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ART: WOOD AND PAPER WORKS AT KENAN CENTER

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LITERARY: PATTI SMITH CLOSES OUT THE BABEL SEASON

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NEWS: Günter Grass, RIP; Globe Cycle Works, 1896; a day with Crisis Services.

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FILM: Merchants of Doubt, True Story, plus capsule reviews.

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EVENTS: Your regional guide to the best music, art, and other goings-on.

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ASSISTED LIVING: Rock star Keith Buckley offers readers everyday advice.

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PUBLIC QUESTIONNAIRE: Actress Kerrykate Abel.

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SATURDAY, APRIL 18 IS RECORD STORE DAY, when celebrants pay homage to the brickand-mortar shops that sell music and serve as anchors to communities of fans. SEE PAGE 10.

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NEWS COMMENTARY

GÜNTER GRASS’S GLASS HOUSE The Nobel laureate died this week, age 87

BY BRUCE FISHER

THE NOBEL PRIZE-WINNING German novelist Günter Grass

died this week. Grass also wrote essays, poetry, and plays, including a one-act play, “Only Ten Minutes to Buffalo,” that is kind of a lousy way to get to know his work. But it’s amusing, in an absurdist sort of way. Buffalo is some far-off place, somewhere in the vast oceanic landscape of North America. Grass’s characters weren’t exactly sure where. Graduate students, no doubt, will one day write dissertations about Günter Grass’s minor works—but for almost half a century, so many Americans and Europeans read his major works that the Nobel Prize committee found it safe to award him the biggest gold medal of all in 1999. His acceptance speech was all about the political atrocities in the late Generalissimo Augusto Pinochet’s murderous, fascist regime in Chile. Rotten guys, those Chileans. Trained up by our rotten CIA. Grass as awardee and as political activist was relentless in hammering all the bad guys we supported. Then, suddenly in the summer of 2006, he had a story of his own to tell. For most of his adulthood, from 1959 to 2006, Grass was the famous German novelist and Social Democrat, the moustachioed, tobacco-voiced moralist whose total absorption with the lost city of his youth was charming, inventively and insistently and also voluminously explicated in his long shelf of books. His characters were political through and through: little loud Oskar Matzerath, beating and screeching in The Tin Drum, an allegory for his nation contained in the kid who willfully refuses to grow up. The noble, doomed youth in Cat and Mouse, swimming beautifully in Danzig harbor before the war made it Gdansk harbor and sent all the Germans and their 800 years of being Danzigers away and erased handsome youth. Less celebrated but beautifully drawn allegories were Grass’s animal characters: The Flounder from the old folktale of the fisherman and his wife; the post-apocalyptic The Rat with wise, enduring rodents the witnesses to war; and the animal pathway to a torpedoed ship full of German civilians in Crabwalk. In The Call of the Toad, an old Polish woman and an old German man trying to negotiate repatriating dead Germans to Gdansk, to turn it into Danzig again, if only for the dead.

LOOKING BACKWARD: GLOBE CYCLE WORKS “Club runs are of weekly occurrence among Buffalo wheelmen; but something new in cycling trips, and a very pleasant novelty indeed, was the first annual country run given by the Globe Cycle Works. It took place last Sunday, and brought together one of the merriest and largest companies of bicyclers that ever left Buffalo for a day’s outing.” —Buffalo Express, 1896

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BUFFALO HISTORY MUSEUM.

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The Globe Cycle Works first annual run took place on May 24, 1896, the date of this photograph. Here, hundreds of “wheelmen” line up at the Globe salesroom at 616 Main Street, ready to depart for the countryside. The run concluded in North Collins, where cyclists were treated to bicycle races, football, baseball, and other pastimes, all on the dime of Globe Cycle Works proprietors William H. Penseyres and Charles Haberer. The partners started manufacturing bicycles in a small shop in 1889, and by 1895 occupied a four-story factory at Broadway and Elm streets where Globe, Mascot, and P&H Special bicycles were made. By 1900, the firm was one of 79 bicycle manufacturers in Buffalo, at a time when thousands of bicycle commuters crowded Main Street, Broadway, Genesee Street, and Delaware Avenue during peak travel times. By 1904, Globe Cycle Works was out of the bicycle business, a victim of the “bicycle bubble” of the Gay Nineties. Today, groups like GO Bike Buffalo and Slow Roll Buffalo are reviving an indigenous cycling tradition.-THE PUBLIC STAFF P


COMMENTARY NEWS

IN 2006, THE GERMAN STORYTELLER AND MORAL WITNESS AGAINST THE WORST THAT THE GERMANS HAVE BEEN AND COULD BE ADMITTED THE UNTHINKABLE.

So from 1959 to 2006, Günter Grass was the kind of German we needed: intellectual, gruff, magically productive, relentlessly genuine about his feelings for his lost city of Danzig but reassuringly resolute that it was indeed lost. Then, suddenly, in one of our Iraq war summers, the German storyteller and moral witness against the worst that the Germans have been and could be hurriedly stepped forward, just before the newspapers published their own stories, and admitted the unthinkable—that he himself had been a member of the Waffen SS.

THE PODCASTS

Feet of clay: Robert Byrd, the US Senator from West Virginia, got a pass because he’d long since admitted having been a Klansman in the 1930s, before having become a New Deal, Fair Deal, New Frontier, and especially a Great Society

Then, worse, even while continuing to churn out work of actual literary merit, having created so much of such enduring value, he clumsily or willfully but undeniably did what too many on the left do when objecting to the tactics of the late Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon or the newly re-elected Bibi Netanyahu—he lashed out at Israel, the nation, rather than at the Likud’s policy. That’s when he lost his credibility. Yes, back when he was 17, he was a conscript, doing national service in 1944. He found himself reassigned to the Waffen SS because most of the U-Boats had been sunk, so 10 months before the end of Hitler’s regime, Grass couldn’t achieve his true boyhood aspiration of becoming a submariner. And no, he did not, at age 17, commit any atrocities, because both he and the journalists who exposed him agree that he manned an anti-aircraft gun until his unit was overrun by World War II’s victors. Clever like his rat, wise like his flounder, the young writer in the 1950s figured out that starting his career wouldn’t quite work had his book-jacket blurb truthfully exclaimed that between the covers we’d find how “former Waffen-SS volunteer Günter Grass explains the inherent violence, murderous intolerance, and misogyny of his people in this brilliant premiere novel set in the city now known as Gdansk, but which he adamantly insists on calling Danzig.” Nope. Clever a long time, he covered it up. Then, after an entire adulthood being a critic and moralist, he forgot that he wasn’t allowed into that performance space any more. Now we won’t read him as we once did. Now, the 20th century has been supplanted. Years from now, some Russian will write about the viciousness of Putin’s Chekists, and then will be revealed to have been one. Some Serb will speak movingly of the old days in Mostar, the Tito days, before Milosevic got him all riled up to kill Bosniaks. Some Somali, some Congolese, some deeply insightful, nostalgic, magically inventive ex-cop from Iguale in Guerrero: great career, strong anti-narco message, moral light—then, oops, he forgot to mention that part. The complicity, being that the best insight about villainy proceeds from the beast’s own interior. Bruce Fisher is visiting profesor of economics at SUNY Buffalo State and director of the P Center for Economic and Policy Studies.

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That was what Grass did. Grass had a use here. He was the German whose books were correct: He was the critic of Nazis, but also the unapologetic exponent of the genuineness and integrity of a great cultural tradition. Useful, too—he warned the world against letting the East Germans join what was, until November 10, 1989, just West Germany. I’m German, I know who we are, I know what evil we’re capable of. We are, he said, the people who gave you Auschwitz. Yes, there was Peter Handke, but he was too opaque. Heinrich Böll, sure, but he was too metaphorical in a literary way. Durrenmatt wrote plays. Grass, however, wrote interesting, colorful, sexy, provocative novels, novels you could get stuck in, like layer cakes, for Grass’s magical realism was validated by Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s in his One Hundred Years of Solitude.

But Günter Grass’s admission was something else. This wasn’t just admitting that he, like every other kid in Germany, had been a member of the Hitler Youth. This wasn’t just admitting that he’d been a soldier on the losing side. The Waffen SS were killers. No, murderers. No, terrorists. They were sadistic Nazi criminals. Imagine a Freedom Rider stepping out of the documentaries about Selma and admitting that he and his friends had been in the same gang that had murdered those four little girls in that church bombing reenacted with such horrifying versimilitude in Oprah’s movie.

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This stream of writing about Germanness would have faded gently into the musty halls of academe at Grass’s death, for Germans to us these days are some amalgam of Mike Meyers’s SNL character Dieter, plus ads for handsome and expensive automobiles, and nowadays some rumors about the rebirth of Weimar Republic sexual adventurism in Berlin, and some images of dour Angela Merkel scolding Vladimir Putin. Germans in the 20th century were not marginal or comical—they were, in the days when Grass was coming up, simply enormous, huge. Huge intellectually, technologically, politically. It took 15 years after World War II, by about the time Grass became famous, for Americans to begin to accept the message that Germany was no longer the threat that it had been. Every Baby Boomer boy in America grew up fighting Nazis, not Japanese, because the Nazis were the worst—until, suddenly, they weren’t anymore, because the Communists had put up the Berlin Wall, and President Kennedy not only stood with the former enemy but said aloud, that he, too, was a Berliner. And if our president was a German, well, then, somebody had to explain what had come before.

icon. And he’d been in some holler in West Virginia, not in the heated nights of night-riding Alabama, Georgia, or bloody lynch-mad Mississippi.

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So much about Germnanness streamed from Grass—a book imagining a meeting of all the major and many you-never-heard-of-them minor German writers, a book like a hundred-year Lakota winter count but in German, My Century. Of special poignant relevance to Rust Belters like us, who mourn what was even as we invent and redefine, was Grass’s nostalgia for the lost city.

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NEWS LOCAL

SAFETY NET Chronicling a day in the working life of a Crisis Services sexual assault caseworker BY AARON LOWINGER

AROUND NOON ON GOOD FRIDAY, Crisis Services sexual assault caseworker Ashley Markel receives a new case. It comes in the form of a handwritten report, scanned and sent via an email, which Markel scrolls through. She sighs as she reads the narrative completed by another Crisis Services worker in a local hospital where D.—a false initial—has arrived for treatment. On the third floor of Buffalo Police Headquarters, Markel occupies a large room with four desks, three emptied by the ebb and flow of non-profit budgeting cycles. Insect traps line the walls of the offices and bathrooms. The rising temperatures after a prolonged freeze have been marked by an uptick in cockroach activty at HQ. On either side of her office are open rooms crammed with probably the last collection of office desks without computers on top of them in all of downtown Buffalo. These are the rooms for the day and night shifts of the Buffalo Police Department’s Sex Offense Section. A few minutes after receiving the new referral, Markel is discussing the case in the adjoining room with a detective who has already reviewed the police report and the victim’s statement. Detective and social worker hold an archetypal debate between the right and left brain: the person in search of facts and the person who looks for the spirit of the thing. These are tricky waters to navigate. The word “victim” itself is problematic because it privileges the agency of the offending party. Markel, the advocate, is always in the position to defend her clients. “Survivors do strange things,” she says to the detective, as a way of describing the fact the survivors of trauma do not always act ways that would appear rational or logical to an outside observer. While being true in many instances, that explanation doesn’t always help in assembling facts, and the detective’s face shows that. Markel credits the squad’s lieutenant, David Mann, for believing that such disparate roles belong in the same working unit. Beyond the moral imperative to help, a supported witness yields better results for the prosecution. Crisis Services provides that support. Like any good social worker, it’s easy for Markel to understand their viewpoint. “It’s their job to be objective, and I’m really not. As an advocate, I always believe.” The Crisis Services Advocate Program has been working with the Buffalo Police Department for 20 years; Markel has been stationed there for the last three. The idea is that a Crisis Services case manager can help to provide what survivors need after they come forward, and that law enforcement can help the social workers identify clients in need during a crucial and vulnerable time. “We’re needed in the community. We’re in police stations, we’re in hospitals, and constantly collaborating,” says program director Robyn Wiktorski-Reynolds. “We’re needed for the survivors of these crimes as well as by other groups. It’s absolutely vital.” Markel reaches D. by phone and almost immediately begins paving a foundation for physical and emotional recovery. She asks for permission to talk, permission to call D. by first name, permission

Ashley Markel discussing a case with Detective Adam Stephany.

“WE’RE NEEDED IN THE COMMUNITY. WE’RE IN POLICE STATIONS, WE’RE IN HOSPITALS, AND CONSTANTLY COLLABORATING.” to call at a later time to meet, all as a way of building trust and empowerment. She checks on the medical treatment D. has already received and begins to explain the law enforcement process, counseling D. from the start that justice is more of a journey than an event. Safety planning for a survivor often focuses on immediate medical needs and physical protection. As a matter of protocol, all survivors of sexual assault are advised to undergo a regimen of HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) drugs. The PEP drugs help guard against HIV from taking root in the blood, but they also bring a torrent of nausea, fatigue, and incontinence. “Given somebody who’s been through horrific trauma and then taken these medications, I’m someone who’s here for that,” Markel says. The advocates—there are other workers for domestic violence and elder abuse cases in other locations—work hand-in-hand with the New York Office of Victim Services (OVS) to pay for medical treatment and the loss of property associated with a crime. When survivors submit to a rape kit in the hospital, they forfeit the clothes they were wearing at the time of the assault. For some, replacing a favorite pair of jeans is a big step in their recovery, according to Markel. The emotional and mental rehabilitation is a much more nebulous and protracted path, and Markel encourages all to “define their own justice.” “Because we have a very broken justice system it is very very important for survivors to take their healing into their own hands,” she explains, “and to not align it with the criminal justice process. It’s really important for them to decide how they are going to heal.” On Good Friday, Markel follows up with a survivor of sexual as-

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sault at a local college who is weighing options. A rape kit may prove that sexual contact occurred, and with whom, but it usually can’t prove that a crime has taken place. Some piece or pieces of corroborative evidence are required to get an indictment. Markel is working with this survivor both to define an acceptable form of justice and to explore ways to collect the evidence needed to prosecute. Markel is the only designated sexual assault case manager in Erie County and handles between 300 and 400 cases per year. A separate domestic violence advocate program receives around 1,000 cases. Thanks the restoration of $300,000 in funding from New York State and fundraisers such as the April 26 “Walk a Mile in Her Shoes” event, the advocate program continues to provide crucial services to some of the community’s most vulnerable and atrisk residents. Wiktorski-Reynolds credits State Senator Tim Kennedy for his advocacy of the program, securing funding in the state’s latest budget to replace an arm of funding vacated by OVS. “It instills hope that someone does see the value of this work,” she says. “This can’t go away, that can’t happen.” The program’s workers require ongoing emotional and financial support themselves. Markel credits a strong family structure, pets, and support from her own personal network for enabling her to do her work. “We’re dealing with very, very difficult topics,” Markel says. “Every day we’re taking on stories. We’re taking in the experiences of people that have been violated in the most intimate way. Some of P these stories stick with you. And then you go home.”

