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FREE EVERY WEDNESDAY | APRIL 29, 2015 | DAILYPUBLIC.COM | @PUBLICBFLO | WHAT DAY IS CINCO DE MAYO?

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COMMENTARY: WHO BENEFITS FROM THE RUST BELT RECOVERY?

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ART: PHILIP BURKE’S CARICATURES AT THE BURCHFIELD

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CENTERFOLD: CHUCK TINGLEY’S NOSTALGIA II AT EL MUSEO GALLERY

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ASSISTED LIVING: KEITH BUCKLEY SAYS CARPE SOMETHING, ANYTHING


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NEWS: Michael Morgulis and the City of No Illusions.

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SPOTLIGHT: Photographic interloper Frederick Mount.

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RESTAURANTS + BANQUET HALLS PATIO DINING CATERING + PARTY SUPPLIES SPORTING GOODS BIKES SALES + REPAIRS CAMPING SUPPLIES

LOOKING BACKWARD: A. Klein & Son, Sherman Street, 1931.

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FILM: Salt of the Earth, The Avengers: Age of Ultron, Clouds of Sils Maria.

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DRINK: Schnitzel & Co., delightful Swiss-German fare in East Amherst.

ON THE COVER KEVIN RYBCZYŃSKI captured this photo of a peregrine falcon atop the Statler Towers. See more of his work on Instagram: @buffalony.

THE PUBLIC QUESTIONNAIRE: Actor Lisa Vitrano.

THE PUBLIC STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF GEOFF KELLY MUSIC EDITOR CORY PERLA MANAGING EDITOR AARON LOWINGER FILM EDITOR M. FAUST

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TEACHERS AREN’T THE VILLAINS BY BRUCE JACKSON STANDARDIZED TESTING of pre-college students is, I think, a good idea—if the tests tell us what we really need to know. From what I’ve read, I’m not at all sure the current plan for tests do that. But they may, at some point, get that right. That is a matter of tuning. If we had tests that accurately depicted students’ basic skills in such things as reading comprehension, writing ability, mathematical ability, and such, that could be a real help to both the students and their parents in knowing where things are, what help to seek (if help is needed), what opportunities to pursue, what things to complain about, and so forth. Equally important, it would make sure that the schools, which have an interest in looking good, aren’t doing what amounts to self-evaluation and finding themselves wonderful and delightful in all regards. Not all schools do this, but some do. None should be allowed to do this. None. But linking standardized testing to teacher evaluation is wrongheaded, stupid, and lazy. It makes no sense to anyone who works on the ground. Standardized tests tell us nothing about teacher competence, lack of competence, or teacher excellence. Often, the very best and hardest-working teachers are in the worst-performing schools. Their kids don’t score well on the standardized tests, but the best of those teachers have had the most intense and humanly-draining relation to their work of anyone in the system. What they do doesn’t show up in the scores. That’s because the scores are only a partial reflection of what teachers do and are able to do. I’m an outsider in this: I’ve had children who have gone to Buffalo schools, but I have never taught in one. I’ve taught in one private and two public universities. UB mostly, and Indiana University, if you count the one year I taught composition there before going to Harvard. But a lot of my students and friends have taught in public schools, and we have talked, and continue to talk, about these things. Students at Harvard were very easy to teach. Not only had they been rigorously cherry-picked before admission, but every one of them was surrounded by high-energy overachievers. You had to work hard to do badly. The air was full of getting-there. In Buffalo city schools, how well students do depends very much on the same sort of thing. The charters, City Honors, and such, cherry-pick: The kids who enter those doors know they are on the city’s high road, and so do their teachers, and the teachers’ administrators, and all perform accordingly.

Of course those kids do well: We assume you are smart, invested, and intelligent. We shall deal with you accordingly. (I know this from childhood experience: I went to Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan, one of the four New York City high schools you had to test into; our teachers had PhDs, our peers were scary; you couldn’t be lazy.) What about a kid who hasn’t been cherry-picked, one who goes to one of the get-by schools and who is surrounded by get-by cohorts? What about a kid not lucky enough to have grown up in a household in which books and literacy were assumed, or English was not the native language? What about a kid who could read before entering first grade? What do the scores tell us about that? What do they tell us about the teachers working with those kids? Nothing. Absolutely nothing. Albany now seems to want to flatten it all out. All kids should graduate with certain skills. No problem there: From our social need and their personal need, that is a reasonable goal. You finish secondary school you should have certain basic skills. But holding the teachers responsible for this flattening of social responsibility, care, and concern? Bullshit. In all regards. Teachers cannot be held accountable for those scores. Most of the public school teachers I know are people who really care about their students and what they are doing. The causes of broken families, unemployment, double-shifting, are not theirs and they are not the students’. The differential in some families providing households of high English literacy and others of trying to learn the language is not theirs either: It is only something they have to deal with, every day. So testing is great—if it tells us what skills students do or do not have and if it allows parents and students to address what’s wrong. But blaming teachers for flunking scores on these tests is like blaming homicide victims for standing in the way of the bullets. Teachers are not our bad guys. The problems are grounded in the social conditions that make the work of the most serious and dedicated of them nearly impossible. You want a test that tells you what’s wrong? Devise one that goes to life in our community, and tells you how to fix what is wrong, not one that goes to what happens in the schoolrooms. Schoolrooms are where these issues are dealt with, not where they are caused.

A FEW MORE MILLILITERS COULD GET YOU TO LONDON TO SEE THE BILLS.

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Bruce Jackson has been a teacher for 53 years. P

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NEWS COMMENTARY

FIRE IN THE RUST How “growth” masks a sad shift toward the rentier class BY BRUCE FISHER

PHOTO BY CATHERINE LINDER SPENCER

A FRESH LOOK AT RECENT DATA SHOWS that since 2000, the

Rust Belt’s economic growth is strangely, disproportionately due to the category that includes finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing. This means that the much-heralded comeback of the Rust Belt is a fragile, in several cases non-existent trend that is masked by the pleasant appearance of new construction—construction of commercial office space and suburban houses in markets already glutted with abandoned inner-city homes and massive downtown vacancies. What the numbers show is that the Rust Belt is financializing faster than the American economy as a whole. It’s happening faster in Cleveland and Rochester than in Buffalo, but pay attention: A new real-estate bubble is forming in precisely the places where manufacturing is withering. The good news is that, in the aggregate, economic growth in 10 of the biggest Rust Belt metros is a reality. Economic growth is measurably occurring even where the population is flat-lining or has declined since 2000. Economic recovery since 2009, the years of the Obama administration, is a reality in the Rust Belt’s Big 10, especially in Detroit, even though the Detroit metro economy is smaller than it was before 9/11. As of 2013, the last year for which numbers on a metro-by-metro basis are available, things were looking up in Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Rochester, Buffalo, Dayton, Albany, Toledo, and Syracuse. Now for the rest of the story. A tiny sector—the finance, insurance, and real estate (or FIRE) sector, which in most of these metros employs only a couple thousand people—is responsible for an insanely disproportionate share of the positive numbers in the Rust Belt. In some Rust Belt metros, FIRE is half or more of the economic growth recorded since 2001. In America’s metros overall, FIRE is up a little over 6.8 percent since 2001. That means that, nationwide, overall, there’s no real estate bubble. But in the burgs that are not actually increasing in population, or where (like the Buffalo metro) the population increase over the course of the last 15 years is negligible, the disproportionate growth of FIRE is unmistakeable. Real estate and finance are not manufacturing, not entrepreneurship, not engineering, not the sought-after “tradeable sectors” that bring metropolitan regions new earnings from the export of new solutions or new goods sold to the world market. Instead, the new money that is getting counted comes from trading in local real estate, from renting money, from renting property, and from developing property—which happen to be the activities that fund the political class. And those activities rely on the dynamic we see most pointedly in Buffalo: abandonment of the old and sprawl without growth.

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The only other sectors growing in Buffalo since 2001: wholesale and retail trade; services, specifically professional, educational, healthcare (but not hospitals); a little bit in entertainment and hospitality; and a bit in state and local government. We’ve seen this in the employment numbers, too: Manufacturing employment is down, and manufacturing is down also both as a share of our regional output and as a contributor to the regional economy. Of the 10 big Rust Belt metro areas, only in Pittsburgh and in Toledo are the FIRE engines not pulling the trains. In Pittsburgh, which lost population at about the same rate as Buffalo, Detroit, and Cleveland between 2000 and 2010, the FIRE economy is just four percent of a very modest economic uptick. But the Pittsburgh region has a remarkable story to tell about entrepreneurship, albeit in the service sector, not in goods-making. In Toledo, which has had an even more modest upswing, the FIRE economy contributed only four percent of the improvement, which is being shared by

fewer people in its shrinking metro, but Toledo is where most of the glass that goes into automobiles is made. Goods-making is up in Toledo, as it is in Detroit, since the Obama administration began.

MORE HEAD, NOT MUCH BEER Just over one-third of the real-dollar increase in the Buffalo-area economy has come from FIRE in the past dozen years. There’s a 16 percent increase in manufacturing nationally; here, manufacturing fell by almost 11 percent. Goods-producing here, including food-processing for local consumption as well as car parts and other exports, is down a lot from 2001, and now accounts for less than a fifth of the regional economy. In Rochester, whose economy is slightly bigger than the Buffalo-Niagara Falls region’s though its population is slightly smaller, FIRE accounts for 55 percent of the economic growth there since


COMMENTARY NEWS 2000. In Cleveland, which saw its regional population shrink by just a little more than 70,000 between 2000 and 2010, FIRE accounts for 67 percent of the growth in the total output of goods and services in a metro of 2.1 million souls. Look at that again: In Cleveland’s metro, two-thirds of what the federal government counts as economic growth is from the FIRE sector. Cleveland is a sophisticated and relatively large metro. It has pro sports, big culture, a huge and globally respected medical center, some multinational corporate headquarters, a diverse civic sector, major banks, and a big footprint in national politics. But its sprawl-without-growth syndrome is worse than in the Buffalo metro. Its central city continues to hollow out—the city itself lost 17 percent of its population between 2000 and 2010—and the FIRE sector thrives while the rest of its economy treads water. Here’s what this means to you. If you work for a bank or, a real-estate developer, or if you hold some property as a landlord, you know well that you’re doing better since the crash of 2008. But when you look at the numbers of people getting the new post-crash jobs, the tough reality is that almost all of the new jobs since the recovery began in 2009 are jobs that pay minimum wage, so you’re relying for your rents, your fees, and your comparatively high salaries on the ongoing financial well-being not of new entrants to the workforce, and not of new exports, but on three things that you really hope will continue: low interest rates, a strong American dollar, and a rising stock market to benefit all those old folks who have some assets. (About one quarter of our population here is over 60.) If you don’t work for a bank, develop real estate, or own property, you’d best be living in one of the Rust Belt metros where the economy is diverse enough to weather the changes that many observers see as inevitable: a rise in interest rates sometime in 2015, a recovery of the Euro in 2015, and a “correction” in the stock market in 2015, too.

FARMING IS FADING Goods-producing in the private economies of the 10 biggest Rust Belt metros is less than it was a decade ago because globalization hasn’t stopped—and nowadays, goods-producing for the export market faces a challenge: the strong US dollar. Only in car-making Detroit and in automobile-window-making Toledo are goods-producing activities worth more today than they were in 2001—but only by tenths of percentage points. In every other one of the Big 10 metros, service industries are a far bigger share of their regional economies than in 2001.

