Everett, Chris O’Dowd, and Terence Stamp. Dipson McKinley, Four Seasons MOONLIGHT is by an overwhelming critical consensus one of the best films of the year, which might be a bad thing to tell you; that kind of high expectation can blind audiences to the accomplishments of this deliberately paced, delicate film about a boy’s growth to adulthood. And please don’t consider those adjectives synonyms for “boring.” Audiences are reacting as strongly to the film as are critics. If you can’t see a film without knowing in advance what it’s about, look it up. Otherwise, take a leap of faith and go see it. Starring Trevante Rhodes, Mahershala Ali, Naomie Harris and Janelle Monáe. Directed by Barry Jenkins (Medicine for Melancholy). -MF. Dipson Amherst, Dipson Eastern Hills THE PICKLE RECIPE belongs to Rose (Lynn Cohen), an 85-year-old great grandmother and owner of a Detroit delicatessen. The recipe, a closely guarded secret, is sought after by her son Morty (David Paymer) and grandson Joey (Jon Dore), each in serious need of funds. The ensuing complications include a drug dealer who can analyze the ingredients of almost anything and a preposterously fake rabbi. Veteran actress Cohen contributes a spirited and engaging performance, coming off as a combination Ruth Gordon and Molly Picon. Dore does his best but he’s forced to sustain a progressively flattening series of contrivances, ending in a make-nice resolution. You may not have to be Jewish to get a kick out of this uneven comedy, but it may help, though it also may not be enough. Directed by Michael Manasseri (A Mosquito Man). -GS  North Park ENDS THURS RULES DON’T APPLY—In concocting a movie about the notoriously nutso  but uncommonly gifted and accomplished Howard Hughes, Warren Beatty, whose slow work pace and age (he’s 79) probably mean we won’t see another film directed by him, seems to have decided , “Hey, why ruin the fun with dreary details, or even truthiness?” This might have been justifiable if the movie was a lot of fun, but its amusements are too modest and infrequent. Beatty has conceived and played Hughes as a parody of the real man, a rather odd, perhaps self-serving creation. He’s rummaged in Hughes’s history, grabbing and transforming events and facts to produce a flamboyant star turn for himself. But his movie is muddled and confusing, unmistakably more about him than  Hughes. With Alden Ehrenreich, Matthew Broderick, Candice Bergen, Annette Bening, Lily Collins, Haley Bennett, Ed Harris, Amy Madigan, Oliver Platt, Martin Sheen, and Alec Baldwin. –GS Dipson Amherst, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria,  SULLY—Clint Eastwood’s trademark low-key approach to filmmaking is pleasurably displayed in this thoughtful look at the so-called “Miracle on the Hudson,” the 2009 incident in which a damaged airplane made an emergency landing on the Hudson River with no loss of life. Though pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger (Tom Hanks) was lionized by a public that had long been starved of unambiguous heroes, behind the scenes he was subjected to interrogation by flight officials who questioned his judgment in the face of what their computer models say he should have done. It’s not hard to read a political subtext into this, that we should trust people of proven skill and experience instead of Monday morning micromanaging them (and at the age of 86, Eastwood is entitled to that opinion). But if the story’s drama is built on a shaky pivot (was the second engine functional?), the way it unfolds is smoothly engrossing. With Aaron Eckhart, Laura Linney, Jamey Sheridan, Valerie Mahaffey, and Anna Gunn. –MF Dipson McKinley, P Four Seasons

CULTURE > FILM

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THE SUPERNATURALISM OF CHRISTMAS BY MASON WINFIELD

THE AVERAGE AMERICAN STEREOTYPES HALLOWEEN AS THE ETERNAL “SPOOK NIGHT” AND IS SURPRISED TO HEAR THAT CHRISTMAS WAS ONCE ITS RIVAL

cle. It’s a good date to pick for the birth of humanity’s second chance, its Redeemer.  Our Christmas owes a lot of its window dressing—colors, images, symbols—to old Germanic midwinter festivals. The Church was always grafting its own high points onto pagan celebrations. It was the sugary spoonful that helped the conversion go down. Few Christian events have completely shed their pagan trappings, even today. Midwinter day is dark, though, and Dark Age societies piled a lot onto it. It was a night for the light-haunters to come forth and prowl the fringes of human society. The family dead might well return through the gaping door. Who knows what else might come with them?  By the Middle Ages most of the ideological fighting was done, and Christmas Eve was at least outwardly a sacred night. That doesn’t mean it lost all its baggage. In legend and folklore, Christmas Eve was a night for spontaneous supernatural manifestations. Visions and prophecies were expected. The dear human departed were prone to reappear. Cows and sheep in the barn might be spotted bowing down to worship. Dogs and cats might be overheard praying in human speech. The form of the Christ Child might even put in appearances around the world, turning up as a helpless waif to test the kindness of those it meets. And what is Santa Claus—an ageless, deathless, costumed superhero with a flying sleigh and an inexhaustible bag of presents—if not some sort of fairy-being? Menacing apparitions like Death or the Devil were thought to claim or scare people who broke the sanctity of the evening. That night, both were working for God. The Alpine figure of the Krampus is surely in the mold. By Shakespeare’s day the tradition of the haunted Christmas Eve was so well set in folk memory that many plays and ballads allude to it.  By the reign (1837-1901) of England’s Queen Victoria, Christmas Eve had become a delightful night to be titillated. Telling spooky stories around the fireside was part of the family celebration, particularly among English families. Charles Dickens’s (1812-1870) A Christmas Carol (1843) was just the flower, not the kickoff of the tradition. Prominent American writers including Washington Irving (1783-1859) used Christmas Eve as the basis for ghostly stories.