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INTERVIEW BOOKS JUST BUFFALO’S BABEL SERIES

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Patti Smith says she’s not a rock star, but she’s not fooling anyone BY CAITLIN CROWELL

WHEN SHE PLAYED THE LAST-EVER SHOW at the storied CBGBs, Patti Smith went on a riff in her version of “So You Wanna Be a Rock and Roll Star.” You can watch the video online; it will make you want to make something. “This is the era / Where everybody creates,” she shouts. “It’s all open / It’s all open to you / It’s all up to you / What are you going to fucking do with it?” So, just do it— but really, do it. Get up at five in the morning, like Smith does, and write until the shrieks from a nearby school drive you away from your keyboard. Learn to take photographs. Do some art, write a book, sing a song. Work for a politician. Perform your poetry. Make a record. With a little help from your star-spangled friends, or if they’re gone, by yourself. This is the era where everybody creates. Save the world. What Smith has been creating is a followup to her humane and lovely memoir Just Kids. That book won the National Book Award in 2010 and reminded anyone who needed reminding how spectacular a force Smith has been for all our lives. In the meantime, of course, she has been doing everything else: touring with her beloved band; writing Oscar-nominated music for the movie Noah; playing the Vatican. Though she’ll tell you that she dropped out of rock and roll to raise a family, she never quit being an artist or reading poetry or writing, writing, writing. Smith will be the last of this year’s speakers in Just Buffalo Literary Center’s Babel Series, at 8pm on Friday at Kleinhans. General admission tickets are still available, but going fast; visit justbuffalo. org or call 832-5400. Students with ID get in for $10. They’ll also be announcing next year’s lineup, so get ready to swoon. Just Kids struck me as so gentle and so kind and so full of love. How do you handle being a rock star without the fury? And being a writer, it seems, without much cynicism? Well, first of all, the way that I handle being a performer is that I never think—I don’t have any image of myself as a rock star. I might have had a brief image of myself as a rock star when I was young, you know, in my 20s, and it was exciting, and I had that sort of frontal, idealistic energy. I still maintain my idealism, but at this time of my life, I think of myself more as sort of a friend, or a performer; I hardly think of myself as a rock star, you know. I have children, I’m 68 years old, I don’t live that kind of lifestyle, you know. I live in my own way fairly simply, and have since 1979, when I left the public arena.

Last time I thought of myself as a rock star was probably then, 1978…and it was exciting, but now I just think of it as the work that I do. And it doesn’t make me any different, any better or in any way more exciting than any other person. I just have command of my discipline. You know, when I go on stage in front of 100,000 people, or 10 people, I go with the same intent, and that’s to communicate. And when I get off the stage, I’m just myself, you know, going about my day. So I think that it’s not only healthy, mentally and emotionally healthy, it’s actually, you know, I think in all ways has added to my longevity as a performer and singer. I’m physically healthy, I haven’t destroyed my voice, I’ve never had a real, what

PHOTO BY EDWARD MAPPLETHORPE

people would imagine a rock-and-roll lifestyle would be. Because if you actually take away the glamor that people attach to it, or the sex and drugs and things like that, what you really have is a very grueling job. Sometimes you’re on a tour bus. I’m on a tour bus with nine guys, driving from Poland to could be some other country, and it takes 11 hours on a bus and a lot of it is tedious, it’s long, you have long waits between sound checks and going on stage, the technical difficulties. It’s not really a glamorous life; it’s kind of an innocent military-style life. It’s like boot camp. You get in your bus. But it’s a lifestyle I actually like. I’m not really attracted to a glamorous lifestyle; I like a work-ethic-driven lifestyle. Sorry my answer’s so long, but I think the short answer would be, I focus on the work. I don’t focus on the ephemera around the work, or a lifestyle around the work; I focus on the work, and that’s what keeps me grounded. And in terms of writing: Writing is a solitary, you know, it’s completely different than performing. Performing, you’re constantly in the public eye, you’re giving, you’re extending yourself. Writing is very solitary, and you’re basically your own mirror, so you know you have to stay healthy to do that as well. I think writing is in some ways more grueling than performing. How, at this stage in your career, do you surround yourself with community? Well, I’ve had to, by necessity, create my own community. When I left New York and went to Detroit in ’79, my community became my husband and my children and my private work, the work I did by myself. At this stage of my life, a lot of what my community—the people who made my community—many of them are dead. My brother and Robert [Mapplethorpe]…my pianist Richard Sohl, Jim Carroll, Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs—the people that I considered my community, I would say 70 percent are gone. And still I’m very lucky, because I still work with Lenny Kaye, I still work with Jay Dee Dougherty, and I have Tony Shanahan, so my band presents a continuing community. And now the people that I work with, my editor Betsey Lerner, who I worked with on Just Kids. So really my new community is my children, who I often perform with, and the people I’m working with now.

But at this point of my life, I have to rely a lot on myself for my community. It has to be a community of memory and discipline. It’s not the same as when I was young, and we were all working together, and all together, all kinds of people, and everywhere there

were struggling poets and writers and musicians, all living in cheap apartments, and all a walk away. The landscape has greatly changed. But you know I’ve worked all my life. I’ve written since I was a child, so I rely on my internal community, the memory of former communities, and my new communities. Do you have a time when you write? I like to write early in the morning. I just finished a book, I was on deadline; I wrote morning, noon, and night, I woke up at four in the morning ’cause I couldn’t sleep and then would start writing again. But I mostly like to write in the morning; I developed that discipline when I had my first child, because I had no time to write. You know, when you’re young, you might stay up all night writing, or you can, you don’t have any time frame. If I worked in a bookstore, when I came back I could sit up all night and write. When you have children, of course, everything changes. So I found my niche: From five in the morning till eight in the morning was when my husband and children were sleeping, and I started using that as my writing time. The magic quiet hour. It took several months to get used to that. At first I’d just stare at the page, or stare at the typewriter, but then through the years I got used to it, and it just developed as a happy discipline. My children are grown, but I still like to get up early and write in the morning. The mind is…because we come out of a dream state, and often we’re working things out in a dream and we get up and have a little breakfast or a coffee or something and we’re in this very lucid state. I find it a vey good time to work. The city is asleep. So there’s a nice rhythm, a really human rhythm. I guess what I meant when I talked about the rock-and-roll lifestyle was: How do you just be human? [Laughs.] Because that’s what I am! You know, I was from a lower-middle-class family, the oldest of four kids. I started working very early, when I was 12 or 13, babysitting, picking blueberries, working in a factory. I’ve always worked; I never became like a rich rock star. I left rock and roll before I entered into that phase. I had garnished a certain amount of fame and a certain amount of recognition, but I left too quickly to build on that.

I didn’t squander a fortune; I didn’t make a fortune. I know how to live simply, and I know how to live well. Read more of this interview at dailypublic.com.

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ARTS REVIEW How to Build a Rose Garden byJodi Harvey-Brown.

WOOD, PAPER, SCISSORS Four artists at the Kenan Center Garden Elf by Doris Timkey.

BY JACK FORAN SUPERB ARTWORK IN PAPER AND WOOD is currently on show at the Kenan Center in Lockport. The four artists are Diane Bond, Jodi Harvey-Brown, Doris Timkey, and Marie Prince. Mostly sculptural art but with a decidedly Japoniste two-dimensionality quality in the work of Diane Bond. Characterized by uncannily complex paper folding and cutting. Origami squared, cubed, and sliced. The show title mentions scissors as a primary tool for these several artists, but this one is more likely to have worked with an X-acto knife. The pieces include elegant and understated wall-hangings of alternately same and differently patterned—with folds and slices—black paper squares suspended from twig horizontal rails—like miniature bamboo—to various art books. Some with the faintest suggestion of practicality—as storybooks, for instance—but for the most part leagues away from any idea of books in the traditional sense of text vehicles. Among non-book items is a piece called Micromanagement, with strands of film and microfilm. Another is a small Personal Reliquary, invoking spiritual gifts—or virtues—in English and Latin. Among the simpler and more straightforward works is a beautiful fold book with woodcut tarot figures and initial letters, and epigrammatic text from Voltaire on life as a card game: Each player must accept the cards life deals, but once they are in hand, he or she must decide how to play them, to win the game. Paper artist Jodi Harvey-Brown’s tool of choice—in addition to scissors—seems to be a paper shredder. Out of paper that looks like it has encountered one, she makes sculptures, one of which, entitled Rose, looks more like a small garden plot of roses. A bouquet at

IN GALLERIES NOW BY TINA DILLMAN = ART OPENING 464 Local Art Gallery & Gifts (464 Amherst Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 464gallery. com): Context Contingent: MICA Alumni Group Exhibition, opening Fri Apr 10, 6-10pm, on view through April 29. WedFri: 12-6, Sat-Sun: 12-4, by event or appointment. 1045 Elmwood Gallery for the Arts (1045 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-228, photographics2.com/store/welcome-toour-studio-1045-gallery-store): Masked Facades, Poster Designs by Chris Lorek, opening Fri Apr 17, 6-9pm. Thu & Fri 11-6, Sat 11-4 and by appointment. Albright-Knox Art Gallery (1285 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, New York 14222, 882-8700, albrightknox.org): Coexistence: Humans

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least. Uncanny artwork, again. Again, one asks, how does the artist do it? Another, even more elaborate piece is called How to Build a Rose Garden. Not so much a garden as a flowery whole fantasy landscape, with central feature huge dragon with wings, against a mountain backdrop featuring a spring with fettucine-like shredder product paper water flowing from it, down the mountainside. Another work by this paper artist is basically papier-mâché. It is called The Little Prince and consists of a white globe and the little boy the pilot meets in the desert. One of the lessons the boy relates—that he has learned from the fox—is that it is the time and effort one spends on one’s rose that makes the rose significant. The sculptor in wood among the artists is Doris Timkey. She makes human or animal figures of found wood or what looks like found wood—driftwood or tree branches or gnarly roots. Or essential elements of human figures—faces—that emerge from wood that retains its basic supposed original form, still looks like a tree branch or roots complex. Part folk art in the found wood aspect, but highly skillful sculpting in the figural parts, the faces that characteristically display enigmatic Etruscan smiles. One room of Timkey’s work is devoted to the theater—a marionette theater and dozen or so charmingly crafted foot-and-a-half-high marionettes, including stock characters from a era before political correctness, “Luna Tick” and “Chow Ming Lee,” and four principals of an escape from slavery drama—a fugitive slave woman, a Quaker couple, and a mean-looking lawman with badge and gun, no doubt on the trail of the fugitive woman. Another room is a veritable barnyard full of chickens and an oversize green frog. And on a shelf, an ar-

and Nature (2015 AK Teens: Future Curators Exhibition), opening Apr 16, 5-8pm, on view through May 17; Overtime: The Art of Work & Eye to Eye: Looking Beyond Likeness, both shows on view through May 17; David Adamo in the Sculpture Court, on view through May 17: Robert Heinecken: Surrealism on TV, on view till May 31. Tue-Sun 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays until 10pm. Art Dialogue Gallery Custom Framing (5 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14209. artdialoguegallery.com): New work by Donald Scheller, on view through May 29. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Artists Group Gallery (Western New York Artists Group) (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, 885-2251, wnyag.com): 19th Annual Juried Members Exhibition-Modern Works, juried by Nina Freudenheim. TueFri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Artspace Buffalo Gallery (1219 Main Street, Buffalo, NY, 14209): 8th annual residents’ exhibition 2015, on view through April. Sat & Sun 12-4pm.

THE PUBLIC / APRIL 15, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Atrium 124 Gallery (124 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14201, 631-5777 ext. 698): Works by Julian Montague and Dan Carey on view through April 9. Benjaman Gallery (419 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY, 14222, 553-8483, benjamangallery.com): An Exploration of Regional Art over 3 Centuries, with a foucs on the paintings by Robert N. Blair. Thu-Sat 115pm, Sun-Wed by appointment. Big Orbit (30 Essex Street, Buffalo, NY 14222, cepagallery.org/about-big-orbit): The Tenant, (A Solitary Experience), UB Thesis Exhibition by Avye Alexandres. On view through Apr 19 (allow 45-60 minutes to experience the work, since there is a walk included). Fri & Sat 12-6pm and by appointment. Box Gallery (Buffalo Niagara Hostel, 667 Main St, Buffalo, NY 14203): As Above, So Below, new work by Caroline Doherty, on view through May 10. BT&C Gallery (1250 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183, btandcgallery.

thritic-looking piece of grapevine that the artist has fashioned into a Fantasy Animal that looks like a cross between a dodo and the Flub-a-dub. Two extinct species. Marie Prince makes little framed collages about the presidents, one for each president, good or bad. Washington and Lincoln and FDR and Obama cheek by jowl with Nixon and Reagan and George W. Bush. Each assemblage contains some relevant pictures, including a reproduced photo or etched or painted portrait of the president, a reproduction (presumably) signature, a negotiable coin with the president’s image, if there is one, and if not usually a non-negotiable coin of the sort you see a magazine advertisement for a set of every so often. And usually a postage stamp with the president’s image. Most of them have a postage stamp, except the ones recent Congresses disdain to honor in any way, like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton—Obama shouldn’t hold his breath for a stamp—or would just like to forget, like George W. Bush. Washington has a five-cent stamp. Lincoln a four-cent stamp. James Madison a 34-cent stamp, and his popular wife Dolly a 15-cent stamp. The title of the exhibit is Wood, Paper, Scissors. It continues through April 26.