JUST OVER ONE-THIRD OF THE REAL-DOLLAR INCREASE IN THE BUFFALO-AREA ECONOMY HAS COME FROM THE FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE SECTOR IN THE PAST DOZEN YEARS.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

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LOOKING BACKWARD: A. KLEIN & SON A. Klein & Son, 230 Sherman Street, was one of the East Side’s best known makers of sausage and fresh and smoked meats. This 1931 photograph, taken by Hauser Bob and looking at the northwest corner of Sherman and Lovejoy (renamed to Paderewski in 1941), shows the owners and six employees and delivery trucks. At center are Andrew Klein, who established the business in 1887, and his son Carl J. Klein, who assumed the business in 1949. At the time, A. Klein & Son was part of a solidly German neighborhood in the shadow of St. Ann’s Roman Catholic Church. Families with names like Wurzer, Schmitt, Wehner, Gulibersuch, and Weber occupied nearby homes. Across the street, and not visible here, Sperry Park and Public School 31 anchored the neighborhood. Klein’s “old tyme” wieners were popular, and served at Your Host restaurants after 1944. In 1969, the Klein sausage works were destroyed in a three-alarm fire. Today, the site of A. Klein & Son is a vacant lot, in character P with much of the surrounding neighborhood. Four of seven homes shown on Sherman Street remain. -THE PUBLIC STAFF

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IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS WHICH ARE ON THIS PROOF, THE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 Buffalo’s experience is the norm: THE sprawl PUBLIC CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINE AD continues, even when regional population flat-lines EVENre-IF THE AD IS A PICK-UP. In Buffalo, services are 65THOROUGHLY percent of the

or declines. gional economy. In Cleveland, 71.5 percent. In And we know what that Even now that � CHECK COPYmeans: CONTENT Pittsburgh, 71.8 percent. MESSAGE Even in Rochester, TO ADVERTISER the price of gasoline is $1.50 per gallon below where private firms with Department of Defense Thank you for advertising CHECK DATES decidwhat it was�before theIMPORTANT Saudi oil minister contracts actually make things, service secwith theTHE PUBLIC. Please to help� Barack Obama makeADDRESS, war on VladiCHECK NAME, tor shot up from 55.2 percent to 64.2your percent review ad ofand ed check mir Putin, too large a share of median-income the regional economy in thefor firstany decade of this errors. The original PHONE #, & WEBSITE goes for fuel. new century. layout instructions households have � PROOF OK (NO there’s CHANGES) As weasreported here recently, no interrupAnd then there’s farming. been followed as closely possible. THE PUBLIC tion offers in the 30-year trend of where building perThe Great Lakes area continues to receive the � PROOF OK (WITH CHANGES) design services withmitstwo for new houses are issued: over 58,000 in the most reliable, least destructive proofsforms at of no precharge.suburbs, THE fewer than 2,000 in the city since 1980. cipitation, with fewer hurricanes, tornadoes, PUBLIC is not responsible MESSAGE TO ADVERTISER And throughout the Rust Belt, that’s the way it or ice storms than either the or Gulf Signature for Atlantic any error if not notified Thank you forAdvertisers advertising with goes, because throughout theTHE Rust Belt, we are coasts. But farming is, overall, fading over-of within 24 in hours receipt. PUBLIC. Please review your adthat andtranscend mulooking at ____________________________ metro economies all importance even where The regional populations production department check for any errors. The original nicipal boundaries, but there is nolayout effective metare shrinking. must have a signedinstructions proof in land-use have been followedschool as closely ro-wide planning, administraDate _______________________ Farming accounts for less than ONE order to percent print. of Please sign as possible. THE PUBLIC offers tion, or governance, except, to adesign small extent, and all the economic activity in all 10fax Rustthis Beltback met-or Y15W14 and approve services withIssue: two proofs no charge. THE then inconsistently, for at water and sewer systems. ______________________ ros. In six out of 10 of them,by farming has shrunk responding to this email. is not responsible for any error if PUBLIC Not surprisingly, in the places like Upstate New since 2000. Where it has grown, its contribution not notified within 24 hours of receipt. The York where the majority the PUBLIC. new jobs are in THIS PROOF MAY ONLY BE USED FOR PUBLICATION INof THE to these regional economies is less than that of production must a signed retail, indepartment hospitality, and inhave services other than tourism, museums, information technology, or proof in order to print. Please sign and fax banking or real-estate development, and not in other small sectors like film-production, internet this back or approve by responding to this manufacturing or other high-pay fields, the inpublishing and such that actually exist all over email. come polarization economists Emmanuel Saez the USA, but that are mainly concentrated in the and Thomas Piketty describe as the national � CHECK COPY CONTENT mega-metros of New York, Los Angeles, Chicatrend has a local expression: Making money with go, Boston, and Seattle. � CHECK DATES money IMPORTANT benefits people with money, not people who work jobs that payPHONE wages#, and salaries. � CHECK NAME, ADDRESS, & WEBSITE BEWARE THE SPRAWL MACHINE The lessons of Detroit and Toledo are pretty � PROOF OK (NO CHANGES) Despite robust urban agriculture movements, clear, too: Obama’s rescue of General Motors new land-banking legislation to help manage the � PROOF broughtOK manufacturing back from its steep de(WITH CHANGES) huge inventories of abandoned urban real estate, cline. Making things and then selling them to and the new, Millennial-driven re-urbanization the world has re-established a more sound ecomovement, available evidence from the Rust Belt Advertisers nomicSignature foundation in those metros. It’s slightly metros outside New York State indicates that different in Pittsburgh, which (like Buffalo and

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most of the rest of the Rust Belt) continues to lose goods-making industry. But in Pittsburgh, what growth their metro economy has seen had indeed come from services, but also from tradeable sectors. The numbers show that Pittsburgh’s civic leadership was wise to invest 20 years, three universities, and three major foundations’ grant-making in entrepreneurship rather than in house-flipping seminars. And re-migration to central-city Pittsburgh has had some net benefit: as we will show in subsequent essays, Pittsburgh is doing better on containing sprawl than Buffalo, Rochester, Cleveland, Dayton, and other Rust Belt metros where the FIRE economy rides high. We’ll also take a look at who is making what. Here’s a hint: Manufacturing in Buffalo-Niagara Falls was worth $8 billion in 2001. In 2013, it was worth only $7.1 billion. Renting money and pumping up real estate was worth $6.1 billion in 2001, but grew to $7.9 billion in 2013. Manufacturing pays high wages to working people, while real estate and finance pay speculators and a very few very, very highly-paid bankers and the people who help bankers. It’s no surprise that incomes derived from wage-work here are not doing too well, but that the relatively few people who run banks and rent out offices are doing very, very well. Funny thing about FIRE: It seems to need a lot of fuel. And as we’ll see, the political class in the Rust Belt never tires of supplying it. Bruce Fisher is visiting professor of economics at SUNY Buffalo State and director of the P Center for Economic and Policy Studies.

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Michael Morgulis’s iconic design was born in the Blizzard of ’77.

STILL NO ILLUSIONS Michael Morgulis needs a home for this table. Any ideas?

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As with everything in the Morgulis oeuvre, there is a story behind this iconic logo, which was actually born as a t-shirt during the Blizzard of ’77.

When he went to work on the final design the next day, snow had begun to fall. It was late January 1977, and an epic storm was just commencing.

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That t-shirt design, which remains one of the most popular in his inventory to this day, and is sent out all over the world, references an official-looking city seal. It features a bison encircled by snowflakes. Over the years some have taken issue with the words, which Morgulis admits to being “on the edge of snideness.” But he wanted something with an edge, and something people could relate to, as truly representative of the city he loves. “People believe in the City of No Illusions,” he says. “I’ve been asked about it, and I say, ‘Wouldn’t you rather live in a place without illusions—that is, someplace real?’”

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883-2150 | ESSEXSTREETPUB.COM One longtime customer who bought many City of No Illusions shirts over the years to give to business acquaintances was the proprietor of Buffalo Hardwood Floor Center. One day he asked if Morgulis would object to having an artisan create a floor medallion based on that logo for their showroom. Later, when the company moved, Morgulis was offered the giant medallion, to which he added a pedestal base, creating a table. For many years that was stored in his studio at the Tri-Main, and then moved to the Hertel shop when he relocated there in 2010. But Morgulis was always interested in a more public space, so when his friend Prish Moran opened a second Sweet_ness 7 Cafe on Parkside, he offered it to her, and soon it was in use as a communal table in the coffee shop. That space was recently reconfigured, and the eight-foot table was just brought back home to Hertel Avenue, where Morgulis hopes people will come to check it out. “What’s important to me is I had something to do with it, and it has a story—otherwise, it’s just a big piece of wood. Or a lot of little pieces of wood…” The artist, printmaker, poet, and indisputable Buffalo booster displays no false modesty about his enduring t-shirt design. “I don’t think anyone has come up with as a good a logo/slogan for the City of Buffalo since.” Any ideas where Morgulis’s table should go? P Send them to info@dailypublic.com.

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In the late 1960s, as a grad student in UB’s just-hatched American Studies program, Morgulis was asked to use his artistic talent to help establish an identity for the new major. The mural he created featured a buffalo, but no slogan. Words came a decade later, when Morgulis, then owner of a design studio /silkscreen print shop called Great Arrow Graphics, was asked by American Studies colleagues to design a t-shirt for the program. The old mural image needed a clever slogan. Someone referred to Ursula K. LeGuin’s post-apocalyptic sci-fi novel City of Illusions. “I said no, it should be ‘City of No Illusions,’” recalls Morgulis. The phrase stuck.

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That’s the guiding philosophy behind the life’s work and entrepreneurship of graphic artist Michael Morgulis, whose Local Color Gallery at 1417 Hertel Avenue is both shop and studio. It is now also home to an eight-foot table, with a rare-wood inlay top replicating “City of No Illusions”—arguably the best Buffalo logo ever, designed a generation ago by the t-shirt king, in sly and oh-so-apt homage to his hometown.

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ARTS REVIEW

THE LIKENESS OF BEING Philip Burke at the Burchfield Penney Art Center BY JACK FORAN BILL MURRAY LOOKS MORE LIKE BILL MURRAY than Bill Murray

himself in the caricature portrait by artist Philip Burke, in a career overview exhibit at the Burchfield Penney Art Center. Because of the way caricature—when superbly done—gets to the heart of the matter, reduces to essence, eliminating extrinsics and extraneous. So Audrey Hepburn is mostly just neck. The rest of her a little askew. Not so glamorous, but gamine. And Conan O’Brien mostly chin, and cocky little guy attitude. And Jerry Garcia major askew, with weird, unmatched, saucer-like eyes. And Joey Ramone extreme askew, à la Picasso, les Demoiselles. On the wall next to Kurt Vonnegut—who looks in his caricature a lot like his aspirational model Mark Twain—his quote about “we are what we pretend to be…” The subjects of the caricatures are celebrities mainly—from music or athletic or political realms—so particularly given to pretending. Part of getting to the essence is indicating how well they manage the pretending. Frank Zappa as music realm gray eminence very well. Rafael Nadal as giant-killer extremely well. Some of the politicos as statesmen not so well at all. This exhibit is a local boy makes good story. Burke was born and reared in Buffalo, but in the mid-1970s—his early 20s—made his way to the West Village in New York City, where he began drawing—pen-and-ink caricatures at first—for the Village Voice, then Vogue, Vanity Fair, and The Progressive, before landing a regular gig with Rolling Stone from 1989 to 1995. Somewhere around the mid1980s he switched from ink on paper to paint on canvas, in bright

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THE PUBLIC / APRIL 29, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

and lurid and improbable colors in wild array. Lessons from the Fauves. Since Rolling Stone, he’s done cover and other art for publications the likes of Time, Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, and the New York Times. Some of the issues featuring his artwork are on display under glass. Most of the hung work is from the colorful paint on canvas years, but some earlier pen and ink work as well. Including a laugh out loud funny political cartoon from 1981 of Ronald Reagan and then Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi. Gaddafi as a mosquito on Reagan’s oversized nose, at which—the mosquito, not the nose—Reagan is aiming a pistol, about to fire a bullet that may annihilate the mosquito but will continue straight on into his—Reagan’s, not Gaddafi’s—aiming eye. It had to have helped the artist to have been precocious. Among the black and white drawings is an accomplished caricature drawing he made for a school project at age fifteen—fifteen—of novelist Henry James as a gimlet-eyed cat with binoculars that have eyes of their own, just in case. A feline upon which nothing is lost. For Rolling Stone, there’s a portrait of Kurt Cobain with a spacey angelic look and little wings. A note next to the painting says it was done within a month of Cobain’s demise, and when it was published, the Rolling Stone editors deleted the wings, “fearing they glorified the musician’s suicide.” They should have been so fastidious about the campus rape piece.

PHILIP BURKE BURCHFIELD PENNEY ART CENTER 1300 ELMWOOD AVE, BUFFALO / BURCHFIELDPENNEY.ORG

Then there’s the O. J. Simpson dark side portrait. On the edge to outrageous. Burke gets away with what he’s doing a little like O. J. got away with what he did. For a while anyway. Among the politicos, George W. Bush gets off pretty easy. A drawing of him from 2014 as gentleman cowboy, white shirt, hat but no cattle, sporting a holster and it looks like drawn six-gun, at his hip. Anyway, armed and dangerous, though not as dangerous as when he could start wars on a whim that would kill hundred of thousands or millions. Dick Cheney is there, malicious snarl, the picture of evil incarnate. And Donald Rumsfeld lost in the fog of Donald Rumsfeld. And Richard Nixon, beady eyes barely visible amid the ample jowls and ski jump nose and hunch posture. Chris Christie framed by one of the ironwork archways of the George Washington Bridge, his head and face just about filling that frame. And Rush Limbaugh with his brain on fire. Among the Democrats, respectful caricature portraits of Barack Obama and Michelle, but a Hillary Clinton in the guise of Queen Elizabeth I. And multiple portraits of Bill Clinton, in various guises. One section is of Burke self-portraits over the years, proceeding from more or less straightforward to more caricatural indulgence, with Picasso reference distortion effects. But an early on self-portrait as Picasso in his studio, standing at his easel. A delightful exhibit. Great fun. Continuing through September 13. P


GALLERIES ARTS

IN GALLERIES NOW

through Apr 29. Tues-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat & Mon open by appointment only. Paint the Town Studio (74 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 465-6682): Work up by Jarael Adams.

BY TINA DILLMAN

Pausa Art House (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 697-9069, pausaarthouse.com): Life’s a Beach, by Peter Caruso, opening Fri May 1, 6pm. Thu-Sat 6pm-12am, Live music every night, see website for more info.