MANY OF US see nothing but bustle in today’s commemoration of Christmas. Even those who have no patience with the production should recognize that the season is a sacred time of year for a great many. The line, however, between sacred, spiritual, and spooky has never been as sharp to the preindustrial mind as the postindustrial world draws it. Christmas was once charged not just with holiness but with supernatural intrigue.  All world societies of any development have had their traditional power-days, points of the year noted for being spiritually energetic. Most of them are based around the solar points of the year, the solstices and equinoxes. Some festivals fell on the points in between, such as for the Celtic societies—the Irish, Scottish, Welsh, and pre-Roman French. Our Halloween, an evolution of the Celtic Day of the Dead, is one such cross-quarter day, halfway between the fall equinox and the winter solstice.  The Bible doesn’t have much to say about the date of the birthday of Christ, and there isn’t a month in our calendar in which some outfit hasn’t commemorated the event. But as the Church grew and its philosophy settled, some date needed to be fixed for one of its most important events. The Church picked Midwinter Day to celebrate its Savior’s birth.   You’d have thought the agrarian societies onto which Christianity was imposed would have valued the day with the greatest daylight. You’d have thought that the Church would have picked Midsummer’s Eve (June 24), the day appointed to celebrate the summer solstice. Our Christmas Eve is the calendar inverse, based around the day of the greatest darkness. This could seem contradictory.  Jesus is, after all, a solar figure. Never forget, though, that from the summer solstice forward, the days shorten until they bottom out at the winter solstice. From then on they grow until they peak again. The winter solstice is the symbolic nativity of the sun, the rebirth of the cy-

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4 ALLEN STREET POUTINE / 242 ALLEN ST Allentown’s brightest corner brings traditional and experimental poutine combos south of the border. Make sure to draw on their wall!

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5 NO LABELS CLOTHING CO-OP / 224 ALLEN ST

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Sharing space with Pine Apple is this workerowned, LGBTQ-oriented clothes and thrift shop.

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This neighborhood cafe serves west Allentown and the D’Youville College area with coffee, desserts, and simple lunches.

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Comprehensive nightspot with food and entertainment, this Saturday’s offering being one Jerry Garcia collaborator Melvins Seals alongside some of the finest Grateful Dead tribute acts anywhere.

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Stop in for some avocado toast and your daily caffeine fix. And in the oncoming cold weather, warm yourself on that long, heated, tiled bench.

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2 TIPICO COFFEE / 128 FARGO AVE

Some of the best Puerto Rican food in the city. If you’re not in the mood for rice and beans with roast pork—which is nuts—try the cubano or tripleta sandwich.

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A former a church and forever architectural jewel plays home to a rotating exhibit of historical manuscripts and special cultural events, like this weekend’s Queen City Market.

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Author-researcher Mason Winfield is the author of 11, soon 12, books. He is the founder of Haunted History Ghost Walks, Inc., Western New York’s original supernatural touring company.

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1 KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY / 453 PORTER AVE

Most Americans probably think that Halloween would be the night for heightened supernatural reports. As I review my own files of contemporary ghost stories and encounters from Western New York, I don’t find that automatic spike on Halloween. I do find a strong connection to the Christmas season, particularly at East Aurora’s preserved Arts & Crafts Movement community Roycroft. You seldom get through a holiday fortnight without hearing some new campus tale from the glow of the winter solstice, and it’s probably to be expected. The time itself was of deep significance to the Roycroft’s mercurial founder, Elbert Green Hubbard (1856-1915), and he held annual celebrations of the season if not exactly the religious event.  This might be the time to begin a five-article series through the month of December presenting Christmas-season ghost stories at Roycroft. Winter was the season of storytelling, anyway, for many world societies—including the Iroquois/Haudenosaunee of upstate New York, whose culture and spirituality was deeply admired  at Roycroft. 

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Some of our favorite spots nearby the Queen City Market at Karpeles.

There’ll be scary ghost stories And tales of the glories of Christmases long, long ago.

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By the early 20th century the Christmas ghost story was mostly a literary/academic tradition. Notable contributors include the American master Henry James (1843-1916); British supernatural writers M. R. James (1862-1936) and Algernon Blackwood (1869-1951); and British authors A. M. Burrage (1889-1856) and Sir Andrew Caldicott (1884-1951). Mid-century Christmas ghost stories come from King’s College (Cambridge, England) librarian A. N. L. “Tim” Munby (1913-1974), a campus legend for the genre. Writer/professor Robertson Davies (1913-1995) maintained an 18-year tradition of composing a new story to be read at the traditional Christmas party at Massey Hall, University of Toronto. (Davies’s 18 fanciful tales are collected in a book called High Spirits.)  Only in recent decades have we completely lost the popular sense that Christmas Eve should be mysterious as well as unflinchingly good. The tradition is echoed, if not remembered, in the lyrics of the pop song It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year (1963):

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The Public - 11/30/16