WOOD, PAPER, SCISSORS KENAN CENTER 433 LOCUST ST, LOCKPORT / KENANCENTER.ORG

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com): Some Things, work by Roberley Bell, on view through May 29. Hours, Fri 12-5pm or by appointment.

5pm. Paintasia, on view till May 25 in the Arcangel Gallery. Mon-Sun 10am-5pm, included with Garden Admission.

¡Buen Vivir! (148 Elmwood Ave. Buffalo, NY 14201): Photographs by Orin Langelle, Struggles for Justice: Forests, Land, and Human Rights—Late 80s to Late 90s.

Burchfield Penney Art Center (1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 878-6011, burchfieldpenney.org): The Likeness of Being, portraits by Philip Burke; Selections from a Soldier’s Portfolio, Patteran: A Living Force & Moving Power, Robert Blair; Portrait of a Media Artist, Emil Schult; The Scrutiny of Objects, Sculptures by Robert A. Booth; Inquisitive Lens, Marion Faller; Charles E. (The Font Project), Richard Kegler/P22 Type Foundry; Audio Graphics, Charles E. Burchfield; A Resounding Roar, Charles E. Burchfield; Body Norms, selections for the Spong Collection. Tue, Wed, Fri & Sat 10am-5pm, Second Fridays until 8pm, Thu 10am-9pm, Sun 1-5pm.

Buffalo Arts Studio (Tri Main Building 5th Floor, 2496 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, 833-4450, buffaloartsstudio.org): Assemblage by Megan Conley, Binary ConScience by Stacey Robinson, & Jump Start a student exhibition, all on view till May 2, Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Fourth Fridays until 8pm. Buffalo Center for Arts and Technology (1221 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 259-1680, buffaloartstechcenter.org): Currently on view, Graham Mitchell Sears, on view through mid-April. Mon-Fri 10am-3pm. Buffalo & Erie County Botanical Gardens (2655 South Park Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14218, 827-1584, buffalogardens.com): Gardens’ Painting Class, included with admission; Mar 20-May 25, Mon-Sun 10am-

Burchfield Nature and Art Center (2001 Union Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 677-4843, burchfieldnac.org): West Seneca Art Society, opening April 10, 7-9pm, on view through April 30. Tue-Fri 10-4pm, Sun 1-4pm, see site for upcoming classes.


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Technologies by Iyanna Taylor. Part of the Coexistence: Humans and Nature (2015 AK Teens: Future Curators Exhibition) at the Albright-Knox. Canisius College Mary and Lou Vogt Art Gallery (Canisius College 2001 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14208, 888-8412): Inked, works by Patrick Willett. Castellani Art Museum (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200, castellaniartmuseum.org): Artists View the Falls: 300 Years of Niagara Falls Imagery, on view through Aug 16; Bring to Light: installation by Kurt Von Voetsch & Michael Beam on view through Apr 26; Gary Sczerbaniewicz: High Strangeness, on view through May 3. Tue-Sat 11am5pm, Sun 1-5pm. CEPA (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 856-2717, cepagallery. org): Baby’s on Fire: Rachel Rampleman. On view through May 30. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Dreamland (387 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, facebook.com/ dreamlandarts.buffalo/timeline): Disembodied, new work by Dana Tyrell, opening Sat April 18, 7-10pm, work on view through April 27. Eleven Twenty Projects (1120 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 8828100, eleventwentyprojects.com): The Sacrifice: A Retrospective (1980-2013) of Joe Orffeo. Open by appoinment only. Enjoy the Journey Art Gallery (1168 Orchard Park Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 675-0204, etjgallery.com): Spot On, on view through May 2. Tue-Wed 11-6pm, Thu-Fri 2-6pm, Sat 11-4pm. Fargo House Gallery (287 Fargo Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14213, thefargohouse.com, visit website for appointment): Currently on view, Caitlin Cass: Benjamin Rathbun Builds Buffalo, on view through April. Hallwalls (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694, hallwalls.org): Amid/In WNY Part Two, survey of local and regional contemporary artists on view through May 1. Tue-Fri 11am-6pm, Sat 11am2pm. Impact Artists’ Gallery (Tri Main Building, 2495 #545, Buffalo, NY 14214, 835-6817, impactartistsgallery.org): Evolution 2015 “Zen”, Wearable Art Fashion Show & Competition, Apr 17 at UB Center for the Arts, see site for more details. Wed-Fri 11am-4pm, Sat 11am2pm. Indigo Art Gallery (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572 indigoartbuffalo.squarespace.com): Metamorformations, work by Lynn Northrop, on view through April 25. Wed & Fri 12-6pm, Thu 12-7pm, Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sun and Mon. Kenan Center House Gallery (433 Locust Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 433-2617 kenancenter.org/arts/ gallery.asp): Wood, Paper, Scissors; Book Art, Sculpture and Collage by Diane L. Bond, Jodi Harvey-Brown, Marie Prince & Doris Timkey, on view through Apr 26. Mon-Fri 12-5pm & Sun 2-5pm. Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall) (220 North Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 885-4139, rain.org/~karpeles): On view: Buffalo Boxers: A Cultural Celebration. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall) (453 Porter Avenue, Buffalo,

NY 14201, 885-4139, rain.org/~karpeles): On view Maps of the United States, and upcoming Early Maps of the World. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. Lockside Art Center (21 Main Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 478-0239, locksideartcenter.com): Juried Fiber Art Exhibit, on view till Apr 25. Fri-Sun 12-4pm. Manuel Barreto Furniture (430 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 867-8937, manuelbarreto.com): Nothing Happens Twice, work by Jozef Bajus. Exhibit on view through May. Tue & Wed 11am-5pm, Thu-Sat 10am-6pm. Meibohm Fine Arts (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940, meibohmfinearts.com): Joe Orffeo (1926-2013): Retrospective Part II (1980-2013) on view though Apr 18. Tue-Sat 9:30am-5:30pm. Native American Museum of Art at Smokin’ Joes (2293 Saunders Settlement Road, Sanborn, NY 14123, 261-9251): Open year round and free. Exhibits Iroquois Artists work. 7am-9pm. Niagara Arts and Cultural Center (1201 Pine Avenue, Niagara Falls, NY 14301, 282-7530, thenacc.org): Lewiston-Porter Students Art Exhibition, Mar 21-Apr 18, 2015. MonFri 9am-5pm, Sat & Sun 12-4pm. Nina Freudenheim Gallery (140 North Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 8825777, ninafreudenheimgallery. com): Ground, by Joan Linder, on view through Apr 29. Tues-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat & Mon open by appointment only. Paint the Town Studio (74 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 4656682): Work up by Jarael Adams. Pausa Art House (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 6979069, pausaarthouse.com): Elemental, by Rosemarie Bauer Sroka, on view through Apr 25. Thu-Sat 6pm-12am. Project 308 Gallery (308 Oliver Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 523-0068, project308gallery.com): Buffalo Society of Artists Annual Members’ Exhibition on view though April 25. Tue & Thu 7-9pm and by appointment. Project 308 also holds classes and rents their facilities, for more information visit their website. Queen City Gallery (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY, 14203, 868-8183, queencitygallery.tripod.com): Rotating members work on view. TueFri 11am-4pm and by appointment. Open late every First Friday from 6-10pm and every Thursday Open Mic, 7-9pm. River Art Gallery (83 Webster St. North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 260-1497, riverartgalleryandgifts. com) Northern Reflections: a collection of works by Deanna Weinholts. Mar 7-Apr 4, Wed-Sat 11am4pm. Sports Focus Physical Therapy (531 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY, 14202, 332-4838, Sportsfocuspt.com): Visual Parables by Glenn Kroetsch. Open First Fridays April 3 & May 1, 6-9pm. Squeaky Wheel (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, squeaky. org): Special reception, Sat Apr 11, 7-10pm for opening of Storefront Gallery with an Installation

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by Rachel Rampleman. In the gallery: Liz Bayan’s UB Thesis Exhibition, Handle with Care, on view through April 25. Open to the public Tue-Sat 12-5pm.

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Starlight Studio and Art Gallery (340 Delaware Avenue, Bufflao, NY 14202, starlightstudio.org): Ubiquitous Benevolence, works by Larry Allen. Mon-Fri 9-4pm. Studio Hart (65 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 536-8337, studiohart.com): Great Valley Sketchbook, paintings and prints by Tom Rooney. On view through April 25. Tue-Fri 11:30am-3:30pm, Sat 12-4pm, and open every First Friday 6-9pm. Sugar City (1239 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, buffalosugarcity. org): Free Space, a group art show. Gallery hours: Sat 4/11, 5-11pm, Sun 4/12, 5:30-11pm. TGW@497 Gallery (497 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 9496604): Refind, metal discoveries by Robert Then & Richard Rockford. Wed-Fri 12-5pm, Sat 12-3pm. UB Anderson Gallery (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 8293754, ubartgalleries.org): Cravens World: The Human Aesthetic, on view though Dec 31, 2015. Exhibition will include archaeological and ethnographic objects from Annette Cravens collection. WedSat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Lower Art Gallery) (201 Center for the Arts, Room B45, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 645-6913, art.buffalo.edu/ resources/lower-gallery): Interstices: The 2015 Rumsey Competition Exhibition: Lydia Daggett, Kayleigh Fogle, Lauren Goetzmann, Elise Roy & Qiong Wu. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm. UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Project Space) (201 Center for the Arts, Room 155, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 6456913, art.buffalo.edu/resources/ project-space): Spring Thaw, work by undergraduate students, on view through Apr 17. Tues-Fri 11am5pm, Sat 1-5pm. Unity Gallery (1243 Delaware Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209): The Journey Continues, a collection of paintings and found object mosaics by Judi Witt, on view through Apr 29. Villa Maria College Paul William Beltz Family Art Gallery (240 Pine Ridge Terrace, Cheektowaga, NY 14225, 961-1833): Photography Program Student Exhibit, up through April 24. Mon-Fri 8am-8pm, Sat 10am5pm. Western New York Book Arts Collaborative (468 Washington Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 438-1430, wnybookarts.org): 7th Annual Edible Book Festival, Sun April 12, 4-8pm. In the gallery-Sunnyoutside: Ten Years of Goo dBooks Done Well, up P till May 2. Wed-Sat 12-6pm.

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AMHERST: 6BR 4.5BA. Cherry kit w/ SS, LR w/ fp, sunrm w/ wet bar. Hot tub, pool, 1st flr ste (poss in-law apt or home ofc), 40+K in recent improvements. 625 LeBrun, $970,000. Susan D. Lenahan, 864-6757(c) ELMA: 4BR 2BA Victorian w/ orig. charm. Eat-in kit w/ pantry, 2nd flr lndry, mstr ste w/ sitting area & walk-in. 2960 Bowen Rd, $329,000. Susan D. Lenahan, 864-6757(c) NIAG. FALLS: Well-maint 2/2 dbl. loaded w/updates (roof, furnc, plumb, elec., etc.)! 535 23rd St, $59,900. Mark W. DiGiampaolo, 887-3891(c) ORCHARD PK: NEW! 4BR 3.5BA w/ teak hrdwd flrs. Columned foyer, ofc, DR w/ pantry, sunrm, hi-end cherry kit w/ fam DR, MBR w/ coffee bar, walkout bsmt. 16 Rock Dove Ln, $889,000. Susan D. Lenahan, 864-6757(c) TONAWANDA: REDUCED! Updated 2BR 1.5BA condo. New eat-in kit & appl, LR w/ fp, BRs w/ lrg closets, full bsmt. 16 Queens Guard, $135,500. Susan D. Lenahan, 864-6757(c)

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ALLENTOWN: NEW! 2BR in restored historic mansion w/ hi ceilgs, hrdwd flrs, AC, expos brick & in-unit lndry. 441 Franklin #7, $1,500+. Mark W. DiGiampaolo, 887-3891(c) CHEEK OFC: Two sep. 1200sf ofcs (1st or 2nd flr) w/ reception & 4+ rms ea. Shared parkg. 3620 Harlem, $1,200/mo for ea. unit. (incl util). Ellen Drexler, 912-1966(c) ELMWOOD VLG: Large 2BR w/ hrdwd flrs & nat wdwrk, formal DR, ofc/den, bsmt lndry, attic strg, porches, off-st park, 268 Baynes, $900+. Robin Barrell, 986-4061(c) NIAG. FALLS: Furnished waterfront condo. 1.5BR 1BA great views of river. 51 S. 86th St #1A, $850 inc. util. Robin Barrell, 986-4061(c) WEST SIDE: 2BR. Former church w/ hrdwd flrs, gas fp, in-unit lndry. 2nd flr: Lrg mstr, sitting rm & bth. Rooftop deck. 75 Bird Ave. $1,300+. Robin Barrell, 986-4061(c) WEST VILLAGE: 2-story duplex w/ 1BR, hrdwd flrs, in-unit lndry, modern kit, exposed brick. 247 Georgia, $900+. Robin Barrell, 986-4061(c)

716-819-4200 431 Delaware Avenue Buffalo, NY 14202

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 15, 2015 / THE PUBLIC

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MUSIC RECORDS

SPIN IT Your guide to Record Store Day 2015

PHOTO BY BILLY SANDORA-NASTYN

BY CORY PERLA A 2014 BILLBOARD MAGAZINE HEADLINE READ “Vinyl Sales Hit Historic High in 2014.” Take that in for a moment. More vinyl

records were sold last year than in any year since 1991, the year Nielsen began tracking vinyl record sales. Of course, the golden age of vinyl records had ended by 1991, but could a new renaissance be blossoming, and could the now annual music-buying holiday, Record Store Day, have something to do with it? Last year, 57 percent of all record sales happened at independent stores, which means a lot of locally owned businesses across the country sold a lot of merchandise in a market that was once considered dead. Acts like Jack White and Daft Punk were among the highest sellers of physical records in 2014. One of the biggest record outlets in the City of Buffalo, Record Theatre, reported that their Record Store Day sales last year were better than their Christmas sales. This year there are more than 1,200 stores nationwide participating in Record Store Day—four in Buffalo. With the eighth annual celebration of Record Store Day coming up this Saturday, April 18, we talked to some of the record experts at Record Theatre, Spiral Scratch, and Black Dots, who picked their favorite Record Day Store exclusive releases. The Public even got in on the fun and picked some of our most anticipated records as well.