= ART OPENING OPENING 225 Louisiana Street Studios (225 Louisiana Street, Buffalo, NY 14204): Pop Up Installation by Marissa Carol & open studios including artist Mark Synder 5-8pm.

Prism (MyBuffaloPride, 224 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14201): Retrospective, 5 years of illustration by Mickey Harmon, opening Fri May 1 at 7pm, on view through June 1. Thu & Fri 4-8pm, Sat & Sun 3-7pm.

1045 Elmwood Gallery for the Arts (1045 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-228, photographics2.com/store/ welcome-to-our-studio-1045-gallerystore): Student Art Show in Ceramic Sculptures by Hilary Collins, Opening Reception Fri May 1, 6-9pm. Thu & Fri 11-6, Sat 11-4 and by appointment. Albright-Knox Art Gallery (1285 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, New York 14222, 882-8700, albrightknox.org): Coexistence: Humans and Nature (2015 AK Teens: Future Curators Exhibition) on view through May 17; Overtime: The Art of Work & Eye to Eye: Looking Beyond Likeness, both shows on view through May 17; David Adamo in the Sculpture Court, on view through May 17: Robert Heinecken: Surrealism on TV, on view till May 31. Tue-Sun 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays until 10pm.

Project 308 Gallery (308 Oliver Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 5230068, project308gallery.com): Planetary Perspectives, poster designs by Eric Johnson. Opening May 8, on view though May 15. Tue & Thu 7-9pm and by appointment. Project 308 also holds classes and rents their facilities, for more information visit their website. Queen City Gallery (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY, 14203, 868-8183, queencitygallery.tripod.com): Rotating members work on view. TueFri 11am-4pm and by appointment. Open late every First Friday from 6-10pm and every Thursday Open Mic, 7-9pm.

Art Dialogue Gallery Custom Framing (5 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14209. artdialoguegallery.com): New work by Donald Scheller, on view through May 29. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am3pm. Artists Group Gallery (Western New York Artists Group) (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, 885-2251, wnyag. com): Artists See Buffalo, Opening Reception May 1, 7:30-9pm, on view through May 29. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm, Closed Sun-Mon. Benjaman Gallery (419 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY, 14222, 553-8483, benjamangallery.com): An Exploration of Regional Art over 3 Centuries, with a foucs on the paintings by Robert N. Blair. Thu-Sat 11-5pm, Sun-Wed by appointment. Big Orbit (30 Essex Street, Buffalo, NY 14222, cepagallery.org/aboutbig-orbit): Drawing Together with Felice Koenig, a collaborative drawing project. Koenig will be present for 90 minute sessions each weekend through May 10. Visit site to sign up for an appointment: http://cs1projects.org/drawingtogether. Fri-Sun 126pm. Box Gallery (Buffalo Niagara Hostel, 667 Main St, Buffalo, NY 14203): As Above, So Below, new work by Caroline Doherty, on view through May 10. BT&C Gallery (1250 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183, btandcgallery.com): some things, work by Roberley Bell, on view till May 29. Gallery open Fri 12-5pm or by appointment. ¡Buen Vivir! (148 Elmwood Ave. Buffalo, NY 14201): Photographs by Orin Langelle, Struggles for Justice: Forests, Land, and Human Rights—Late 80s to Late 90s. Buffalo Arts Studio (Tri Main Building 5th Floor, 2496 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, 833-4450, buffaloartsstudio.org): Assemblage by Megan Conley, Binary ConScience by Stacey Robinson, & Jump Start a student exhibition, all on view through May 2, Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Fourth Fridays until 8pm. Buffalo Center for Arts and Technology (1221 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 259-1680, buffaloartstechcenter. org): Coexistence: Humans and Nature, April 24-May 15, Opening Thu Apr 23, 5-6:30pm. Mon-Fri 10am3pm. Buffalo & Erie County Botanical Gardens (2655 South Park Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14218, 827-1584, buffalogardens. com): Gardens’ Painting Class, included with admission; Mar 20-May 25, Mon-Sun 10am-5pm. Paintasia, on view till May 25 in the Arcangel Gallery. Mon-Sun 10am-5pm, included with Garden Admission. Burchfield Penney Art Center (1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 878-6011, burchfieldpenney.org): The Likeness of Being, portraits by Philip Burke; Selections from a Soldier’s Portfolio, Patteran: A Living Force & Moving Power, Robert Blair; Portrait of a Media Artist, Emil Schult; The Scrutiny of Objects, sculptures by Robert A. Booth; Inquisitive Lens, Marion Faller; Charles E. (The Font Project), Richard Kegler/ P22 Type Foundry; Audio Graphics, Charles E. Burchfield; A Resound-

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Sports Focus Physical Therapy (531 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY, 14202, 3324838, Sportsfocuspt.com): Visual Parables by Glenn Kroetsch. Open First Friday May 1, 6-9pm.

An illustration by Mikey Harmon from Retrospective, at Prisim. ing Roar, Charles E. Burchfield; Body Norms, selections for the Spong Collection. Tue, Wed, Fri & Sat 10am5pm, Second Fridays until 8pm, Thu 10am-9pm, Sun 1-5pm. Canisius College Mary and Lou Vogt Art Gallery (Canisius College 2001 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14208, 8888412): Inked, works by Patrick Willett on view through May 22. Castellani Art Museum (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200, castellaniartmuseum. org): Artists View the Falls: 300 Years of Niagara Falls Imagery, on view till Aug 16; Gary Sczerbaniewicz: High Strangeness, on view through May 3, with Artist Talk Sun Apr 26 3pm. Tues-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. CEPA (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 856-2717, cepagallery.org): Baby’s on Fire: Rachel Rampleman. On view through May 30. MonFri 9am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Dreamland (387 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, facebook.com/ dreamlandarts.buffalo/timeline): Video Screening, Performance & Discussion with artist Selma Selman, Wednesday Apr 29 8pm, sponsored by UB Art Dept & Jasmina Tumbas. Eleven Twenty Projects (1120 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 882-8100, eleventwentyprojects.com): The Sacrifice: A Retrospective (1980-2013) of Joe Orffeo. Open by appoinment only. El Museo (91 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 464-4692, elmuseobuffalo. org): Memento: New Paintings by Chuck Tingley. Opening reception Fri May 1, 6-9pm, on view through June 2. Tues-Sat 12-5pm. Enjoy the Journey Art Gallery (1168 Orchard Park Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 675-0204, etjgallery.com): Spot On, on view through May 2. TueWed 11-6pm, Thu-Fri 2-6pm, Sat 114pm. Hallwalls (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694, hallwalls. org): Amid/In WNY Part Two, survey of local and regional contemporary artists on view through May 1. Tue-Fri 11am-6pm, Sat 11am-2pm. Hi-Temp Fabrications (79 Perry Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 852-5656, appointment only): Phism: Sorry, Grandma, Senior Thesis BFA Art Exhibition opening Sat May 2, 5-9pm & Experiential Ecosystems-video projections by Mary Beth Osborn, opening Sat May 2, 7-9pm. Indigo Art Gallery (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572 indigoartbuffalo.squarespace.com): Collisions, installation & paintings by George Afedzi. Opening Fri May 1, 6-9pm, artist talk 5/16 at 1pm. On view through May 30. Wed & Fri 126pm, Thu 12-7pm, Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sundays and Mondays.

Kenan Center House Gallery (433 Locust Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 433-2617 kenancenter.org/arts/gallery.asp): Extraordinary Forms IV: The Ceramics Legacy of Robert Wood, opening Sun May 3, 2-5pm, on view through June 7. Mon-Fri 12-5pm & Sun 2-5pm. Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall) (220 North Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 885-4139, rain.org/~karpeles): On view: Buffalo Boxers: A Cultural Celebration. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall) (453 Porter Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201, 885-4139, rain.org/~karpeles): On view Maps of the United States, and upcoming Early Maps of the World. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. Lockside Art Center (21 Main Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 478-0239, locksideartcenter.com): A Brushing Impression, solo exhibition by Manning McCandlish. Opening reception Sat May 2, 2-4pm. On view through May, Fri-Sun 12-4pm. Market Street Art Studios (247 Market Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 4780248, marketstreetstudios.com/): Upstairs gallery: student-teacher exhibition on view through May 9; Opening May 3 in the Whalen Gallery: Sue McKenna Retrospective on view through June 14. Mon-Sat 10am5pm, Sun 11am-4pm Manuel Barreto Furniture (430 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 867-8937, manuelbarreto.com): Nothing Happens Twice, work by Jozef Bajus. Exhibit on view through May. Tue & Wed 11am-5pm, Thu-Sat 10am-6pm. Meibohm Fine Arts (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940, meibohmfinearts.com): On a Wing, recent watercolor works by Kateri Ewing, on view through May 23. TueSat 9:30am-5:30pm. Native American Museum of Art at Smokin’ Joes (2293 Saunders Settlement Road, Sanborn, NY 14123, 261-9251): Open year round and free. Exhibits Iroquois Artists work. 7am-9pm. Niagara County Community College Dolce Valvo Art Center (3111 Saunders Settlement Road, Sanborn, NY 14132, 6145975): Student Honors show, on view through May 9. Mon & Tue 12-5pm, Wed &Thu 12-7pm, Fri 12-3pm, Sat 113pm. Nichols School Gallery at the Glenn & Audrey Flickinger Performing Arts Center (1250 Amherst Street, Buffalo, NY 14216, 332-6300, nicholsschool.org/ artshows?rc=0): Parent Art: recent work of Nichols School Parents on view through June 22. Mon-Fri 8am4pm, Closed Sat & Sun. Nina Freudenheim Gallery (140 North Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 8825777, ninafreudenheimgallery.com): Ground, by Joan Linder, on view

Squeaky Wheel (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, squeaky.org): Baby’s on Fire, Installation by Rachel Rampleman Storefront Gallery with an Installation by Rachel Rampleman. Tue-Sat 12-5pm. Starlight Studio and Art Gallery (340 Delaware Avenue, Bufflao, NY 14202, starlightstudio.org): A Musical Interlude: New & Selected Paintings by Gary L. Wolfe, opening Fri May 1, 6-9pm with live performances by several musicians. Mon-Fri 9-4pm. Studio Hart (65 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 536-8337, studiohart. com): Water’s Edge, a group exhibition opening Fri May 1, 6-9pm. TuesFri 11:30am-3:30pm, Sat 12-4pm, and open every First Friday 6-9pm. Sugar City (1239 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, buffalosugarcity. org): Body is Home, mixed media work by Jaime Schmidt, opening May 2, 7-11pm, on view till May 9. TGW@497 Gallery (497 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 949-6604): The Collage, work by Joan Fitzgerald, Patti Harris, Marie Hassett, Joyce Hill, Gerald Mead, Russell Ram, Evette Slaughter & Daniel Rodgers, opening Fri May 1, 6-9pm. Wed-Fri 125pm, Sat 12-3pm. UB Anderson Gallery (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 829-3754, ubartgalleries.org): Transmaterial, a group exhibition curated by Alicia Marvan. Martha Jackson Graphics: Prints from the UB Art Galleries Permanent Collection; These Fragile Truths, UB MFA Thesis by Tricia Butski; Our Own Devices: Exploring the Tools of Annette Cravens World, All opening Sat May 2, 6-8pm, and on view till June 28. Wed-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Lower Art Gallery) (201 Center for the Arts, Room B45, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 6456913, art.buffalo.edu/resources/ lower-gallery): Phantom Vibrations, curated by Liz Bayan, works by Lynn Hershman Leeson, Clement Valla, Kris Verdonck, Future Death Toll, Jillian Mayer, Erik Carter and Tyler Madsen. On view through May 16. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm. UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Project Space) (201 Center for the Arts, Room 155, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 6456913, art.buffalo.edu/resources/ project-space): Spring Thaw, work by undergraduate students, on view through Apr 17. Tues-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm. Villa Maria College Paul William Beltz Family Art Gallery (240 Pine Ridge Terrace, Cheektowaga, NY 14225, 961-1833): 2015 Graphic Design Student Exhibit, opening May 1, 5-8pm. Mon-Fri 8am8pm, Sat 10am-5pm. Western New York Book Arts Collaborative (468 Washington Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 438-1430, wnybookarts. org): Sunnyoutside: Ten Years of Good Books Done Well, up through P May 2. Wed-Sat 12-6pm.

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9


PHOTOGRAPHY SPOTLIGHT Woman waking up on the wrong side of the bed under a cloud, by Frederick Mount.

Photographer Frederick Mount.