RECORD THEATRE, REPORTED THAT THEIR RECORD STORE DAY SALES LAST YEAR WERE BETTER THAN THEIR CHRISTMAS SALES.

223 LAFAYETTE AVENUE / BLACKDOTSBUFFALO.COM

JOSH SMITH The Germs Forming

291 BRYANT STREET / FB: SPIRALSCRATCHRECORDS

MAIN & LAFAYATTE / 1800 MAIN STREET UNIVERSITY PLAZA / 3500 MAIN STREET RECORDTHEATRE.COM

7” Vinyl

“This label called Superior Viaduct, I’ve never heard of this label, but they’re doing a bunch of reissues of old West Coast hardcore records. There’s a Germs seven-inch and a Flipper reissue. These records are like $400 or $500 records because they are super rare. If you’re a completist fan of these bands, you’re going to want these records.” Warzone Fight For Justice

DAVE PALUMBO Johnny Thunders: Live at Max’s Kansas City (Volumes 1 and 2) Double Vinyl LP

“This is one Johnny Thunders’s best live records. He’s known for really blowin’ it live. It’s Johnny Thunders, Walter Lure, and Billy Rath live in 1978. That was pretty early on, right after [ Johnny Thunders and the Heartbreakers’] big album, L.A.M.F.”

Vinyl LP

“I feel like Record Store Day is a good excuse for a lot of labels to reissue some of the stuff that hasn’t been out in a long time. Victory Records is repressing Warzone Fight for Justice. It’s not my favorite Warzone record, but Warzone is one of my favorite New York hardcore bands. Also, Path of Resistance’s Who Dares Wins. I’m from Syracuse and that’s like an old, post-Earth Crisis hardcore band from Syracuse.”

The Animals The Animals are Back

Music by Del Paxton, Cages, and Bryan Johnson & Family. Free vegan cookies, and food from GG’s Franks.

Ian Dury and the Blockheads New Boots and Panties!!! Expanded Edition Double Vinyl LP

“This comes with one green record and one red record, and a pop-up of Ian Dury in the middle. It just looks like a really cool reissue. It’s a classic album and I love when they reissue classic albums on Record Store Day that haven’t been available on vinyl for a long time. That’s my favorite aspect of Record Store Day.”

10” Vinyl LP

This is the Animals’ third EP. It’s a 10-inch. It was originally a 45. They made it a 10-inch because they cut it at 45 so the grooves are wider and you get better sound. It’s their first vinyl reissue since 1964.” .

RECORD STORE DAY HAPPENINGS

RECORD STORE DAY HAPPENINGS

DAN ORGAN

Live music by Velvet Alphabet, Mark Nervous, Bill Nehill, Wolf, Aaron and the Burrs, Newish Star, and Rosy.

ERIC KENDALL The Coach Whips Bangers vs Fuckers Vinyl LP

“This is John Dwyer from Thee Oh Sees’ first band. They sound like if you took Thee Oh Sees and threw them in a blender: It’s noisier and way more thrashy.”

DAN K Marvin Gaye “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved By You)

CORY PERLA Air Playground Love/High School Lover 7” Colored Vinyl

Many fans of the French space rock band Air were introduced to them through their soundtrack to the 2000 film The Virgin Suicides, directed by Sofia Coppola. This record is still considered one of Air’s greatest achievements and two of the record’s best cuts, “Playground Love” and “High School Lover” (the theme song to the film), will be rereleased on Record Store day on limited edition orange seven-inch vinyl.

Onehtrix Point Never Commissions II Vinly LP

J Dilla Fuck The Police 7” Vinyl Picture Disc

Onehtrix Point Never, a.k.a. Daniel Lopatin, makes some of the most vexing, yet strangely gratifying music I’ve ever heard. On Commissions II (he released the first edition last Record Store Day), he took some obscure contemporary Japanese video game music, made by composer Manabu Namiki, reimagined it as the score for the anime film Magnetic Rose (directed by Koji Morimoto), and composed and recorded live in Tokyo last November. You probably don’t have to know anything about Japanese video game music or anime movies (I sure don’t) to enjoy these surreal, warped sound environments, which Red Bull Music Academy commissioned—thus the record’s title.

One of the most celebrated hip hop producers of all time, J Dilla, even after his death, seems like a never-ending source of heady productions. Dilla’s classic “Fuck the Police,” which is by all accounts one of his masterpieces, will be re-released for the first time in a decade on Record Store Day on a double-sided seven-inch picture disc in the shape of a police badge. Side A is the original version of the track, while side B features the instrumental version.

10 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 15, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Seven-inch vinyl

“First of all it’s Marvin Gaye: legend of Motown, soul eccentricity right there. [“How Sweet It Is”] is one of the sweetest love songs ever made. The B-side is a duet with Mary Wells, and she was a pioneering female voice in Motown. This is just a perfect record.”

RECORD STORE DAY HAPPENINGS 1800 MAIN STREET AT LAFAYETTE Meet Yellowcard (4pm), hang out with DJ Axe from 107.7 Alternative Buffalo. Food from Lloyds Taco Truck or R&R BBQ Truck and beer from Community Beer Works. 3500 MAIN STREET IN THE UNIVERSITY PLAZA Live music by Handsome Jack, Sleepy Hahas, Governess, Pine Fever, Wild Things, Colin Griffin, Hot Blood, Battery Electric, This, Houston Gardwell Collective, Dollar Diplomacy, and Blank Gener8tion. Food from Whole Hog and P 716 Club food trucks.


SPOTLIGHT MUSIC

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YOU TURN OFF THE BEDROOM LIGHT AND DRIFT OFF TO SLEEP, DREAMING WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN.

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HICKORY SMOKED WINGS RIBS, BURGERS, + MORE

DEL PAXTON BY DANIEL BAUER WHEN I FIRST STARTED WRITING for the local

music blog buffaBLOG not long after moving here from Pittsburgh, editor Mac McGuire gave me a rundown of the scene. He started with Del Paxton, saying something like, “If anyone’s gonna get legs outside of Buffalo, these guys will.” Prescient, Mac: Del Paxton announced they’d signed to Topshelf Records on February 4, and it’s a hell of a home for them. The label’s at the heart of the so-called “emo revival,” typified by bands like Prawn and The World is a Beautiful Place & I Am No Longer Afraid to Die. With a split record with Montreal’s Gulfer due out April 7 and a full-length album on the horizon, Del Paxton is poised for an introduction to the world. Or at least the niche world of contemporary emo, which is still small enough to function on old friendships, a DIY ethos, and a shared love of Braid.

BLACK DOTS RECORD STORE 223 LAFAYETTE AVE

records, nearly half were limited variants in runs as small as five apiece.

Chapman didn’t actually discover Worst. Summer. Ever. until nearly a year after it had been released. Del Paxton had been touring clubs and basements throughout the region for months before Chapman contacted England about putting the EP out as a 12-inch record. “When [Kyle] heard Del Paxton, he just called me up and was like ‘I’m releasing this,’” said England. “He really liked it and he believed in it.” Secret Audio Club puts their releases out on digital platforms, but their bread and butter is vinyl. Really nice vinyl: Out of 500 Del Paxton

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“We got exposed to this vinyl community, and I wasn’t really aware of how deep that rabbit hole went,” said England. “That was huge.”

Topshelf Records’ Seth Decoteau said that while he and co-founder Kevin Duquette were aware of Del Paxton before the Secret Audio Club release, the vinyl influenced their decision to reach out to the band.

“I’ve always had the biggest man-crush on Dylan’s voice and his guitar abilities, ever since we were kids,” said Chapman. “He is just one of the most phenomenal musicians I know.”

MONDAYS @ 10PM

Though Del Paxton was Secret Audio Club’s first official signing, attention to detail like this—along with good ears—had already won them a dedicated audience of vinyl enthusiasts who snatched up Worst. Summer. Ever. when the label re-released it in April of 2014.

“We still wanted to keep making that kind of music,” said England. Namely: “Mid-1990s, Midwest emo stuff…riffy, guitar-driven.”

Fortunately, one of those friends was Kyle Chapman, one of two minds behind record label Secret Audio Club. He’d known England when they were teenagers playing in bands in Binghamton and Canandaigua.

take-out available or call ahead & pick up!

! e l a S 0 2 / Spring 4

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Huge enough, apparently, to attract the attention of Topshelf Records, who contacted the band shortly after the vinyl was released.

“We recorded our EP and I remember thinking ‘I just want my friends to hear this. I have friends that I think will dig this,’ and that’s about it,” said McClure.

KITCHEN HOURS

MON-SAT 11am-1am SUN 3pm-1am

DEL PAXTON

Del Paxton formed in early 2013 when drummer Greg McClure and guitarist/vocalist Dylan England got together to start writing songs. Both had just recently moved to Buffalo (from Ithaca and Binghamton, respectively). Their former bands had toured together in years past and they were eager to keep playing.

After a few practices, they drafted Zack Schoedel to play bass and finished up the five songs that became the band’s debut EP, Worst. Summer. Ever., self-released on August 25, 2013.

HOUSEMADE PASTRAMI/UNIQUE SAMMICHES SNACKATIZERS . VEG/VEGAN OPTIONS

“I was in the library studying for a final…and I got an email [from Topshelf ],” said McClure. “I just figured it was one of my friends messing with me.”

“It’s so easy nowadays for a band to record an EP and just put it up on Bandcamp,” said Decoteau. “The fact that they were getting it released by Secret Audio Club, who we respect a lot, definitely spoke a little extra.” Topshelf and Del Paxton formally announced the signing and the upcoming split with Gulfer on February 4th, 2015. “If you would have asked me a year ago what label I would like to work with the most, I would have said Topshelf,” said Schoedel. “So it’s cool that it happened that way.” Del Paxton working with Topshelf makes sense. Del Paxton traffics in catchy hooks made covert by unconventional song structures and rhythms while Topshelf is known for pushing the envelope of what modern indie, punk, and emo sound like. While you can apply the “emo revival” label to either, there’s more going on than nostalgia for mid-1990s Midwest guitar rock. Catch Del Paxton on Record Store Day (Saturday, April 18) at Black Dots Record Store (7pm, $8) with Pittsburgh’s Brightside and East Haven’s Posture & The Grizzly. They’ll also be touring the US and Canada in the spring and summer to support the split with Gulfer, out P April 7, 2015. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 15, 2015 / THE PUBLIC

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12 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 15, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 15, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 13

BUFFALO UNCONFERENCE—which takes place this Saturday, April 18 at D!G, the shared workspace in the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus’s Innovation Center—promises to bring together a host of young tech innovators, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, and others who hope to nurture and benefit from a burgeoning sector of the Western New York economy. Attendees are encouraged not only to listen to presentations but to suggest subjects and make presentations themselves. “Innovation happens when you bring people together from different backgrounds, with different experiences, and encourage conversations about the concepts they care about,” says event organizer Clark Dever. In advance of the conference, we worked with Dever to assemble and photograph some of those who have made an significant impact in the tech sector here. Drone photography was provided by Todd Salansky of Norris Clifton Aerial Photography. You can read more about Buffalo Unconference—powered by AT&T and co-sponsored by Infotech Niagara, SelectOne Search LLC, 43North, D!G, Z80 Labs, VCAMP, Algonquin Studios, and Heads Up Display, Inc.—and register to attend for free, at buffalounconference.com.


EVENTS CALENDAR Tim Meadows 8pm Helium Comedy Club, 30 Mississippi St. $18-$31 [COMEDY] To some, he’ll always be The Ladies Man. To others, his OJ Simpson impression will live in infamy for all time. Regardless, it’s clear that Tim Meadows is a comic genius. He’ll come to Helium Comedy Club to deliver his hilarious brand of stand up comedy this Thursday, April 16 through Saturday, April 18 for five shows. -CP

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Paul Thorn Band 7pm Tralf Music Hall, 622 Main St. $23-$25 [BLUES] Taking a break from a series of inthe-round gigs with Ruthie Foster and Joe Ely, Paul Thorn hits the Tralf Music Hall this Thursday for his first full-band show in a while. Out supporting last year’s Too Blessed to be Stressed, Thorn is a bluesman’s bluesman, with a raspy belt that any fan of the genre can appreciate. Although normally focused on “the struggle” from his singular perspective, Thorn’s new set is built on universal truths that collectively project a more feel-good sentiment. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

IN PRINT

Buffalo Rap Round Robin

THE HAMILTONES

The Hamiltones (Tape) Recommended If You Like: Aaron & the Burrs, the Televisionaries

The Hamiltones is the debut tape from one half of the most bitter surf-rock rivalry in town. Featuring members of Space Wolves, JOHNS, and Kharlos, the trio’s tape was released a couple weeks back through local label, More Power Tapes.

SUPERHUMAN HAPPINESS FRIDAY APR 17 9PM / NIETZSCHE'S, 248 ALLEN ST. / $7 [DANCE FUNK] Calling Brooklyn-based band Superhuman Happiness “dance funk” is like calling pho soup. It’s much more than that. Incorporating house vibes, Afrobeat influences, and synthpop melodies, the band reconciles new wave aesthetics with funk grooves, even mixing in a dash of psychfolk. That might sound like a lot to swallow, but when put into practice, their sound— which the collective has been meticulously honing since their formation in 2008—actually comes off as effortless and natural, and while their name might seem overzealous, their live delivery is on target. Check them out at Nietzsche’s this Friday, April 17 with support from Erica Wolfling and the Houston Gardwell Collective. Two-for-one admission with a Modest Mouse ticket stub. -CORY PERLA

“Not Sleeping (You Don’t Know)” (Song) RIYL: Andrew Bird, Dr. Dog, Pine Fever

Multi-instrumentalist Jacob Verghese of Pine Fever released the latest track from his ongoing solo venture, Cadaver Country, early last week. Verghese handles all of the instruments on the toe-tapping track, which include banjo, washboard, thumb piano, and harmonium.

FRIDAY APR 17 The Tins Kickstarter Benefit Show

WEDNESDAY APR 15

“Inspiration” (Song) RIYL: De La Soul, Madlib, Gang Starr

The music video for the track “Inspiration” finds the hip hop producer picking through the vinyl selection at Record Theatre for some creative musings.

LOCAL SHOW PICK OF THE WEEK PLEASURE LEFTISTS W/ SOFTLINES, AARON & THE BURRS THE GLITTERBOX THUR, APRIL 16 / 7PM / $7

Monophonics 9pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $13-$15 [SOUL] Coated in soul and teeming with the dazed momentum of psychedelic rock, Monophonics have a knack for putting a contemporary slant on the kind of moody, booming 1960s anthems that tackle themes from riots to twisted romance. This Thursday, April 16 the fivepiece outfit will take the stage at Buffalo Iron Works, igniting the crowd with a set drenched in keys, swirling brass lines, shimmering guitar hooks, and the fervent vocals of Kelly Finnegan. Perfect opportunity to experience a highly talented cast of musicians who channel the ghosts of soul kings, glitzy Motown ensembles and combine it with a tasteful pop sensibility. -JEANETTE CHIN

CADAVER COUNTRY

JACEBEATS

10pm Gypsy Parlor, 376 Grant St. $5 [HIP HOP] Baltimore-based Don “Height” Keech is the central figure in the hip hop collective Height with Friends. Keech’s beginnings as a solo act resulted in a prolific series of three full-length discs and six EPs. But since 2009’s Baltimore Highlands, Height with Friends has worked hard toward building a more traditional band-format, seldom heard of in hip-hop, with live instruments and a truly collaborative approach. Last year, Keech launched the ongoing Height Zone World podcast, which is his first stab at becoming a host/interviewer and arts commentator. Height with Friends, meanwhile, performs at Gypsy Parlor, Thursday along with Little Cake and Jack Toft, Dr. Ooo, Short Moscato, Eze Jackson, and Passalacqua, as part of an event called Buffalo Rap Round Robin. -CJT

THURSDAY APR 16

Russian National Ballet Theatre in The Sleeping Beauty

2015 AK Teens: Future Curators Exhibition Opening

7pm UB Center For The Arts, 103 Center For The Arts $24.50 to $34.50 for the public and $13.50 for students [DANCE] The University at Buffalo’s Center for the Arts welcomes the Russian National Ballet Theatre to the stage for their presentation of The Sleeping Beauty on Wednesday, April 15 at 7:30pm. This traditional full-length ballet, made up of three acts, features music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and choreography by Marius Petipa. The piece, which is often recognized as one of the finest achievements in classical ballet, first debuted in St. Petersburg in 1890. The Russian National Ballet Theatre, founded in Moscow in the 1980s, comprises 50 dancers and is currently under the artistic direction of legendary Bolshoi principal dancer Elena Radchenko. Since becoming head of the company in 1994, Radchenko focuses on showcasing traditional Russian ballet works along with up-andcoming dancers throughout Russia. The performance will be held in the Mainstage Theatre, located at the Center for the Arts, North Campus. -VANESSA OSWALD

[ART] Presented by the First Niagara Foundation, AK Teens is a mentoring program for young adults living across Western New York and the Southern Tier who seek to pursue careers in the arts. As part of the program, Future Curators pairs up 11th- and 12th-grade students with museum staff to prepare and install an art exhibition. This year the exhibition, entitled Coexistence: Humans and Nature, focuses on work created by high school students from Western New York and Ontario. Join the students in celebrating their first museum show on Thursday, April 16 at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery with an evening of tours led by the Future Curators. There will be live music performed by the Nozz Trio, a jazz group from Niagara Falls High School, and Baily Valint, a classical violinist from Kenmore East High School. There will be a reception in the AK Café, 6-7:30pm. -TINA DILLMAN

14 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 15, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

5pm Albright-Knox Art Gallery, 1285 Elmwood Ave free

7pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. free [INDIE ROCK] Come out to Mohawk Place this Friday, April 17, where a myriad of the brightest local bands will be playing a benefit show in support of the Tins Kickstarter campaign to fund their latest full-length album and documentary. Over the years the three-piece indie-rock outfit has carved a niche for themselves in the city’s music scene. Their latest EP, Young Blame, is a display of the genre’s finest elements—steady, yet beaming with radiant vocal harmonies, rhythmic experimentation, and genial, dynamic chord progressions. Their next album, with producer Robby Takac at the helm is certainly one to anticipate. A lineup of the city’s most promising talent—the Tins, Parade Chic, Sharon Mok (of Tiny Rhymes), the Musnt’s, the Soft Love, the Waves, and Brimstone Blonde—will perform in support the trio’s well deserved efforts. -JC

Yacht Rock Revue 9pm Seneca Niagara Bear's Den, 310 4th St $25-$35 [YACHT ROCK] Blame the Bee Gees for upping the ante on America’s collective falsetto hardon, but in retrospect the oft-maligned “Yacht Rock” era produced some damn fine pop music. True, it’s hard not to wince when you play the tape all the way through to its late-stage devolution and the syrupy, adult contemporary crap it helped spawn, but in the 1970s and early 1980s these smooth crooners made for top notch talent. Not so much a genre unto itself, the Yacht Rock phenom is more about an aesthetic that many credible rockers passed through via production—it’s where the radio hits of Steely Dan and Dan Fogelberg intersect, and much of it has to do with jazzy undertones made more palpa


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6PM FREE

APR 17

Superhuman Happiness, Erica Wolfing, Houston Gardwell Collective

(ALL DAY) KARPELES MANUSCRIPT LIBRARY PORTER HALL, 453 PORTER AVENUE FREE [MARKET] Author George Bernard Shaw on the first book he attempted to have published: “I finished my first book seventy-six years ago. I offered it to every publisher on the English-speaking earth I had ever heard of. Their refusals were unanimous: and it did not get into print until, fifty years later.” If it was that difficult for the author of Man and Superman to have a book published, it’s no wonder so many authors are self-publishing these days. Needless to say, it’s much easier now, too, and as a result events like the Buffalo Small Press Book Fair are growing. Last year nearly 6,000 people attended the event, and this year it will return for two days, Saturday, April 18 and Sunday, April 19 at Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum, Porter Hall . This year the event will feature 140 vendors—artists, book makers, letterpressers, comic book crafters and more—from Buffalo and throughout the country. For a full list of vendors, visit buffalosmallpress.org. The Public proudly sponsors the Buffalo Small Press Book Fair. -THE PUBLIC STAFF

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10PM

SATURDAY

APR 18

Bryan Johnson & Family, MAGS, & The Midnight Hollow 10PM $5

SATURDAY APR 18 Bearhunter

ble in a watered-down pop setting. The Yacht Rock Revue has made a successful career for itself by meticulously recreating that breezyblow feel, and sometimes they’re even joined by a first run artist—as is the case on Friday at the Bear’s Den (inside the Niagara Casino) when Robbie “Steal Away” Dupree spices up the bill. -CJT

Zodiaque Dance Ensemble 7pm UB Center For The Arts, 103 Center For The Arts $20 public, $10 students [DANCE] The University at Buffalo Theatre & Dance Department will showcase the Zodiaque Dance Ensemble Friday, April 17 through Sunday 19. The performance, directed by Kerry Ring and Anne Burnidge, will feature works from two guest artists, faculty choreography, and mentored student works. New York City-based dancers Kendra Portier and Daniel Gwirtzman will present their choreography paired with works from UB faculty members Burnidge and Jeanne Fornarola. Pieces by four advanced choreography students (Becca Corbin, Lexi Julian, Fallon Martin, and Sammi Pfieffer) will also be shown. The company, comprising 28 undergraduate dance majors, will bring to the stage jazz, tap, and post-modern contact improvisation. Subjects to be emphasized in the pieces include the politics surrounding the world’s decreased water resources, “selfies,” relationships, and afterlife. Friday and Saturday performances start at 7:30pm and the Sunday performance is at 2pm. The show will be held in the CFA Black Box Theatre in the Center for the Arts, North Campus. -VO

8pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $5 [ROCK] The local trio's bluesy stew got a proper analog showcase on 2013's Call It a Red, which was recorded on reel-to-reel tape and exemplifies the chemistry at the band's core. David Carlos's lilting vocal style projects a world-weary honesty that recalls a less polished Dan Auerbach, and references to the Black Keys surface in other areas as well. But Bearhunter also embraces an indie-pop spirit the pokes through often enough to make their sound very much their own. Check it out at Mohawk Place on Saturday, April 18 with Sleepy Hahas, The Naturalists, and Handsome Jack. -CJT

Bryan Johnson and Family

9pm Nietzsche's, 248 Allen St. $5 [SURF ROCK] It's hard to believe that such tidy, ultra-melodic surf-pop can actually come from the cloud-heavy cover of Western New York. True, the sentiment isn't always as sunny to match, but that's part of the fun. Bryan Johnson and Family wrap old-timey themes of juvenile angst in bouncy, two- to three-minute pop songs that help us forget how awfully complicated life has become. Check out "Beaches" from the Cool Your Jets EP—out late last fall on Admirable Traits—wherein Johnson laments not being able to accompany his gal for a day at the beach. The four-piece will surely lift spirits at Nietzsche's on Saturday, April 18 with American Low, MAGS, and the Midnight Hollow.-CJT

Aqueous 10pm, Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $10-$15 [JAM] Buffalo’s kings of the Queen City jam scene are back. Aqueous will be making a long-awaited return to Buffalo this Saturday, April 18, for a special show at Buffalo Iron Works. The band’s last performance in Buffalo was on New Year’s Eve with fellow scene friends, Funktional Flow. It sold out and was a great way to kick off the new year. If there’s one band that continuously ups the ante though, it’s Aqueous. The foursome is doing a special Cake set, and yes, that’s Cake as in the band. The first set of the night will be all Aqueous, but the second will be a full set in tribute to the popular 1990’s band. -JS

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CONTINUED ON PAGE 16 DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 15, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 15


EVENTS CALENDAR

YELLOWCARD SATURDAY APR 18

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7PM / TOWN BALLROOM, 681 MAIN ST. / $22-$24 [POP PUNK] As forefathers of the pop punk resurgence in the early 2000’s, Yellowcard have always followed one rule: stay true to yourself. It’s that mantra and their originality that’s helped them persevere—with a brand new record, Lift a Sail, a huge fanbase, and a passion for exploring new musical territory. This week The Public talked to singer Ryan Key about the band’s musical process and the new record, which will be on full display at their show Saturday, April 18 at the Town Ballroom with Finch. If you were to choose a theme for Lift a Sail in one word, what would it be and why? Strength. There are so many levels to a record, but this record was important for us to make. Some of us were going through intense life experiences while recording, so being strong was something we needed to put down in music. How did the past few years of changes impact you when you were writing this record? We’ve been pretty charged since we picked it back up again a few years ago. We’ve been making records and touring without a lot of time off at all. The process wasn’t really too different for this record. We were pretty excited to make a new record. I think things going on in our personal lives had a profound effect on it. Do you ever look to past albums you’ve created to influence a new record’s sound, or do you choose to always look ahead? It’s a bit of both. You don’t want to make the same record twice, so that means exploring new territory and going outside of the box and going beyond what people expect from us and what we expect from ourselves, but it means also really digging into the roots of the things that have defined us as a band. In terms of musical construction, what was the most significant change from the last record to this one for you? Tempo is the most noticeable difference. A lot of songs on Lift a Sail are mid-tempo, where songs on the last record were up-tempo. We settled into this alternative rock kind of sound, but there’s still a lot of pop-rock going on. Melodically, I challenged myself and pushed myself. It took some getting used to, but it’s a good change I think. Besides social changes and personal experiences, what inspires you when writing a song? I really pull from what’s going on with me and my life. Sometimes I write outside of myself and write about experiences of people close to me. But most of my songs come from a very personal place. I use the music we write to help me come up with a direction and let it inspire me. -KRIS KIELICH

PHOTO BY KATIE HOVLAND

MEET YELLOWCARD YELLOWCARD WILL STOP BY RECORD THEATRE, 1800 MAIN ST., AT 4PM AS PART OF RECORD STORE DAY. FOR MORE INFO ON RECORD STORE DAY, TURN TO PAGE 10.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15