PHOTO BY ZACH ROSE

FREDERICK MOUNT BY CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY DON’T BE SURPRISED IF YOU WALK IN ON local photog-

rapher Frederick Mount doing something unexpected in your basement. Or in the abandoned shed on the adjacent lot. Or when you go to replace the light bulbs at that property you’re looking to unload over on Chandler. “I’m addicted to different locations,” he confessed during a recent afternoon chat. “I like adventure and new experiences, and finding a location that works is half the fun. If I want to use a location I technically shouldn’t be in, we call it a ‘run and gun’ and get it done as fast as possible. There’s always a way around things. I think it’s better to ask for forgiveness afterwards rather than for permission beforehand. Asking permission is boring, whereas by asking for forgiveness, you’re forging a path.”

white hazmat suits confer with black robed-and-hooded individuals to build a metaphor about moral judgment. In another—his current project—synthetic storm clouds seem to persecute certain individuals. To create these complicated scenes, Mount often gets help from his wife Jen, who has been known to appear in his work. And with its seemingly never-ending supply of abandoned nooks and crannies, Buffalo is a perfect spot for him. But that’s only something he’s embraced in recent years, after overcoming the “get outta Dodge” mentality he grew up with. A teaching stint in South Korea helped him gain perspective.

He makes it all sound so reasonable. The quiet headspace of a maintenance day job has spoiled him with time to daydream about creative possibilities. The good news is, the 29-year-old South Buffalonian is very respectful of borrowed spaces, so if you don’t catch him in the act you won’t know he came by. He also enjoys working in the wee hours, so you’ll probably sleep through the whole ordeal anyhow.

“I did a lot of urban exploring photography as a means of trying to connect to this city, to connect with its past,” he said. “Once I left the country and returned, I gained a new appreciation for it. I’m no longer looking for the decline of Buffalo. I’m very inquisitive by nature, and I use my photography as a way of asking and, potentially, answering questions. The pictures are always a reflection of something I’m going through at the time, and they started as a means for me to try and gain a better understanding of this place that shaped me.”

All joking aside (he would never invade your home to take photos.…not while you’re living in it, anyway), Mount’s photography requires access to a variety of settings that can’t be recreated in his living room or a standard studio. To survey his work is to be confronted with a rare gift for convincing surrealism wherein a grandfather clock appears on a shoreline, or gigantic white balls function to isolate us from one another. In one series, men in

Since those early urban exploration studies, Mount has evolved into someone who takes photos that emulate the cinematic images in his head, and they tend to contemplate weighty internal debates. A self-described “art-asshole,” he’s easily bored by mundane shots of sunsets and puppies which, while dear to the hearts of many, just don’t make him tick. But using his camera to address existential issues definitely does.

“The images I go after are like stills from a movie—there’s something that comes before and something else right after,” he said. “I’m just capturing one little slice. Since a series can take six months to a year to complete, if I don’t have a deep-seated personal connection to the concept, it’ll fizzle out. It’s partially true that I’m the subject in most of my photos even when I’m not there. But my feeling is, if the images aren’t somehow personal, then you’re just taking pretty pictures. And there’s nothing wrong with that. It’s just not my forte.” Most photographers that have been at it for any length of time will attest to the value of lighting as the most powerful emotive component in a given shot, something with which Mount wholeheartedly agrees. But beyond that, he’s careful not to get too hung up on the scholarly aspect of taking pictures—rules are made to be broken. “Many photographers worry about the technical aspect of their work way too much and that’s what keeps them from completing projects, but for me it’s conceptual—does the image make you think? Is it engaging? That’s what’s most important.”

FREDERICK MOUNT FRED MOUNT PHOTOGRAPHY FREDMOUNTPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

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PUBLIC QUESTIONNAIRE THEATER

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THE PUBLIC QUESTIONNAIRE:

LISA VITRANO

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BY ANTHONY CHASE LISA VITRANO IS ONE OF THE MOST sought-after leading ladies in this region. Every year, it seems, she gives at least one tour de force performance in at least one thrilling role. Last year was her year of Arthur Miller, giving a powerful and affecting performance as Beatrice in A View from the Bridge at Subversive and a portrayal of Elizabeth in The Crucible at American Repertory Theater that was so painfully intense that the palms of our hands went cold and we squirmed in our seats as the suspense built. The year previous, she was regal as tormented Gertrude in Hamlet at Shakespeare in Delaware Park. She was soulfully elegant as a patrician Buffalo wife and mother in A. R. Gurney’s Ancestral Voices at Road Less Traveled the year before that, and wowed audiences with her own autobiographical play Bitch Bares All the year before.

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Currently, she is playing Helen, the daughter of a wealthy family married to a union organizer in Anna Kay France’s stage adaptation of Manny Fried’s autobiographical novel, The Un-American, at Subversive Theatre Collective. In the play, her husband is called before the House Un-American Activities Committee for questioning. “Left to care for her two young daughters,” says Vitrano, “Helen faces enormous pressures from her friends and family to distance herself from her ‘rabble rousing’ husband. She is a woman torn between two worlds. Does stick with and stand by her controversial husband? Or does she succumb to the pressure of her wealthy friends and family?” Women in conflict, thrust into situations not of their own making seems to be a Lisa Vitrano specialty. Beatrice, Elizabeth, and Gertrude could all be described in this way. She won an Artie for such a role in Jon Elston’s Private Viewing. With uncommon insight, intellect, and rigorous preparation, Vitrano brings these women depth, dignity, and reality. She is, without question, one of this city’s A-list actors. Here she submits to The Public Questionnaire: What word would your friends use to describe you? I can’t honestly presume to know that without asking one of them. So I did and he said “feisty.” What quality in your current characters is most unlike your own personality? Helen grew up in a wealthy family; I did not. I think she carries with her a sense of entitlement that I definitely do not relate to. What quality in your current role is most like your own personality? She has a fear of uncertainty and concern for her future, because her life is being tugged and pulled at from different directions. For reasons different from hers, I can identify with this. When and where were you the happiest? I am happiest whenever I open a show—and I am happiest where I can be out in the wilds of nature. What is your idea of hell on earth? Being in a mall during peak shopping seasons. What is your greatest fear? That I’ll never accomplish all the crazy ideas for projects that swirl around in my head. Which talent do you most wish you had? I wish I could play multiple musical instruments. What superpower do you most wish you had? I can’t narrow that down to just one! I want to be a flying invisible time traveler, who can read the minds of all living creatures. What would you change about your appearance? Classic short girl answer: I would like to be taller. What trait do you most dislike in others? Lack of consideration and compassion What do you most value in your friends? An open mind and loving kindness.

What quality do you most value in a good director? I love directors who are organized, honest, truly embrace collaboration, and really put themselves into the work instead of just directing traffic. I need to feel I can trust my director. What is your guilty pleasure? Cooking competition shows! Who is your favorite fictional hero? Dorothy in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Who are your real-life heroes? Too many to name! Pretty much everyone out there struggling to make a living and doing so with a positive attitude. What do you consider to be the most overrated virtue? Ambition. On what occasion do you lie? This is one of those weird existential loop questions! I used to lie often as a child, so I try really hard not to now. But I lie all the time! I lie to myself and the world when I’m having a bad day. I lie for a living, thinking another persons’ thoughts and speaking someone else’s words. But those are fun lies. I never lie with the intention to cause harm. What was the subject of your last Google search? Gobekli Tepe. I am an ancient civilizations freak. If you come back in another life, what person or thing would you like to be? I would like to come back as a bird or a tree. If I did come back as a tree, I’d like for it to be on a tropical island where I be allowed to grow big, strong, and old. Until a bolt of lightning strikes me down. What role, in which you will never be cast, is perfect for you? Li’l Bit in Paula Vogel’s How I Learned to Drive. What is your motto? Do what you love, trust what you know, smile P and breathe.

Designing Western New York Monday, May 4 at 9 p.m. on “Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing Western New York” captures the famed landscape architect’s impact throughout Western New York and explores how his legacy is being carried into the future.

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“Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing Western New York” is funded by the Margaret L. Wendt Foundation.

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NOSTALGIA II / CHUCK TINGLEY’s paintings are on exhibit at at El Museo Gallery (91 Allen Street) beginning Friday, May 1, with a reception 6-9pm. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 29, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 13


EVENTS CALENDAR Tell me about Shockwaves. It is really an amalgam of a lot of different artforms I’ve worked in; music, art, painting, writing, film, video, dance. What my work is, what I’m trying to accomplish is to kind of depict how our brains work, how we remember stuff. Not necessarily what happens—like your average Hollywood movie is a depiction of action—but kind of like the stream of consciousness in Ulysses or even Finnegans Wake. I’m attempting to depict what our brains are doing when remembering. In other words, it’s a depiction of our subconscious minds. Shockwaves is really a story of abuse and revenge, but I’m telling it through stream of consciousness.

PUBLIC APPROVED

I’d imagine that it would be easy to lose track or lose yourself in it because it’s such a hypnotizing film. How did you stay focused? I had

IN PRINT

JOE MASON

Lazy Beach Baby (Album) Recommended If You Like: Toro Y Moi, Brendan Canning, Lesionread

Lazy Beach Baby is an 18-track, genre-spanning album from the increasingly diverse Mason. Full of hazy vocals, oddball electronics, and dreamy melodies, Lazy Beach Baby is the summer-ready, beachgoth soundtrack for endless lazy days on Lake Erie.

MOODY COSMOS

PHOTO BY DIDIER FELDMANN

SHOCKWAVES/SOS SOUND SERIES FEATURING KASUMI WEDNESDAY APR 29 7PM / SQUEAKY WHEEL, 617 MAIN STREET / $7 [EXPERIMENTAL] With the aid of copious amounts of coffee, experimental filmmaker and sound manipulator Kasumi pored through hundreds of public domain videos—obscure movies, educational films—to string together the approximately 25,000 images that comprise her full-length film, Shockwaves. During the creation of Shockwaves, the artist would often study an entire film only to yield a single useable one or two second clip. What she was searching for were what she calls “universal gestures”—motions, glances, facial expressions—that when strung together become a language of their own. This Wednesday, April 29 Kasumi will make a special presentation of Shockwaves at Squeaky Wheel, followed by an improvised live cinema and sound performance the next day (Thursday, April 30) with her friend Adrian Bertolone a.k.a. Ay Fast as part of Squeaky Wheel’s SOS Sound Series. We spoke with the Cleveland-based artist about her experience cutting together her hypnotizing, unrelenting film.

outlines, I had a narrative structure to it. That’s a good question, though. In a way, it’s as much a musical piece as it is a film. I was using these tiny samples from public domain movies and sometimes they provided some narration or dialogue, like in the trailer, there are words, but there was also a music track, so I had to figure out a way to glue those pieces into—compose them into—a bigger composition. I used them as musical phrases and notes in a bigger composition, so I was always focused. I couldn’t afford to lose focus or I’d just forget what was going on. I had a plan and it was like rolling down a mountain without breaks for four years. I had to just keep going and I couldn’t take my eye off of what was in front of me, or else I might just crash into it. What were you looking for? What I was looking for were kind of universal gestures. A gesture that will mean the same thing to anyone watching. As I said, I use these gestures and piece them together as a sentence or phrase of music to make some kind coherent thought. When you juxtapose those images together they create meaning, they can be applied to something else. Is your process of editing anything like your live sound performance? What is the relationship between the process of creating this film and your live sound performance? The

similarity is that I’m using a lot of the same material, these tiny little cut-out clips that I load into software. I’m playing with Adrian Bertolone live and we haven’t played together for six years or some crazy number of years, so I don’t really know what he’s going to do, and he doesn’t know what I’m going to do, so it’s going to be kind of impromptu, though we’ll talk about it beforehand. I have to plan more in advance the live show so I know where I’m going to go, but I have to be open to improvisation. -CORY PERLA

“Rocky” (Song)

RIYL: Foxygen, Shuggie Otis, Mooses

Peter Cahlstadt, frontman of the Fredonia-bred, psych-rock act Mooses, released the first track from his new solo project last week. “Rocky” mixes smooth psych and R&B with Cahlstadt’s laid-back, layered vocals.

WELL KEPT THINGS

“Great White North” (Song) RIYL: Real Friends, Wonder Years, I Can See Mountains

One of the newest additions to Buffalo’s pop/punk scene, Well Kept Things recently signed to Antique Records, which will release the quartet’s debut EP Homegrown on June 16.