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SUNDAY, APRIL 19 Changemakers 30 Under 30 5:30pm Burchfield Penney Art Center, 1300 Elmwood Ave. $30-$40 [CELEBRATION] As Buffalonians, we are witnessing many developmental changes in the city, as well as an increase in the city’s population. A sizeable portion of the population increase is due to an influx of immigrants who have migrated to Buffalo from various countries, and to the number of college students who have decided to stay in Buffalo after graduating. These recent college grads are beginning their careers in Buffalo and making a huge impact on our community. For that reason local entrepreneur Jami Crews created Changemakers 30 Under 30, an event that recognizes young, dynamic professionals in or from Western New York. This year's Change Makers 30 Under 30 event will take place Sunday, April 19 at the Burchfield Penney Art Center on the campus of Buffalo State College. The event will be hosted by Miss Buffalo 2015, WKBW television personality, and past Changemaker 30 Under 30 Honoree, Desiree Wiley. For more information check out dailypublic.com. -PETER JOHNSON

MONDAY APR 20 Businesses Strategies for Artists 5pm The Foundry, 298 Northampton St. free [ART] Calling all makers of creative works: Are you in need of learning how to market your work, setting reasonable price points, and learning new strategies on how to sell? Hosted by the Arts Services Initiative of WNY, two sessions will provide local artists with information that will assist in jumpstarting careers. Speakers from the Arts Business Institute will cover relevant topics and answer questions that may have been stumping you. The first session is on Monday, April 20 at The Foundry, and the second session on Tuesday is located at the Niagara Arts Cultural Center. Food will be provided and it is necessary to RSVP for these free sessions. Visit asiwny.org for more details. -TD

TRIMANIA SATURDAY APR 18 8PM / TRI-MAIN CENTER, 2495 MAIN ST., / $20 ADVANCE, $25 AT THE DOOR [PARTY] For those scoring at home, this will be the sixth Trimania event since 2002, and first one since 2013. There will be more than 30 bands participating, at least 20 artists with work on display on the walls and performing in the halls, three live photo booths, a handful of food trucks, microbrews from Flying Bison and two specialty cocktails fitting the theme of mischievous business: Vanilla Gorilla and Chocolate Monkey. As an added flavor, this year’s event will open up the sixth floor for the first time in Trimania’s history, allowing for two stages to provide non-stop music and the good folks at Buffalo Arts Studio—the Tri-Main Center’s anchor arts mainstay—is teaming with the Buffalo Infringement Festival to have an indefinite smattering of performance artists and musicians infringe upon the evening with their talents. Partial list of performers: Irving Klaws, 12-8 Path Band, Tommy Nguyen, Korey Green, Stacey Robinson, Strange Acres, Pine Fever, Binary ConScience, Buffalo Circus Guild, puppetry by Chantal Colato, Pyromancy (fire spinners), and Fleuron Rouge dancers. Add a few bad puns and this installment of Trimania, this Saturday, April 18 will feature zero monkeying around and a 500-pound gorilla's worth of fun and stimulation. -AARON LOWINGER

16 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 15, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


CALENDAR EVENTS

TUESDAY APR 21

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2Cellos

7pm UB Center For The Arts, 103 Center For The Arts $24.50-$44.50 [CLASSICAl] Classical cellists Luka Šulić and Stjepan Hauser strike their strings with John Bonham ferocity. The Croatian duo is known as 2Cellos, and they’re bringing new meaning to the term classic rock. Their self-titled debut and sophomore album, In2uition, boast instrumental (usually cello) arrangements of rock favorites. They rose to fame on YouTube with their cover of “Smooth Criminal,” which was eventually featured on Glee—arguably one of the show’s finest moments. Catch 2Cellos at the UB’s Center For The Arts on Tuesday, April 21. -KP

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WEDNESDAY APR 22 The Used with Every Time I Die 6pm Rapids Theatre, 1711 Main St. $25-$30 [ROCK] I can hear hundreds of local emo fans asking the same question in unison, and the answer is yes, the Used is still a band, and they have been, continuously, since 2001. It’s just, since 2004’s In Love and Death, they just kind of fell off the radar for most alternative rock fans. Maybe it’s because their fans moved on to indie rock and they moved away from their emocore roots into a more radio-friendly hard rock sound at the wrong time, but if you have been paying attention to the four-piece band from Orem, Utah you probably noticed their move from long time label Reprise Records to Hopeless Records. With that move the band has become more political—their latest record, 2014’s Imaginary Enemy, features songs with titles like “Revolution” “Force Without Violence,” and “A Song to Stifle Imperial Progression (A Work in Progress)” marking a motion to mature with their audience. The Used come to the Rapids Theatre on Wednesday, April 22. For rock fans in Buffalo, the big draw of this show is the Used’s tour support, Every Time I Die. The Buffalo hardcore band caused a series of minor riots during their string of Christmas shows at the end of the year. The pit should be just as disorderly when they take the stage at the Rapids on Wednesday. Marmozets and the Eeries open the show. -CP

KYLE SUNDAY APR 19 6PM / THE WAITING ROOM, 334 DELAWARE AVE. / $15-$18 [HIP HOP] In 2013, when Ventura, California-based rapper KYLE started to break out, Complex Magazine posted an article titled “Hip Hop’s Sonic Doppelgangers,” comparing the young up-andcoming rapper to one of the world’s most popular rappers, Drake. That comparison is a blessing and a curse: of course it’s flattering, but it’s also an enormous shadow to stand in. The rappers share a similar emotionally charged flow and a propensity for huge, neon beats, but Kyle’s delivery— which, with his slurred style, at times recalls a much less freaky, higher-register version of Tyler the Creator—takes Drake’s emo-rap persona a step further toward the suburbs. If you’re looking for a starting point, check out his impressive reimagining of Jane Child’s 1990s synthpop anthem “Don’t Wanna Fall in Love,” then check him out when he comes to the Waiting Room on Sunday, April 19 with support from Slip Stones, Don Scuzz & The Hooligang, and Big Tim. -CORY PERLA

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Buddy Guy

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PHOTO BY DERRICK SANTINI

7pm UB Center For The Arts, 103 Center For The Arts $39-$49 [BLUES] Guitar legends have come and gone. Guys like Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan have unfortunately passed, and those that are still alive like Eric Clapton don’t tour as much as they used to. At 78 years old, Buddy Guy not only heavily influenced the previous three, but is still around and touring today. The blues legend shows absolutely no signs of slowing down with virtuosity and pure showmanship at the forefront of previous performances. Next Wednesday, April 22, Buddy will be taking the stage at the University at Buffalo’s Center for the Arts. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee will be joined by the, not-so-young-anymore, 16-year-old Quinn Sullivan whom Buddy helped personally groom and has showcased in previous years. Buddy Guy is simply one of the best guitarists who have ever picked up the instrument and his depth and ability are a true testament to the blues in America. -JS

The Soft White Sixties 9pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $10-$12 [ROCK] The Soft White Sixties adopted their name from light bulbs, which is fitting since their music hits you like a smoky soulful-rock electric shock. The San Francisco quartet spent their early years relentlessly perfecting their live showmanship, boasting seething rock with deep grooves and fuzzed-out hooks—modern pop with a gritty edge. Their 2013 release, Get Up, is all that and more, but ultimately just a really great rock album. Catch the Soft White Sixties at Buffalo Iron Works on Wednesday, April 22. -KP

NEUTRAL MILK HOTEL TUESDAY APR 21 8PM / ASBURY HALL, 341 DELAWARE AVE. [INDIE ROCK] “Dear friends we love you but it’s time to say goodbye for the never ending now,” read the press release for Neutral Milk Hotel’s 2015 tour announcement. The lauded indie-rock band has maintained a discontinuous existence over the last decade. Lead by Jeff Mangum, the group disbanded in 1999 after the release of their second album, the critically acclaimed In the Airplane Over the Sea, a record that has become a cult classic among indie rock fans for its ironically sweet melodies and broken-down lyrics. In 2005, the popular indie blog Pitchfork gave the album a perfect score, comparing its influence to 1990s records like Radiohead’s OK Computer, Pavement’s Slanted and Enchanted, and My Bloody Valentine’s Loveless. The reclusive Mangum tip toed around the project for most of the early 2000s before returning to live performances in 2010. In 2011 the band released a compilation EP of songs written between 1992 and 1995 before returning for a full reunion tour in 2013—when they played their first shows together in nearly 14 years. If it’s true that this will be the band's final tour, then you may not want to miss their show at Asbury Hall P on Tuesday, April 21. -CORY PERLA

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DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 15, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 17


PUBLIC QUESTIONNAIRE THEATER

PLEASE EXAMINE THISQUESTIONNAIRE: THE PUBLIC PROOF CAREFULLY

KERRYKATE ABEL

IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS WHICH ARE ON THIS PROOF, BY ANTHONY CHASE THE PUBLIC CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINE THE AD THOROUGHLY EVEN IF THE HARBOR, A COMEDY by Chad Beguelin, is the AD IS A PICK-UP. story of Kevin, a gay man whose idyllic life in Sag

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Thank you for advertising with THE PUBLIC. Please review your ad and check for any errors. The original layout instructions have been followed as closely as possible. THE PUBLIC offers design services with two proofs at no charge. THE PUBLIC is not responsible for any error if not notified within 24 hours of receipt. The production department must have a signed proof in order to print. Please sign and fax this back or approve by responding to this email.

Harbor is disrupted by the unexpected arrival of his ne’er-do-well sister and her teenage daughter. Those familiar with the stage work and cabaret persona of Kerrykate Abel will not be shocked to learn that she plays the ne’er-do-well sister in this Buffalo United Artists production.

Kerrykate specializes in brassy dames, typically with hearts of gold. As Buffalo’s First Lady of Cabaret, her material fluctuates between needing to believe the lies of handsome men, cynical dismissals of romance, and a compulsion to embarrass her own teenage children—often underscored by the banter of accompanist Chuck Basil. On stage, � CHECK COPY CONTENT she was recently the former whore now married to PHOTO BY CHERYL GORSKI a cop in Poseidon: An Upside Down Musical, but her � CHECK IMPORTANT DATES roles have ranged from an impressively buxom Salome to the full range of overbearing mothers (In Gabriel’s � CHECK ADDRESS, PHONERose) #, & and WEBSITE Kitchen andNAME, yes, there was a Mama best friends with questionable judgment (The Divine Sister, among numerous others). � PROOF OK (NO CHANGES) In her ownOK eyes, Kerrykate is a cabaret artist and “mother of an actress/artist daughter and an award win� PROOF (WITH CHANGES) ning gymnast son, and the wife of a brilliant writer.” You will also learn, from her answers to the questions below, that she identifies, with peculiar fervor, with the lives of Julie Wilson, Mabel Mercer, and Elizabeth Taylor. Advertisers Signature Here, Miss Kerrykate Abel submits to the Public Questionnaire:

____________________________

What word would your friends use to describe _______________________ you? “Passionate.” Also, “direct” and “eccentric.” That’s Y15W13 Issue: ______________________ three. They might also say, “She cannot count.” Date

What quality yourBE current character is THIS PROOF MAYofONLY USED FOR PUBLICATION most unlike your own personality? IN THE PUBLIC. Donna is an opportunist out to get whatever she can from anyone. I am not like that.

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What quality of your current character is most like your own personality? She enjoys a good time, and she is very concerned for her daughter’s happiness. When and where were you the happiest? Now. Happiness is a choice. What is your idea of hell on earth? I think that that is also a state of mind, but to be specific, it would be not being able to express love or art. I can’t fathom it. Being stuck in a cubicle from nine to five would be a close second.

ROCKS!

What is your greatest fear? Fear is the opposite of love. I try not to think about it. We are not given much time in this life—focus on the joy. Which talent do you most wish you had? I would want to be a better dancer. I’m working on it. I never had the comfort or confidence with my body when I was younger to really do what I wanted—I always felt clumsy and insecure. We’ll see what happens. I’m not expecting miracles, no delusions of grandeur, but I think just working to improve is a start. What superpower do you most wish you had? Ha! Either flying or the ability to blink and wrinkle my nose a la “I Dream of Jeannie,” and get everything done!

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18 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 15, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

What would you change about your appearance? It changes, if that makes any sense. The older I get, the less it bothers me. (Whatever I feel the issue may be, mostly it’s my metabolism, which some days I feel has gone on hiatus.) I just tell myself that Elizabeth Taylor went through the same thing, so I’m in good company. What trait do you most dislike in others? Dishonesty. Deception. Sadly, I see and hear about it way too often. What do you most value in your friends? Kindness and compassion. Loyalty, meaning they won’t throw you under the bus at the first sign of trouble. My circle gets smaller every year. I think everyone’s does. What quality do you most value in a good director? Knowledge. A director needs to have a passion for what they are undertaking, and respect of what

actors go through during the rehearsal process. Also, a friend once told me: unbridled ambition. What is your guilty pleasure?Designing Women and The Golden Girls. I’m somewhere between Blanche Devereaux and Julia Sugarbaker. Go figure that one out. Who is your favorite fictional hero? Alice Walker’s Celie. Any of the women from Dear Zari and all of the women from Kris Radish’s Elegant Gathering of White Snows. Just off the top of my head. There are many. Who are your real-life heroes? Julie Wilson, who just left us and I am still reeling—she was glamorous, kind, helpful, supportive—it was recently said that everyone in the cabaret world has a love story about Julie, and they were right. You could not find a more generous, lovely, and giving human being. She wore a gardenia as a tribute to Billie Holiday. I wear a gardenia as a tribute to her. Alexandra Billings, because she is a survivor, and hysterical, and wise. And my wife, S. Alexander Abel-Smith, because she is brilliant and strong and generous and never loses her cool. Finally, both of my children; Zoe because she is intelligent, witty, is an amazingly talented singer and actress and has a strong sense of self; and Alexander because he is unbelievably compassionate, excels at all things STEM as well as gymnastics – these are things that I could never do. What do you consider to be the most overrated virtue? Conformity. On what occasion do you lie? If it would be the kinder, gentler thing to do, I would consider distorting truth. But to outright lie does nothing for you or anyone else. Just own your damn truth—it’s one of the few things that is absolutely yours. What was the subject of your last Google search? Warning: literary geek alert. I was looking for the voice recording of T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” I found it. Apparently it is available on iTunes… If you come back in another life, what person or thing would you like to be? Ask me again in 100 years, I’m sure the answer will never be the same. What role, in which you will never be cast, is perfect for you? The lead in a show about Mabel Mercer. What is your motto? “I don’t entirely approve of some of the things I have done, or am, or have been. But I’m me. God knows, I’m me.” (Elizabeth Taylor.) Also: “If P you’re going through Hell, keep going.”