LOCAL SHOW PICK OF THE WEEK GUERILLA TOSS W/ ALPHA HOPPER, CCDS (DEATH SQUAD) SUGAR CITY / 1239 NIAGARA ST SUN, MAY 3 / 7PM / $5

WEDNESDAY APR 29 The Werks with Sonder 9pm The Waiting Room, 334 Delaware Ave. $12-$15 [JAM] After this year’s music festival circuit, everyone will know who Dayton, Ohio’s the Werks are. The band is on a few huge festivals, including the famous Electric Forest festival, and now their own—The Werk Out Music Festival, which will also feature Umphrey’s McGee, Papadosio, Lettuce, and more. If you can’t make it out to Thornville, Ohio for The Werk Out Fest, the band will be playing Night Lights Music Festival in Sherman, New York in September, but not before they come to town for a more intimate experience at the Waiting Room on Wednesday, April 29 with Sonder. -CP

Blueprints: Dance and Architecture 8pm SUNY Buffalo State, 1300 Elmwood Ave. $10-15 [DANCE] In a meld of space, movement, and thought, the faculty of Buffalo State College are tackling the field of architecture for their annual faculty-choreographed performance in Upton Hall’s Warren Enters Theatre this Wednesday through Saturday at 8pm with 2pm matinee on Saturday. Carlos Jones will be laying the foundation with layers of tap dancing and stepping for Leanne Rinelli’s exploration of walls and Mike Lambert’s gothic delve into the realm of gargoyles. Joy Guarino will then focus on the architectural heritage of Buffalo and Janet reed will finish the performance look skywards with a commentary on high-rises. -AARON LOWINGER

14 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 29, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

PHOTO BY JIM SAAH

THURSDAY APR 30 Salad Days: A Decade of Punk in Washington, DC (1980-90)

The Bones of J. R. Jones

7pm Hallwalls, 341 Delaware Ave. $8 [SCREENING] The Guardian UK said it might be the best music documentary of last year when it arrived in December, and former Metrozine-publisher Scott Crawford’s film is selling out screenings across the country. Arrive early for the showing at Hallwalls this Thursday, April 30. Examining the ferocious DIY spirit of punk in our nation’s capital, featuring Bad Brains, Minor Threat, Government Issue, and others the film stands as a testament to the power of art for art’s sake and what’s possible when making a buck isn’t much a priority. -CJT

[FOLK ROCK] This Thursday, April 30 The Bones of J. R. Jones will grace the crowd at Mohawk Place with woolly, blues inspired folk songs as one of the last stops of his nationwide tour. Armed with a dobro guitar, the moniker belongs to J.R. Linaberry, a former punk-rocker turned roots-music lover who occupies a separate persona on stage, enticing audiences with a soulful singing style backed by dynamic finger picking. Furthermore, Buffalo folk artists Patrick Stephen Johnson and Levi Van Cleve (members of Pine Fever) will open the show. -JC

8pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $5


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APR 29

WAKOS 9PM FREE

THURSDAY

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APR 30

9PM FREE

happy hour: band named sue 6PM FREE

FRIDAY

MAY 1

WORTHY FRIDAY MAY 1

[SCREENING] To honor International Workers Day in Erie County, Robert Reich's documentary Inequality for All will be screened at the Burchfield Penney Art Center (1300 Elmwood Avenue, on Buffalo State's campus) on Thursday, April 30 starting at 6pm. Reich's film urges for economic fairness and also presents itself also as a stance to fight against wage stagnation. The screening is presented by Erie County Legislator Patrick Burke, as well as City Councilman David Rivera, State Senator Marc Panepinto, State Assemblyman Sean Ryan, and Buffalo Comptroller Mark Schroeder. After the screening, a public discussion on issues of wage stagnation in America will take place, hosted by Bruce Fisher, columnist for The Public and director of the Center of Economics and Policy Studies at SUNY Buffalo State College. The screening is free and open to the public. -NAJEE WALKER

Broccoli Samurai 9pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $5 [FUNK] Broccoli Samurai may sound like an odd name for a band, but the trio from Cleveland serves up a healthy blend of solid musicianship and a vision that mixes electronic and jam. Their blend of digital and analog takes danceheavy sounds and blends it with live improvisation. This Thursday, April 30, Broccoli Samurai will take the stage at Buffalo Iron Works with openers Mike Gantzer and Dave Loss from Buffalo’s Aqueous. -JEREMIAH SHEA

Tony Hinchcliffe 8pm Helium Comedy Club, 30 Mississippi St. $15-$28 [COMEDY] Rising comic Tony Hinchcliffe is lean, but equipped with a roast muscle so robust, it could make a grown man cry. The verbal assassin materialized at LA’s Comedy Store berating other comedians. He soon caught the

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Electrorespect 8:

[ELECTRONIC/DANCE] Jackin house master Carl Cox recently called Worthy the “new wave in house music,” and internationally known DJs like Richie Hawtin and Diplo drop his tracks on the regular. Though his music might sound more influenced by tech-house or bass artists like Eats Everything or his Dirtybird cohort Claude VonStroke than classic jackin house producers like Carl Cox, Worthy is a leader in the house music world—or future house music scene if you will. As head of Anabatic Records, he’s helping to break up-and-coming producers like Detroit’s ADMN and Buffalo boys Eyes Everywhere. Last summer the San Francisco—by way of New York City and Washington, DC—producer released his debut full-length record, Disbehave, a record he called “a rebellion against the house producer’s status quo” full of wavy, deep basslines and hi-res beats. Worthy comes to Lift Night Club on Friday, May 1 with Eyes Everywhere and Jesse Aaron. -CORY PERLA

6pm Burchfield Penney Art Center, 1300 Elmwood Ave

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A tribute to Mark Freeland

11PM / LIFT NIGHTCLUB, 257 FRANKLIN ST. / $10

Inequality For All

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attention of Roast regular, Jeff Ross and began writing for Ross on Comedy Central’s The Roast and The Burn, touring nationally with renowned comics, and hosting his Kill Tony podcast on the Deathsquad Network. Catch Tony Hinchcliffe at Helium Comedy Club on Thursday, April 30 through Saturday, May 2. -KP

Cowboys of Scotland, The Enemies, David Kane & John Toohill, The Fems Unplugged (John and Kent), Scantron, & more tba 10PM $5

SATURDAY

MAY 2

(rage against the machine tribute) 9PM $10 ADV / $15 DOS

WEDNESDAY

MAY 6

THURSDAY

MAY 7

Retrospective 7pm Prism Gallery, 224 Allen St. free [ART] Come one, come all to the grand opening of Prism, a gallery that is dedicated to local LGBT artists. The mission of Prism is to empower regional LGBT creative makers, and celebrate the community’s history as a vessel of creativity and transformation. Its first show, Friday, May 1, entitled Retrospective, is a collection of works by illustrator Mickey Harmon. Since moving to the area 10 years ago, he has integrated the local architecture and culture as points of reference in his work. This show will highlight works with his distinctive and playful use of color and line that he created over the past five years. The gallery will be open Thursday through Sunday. -TINA DILLMAN

Tyler Westcott 9PM FREE

EPQ Presents: A Tribute To Herbie Hancock

Ellen Pieroni Quartet, Intrepid Travelers, Adam Bronstein Trio, Jon Lehning Sextet 9PM $5

Happy Hour: Neville Francis Reggae FRIDAY

FRIDAY MAY 1

Buffalive Presents:

Schism (tool tribute) Anger Is A Gift

6PM FREE

MAY 8

Spring Fling: The Irving Klaws, The Telltale Signs, The Surfin’ Cadavers 10PM $5

WEEKLY EVENTS EVERY SUNDAY FREE

6PM. ANN PHILLIPONE 8PM . DR JAZZ & THE JAZZ BUGS (EXCEPT FIRST SUNDAYS)

EVERY MONDAY FREE

8PM. SONGWRITER SHOWCASE 9PM. OPEN MIC W. JOSH GAGE

EVERY TUESDAY

Buffalo Classics Tour 2pm Visit Buffalo Niagara, 403 Main St. $15 [TOUR] From Buffalo’s Art Deco City Hall that presides over the waterfront and surrounding city; to America’s first female architect Louise Bethune’s; Hotel Lafayette and the Electric Tower—the ultimate symbol of Buffalo as the City of Light—downtown Buffalo boasts a century-old architectural treasury, conveying a palpable, industrious and artistic past. On Friday, May 1, Explore Buffalo invites all to soak up Buffalo Classics on a tour of downtown’s historic landmarks, including all aforementioned and more. -KP

8PM. RUSTBELT COMEDY 10PM. JOE DONOHUE 11PM. THE STRIPTEASERS

EVERY THURSDAY FREE

5PM. AFTERNOON TRIO w/ JOHN, PAUL, & BILL

EVERY SATURDAY FREE

4:30-7:30PM. CELTIC SEISIUNS (TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY)

248 ALLEN STREET 716.886.8539

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CONTINUED ON PAGE 16 DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 29, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 15


EVENTS CALENDAR

ELECTRORESPECT — A TRIBUTE TO MARK FREELAND FRIDAY MAY 1 PUBLIC APPROVED 10PM / NIETZSCHE'S, 248 ALLEN ST. / $5 [TRIBUTE] I remember the first time I heard a Mark Freeland song: It was at a friend’s party and someone put Electroman’s American Googaloo on the turntable. It was so zany, but instantly likeable and I couldn’t believe the guy was from Buffalo. A trip down the Freeland rabbit hole ensued: In addition to Electroman there was Pegasus, Pegasonics, the Fems, and several of course all of Mark’s solo and visual artwork. It’s hard to believe it’s been eight years since Freeland passed away, but the local scene certainly hasn’t forgotten him. On Friday, May 1, Nietzsches will host Electrorespect 8—A Tribute to Mark Freeland, where a slew of Buffalo artists—the Enemies, Cowboys of Scotland, Scantron, the Fems with John and Kent, JeffRepeater, John Toohill, David Kane, and Ed Koban—will perform their own renditions of their favorite Freeland works. In anticipation, JeffRepeater, John Toohill, Bud Redding of Cowboys of Scotland, and Scantron took the chance to reflect on their favorite Mark Freeland songs. JeffRepeater: “I Think That You’re in Love”

The first Freeland song that pops into mind is “I Think That You’re In Love,” for a few reasons: When I was remixing the tune, it translated well into a modern dance beat structure quite organically. It was not too finicky. Also, the title repeated in the lyrics during the hook are strong and almost everyone can relate to them. The simplicity of the hook along with the relationship to the listener makes it nice and sticky to repeat over and over again in your head later on, and Mark is talking to you through the lyrics. It’s far out and pretty deep if you listen to it and think about it. Bud Redding of Cowboys of Scotland: “You Make Me Want to Love You”

I have always loved “You Make Me Want to Love You.” It’s both punky and progressive rock at the same time. It tells a story, and it mentions love, guns, and beer! Mark was a genius song writer.

John Toohill: “Let’s Stay Up and Party Till Six in the Morning”

I’d have to say “Let's Stay Up and Party Till Six in the Morning.” I remember Nicky G having that seven-inch way back when before I really knew about Mark and it stuck out—as any song with that title should when you’re in your early 20s. I’ve had the pleasure of reinventing/covering the jam I think three times at various Electrorespects. Scantron: “I Am Everybody”

This is one of the first hip hop songs to come out of Buffalo. I love it because in the song he mentions Nietzsche’s in the song. He says, “You’re at Nietzsche’s go wild.” So one of Buffalo’s first hip hop songs mentions Nietzsche’s. He also mentions graffiti culture too. He talks about a guy called Crash, who influenced him to get into graffiti. -CORY PERLA

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

Jim Lauderdale 9pm Sportsmen's Tavern, 326 Amherst St. $25-$30 [COUNTRY] Even if you don't think you know who Lauderdale is, you've likely heard his music in your travels—maybe even on ABC's Nashville. Twenty-six albums in and he's proven himself an Americana master of twang, associating with other revered players like Buddy Miller, Rodney Crowell, and the boys from Hot Tuna. As a country troubadour, Lauderdale keeps his music deep-voiced, string-based, and simple. He also keeps it real: There's none of that countrified hit-radio/auto-tuned crap happening here. Catch him Friday at Sportsmen's Tavern with Stone Country. -CJT

PUBLIC APPROVED

Third Annual Spring Artists Sale

10am Burchfield Penney Art Center, 1300 Elmwood Ave free [ART] Don’t miss out on the Third Annual Spring Artists Sale, featuring work by more than 35 local artisans. This sale will include a wide array of functional and decorative art and artisan goods such as textiles, pottery, jewelry, glassware, handmade journals, prints, photography, and more. The museum store will also have specials, and don’t forget to stop by the café to see what Jerry is cooking. This sale also serves as a fundraiser for the museum, with all artists donating back a percentage of their sales to support the ongoing mission of the museum. This is a wonderful opportunity to stock up on gifts and presents for your loved ones. Come on out and support your local museum and artists on Friday, May 1 and Saturday, May 2 from 10am-5pm. -TD

SATURDAY MAY 2

THE MAINE W/ KNUCKLE PUCK FRIDAY MAY 1 6PM / THE WAITING ROOM, 334 DELAWARE AVE. / $20-$25 [ALT ROCK] The Maine gained a sizable following back in 2008 with tongue-in-cheek tracks like “Everything I Ask For.” Their subsequent albums, Black and White (2010), and Pioneer (2011), maintained a consistent pop-rock swag, but Forever Halloween (2013) veered off the beaten path, marking an abrupt shift to alternative rock territory and prompting criticism of inauthenticity and pandering. But American Candy, released in March of this year, flips the proverbial bird at these accusations, while simultaneously rewarding devoted fans with a mature pop-rock sugar-rush fueled by sticky hooks on tracks like “English Girls” and revitalized sounds (“Am I Pretty?”). Catch the Maine at The Waiting Room on Friday, May 1 with Real Friends, The Technicolors, and Knuckle Puck.-KELLIE POWELL

Frankie Valli 8pm Seneca Niagara Events Center, 310 4th St. $45-$90 [CLASSIC] He couldn't take his eyes off you in the 1960s, and his eyes adored you (though he never laid a hand on you) in the 1970s, but Frankie Valli's career stretches back to the early 1950s as a key player in the then-burgeoning world of ballad crooners. Teaming up with the

16 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 29, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Knuckle Puck is here to remind us that punk-pop is alive and well, and still spawning uber-young bands (these guys are, like, 20 years-old) who create an impressive racket. Hailing from Chicago, the writing has that clever, self-deprecating edge that made emo what it was (and what it remains). And while there’s something generic about Knuckle Puck’s wall-of-crunch-meets-tunedvocals, it’s hard to resist a good hook. After all, there’s supposed to be some pop in that punk, right? -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY


CALENDAR EVENTS Four Seasons in the early 1960s landed a string of jukebox classics—"Sherry," "Let's Hang On," and "Big Girls Don't Cry"—all led by Valli's unbelievable falsetto. The hits continued, leaving Valli, who turns 81 on Sunday, an audience that supports him to this day, as you'll see Saturday, May 2, when he brings the current incarnation of The Four Seasons to Seneca Niagara Casino at 8pm. -CJT

Engaged? Just married? Let the know.

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Consider the Source

9pm The Waiting Room, 334 Delaware Ave. $10-$13 [ROCK] Simply put, Consider the Source is a trio of wildly talented musicians. Encompassing more genres and chops than your average player can handle, the group blends world music culture with some of your more traditional forms like jazz, funk, and progressive rock. Leading the group, dual-neck guitarist Gabriel Marin provides not only guitar work but a tonal landscape by means of a special modification that allows him to play any instrument through his guitar. This Saturday, May 2, the band will take the stage at the Waiting Room with openers Blueshift. With a new album dropping June 2, CTS will most certainly be showcasing some of their amazing new material. -JS

Announce your wedding or engagement in The Public! We’re currently offering two options for print: our profile package and our story package For more information, please contact Sean at sean@dailypublic.com or call 856.0737

Dark Tantrums 9pm Dnipro Ukrainian Cultural Center, 562 Genesee St. $15 [DUBSTEP] Two rooms, 15 acts: UK dubstep producers Dark Tantrums make their first Buffalo appearance along with stateside DJ/producer Concious Pilot, Ontario’s Distinct Motive, Cleveland dubstep producer Thunder St. Clair, and Buffalo’s Basha with Get Real, Mattrix, NeckBrace, Baceface, Dub’L Forte, and Tokyo Drifter. Rochester’s Bones Jones will bring the drum and bass along with OpD, Drumsound Blvd, Fifth Column, DJ Looney Tunes, Beta, and Toyko Knuckes. It happens this Saturday, May 2 at the Dnipro Ukrainian Cultural Center. -CP

SUNDAY MAY 3 Guerilla Toss 5pm Sugar City, 1239 Niagara St. $7 [PSYCHEDELIC] What if LCD Soundsystem joined X-Ray Spex and they all dropped acid? Boston's Guerilla Toss defies our usual canon of descriptive go-to's (kudos to any artist that renders the writers speechless!). We'll weakly offer: it's definitely a danceable clusterfuck, especially for those blessed with rhythmic imagination; it quips and squeals with punk abandon, spiked with psychedelic undercurrents. And, oh yes, there's cowbell…when all else fails, there's (truly) plenty of cowbell. It's going to be a sweaty one when Guerilla Toss comes to Sugar City on Sunday, May 3 with CocaCola Death Squad, Alpha Hopper, and La Parka. -CJT

PHOTO BY PAMELA LITKY

YOUNG THE GIANT SATURDAY MAY 2 5PM / BAIRD POINT, UB NORTH CAMPUS / FREE FOR UB STUDENTS, $40 GENERAL ADMISSION [ROCK] As a band still in search of its sonic identity, recording Mind Over Matter presented more of a challenge to So-Cal’s Young the Giant than your average sophomore slump. After experiencing a noteworthy level of success with a 2010 self-titled debut, the five-piece blew up substantially with an appearance on MTV’s VMA Awards show in 2011. Frontman Sameer Gadhia told Rolling Stone that the new album’s title was a mantra that got them through alternating episodes of selfseriousness and creative doubt—things that fame (and perceived expectations) often bring. Young the Giant has delivered an impressive disc filled with musical possibilities that 2010’s “Cough Syrup” didn’t even hint at. The driving prog-pop of “Amalgam” reeks of Minus the Bear in all the best ways, while lead single “It’s About Time” is fuzzy, lo-fi goodness tempered with a slick sheen. The densely mixed “Eros” is a smorgasbord of 1980s references that gives these guys influential backbone nowhere to be found on their debut. Young the Giant will play at UB’s Baird Point as part of the school’s Spring Fest lineup with In the Valley Below, Banks, Bear Hands, and Royal Tongues on Saturday, May 2. Free for UB students, $40 for everyone else. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

LEARN TO FENCE

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The Devil Wears Prada 6pm The Waiting Room, 334 Delaware Ave. $17-$20 [METALCORE] As a genre, metalcore may be on its last leg, but The Devil Wears Prada is not showing any signs of slowing down. The Ohio foursome has toughed it out and are out on the road in celebration of one of their finest works, Zombie, which they're performing in its entirety. The group will be in Buffalo this Sunday, May 3, for a show at the Waiting Room. The Zombie EP was released in August of 2010 and the eerily themed album did well within the community and remains a favorite of fans. The five year anniversary tour will bring Secrets, Sleepwave, and Revealer in for support. -JS

TUESDAY MAY 5 Seether 6pm Rapids Theatre, 1711 Main St. $27.50 [ROCK] South African post-grunge/hard rock band Seether has always been successful in making a splash on rock radio. With their latest record, Isolate and Medicate, they scored a massive hit with “Words as Weapons.” Not only do they know how to crank out hits with every record, but they certainly know how to put on a high energy show and please a crowd. When they play Tuesday, May 5 at the Rapids Theatre in Niagara Falls, be prepared for the house to come down from the popularity of the new material, and especially during older hits like “Fake It,” “Remedy,” and the always beautiful acoustic ballad, “Broken.” -KRIS KIELICH

1/8V GRIZFOLK W/ COIN SATURDAY MAY 2 6PM / STUDIO AT THE WAITING ROOM, 334 DELAWARE AVE. / $10-$12 [ELECTRONIC] Named after infamous grizzly bear trainer, James “Grizzly” Adams—who moved to California for the sole purpose of taming grizzly bears—LA’s folktronica project Grizfolk began under parallel circumstances; specifically when Swedish producers Frederik Eriksson and Sebastian Fritze hooked up with American folk artist Adam Roth, as Roth reveals: “We had all moved to Los Angeles from other places in order to conquer our dreams.” It was not only a merger between disparate continents, but between opposite ends of the musical spectrum as well. Drummer Bill Delia and Brendan James would go on to join the trio and the product became shimmering electropop creations with the melodic resonance of folk music, as demonstrated in their vibrant debut EP, The Spark (2014). This Saturday, May 2 they’ll be making a stop at The Studio at Waiting Room alongside Nashville natives, Coin. Coin is a fresh four piece outfit whose edgy, upbeat take on 1990s alternative has earned them a spot on AP’s “100 Bands You Need to Know” alongside a tour with Passion Pit. Their eponymous debut album is set to be released on Sunday, May 9. Start your Saturday night off with these two up and coming synth rockers on the second floor of the Waiting Room, where they’ll be playing with support from Younger Then and American Low. P -JEANETTE CHIN

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FILM REVIEW

A photo by Sebastião Salgado in Kuwait’s Greater Burgan Oil Field, 1991.

ORGANIZED IN MADNESS SALT OF THE EARTH BY M. FAUST YOU MAY NOT KNOW THE NAME of Brazilian-born photojour-

nalist Sebastião Salgado, but you’ve probably seen his most famous work: images taken at the Serra Pelada mine in the 1980s, where between 50,000 and 100,000 men worked without machinery in a desperate attempt to get some of the gold that had been found there. You probably remember seeing some of the long-distance photos in the series and thinking, “What kind of insects are these?” before understanding what it was you were looking at. Looking back at the shocking photographs he took there, Salgado recalls feeling that “I had returned to the dawn of time, to a world organized in complete madness.” That was a feeling that followed him through much of his career, as recounted in The Salt of the Earth, a documentary co-directed by Wim Wenders and Salgado’s son Juliano Ribeiro. Educated as an economist (“I know what drives the world”), he left a ca-

IN CINEMAS NOW BY M. FAUST & GEORGE SAX

reer with the World Bank to travel around the world, spending months living with people who generally fall under the radar of the “First World.” His interests led him to many of the worst human catastrophes of the last few decades, including the civil wars in Rwanda, the African famines of the early 1980s, and other disasters that caused the displacements of tens or hundreds of thousands of people. Often working with Doctors Without Frontiers, his aim was to bring suffering to the attention of the rest of the world; that his luminous black-and-white images were so compelling made them that much harder to ignore.

The bulk of the film consists of Salgado looking at and commenting on his photos on a special mirrored screen. Wenders treats the images with the respect they deserve, letting them fill the screen, never zooming in on a detail or resorting to that fake 3-D treatment so popular with the Ken Burns school (as if afraid that viewers won’t put up with pictures that don’t move). You might wish that Salgado had been asked to comment on his preference for black-and white, but then, these results speak for themselves.

The Salt of the Earth took the top prize at Cannes last year and was nominated for the Academy Award for best documentary, which it might have won if not for what the Oscar voters saw as the pressing political importance of Citizenfour. It was not an easy movie to make: Wenders and the younger Sal-

Opens Friday at the Amherst Theater.

THE SALT OF THE EARTH—The world-traveling photojournalist Sebastião Salgado is the subject of this Oscar-nominated documentary by his son Juliano Ribeiro Salgado and Wim Wenders (Pina). Reviewed this issue. Amherst Theater

AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON—Or, how many comic book characters can you cram into one movie? Directed by Joss Whedon (Buffy the Vampire Slayer). Reviewed this issue. Area theaters

ALTERNATIVE CINEMA NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN (2007)—Adaptation of the Cormac McCarthy novel about a Texas hunter who finds $2 million from a drug deal gone bad, only to be stalked by a relentless killer who wants it back. Starring Tommy Lee Jones, Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin, Woody Harrelson, Kelly Macdonald, Tess Harper, Barry Corbin, and Stephen Root. Directed by Joel and Ethan Coen (Blood Simple). Presented by the Buffalo Film Seminar. Tue 7pm. Amherst

18 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 29, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

It is often not an easy movie to watch. The worst of the disasters that Salgado witnessed were not natural but man-made. (The few months of genocide in Rwanda, hard as it may be to believe, were not the most extreme tragedy to befall that country.) Spiritually and psychologically exhausted after 25 years of this, by the late 1990s Salgado says, “I no longer believed in any salvation for the human species.” That he finds salvation for himself in something that starts out as a small side project with his wife lets us leave the film with our spirits raised, but it would be hard to forget what you’ve seen here.

A final thought: Like his New German Cinema compatriot Werner Herzog, Wenders has become as adept at making documentaries as fictional films. The same is true of many British filmmakers as well, especially those who came of age in the 1960s and 1970s. Why can’t you say that about many American filmmakers?

PREMIERES

CLOUDS OF SILS MARIA—French drama starring Juliette Binoche as an actress asked to star in a revival of the play that launched her career, but with an ambitious young actress (Chloë Grace Moretz) in her original role. Co-starring Kristen Stewart, who as named Best Supporting Actress at the Cesar Awards. Directed by Olivier Assayas (Summer Hours). Reviewed this issue. Eastern Hills

gado had each started a similar project independently and decided it would be more useful to collaborate than compete.