COFFEE DRINKS

RAISING THE BAR Public Espresso + Coffee brings unique coffee and collaborations to Buffalo BY MICHAEL CHELUS PUBLIC ESPRESSO + COFFEE, the brainchild

of Sam Scarcello and brothers James and Matt Rayburg, began when the three would roast coffee for dinner parties and friends. After honing their craft, the three turned the hobby into a business and began offering espresso roasted beans and single origin coffee, as well as pour-over coffee, at the Winter Market at Horsefeathers on Buffalo’s West Side. Public Espresso + Coffee developed a cult following and slowly began to expand as word spread. The company is now preparing to open a shop on Grant Street in Buffalo. “Progress is coming along pretty well,” Scarcello said recently. The company will use the space as a roastery first, then eventually a café. The Grant Street location is “in a residential neighborhood,” said Scarcello, “so we have to put a stack in that goes through the three floors of the building.” The renovations should be complete in the near future. While no official opening for the café has

PUBLIC ESPRESSO + COFFEE 368 GRANT ST, BUFFALO PUBLICESPRESSO.COM

PUBLIC AT THE LAFAYETTE 391 WASHINGTON ST, BUFFALO @PUBLICESPRESSO

been announced, Sam is hopeful that it will be operational sometime in the summer. In the meantime, Scarcello and the Rayburgs just began a new endeavor at the Hotel Lafayette, at the invitation of Rocco Termini, the hotel’s owner. Only open for about five weeks, the pop-up coffee and espresso bar is of a sort not previously seen in Buffalo and has brought additional life and vibrancy to the hotel’s lobby. Scarecello said that the five weeks have provided a good “snapshot of how it’s progressing” and they’re excited by how well it’s been received. Public at the Lafayette is located behind the old check-in counter at the Hotel Lafayette. The bar went through a soft opening over several weeks at end of February and early March and then held a grand opening on March 27. They’ve installed a custom-made Modbar Modular Brewing System (four of only 100 machines in existence in the country) to make pour-over coffee, espresso, and a full menu of other espresso-based drinks. They also offer flights where you can see how the same coffee bean makes three different drinks—espresso, an espresso-based drink with milk, and a pour-over coffee.

beverages made with Public Espresso’s coffee. This would include its collaboration with Community Beer Works, the Espresso Whale brown ale. Over a year ago, Ethan Cox and Rudy Watkins of Community Beer Works approached Public Espresso with an idea to enhance their brown ale, The Whale. Together they experimented with various roasts and beans, starting with Public Espresso’s Revolution Espresso blend. The initial batch of the Espresso Whale was made from “30 to 40 shots of espresso that [Rudy] pulled one at a time,” Scarcello said. They later used Public Espresso’s cold brewing technique, which allowed them to make larger quantities. “At the time, we were just a small operation working out of Horsefeathers,” Scarcello said. Since then, Public Espresso coffees have been featured in beers by Big Ditch Brewing Company and Pearl Street Grill and Brewery.

ity, handcrafted beverages, it’s still true to itself. “The beautiful thing about the marriage of those two ingredients is that you still have a beer,” said Cox. “It doesn’t taste like fizzy alcoholic coffee. It retains its Whale character, this really lovely brown malt.” Although the Espresso Whale isn’t brewed on a regular basis, Cox hopes to put it on a regular schedule so that it’s available more regularly. Public at the Lafayette is now open 7am-8pm, Monday to Saturday, and 8am-6pm on Sundays. They will be at the South Buffalo Farmer’s Market on Sundays and feature cold-brewed coffee at Food Truck Tuesdays in Larkinville this summer. This weekly column is produced in collaboration with the Buffalo Niagara Brewers Association. P

Hand-pulling each shot of espresso, though labor intensive, works very well for the Espresso Whale.“I think the reason that it works that well is because the coffee is that good,” Cox said. While the Espresso Whale marries two high-qual-

Scarcello and the Rayburgs also offer food from local sources, like bagels and bread from Breadhive Cooperative Bakery and fresh baked goods from Elm Street Bakery. In the future, Public Espresso hopes to offer a short wine and beer list, including

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FILM REVIEW

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE TRUE STORY BY M. FAUST ANYONE LURED INTO True Story expecting a goofy comedy from the casting of stars James Franco

and Jonah Hill will be disabused of that notion by the opening scene, in which a coroner opens a suitcase that has been fished out of the water near Portland, Oregon. The suitcase contains the twisted body of one of four murder victims, a woman and her three young children. The suspected killer is the husband and father, Christian Longo (Franco). Shortly afterward he is apprehended in Mexico, where he has been using the name Michael Finkel. It’s not an alias he chose at random. The real Michael Finkel (Hill) was a rising star at the New York Times, a journalist who had numerous magazine cover stories filed from around the globe. At the time of Longo’s arrest, Finkel had just been fired for fabricating a composite character from among five African child workers he had interviewed. Adapted from Finkel’s memoir, True Story looks at the relationship between the two men. Intrigued by the accused killer’s use of his name (and unable to work anywhere else), Finkel meets with him in prison and agrees to write his story. Longo pours out his history in rambling, illustrated letters that fascinate the journalist, who feels the two of them are somehow connected. But is Finkel using Longo for a story that will get him back to work, or is Longo using Finkel to concoct some kind of defense? This is a project tailor-made for David Fincher, but instead it was directed by Rupert Goold, an acclaimed British theater director making his film debut. He and his team do solid work keeping the movie from seeming stagey despite its focus on two characters talking to each other. What he can’t quite overcome is the script’s determination not to go anywhere you’re expecting it to go. Finkel’s fiancée Jill (Felicity Jones) watches his growing obsession with alarm, but never confronts him with her concerns, as we’re expecting. Instead she visits Longo in prison to attack his machinations—an event that never actually happened. Lord knows I’ve complained a lot recently about “based on fact” stories that play fast and loose with the facts, but in a film like this you have to take a detail like that with a great deal of self-consciousness. We come away in the end learning only that truth is messy and often unknowable; whether you want to read that as an apologia for P Finkel’s ethical lapse is an argument you can have long into the night.

IN CINEMAS NOW BY M. FAUST & GEORGE SAX

PREMIERES MERCHANTS OF DOUBT—Documentary examining lobbyists who make big bucks muddying the public discourse about issues like toxic chemicals, pharmaceuticals and climate change. Directed by Robert Kenner (Food Inc.). Reviewed this issue. Eastern Hills Mall Cinema MONKEY KINGDOM—Disney nature documentary. Directed by Mark Linfield and Alastair Fothergill. Area theaters. PAUL BLART: MALL COP 2—The rent-a-cop whose name rhymes with “fart” (you don’t think that was accidental, do you?) goes to Las Vegas. This sequel isn’t being screened in Buffalo, but early votes on IMDB.com (which tend to skew positive) give it a rating of 4.2. Directed by Andy Fickman (Parental Guidance). Area theaters TRUE STORY—Adaptation of the book by former New York Times reporter Michael Finkel, fired for fabricating a story, and his involvement with a killer who briefly used his name. Starring James Franco, Jonah Hill, Felicity Jones, Ethan Suplee, and Gretchen Mol. Directed by Rupert Goold. Reviewed this issue. Amherst UNFRIENDED—Chat room friends are stalked by a demon using the account of a dead friend. Amazingly, it’s not a J-horror movie. Starring Heather Sossaman, Matthew Bohrer, and Courtney Halverson. Directed by Levan Gabriadze (Yolki 3). Area theaters

ALTERNATIVE CINEMA DECODER (West Germany, 1984)—Post-punk scifi based on the writings fo William Burroughs about a musician who discovers that muzak is a government plot to induce docility. Featuring F. M. Einheit, Bill Rice and Burroughs; previewed this issue. Weds April 15 7pm. Squeaky Wheel, in the Market Arcade Building, 617 Main St. (squeaky.org) THE HARD PROBLEM—Recorded live at the National Theatre in London, the new play by Tom Stoppard about a psychology researcher wrestling with the nature of consciousness. Starring Kristin Atherton, Anthony Calf and Jonathan Coy. Directed by Nicholas Hytner (The History Boys). Thu 7pm. Amherst IVAN THE TERRIBLE—From the Bolshoi Ballet in

Moscow, a dance interpretation drawing on the Prokofiev score the 1944 Sergei Eisenstein film. Directed by Yuri Grigorovich. Sun 12:55pm. Amherst THE MAJOR AND THE MINOR (1942)—For his first film as a director, Billy Wilder wrote a comedy (with partner Charles Brackett) he was sure would be a hit so as to cement his new position, and he was seldom wrong about what it takes to make a hit. Ginger Rogers stars as a woman forced to pose as a 12-year-old for a weekend at a military school under the unwitting eye of Major Ray Milland. With Robert Benchley. Fri 7:30pm. The Old Chestnut Film Society, Philip Sheridan School, 3200 Elmwood (836-4757) THE NAKED GUN: FROM THE FILES OF POLICE SQUAD! (1988)—Big screen version of the TV comedy starring Leslie Nielsen as an incompetent cop, With Priscilla Presley, Ricardo Montalban, and three Buffalonians—Nancy Marchand, Joe Grifasi, and O. J. Simpson. OK, two and a half. Directed by David Zucker (Airplane!). Fri-Sat, Tue 7:30pm. Screening Room PITCH PERFECT (2012)—Taking a break from the 80s, this weekend’s matinee features the popular comedy about a college a capella singing group. Starring Anna Kendrick, Skylar Astin, Ben Platt, and Brittany Snow. Directed by Jason Moore. Sat-Sun 11:30am. North Park WERCKMEISTER HARMONIES (Hungary, 2000)—Recently named one of the ten most important films of the last decade in a poll taken by the Toronto Cinematheque, this film by Bela Tarr (Satantango) is set in a bleak Hungarian village that serves as a microcosm of Europe as it falls under the spell of a demagogue. Part of the Buffalo Film Seminars. Tue 7pm. Amherst

IN BRIEF THEATER INFORMATION IS VALID THROUGH THURSDAY, APRIL 16

CINDERELLA—The surprising thing about Disney’s live action version of the perennial is how little it differs from their 1950 animated version or any other traditional telling of the fairy tale, despite the contributions of director Kenneth Branagh and screenwriter Chris Weitz (About a Boy). Branagh’s direction is stolid and tentative, as if he wasn’t sure how to spark things dramatically. The production is heavily opulent but not very striking in appearance. Lily James, from Downton Abbey, makes a serviceable but bland heroine; Richard Madden, from Game of

20 THE PUBLIC / APRIL 15, 2015 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

James Franco in True Story.

Thrones, is an appealing Prince. Co-starring Hayley Atwell, Cate Blanchett, Helena Bonham Carter, Stellan Skarsgård, Derek Jacobi, Ben Chaplin, and Rob Brydon. -GS AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Transit Drive-In DANNY COLLINS—Al Pacino stars in a sentimental drama as a septuagenarian “rock star” (think Neil Diamond by way of Rod Stewart) who decides to atone for his sins against taste by moving to New Jersey and connecting with the son (Bobby Cannavale) whose groupie mother he abandoned. It’s not as bad as it sounds because it mostly goes for a light tough, but when it wants to be taken seriously its pretty deadly, And why is this in theaters when much better Pacino recent films—The Humbling, Manglehorn—are not? With Christopher Plummer, Annette Bening, and Jennifer Garner. The directorial debut of Dan Fogelman, writer of Fred Claus, The Guilt Trip, and Crazy Stupid Love, which tells you all you need to know. FIFTY SHADES OF GREY—B&D goes mainstream in the movie adaptation of the books that have sold an estimated 100 million copies (even though no one will admit to liking them). Starring Dakota Johnson, Jamie Dornan, and Jennifer Ehle. Directed by Samantha Taylor-Johnson (Nowhere Boy). Four Seasons, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit FURIOUS 7—A.k.a. Fast and Furious 7. Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Jason Statham, and Michelle Rodriguez. Directed by James Wan (Saw). AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In-In GET HARD—After Unfinished Business and The Wedding Ringer, you’d think star-vehicle comedies would have bottomed out for the year. Let’s hope the nadir is this tired farce starring Will Ferrell as a dumbass businessman on his way to prison who hires the only black man he knows (Kevin Hart) to teach him survival skills. It’s awash in jokes reeking of racism and homophobia, and while I’m sure that the films creators would argue that they’re simply trying to air out these differences, they utterly lack the finesse to walk that line. With Alison Brie and Craig T. Nelson. Directed by Etan Cohen (My Wife Is Retarded). -MF AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In GETT: THE TRIAL OF VIVIANE AMSALEM—Israel’s submission for the Best Foreign Film Oscar is a courtroom drama set entirely in the rabbinical chamber where a woman seeks a divorce from her husband of 20 years—something the rabbis are only likely to grant when the husband agrees, which is not the case here. (Until recently, Israel had no civil marriage.) The space of the

film is limited but the time isn’t: Viviane’s struggle drags on for months as her passive-aggressive husband ignores the rabbi’s demands and refuses to offer testimony. At times the film (the final part of a trilogy, though you don’t need to have seen the previous segments) becomes Kafkaesque in its absurdity, and at other times it’s oddly funny. Ronit Elkabetz (who also co-wrote and directed the film) gives a tour de force performance as Viviane in front of a uniformly excellent cast. With Simon Abkarian and Menashe Noy. –MF Amherst ENDS THURSDAY HOME—Runaway alien meets a girl on the road in this animated feature. Directed by Tim Johnson (Over the Hedge). AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, Transit DriveIn INSURGENT—Teen dystopian sequel. Starring Shailene Woodley, Miles Teller, and Theo James. Directed by Robert Schwentke (R.I.P.D.) AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria IT FOLLOWS—The climax makes no sense, but what’s good in this arthouse horror movie (from the writer-director of The Myth of the American Sleepover, David Robert Mitchell) is so good that you can almost forgive it. In a suburb of Detroit, teens are stalked by a murderous entity that can assume any form and is only visible to the person it is currently stalking. Mitchell understands that postmodern horror movies are games, but plays the one he has invented straight-faced: there are more genuine scares here than any movie I’ve seen in a long time. Starring Maika Monroe, Keir Gilchrist, and Daniel Zovatto. -MF Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria KINGSMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE—“Give me a farfetched theatrical plot any day,” says the villain to the hero during a discussion of spy movies in one of this comic book adaptation’s more bluntly self-referential moments. Far-fetched and theatrical it is, and pretty entertaining to boot, even if it leaves you feeling slightly soiled for succumbing to such excesses as a parade of exploding heads that David Cronenberg could never have imagined. The story is essentially an Anglicization of Men in Black, minus most of the sci-fi and the overt comedy. Working from the same comic book creators who spawned his hit Kick Ass, director Matthew Vaughn pits a secret organization of immaculately clad British spies (suit fetishists will swoon) against Samuel L. Jackson as a frustrated billionaire with a desperate plan to cure global warming. The sequence with Colin Firth slaughtering the congregation at a standin for the Westboro