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Princess Mononoke


REVIEW FILM

MARVELOUS AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON BY GREGORY LAMBERSON IS IT SUMMER ALREADY? I didn’t think so. And yet the summer blockbuster franchise season is

already upon us: Furious Seven has earned more than $1 billion dollars at the box office, and now Avengers: Age of Ultron, the latest special effects extravaganza from Disney-owned Marvel Studios, aims to do the same. Next month Mad Max: Fury Road roars into multiplexes, with such aspiring tent pole entries as Fantastic Four (produced by 20th Century Fox, but licensed from Marvel, rebooting a franchise from just 11 years ago), Ant Man (Marvel again), Tomorrowland (based on a Disney attraction), Jurassic World (a sequel), and Terminator: Genisys (a sequel and a reboot) waiting in the wings. While watching the recent trailer for Ant Man, I caved in to the realization that Marvel Studios has perfected the summer blockbuster formula: The company’s big screen entertainments are wildly entertaining and expertly crafted, which is bad news for film lovers hoping this trend will implode. But after watching the latest Avengers film, written and directed by Joss Whedon, who helmed the more cohesive first film, I’m not so certain. Ultron is the weakest of the company’s interconnected crowd pleasers, neither as smart as Captain America: The Winter Soldier nor as fun as Guardians of the Galaxy. Captain America, Iron Man, Thor, Black Widow, Hulk, Hawkeye, and Nick Fury are back. Is there any point in listing the actors who portray these characters? They’re all likeable as they trade quips sure to elicit laughter from the target audience, but only Scarlett Johansen and Mark Ruffalo are called upon to do much more than provide action for green screen technicians and stunt doubles to enhance. This time around, the Avengers are joined by more heroes than I care to count, and that’s the problem: so many characters and subplots have been crammed into this film that there is little opportunity for characterization or suspense. Whedon recently announced his retirement from the franchise he helped build because the mothership is dictating the inclusion of even more characters in the next two entries, which already have release dates. Following a chaotic raid on Hydra headquarters in the fictional European country Sokovia, Robert Downey, Jr.’s Tony Stark (a.k.a. Iron Man) and Ruffalo’s Bruce Banner (The Hulk) develop Ultron, a sentient computer program which will take over making the world safe so the actors can make more thoughtful movies. Ultron, as voiced by James Spader in the kind of labor-free role Marlon Brando would have loved in his later years, decides the best way to achieve his programmed objective is to rid the planet first of the Avengers and then of all mankind. Paul Bettany isn’t as lucky as Spader: For his unrecognizable role as Ultron’s rival, the Vision, he had to wear heavy makeup and show up on set. For such a high-stakes predicament as eradication by a sarcastic computer, the characters never find themselves in danger, and much of the action is unwisely set in Sokovia. Where’s the fun in that? The new characters include the Flash-like Quicksilver, played by a different actor and handled more enjoyably in last year’s X-Men: Days of Future Past, and his sister, the Scarlet Witch, played by Elizabeth Olson, who barely registers with her limited screen time. I was both relieved and depressed to see Linda Cardellini, so good on TV’s Freaks and Geeks, Mad Men, and Bloodline, in the thankless role P of Hawkeye’s wife.

PRINCESS MONONOKE (Japan, 1997)—The first Hayao Miyazaki/Studio Ghibli film to get wide attention in the West is an environmental fable about a medieval warrior who joins the struggle of forest gods against the humans who are despoiling their land. The English adaptation was scripted by Neil Gaiman. Sat-Sun 11:30am. North Park

IN BRIEF THEATER INFORMATION IS VALID THROUGH THURS APRIL 30

SALAD DAYS: A DECADE OF PUNK IN WASHINGTON, DC (1980-90)—Documentary examining the regional punk scene that produced DIY bands like Bad Brains, Minor Threat, Government Issue, and Fugazi. Thu 7pm. Hallwalls

THE AGE OF ADALINE—Fantasy starring Blake Lively as an immortal woman tempted to give it up when she falls in love with Michiel Huisman. With With Amanda Crew, Harrison Ford, and Ellen Burstyn. Directed by Lee Toland Krieger (Celeste & Jesse Forever). AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In

SINKING OF THE LUSITANIA—Docudrama recounting the British ocean liner that was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine in May 2015. Among the dead was Roycroft founder Elbert Hubbard. The screening is presented by the Roycroft Film Society in conjunction with the Aurora Historical Society. Sun 4pm. Parkdale School Auditorium, 141 Girard Ave., East Aurora, roycroftcampuscorporation.com

CINDERELLA—The surprising thing about Disney’s live-action version of the perennial is how little it differs from their 1950 animated version or any other traditional telling of the fairy tale, despite the contributions of director Kenneth Branagh and screenwriter Chris Weitz (About a Boy). Branagh’s direction is stolid and tentative, as if he wasn’t sure how to spark things dramatically. The production is heavily opulent but not very striking in appearance. Lily James, from Downton Abbey,

Avengers: Age of Ultron

makes a serviceable but bland heroine; Richard Madden, from Game of Thrones, is an appealing Prince. Co-starring Hayley Atwell, Cate Blanchett, Helena Bonham Carter, Stellan Skarsgård, Derek Jacobi, Ben Chaplin, and Rob Brydon. -GS AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Transit Drive-In DANNY COLLINS—Al Pacino stars in a sentimental drama as a septuagenarian “rock star” (think Neil Diamond by way of Rod Stewart) who decides to atone for his sins against taste by moving to New Jersey and connecting with the son (Bobby Cannavale) whose groupie mother he abandoned. It’s not as bad as it sounds because it mostly goes for a light touch, but when it wants to be taken seriously its pretty deadly, And why is this in theaters when much better Pacino recent films—The Humbling, Manglehorn—are not? With Christopher Plummer, Annette Bening, and Jennifer Garner. The directorial debut of Dan Fogelman, writer of Fred Claus, The Guilt Trip and Crazy Stupid Love, which tells you all you need to know. -MF Dipson Amherst, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit

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EX MACHINA—The question, as one character in this film says, isn’t if artificial intelligence will be developed, but when. The answer is probably in our lifetimes, but it’s a subject that seems to stymie the imaginations of filmmakers, from the evidence of, in the last year, Transcendence, Chappie, Eva, and now this. At a remote research installation, a minor employee in a Google-ish company (Domhnall Gleeson) is asked to interact with a female-formed robot (Alicia Vikander) to see if she seems fully and independently intelligent. That such a test would seem to require that he not know the answer in advance is one of many perplexing aspects of the script by Alex Garland, a variable sci-fi scribe (Sunshine, Dredd, 28 Days Later) here making his directorial debut. It’s hard to take any of it at face value given all the clues that there’s more going on here than meets the eye, making it all the most disappointing when we get to the end and discover we’ve mostly been led astray. With Oscar Isaac in a silly hipster beard as a combination of Steve Jobs and Dr. Frankenstein. –MF. Amherst, AMC Maple Ridge, Regal Elmwood,

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FILM REVIEW

BEHIND THE SCENES

LOCAL THEATERS AMHERST THEATRE (DIPSON) 3500 Main St., Buffalo / 834-7655 amherst.dipsontheatres.com AURORA THEATRE 673 Main St., East Aurora / 652-1660 theauroratheatre.com

CLOUDS OF SILS MARIA

EASTERN HILLS CINEMA (DIPSON) 4545 Transit Rd., / Eastern Hills Mall Williamsville / 632-1080 easternhills.dipsontheatres.com

BY GEORGE SAX THERE MAY BE TWO PRINCIPAL MARKET SECTORS for Olivier As-

FLIX STADIUM 10 (DIPSON) 4901 Transit Rd., Lancaster / 668-FLIX flix10.dipsontheatres.com

sayas’s Clouds of Sils Maria: those who strongly admire French star Juliette Binoche—a largish number, surely—and those who like “behind the scenes” looks at the theater and the lives of its artists. Assayas’s film certainly provides Binoche an opportunity for a varied performance, spirited but with notes of reflection and rue. It’s a kind of low-key diva role and performance, and Binoche is certainly impressive. She’s Maria Enders, a middle-aging stage and film star whom we encounter on a train headed for Zurich. There she will accept an award for the man whose play afforded Maria her first big role decades ago and set her on the road to prominence. In it she played an exploitatively maneuvering young businesswoman who has an affair with her female boss. Maria’s mentor dies as she’s in transit and when she arrives, there’s an offer to appear in a London revival of the play, this time as the older woman. She accepts with some reluctance and thereafter we’re treated, or subjected, to long sequences of her going over her lines with her young personal assistant (Kristen Stewart) in the Swiss Alps. Their increasingly tense relationship suffers from this isolated episode and we’re not given much insight into why, except for a generational divergence of outlook. There doesn’t seem to be an erotic element in this, so a parallelism with the upcoming play isn’t really there. (In Joseph Mankiewicz’s movie All About Eve, to which this movie almost seems to be alluding sometimes, there was a suppressed thread of eroticism involving Bette Davis’ star and Anne Baxter’s young schemer.)

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19

Juliette Binoche and Kristen Stewart in Clouds of Sils Maria.

Clouds may be intended to address the interpenetration of life and art, but there’s too little dramatic charge and human interest to arrive at any insight or tension. The protagonists, including, eventually, Chloë Grace Moretz as the very junior Lindsay Lohanish movie star who will play the role Maria once had, seem to be playacting without much point. At least, that’s how it came across to this viewer. Assayas seems to have taken too much for granted. There’s some gloriously arresting photography in the mountains, accompanied by music from Pachelbel and Handel, and there’s Binoche’s fine performance, which does enliven some of the too-unfocused narrative. The title, by the way, is a reference to the striking dynamic cloud formations that funnel through mountain passes in the Alps near Sils Maria. There must be a metaphor hiding somewhere in that title, but I gave up trying to get to it after awhile. P

MERCHANTS OF DOUBT—From Robert Kenner, the director of Food Inc., another documentary to enrage you. His subject is the PR flacks employed Regal Quaker Crossing, Regal Transit Center, Reby big business to sow confusion and misinformagal Walden Galleria tion about issues of public protection. The most FURIOUS 7—AKA Fast and Furious 7. Starring Vin repellent of these may be Marc Marano, a comDiesel, Paul Walker, Jason Statham and Michelle munications specialist in the office of Oklahoma Rodriguez. Directed by James Wan (Saw). AMC Republican Senator James Inhofe, whose belief Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara that climate change is a myth somehow hasn’t Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden disqualified him from chairing the Senate’s enviGalleria, Transit Drive-In ronment committee. Kenner tracks this disrepuGET HARD—After Unfinished Business and The Wedtable but profitable profession back to the 1950s, ding Ringer, you’d think star-vehicle comedies when the tobacco industry found it was more efwould have bottomed out for the year. Let’s hope fective to cast doubt on scientific findings than the nadir is this tired farce starring Will Ferrell as to try to refute them. –GS. Eastern Hills Cinema a dumbass businessman on his way to prison who ENDS THURSDAY hires the only black man he knows (Kevin Hart) to MONKEY KINGDOM—Disney nature documentary. teach him survival skills. It’s awash in jokes reekDirected by Mark Linfield and Alastair Fothergill. ing of racism and homophobia, and while I’m sure Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal that the film’s creators would argue that they’re Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria simply trying to air out these differences, they utPAUL BLART: MALL COP 2—The rent-a-cop whose terly lack the finesse to walk that line. With Alison name rhymes with “fart” (you don’t think that Brie and Craig T. Nelson. Directed by Etan Cohen was accidental, do you?) goes to Las Vegas. This (My Wife Is Retarded). -MF AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, sequel isn’t being screened in Buffalo, but early Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, votes on IMDB.com (which tend to skew positive) Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria give it a rating of 4.2. That’s out of 10. (Update: HOME—Runaway alien meets a girl on the road in After the film opened, the rating dropped to 3.9.) this animated feature. Directed by Tim Johnson Directed by Andy Fickman (Parental Guidance). (Over the Hedge). AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal ElAMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal mwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In INSURGENT—Teen dystopian sequel. Starring TRUE STORY— Adaptation of the book by Michael Shailene Woodley, Miles Teller, and Theo James. Finkel, the onetime New York Times magazine Directed by Robert Schwentke (R.I.P.D.) Regal Elwriter who was fired for creating a composite mwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal character to give a story more impact. Around Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In the time he was fired, the FBI arrested a fugiIT FOLLOWS—The climax makes no sense, but tive named Christian Longo who had been using what’s good in this arthouse horror movie (from Finkel’s name as an alias. Finkel visited Longo in the writer-director of The Myth of the American prison and agreed to write his memoir, but had his Sleepover, David Robert Mitchell) is so good that bullshit meter tested by the man who was accused you can almost forgive it. In a suburb of Detroit, of murdering his wife and three young children. teens are stalked by a murderous entity that can The story cries out for the controlled direction of assume any form and is only visible to the person a David Fincher; instead the job went to debuting it is currently stalking. Mitchell understands that Rupert Goold, whose experience in British theater postmodern horror movies are games, but plays only seem to give him a model to work against. the one he has invented straight-faced: there are Cast against type, James Franco and Jonah Hill more genuine scares here than any movie I’ve are fine as the prisoner and the journalist, but at seen in a long time. Starring Maika Monroe, Keir least as conceived here it’s not really a cinematGilchrist, and Daniel Zovatto. -MF Regal Elmwood, ic story. With Felicity Jones, Ethan Suplee and Regal Transit, Transit Drive-In Gretchen Mol. –MF Eastern Hills Cinema THE LONGEST RIDE—This year’s Nicolas Sparks adUNFRIENDED—Chat room friends are stalked by a aptation features Alan Alda as an old man lookdemon using the account of a dead friend. Amazing back on his life and a lost love while trapped ingly, it’s not a J-horror movie. It is, however, a in an automobile after an accident. With Scott “found-footage” movie. Starring Heather SossaEastwood, Britt Robertson, and Melissa Benoist. man, Matthew Bohrer, and Courtney Halverson. VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILM LISTINGS &(Yolki REVIEWS >> Directed by George Tillman Jr. (Men of Honor). Directed by Levan Gabriadze 3). AMC Maple AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden GalleWalden Galleria ria, Transit Drive-In

CULTURE > FILM

CULTURE > FILM

THE WATER DIVINER—Russell Crowe’s debut as a feature director was a big hit in his native Australia, where the military battle at Gallipoli that sparks its plot is something of a national badge of honor. (Americans know it if at all as the title of Peter Weir’s film on the same subject.) Crowe also stars as a farmer who, four years after the end of World War I, sets off to Turkey to find his three sons, presumably killed in the battle along with nearly 9000 of their countrymen. The film is high on emotional button-pushing and low on plot, which there could have been more of without a clunkily old-fashioned romance between farmer Russ and a Turkish war widow (played by Ukrainian actress Olga Kurylenko). The production values outclass Crowe’s by-the-numbers direction. And while most audiences who see it won’t know anything about the concurrent genocide of the Armenians by the Turkish government that the film completely ignores, you have to wonder at the distributor’s tastelessness in release it on the exact anniversary of that event. –MF Regal Quaker, Regal Transit WHILE WE’RE YOUNG—The best film yet from Noah Baumbach, writer-director of such tart modern comedies as The Squid and the Whale, Frances Ha, and Greenberg. Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts star as a childless Brooklyn couple in their 40s, increasingly alienated from their friends, ho take up with a couple of young hipsters (Adam Driver, Amanda Seyfried). The film seems to change direction when the younger guy turns out to have unsuspected depths of personal ambition, but Baumbach pulls it all together for a satisfying conclusion. His satire is gentle and even-handed, and his wry observations on aging in the post-boomer era are spot on. With Charles Grodin and Peter Yarrow. –MF Regal Quaker WOMAN IN GOLD—Will the movies ever run out of ways to make us hate the Nazis? Helen Mirren stars in a fact-based story as an Austrian who fled to America after the Nazi invasion and now wants to reclaim a family heirloom, a valuable Gustav Klimt painting that is the pride of a Viennese museum. To help her fight the Austrian government she hires a green lawyer (Ryan Reynolds) who happens to be the grandson of another refugee, composer Arnold Schoenberg. The film doesn’t quite know what to do with that detail, or with a story that involves a lot of arcane legal wrangling that isn’t terribly cinematic. Mirren is the main point of interest here, but she’s asked to do too much with too little, while most of the memorable supporting players (Daniel Brühl, Charles Dance, Elizabeth McGovern, and Jonathan Pryce) are underused. Directed by Simon Curtis (My Week with Marilyn). –MF Dipson Eastern Hills Cinema, Flix, North Park, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, ReP gal Walden Galleria

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FOUR SEASONS CINEMA 6 2429 Military Rd. (behind Big Lots), Niagara Falls / 297-1951 fourseasonscinema.com HALLWALLS 341 Delaware Ave., Buffalo / 854-1694 hallwalls.org HAMBURG PALACE 31 Buffalo St., Hamburg / 649-2295 hamburgpalace.com LOCKPORT PALACE 2 East Ave., Lockport / 438-1130 lockportpalacetheatre.org MAPLE RIDGE 8 (AMC) 4276 Maple Rd., Amherst / 833-9545 amctheatres.com MCKINLEY 6 THEATRES (DIPSON) 3701 McKinley Pkwy. / McKinley Mall Hamburg / 824-3479 mckinley.dipsontheatres.com MOVIELAND 8 200 Thruway Plaza Dr., Cheektowaga 895-3409 movieland8theatres.com NEW ANGOLA THEATER 72 North Main St., Angola / 549-4866 newangolatheater.com NORTH PARK THEATRE 1428 Hertel Ave., Buffalo / 836-7411 northparktheatre.org REGAL ELMWOOD CENTER 16 2001 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo / 871–0722 regmovies.com REGAL NIAGARA FALLS STADIUM 12 720 Builders Way, Niagara Falls 236–0146 regmovies.com REGAL QUAKER CROSSING 18 3450 Amelia Dr., Orchard Park / 827–1109 regmovies.com REGAL TRANSIT CENTER 18 Transit and Wehrle, Lancaster / 633–0859 regmovies.com REGAL WALDEN GALLERIA STADIUM 16 One Walden Galleria Dr., Cheektowaga 681-9414 regmovies.com RIVIERA THEATRE 67 Webster St., North Tonawanda 692-2413 rivieratheatre.org THE SCREENING ROOM 3131 Sheridan Dr., Amherst / 837-0376 screeningroom.net SQUEAKY WHEEL 712 Main St., / 884-7172 squeaky.org SUNSET DRIVE-IN 9950 Telegraph Rd., Middleport 735-7372 sunset-drivein.com TRANSIT DRIVE-IN 6655 South Transit Rd., Lockport 625-8535 transitdrivein.com

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BEER DRINKS SCHNITZEL AND CO. 15 NEW ROAD, EAST AMHERST 689-3600 / SCHNITZELANDCOMPANY.COM

all three constituencies are well represented today, and the atmosphere is robust and alive but never overbearing. As a restaurant-goer, I’m as much a fan of décor and ambience as I am of food or service, and Schnitzel does not disappoint. The overall look and feel delivers all the charm of a rural German pub, but it’s the meticulous idiosyncrasies of the décor that win the day. My eyes are drawn to a pair of vintage cross-country skis hanging on the wall. “We found those on Craigslist and literally spent an entire day hanging them in different places to find the right spot,” explains Sinclair “[Owner] Mike [Rizzo] is very detail-oriented.” The bar is stocked with traditional German beers like Franziskaner, Hoegaarden, Weihenstephaner, and Hofbräu München, complemented by a nice selection of New World craft beers from Flying Bison, Great Lakes, Ommegang, and Southern Tier. They also offer German wines from Leonard Kreusch, S.A. Prüm, and Wolfgang. The menu centers around four types of German sausage—knockwurst, bratwurst, mettwurst, and weisswurst—as well as schnitzel made with chicken, perch, pork, and veal. But despite its very specific German focus, the menu offers nice variety, including soups, salads, sandwiches, and flammkuchen—a German-style flatbread pizza. And for those less ethnically inclined, they still have you covered with burgers, ribs, fish fry, and beef on weck. But the potato pancakes are truly the diamond in the rough of this menu. Offered in regular or sweet potato, the pancakes were easily the best I’ve ever tasted—an opinion shared by many online reviewers. “Everything is made from scratch, every day, here at the restaurant,” Rizzo tells me. “We make everything fresh.” After knocking the German pub experience out of the park, Schnitzel also leaves room for fun specialty events centered on craft beer. Thursday is “Flight Night,” when patrons can enjoy $6 flights of beer and half off the late-night menu from 8pm to 11pm. “Brew Crew,” a beer pairing dinner on the third Monday of each month, is hosted by a different local or regional craft brewery each month. The next, featuring Resurgence Brewing Company, is on May 18.

General manager Pete Sinclair and Bruno.

WILLKOMMEN IM SCHNITZEL! Schnitzel & Co. offers delicious, authentic Swiss-German fare BY DAN GIACOMINI MIKE RIZZO, OWNER OF SEVERAL Italian restaurants in

the Northtowns, wanted his next project to be a tribute to his mother, who is of Swiss-German descent, and the Old World favorites she prepared. The result is Schnitzel and Co., a Swiss-German pub in East Amherst whose ambience and menu alike offer an experience that is as authentic as it is enjoyable. The restaurant is off the beaten path, tucked into a wooded area on New Road just north of Dodge in East Amherst. Even the approach feels authentic—as if you’ve suddenly traded Amherst’s suburban sprawl for Der Schwarzwald, the dense “Black Forest” covering much of southwest Germany.

In some ways, the East Amherst location is also a tribute to the large contingent of German settlers who populated the area throughout much of the 19th century. Upon entering, I’m greeted by Bruno, a Lederhosen-clad statue with a chalkboard in one hand and a generously filled stein in the other. Bruno is one of many décor pieces setting the tone of the main bar area. Pete Sinclair, the attentive and inviting general manager, is tending bar today and quickly takes care of me. It’s lunchtime on a Friday—the only day Schnitzel and Co. is open for lunch—and the place is nicely packed. The warm, comforting atmosphere provides a friendly setting that caters equally well to families, friends, and business colleagues. Indeed,

Schnitzel also hosts a Brew Crew Bus Crawl, a daylong tour of local breweries. The next is coming up on Saturday, May 16, and will include stops at Gordon Biersch, Hamburg Brewing Company, Rusty Nickel, and Flying Bison. Guests will enjoy beer tastings and a tour of each facility. (Call 691-4045 for tickets; spaces are limited.) Open since September 2013, Schnitzel and Company has proven itself worthy of the venerable Rizzo name and no doubt stands out among the other Italian-themed restaurants in the Rizzo portfolio, which includes Rizzo’s Casa di Italia (2763 Eggert Road, Tonawanda), Rizotto Ristorante (930 Maple Rd., Williamsville), Banchetti by Rizzo’s (550 North French Rd., Amherst), and their newest addition, Vito & Vino (9210 Transit Rd., East Amherst). If you’re in the mood for authentic Swiss-German cuisine, check out Schnitzel and Company, located at 15 New Road (on the corner of Dodge). Or visit their booth at Taste of Buffalo this summer. The Public’s weekly beer column is a collaboration with the Buffalo Niagara Brewers Association.

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ASSISTED LIVING “QUIT JOB TO GO ON TOUR?”

BY KEITH BUCKLEY

4/23: OPA! AT ACROPOLIS PHOTOS BY SHAWNA STANLEY Round two of the networking event OPA! spread out across both floors of Acropolis. The second floor was dedicated to speed networking: Participants were encouraged to meet 10 strangers in 10 minutes.

PHOTO BY SHAWNA STANLEY

DEAR KEITH: I am in a mildly successful Buffalo band. My bandmates want to book a late spring tour of the East Coast, maybe 10 to 12 dates. It would be our first tour but we have the connections to make it work. My problem is, if I commit myself to this tour, I’ll have to quit my job. My boss can’t afford to give me that much time off and he’ll have to replace me. It’s not a spectacular job or anything—it’s not going to be my career—but I do like it and I’m comfortable there. Should I quit my job and go on tour or should I hold on to this decent job? –TO TOUR OR NOT TO TOUR DEAR TO TOUR OR NOT TO TOUR: The

question of “How many obligations can I effectively half-ass at the same time” has plagued humanity since the dawn of time, so answering this will not be an easy task, particularly because I plan on refreshing my Twitter feed a whole bunch throughout. But, I promise this response will at least be considered “passable.” Isn’t that really all we can hope for? Trick question! Passable is not acceptable. However, neither is imperviousness to consistent failure, so I honestly have no idea what to tell you. I guess if you are dubious as to what course of action to take, do only what is necessary to be great. You said it yourself; your job is “safe.” You know who else did only what was safe? Me neither. Never heard of ’em. If you are not passionate about something, there is no chance that it will inspire passion in other people, and inspiring passion in other people is all we were put on earth to do, aside from getting outraged by things we read on Facebook. To use an adage I just made up: Fortune favors the brave. Unless, of course, you’re as stupid as you are bold. I tend to be ambivalent when people ask me if they should “follow their dreams” of being in a band because the band I’m in is an anomaly and I don’t necessarily believe in anything I could actually tell them. When it started I was too egomaniacal to believe that it wouldn’t work. I was selfish and impractical and hell-bent on “proving myself,” but luckily I was young enough to have not been beaten to a pulp by a cruel world and mildly talented enough to receive encouragement from people I admired. If this band started today I would absolutely consider it a “sign” that, after sleeping on strangers floors for four years, we really ought to hang it up. Back then, however, I didn’t notice signs. I just liked writing and performing and free beer and attention, and if I had to pay for it with the currency of discomfort, it was far easier than finding actual money to pay for it. Obliviousness is a huge part of making your dreams come true, but this only applies to the youth. As an adult you need to focus on your

instinct. Do you really think you should drop out of your third year of medical school to become a sandwich artist because you have a unique gift, or do you just want to live the extravagant lifestyle that Subway sandwich artists live? If you’re honest with yourself, that honesty adheres itself to the DNA of your art and it reproduces quickly and spreads into the subconscious of everyone who bares witness. But if you’re lying to yourself, that deceit takes shelter in your art as well, and people will fail to be moved for reasons they cant even explain. I read a book about codebreakers once where it said (and I’m paraphrasing here, whatever that word means) that the key to codebreaking was to be stupid, because only stupid people are as excited about their one millionth attempt at solving a problem as they were the first time they attempted it. There seems to be an admirable glory is persistence and an inherent shame in quitting, but I don’t believe that applies to every single avocation out there, particularly ones centered around personal expression. There is no blanket answer to your inquiry, but since I’m the resident advice columnist here and they’re paying me the big bucks to pretend like I know what I’m talking about, my advice to you personally is to work until it doesn’t work. If your job isn’t working for you, quit and join a band. If the band stops making you feel fulfilled, quit and go back to work. High school gym teachers and Jesus will tell you “Don’t ever give up,” but I’m here to tell you “Don’t always give up.” Once in a while it’s actually pretty cool. We’re all going to die anyways. Does it really matter that you never finished writing that fan fiction novel about Jim and Pam from The Office?

HAVE A QUESTION FOR KEITH? ADVICE@DAILYPUBLIC.COM Editor’s note: As frontman of Every Time I Die, Keith Buckley has traveled the world gaining insights about the universe. In this bi-weekly column he’ll use those insights to guide our readers with heartfelt and brutally honest advice. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 29, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 23