REVIEW FILM

BLACK NOISE MERCHANTS OF DOUBT BY GEORGE SAX AMONG THE SELECTION of dubious and disturbing spin and

scam agents of deeply entrenched economic and political interests in Robert Kenner’s new documentary Merchants of Doubt, the most repellent may be Marc Marano, a communications specialist in the office of Oklahoma Republican Senator James Inhofe. Inhofe, chair of the Senate’s environment committee, is one of those ardent climate-change deniers (“Global warming is a myth”), and Marano isn’t just one of his communications (read, propaganda) aides. He’s obviously an attack flack and distortionist and, by his own testimony, a happily engaged one. “It’s a new media, a new world,” he says, and scientific arguments are just “so boring.” But personal insinuations and offensives—not so much. One of Marano’s “new media” tricks was to round up online assaults and threats against scientists who appear on media programs to warn about the danger of climate change, and then to electronically distribute them much more widely. Just sharing, of course. As Marano says, you gotta have “fun.” Marano is really the least of it. Kenner’s documentary begins its depiction of the highly organized, well-funded public deception and endangerment back in the 1950s, when the tobacco industry hired master PR movers Hill & Knowlton to strategize and guide efforts to obscure and deflect accumulating evidence of the dangers posed by the industry’s products. The recommended response? “Cast doubt.” That is, don’t try to refute directly, or defeat. Say, instead, that the risks are “unproven,” there are two sides to the question, experts disagree.

Merchant of Doubt.

It’s the same basic strategy of deception and obfuscation that’s shaped corporate America’s response to climate-change arguments. Kenner documents the drift in right-wing politicians’ positions when they’ve been questioned about the subject. A few years ago, a number of prominent ones—even Newt Gingrich!— acknowledged the existence of an impending climate crisis. But over time, this answer became “I don’t know.” Kenner and Skeptic magazine editor Michael Shermer illumine the ideological dynamics behind this subversion of reality. Behind much of the calculated confusion are the usual conspirators, such as the petroleum industry’s Koch brothers and their Americans for Prosperity. But less obvious advancers of misunderstand-

ing are at work, like two atomic weapons physicists trotted out by the right, men whose ideological thrust is really a severe anti-governmental bias, one which scarcely concedes the need for climate remediation from the public sector. Some of the shenanigans and skullduggery the corporations and their political operatives come up with defy more than scientific opinion and national reality. One widely distributed statement calling climate change into question was supposedly signed by more than 30,000 experts and scientists, almost all of whom weren’t. Among the names: Charles Darwin. Opens Friday at the Eastern Hills Mall Cinema.

P

star as a childless Brooklyn couple in their 40s, increasingly alienated from their friends, ho take up with a couple of young hipsters (Adam Driver, Amanda Seyfried). The film seems to change direction when the younger guy turns out to have unsuspected depths of personal ambition, but Baumbach pulls it all together for a satisfying conclusion. His satire is gentle and even-handed, and his wry observations on aging in the post-Boomer era are spot on. With Charles Grodin and Peter Yarrow. –MF Amherst WILD TALES—From Argentina, this nominee for the Best Foreign Language Film is an anthology of six stories about people having really bad days. The brief opening segment hits a little harder than expected what with the recent Germanwings incident. But the best segments—an incident of road rage that spirals out of control; a wrathful bride who learns at her wedding that her new husband was unfaithful; an engineer (Ricardo Darín, a familiar face to foreign movie buffs) decides to fight an unfair parking ticket—are little masterpieces of escalation with satisfying climaxes. Hugely enjoyable. Starring Ricardo Darín, Leonardo Sbaraglia, Oscar Martínez, and Erica Rivas. Directed by Damián Szifrón. -MF Dipson Eastern Hills Cinema ENDS THURSDAY The Major and the Minor

CULTURE > FILM

on life in a run-down hotel in India. Haphazardly Chazelle’s film about an obsessed drum student Baptist Church—to the tune of “Free Bird”—is and indifferently plotted, & it REVIEWS has no more >> purand his even more obsessive teacher takes its probably theDAILYPUBLIC.COM most jaw-dropping thing you’ll seeMORE VISIT FOR FILM LISTINGS pose than to give fans of the original more of cues less from movies about the arts or acaall year. With Taron Egerton, Mark Strong, Mithe same, with the entire cast returning (minus demics than the military, starting in An Officer chael Caine, and Mark Hamill. -MF Four Seasons, Tom Wilkinson, of course). The script lays up and a Gentleman territory before plunging unRegal Elmwood, Regal Quaker, Transit Drive-In the role of Maggie Smith, whose role on Downexpectedly toward Full Metal Jacket. An excelTHE LONGEST RIDE—This year’s Nicolas Sparks adton Abbey has made her the Don Rickles of her lent performance by Miles Teller as the student aptation features Alan Alda as an old man lookmileu, and evenly parcels the rest of the time is overshadowed by Oscar winner J. K. Simmons ing back on his life and a lost love while trapped among Judi Dench, Dev Patel, Bill Nighy, Pein the role of a lifetime as the teacher who bein an automobile after an accident. With Scott nelope Wilton, Celia Imrie, Ronald Pickup, and lieves in pushing students past what they think Eastwood, Britt Robertson, and Melissa Benoist. newcomers Richard Gere, Tamsin Greig, and Datheir limits are. The finale arguably undercuts Directed by George Tillman Jr. (Men of Honor). VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE LISTINGS & REVIEWS >>the movie stands for, vid Strathairn. Caveat emptor:FILM It was made for everything the rest of AMC Maple Ridge, Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal fans of the previous film and expects that you but it’s so well executed it’s hard to complain. Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal remember all the details of its plot. Directed by -MF Movieland Walden Galleria John Madden (Shakespeare in Love). -MF DipWHILE WE’RE YOUNG—The best film yet from Noah son Eastern Hills Cinema THE SECOND BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL—The Baumbach, writer-director of such tart modern title is its own review for this sequel to the 2011 WHIPLASH—Inspired by his own experiences at a comedies as The Squid and the Whale, Frances film about British retirees who find a new lease musical conservatory, writer-director Damien Ha, and Greenberg. Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts

CULTURE > FILM

WOMAN IN GOLD—Will the movies ever run out of ways to make us hate the Nazis? Helen Mirren stars in a fact-based story as an Austrian who fled to America after the Nazi invasion and now wants to reclaim a family heirloom, a valuable Gustav Klimt painting that is the pride of a Viennese museum. To help her fight the Austrian government she hires a green lawyer (Ryan Reynolds) who happens to be the grandson of another refugee, composer Arnold Schoenberg. The film doesn’t quite know what to do with that detail, or with a story that involves a lot of arcane legal wrangling that isn’t terribly cinematic. Mirren is the main point of interest here, but she’s asked to do too much with too little, while most of the memorable supporting players (Daniel Brühl, Charles Dance, Elizabeth McGovern, and Jonathan Pryce) are underused. Directed by Simon Curtis (My Week with Marilyn). –MF Eastern Hills, North Park P

CULTURE > FILM

VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILM LISTINGS & REVIEWS >> DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 15, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 21


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FAMOUS LAST WORDS BACK PAGE

ASSISTED LIVING “25 AND LOST”

BY KEITH BUCKLEY

PHOTO BY SHAWNA STANLEY

DEAR KEITH: I am 25 years old and I feel like I’m socially inept. If I come off as rude, I don’t mean to be. I think I missed that developmental period where you learn how to shallowly interact with people—”chit-chat” or whatever you call it—and have really tried to avoid it at all costs my entire life. I really didn’t have many friends until I was 17. People always think I am rude, or condescending, or crass. What should I do? Should I learn how to better fake chit-chat, or should I just go on as I am, potentially offending people with my lack of social skills? –25 AND LOST DEAR 25 AND LOST: Looking

THE PUBLIC PRESENTS A few of our favorite bands—synth pop band Smart House, Brooklyn bluegrass trio the Vine Brothers, and experimental rock band Strange Acres—took the stage at Nietzsche’s on Saturday, April 11 for the fourth edition of our monthly rock show.

at my extensive collection of autographed Hooters calendars from around the Southeastern region of the United States, it might be difficult to believe what I’m about to tell you, but I need you to take my word for it if we are to make any progress here: I was not always this cool. Much like you and countless other repulsive virgins, I too spent many formative years woefully eyeing the cool kids from across a barren distance as they joyfully, obliviously frolicked in perpetual sunlight, while I, crippled under the weight of doubt and self-loathing, sat in the corner practicing my Bart Simpson impression as The Simpsons Sing the Blues cassette tape played on my Walkman. I vividly remember hearing rumors about the captain of the seventh-grade juggling team receiving sensual fellatio in the back of the detention bus and wondering, “What gifts do I have to offer the world?” or watching in awe as the secretary of the recycling club let a bunch of janitors smell his finger after study hall and thinking, “Am I doomed to forever be a one-man threesome?” The answer I received from my own brain time and time again was a resounding “yes,” unless, of course, the question was something hopeful. Then the answer was “no.” It really depended on the specifics of the question, but the gist was usually this: “You are worthless. You are weak. You are impotent.” “Important?” I would ask eagerly. “No,” my brain would say. “Impotent. It means that your genitals are a useless ornament pinned like a short paper tail on a dumb, hairless donkey.” As a result of this perpetually damning inner voice, I grew resentful. Like you, I too found myself behaving rudely towards others because I was convinced that they were being happy just to spite me. Furthermore, if I could learn to vilify and subsequently hate them, I could believe that I didn’t need to be like them, that their way wasn’t the right way. But if you want to believe that happy people are wrong, it’s not enough to simply detest their behavior. You have to extend the parameters of contempt to encompass the things that make them happy—their friends, music, life itself. And so I did, so committed to shaming the blissful was I. It continued for years. It was tiring, but my anger was thorough and focused. But “25 AND LOST,” one day that all changed and I believe it will change for you too. Pay close attention to my narrative because there is none like it in the world. It is unique and captivating and there is a bit of sexuality and even some humor

HAVE A QUESTION FOR KEITH? PHOTOS BY CORY PERLA

ADVICE@DAILYPUBLIC.COM

in it, but not so much that it doesn’t still kind of make you think. It is as follows. The time: 1997. The place: West Seneca East High School. The year: Is this like the date? I already said 1997. Oh you mean like what year of school? Senior year. A young Keith Buckley has only one friend. She is a reasonably cute but an otherwise sexually ambiguous tomboy who would accompany me home from school or to my father’s hardware store where I worked part-time as the only employee. I was still very much a shy, angry, and sexually repressed Bart Simpson impersonator, but at the behest of my parents I eventually built up the courage to join the school basketball team. To no one’s dismay, I sucked. The whole team sucked, in fact, except for this one tall, sweaty hunk who also happened to be dating the hottest girl in school. I remember watching his glistening shoulder muscles heave and instantly I would revert to the old tropes of doubt, jealousy, and self-hatred that I had experienced whilst watching the kid with his own paper route get an over-thepants hand job at the back of the movie theater when our class took a field trip to see Schindler’s List. I was still as emotionally crippled as I had ever been and the realization that I would never fully be emancipated from those vicious cycles of confusion and shame only accelerated my descent down the toilet that was my life. I was surely lost. Lost, I tell you…(whispering now) lost… One night after returning to my parents’ house from a party where I had been unduly humiliated in front of all my peers, I found a really long chest hair while taking a poo or a pee, I don’t recall which one. At first I was horrified and wondered if I might be dying, but before long I remembered a conversation that I had overheard at camp about which body parts were pierce-able and realized that the “hair” I had discovered was in fact a “pube” and I was not dying, but rather entering a part of my life known as “Pube-Birdie.” My body was beginning to change, and with it so must my mind. Before long, I was covered in cool pubes. If that wasn’t cool enough, my basketball team began winning more games, I got the lead role in the school play, I bit into a can of pop with the sharp teeth I developed, did a handstand on a moving van, and even invented a dance that everybody at my high school prom did in unison! I was the coolest kid in school and I have never looked back. To this day, I still have those pubes. Moral of the story? Don’t have a cow, man. You might come down hard on yourself for seeming “rude,” but you’re considerate enough to know that the nice people around you deserve better. That’s a good start. Relax and enjoy some Hooter’s wings. Tell Tammy I said what’s up.

Editor’s note: As frontman of Every Time I Die, Keith Buckley has traveled the world gaining insights about the universe. In this column he’ll use those insights to guide our readers with heartfelt and brutally honest advice. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / APRIL 15, 2015 / THE PUBLIC 23