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NEWS: COPS AT JUNETEENTH, CITY INSPECT0RS AT DREAMLAND

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COMMENTARY: DON'T CALL IT A COMEBACK: WE'VE BEEN HERE FOR YEARS

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ART: WHAT IT MEANT TO BE MODERN IN THE LAST CENTURY

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SPOTLIGHT: SAX LEGEND BOBBY MILITELLO KICKS OFF NEW JAZZ SERIES

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With Fanny & Calvin from Baila Salsa Dance

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•CAR ACCIDENTS MARK PERLA •SLIPS & FALLS •CONSTRUCTION SITE ACCIDENTS FORMER ERIE COUNTY COURT JUDGE. FORMER CIVIL CHIEF, U.S. ATTORNEY’S OFFICE

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LOOKING BACKWARD: Ferry Circle and reflections on the City Beautiful.

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THEATER: What’s playing on regional stage this week.

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ART: Contemporary Queer exhibit at Sugar City for one more week.

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CENTERFOLD: Endi Poskovic’s The Big Triumph in Red & Green with Blue Text.

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PEACH PICKS: Literary suggestions and news from the editors of Peach Mag.

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FILM: Like Crazy, Beatriz at Dinner. Plus capsule reviews.

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LOCAL NEWS legedly tried to run away.” He was found with a loaded gun in his pocket.  Just Resisting posted a flier all around the casino property in the fashion of an official notice to “cease all operations.” “You are to cease all operations immediately,” it read. “Due to the mistreatment, abuse, and violence towards Black and Brown residents of Buffalo, we demand the termination of this building’s use as a detention facility. We demand this building be released for the purpose of Black joy. Failure to abide by this Nightorder will result in community resistance.”

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lentown known on Dreamland was served a sim94 ELMWOOD AVE / Delivery 716.885.0529 / ALLENTOWNPIZZABUFFALO.COM ilar “cease all operations” notice, except theirs was Hours SUNDAY-THURSDAY: 11AM-12AM legally / FRIDAY-SATURDAY: binding and signed11AM-4:30AM by a Buffalo housing inspector, shuttering them for lack of city licenses for music, dance, and public assembly.

Boaz Singletary, after being pepper-sprayed by police at the Juneteenth festival this weekend, is led into a patrol car.

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Heading into its fourth year, Dreamland has become the rare art space in Buffalo that realizes the inherent strengths of diversity in community and culture-making, a place where the city’s racial and economic segregation shrivels. In 2014, The Public’s Cory Perla called it a “haven for the avant-garde in Buffalo, and the collective that runs the place has successfully balanced the line between remaining all-inclusive and maintaining a safe environment.”

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TWO UNPLEASANT INCIDENTS IN THE PAST WEEK CONNECTED BY A THEME, SAYS A LOCAL LAWYER: “THE OVER-POLICING OF BLACK BODIES” ON MONDAY’S 152ND ANNIVERSARY of the abolition of slavery in Texas, celebrated widely as Juneteenth, a handful of demonstrators returned to the site of one of the nation’s largest such festivals in Martin Luther King, Jr. Park to call attention to what they characterized as over-policing of the weekend’s festival.

According to several witnesses, there were more than 100 police in addition to private security firms and yellow-shirted Peacemakers, an anti-violence coalition aligned with the police, in attendance at the festival. The parade that began the festival was led by the Erie County Sheriff ’s mounted patrol followed by a Buffalo Police MRAP and other military-grade vehicles. “You couldn’t turn around without bumping into an officer,” said demonstrator James Lopez. A man was pepper-sprayed and detained by police without cause, according to Alexander J. Wright, who witnessed the event directly and uploaded his account to Facebook in the immediate aftermath on Father’s Day. He was working a tent for the African Heritage Food Coop he helps organize and run, when he saw a man with a backpack standing with his family, including his own children near the “Edutainment” stage. When security approached him and asked him to open his backpack, he put his hands in the air, asked “Why?” and was immediately pepper-sprayed and physically restrained while police removed and searched his backpack. The incident took place in front of dozens of witnesses including many children, who shared similar versions of the event on social media. The man, identified as Matthew Boaz Singletary, told The Public,  “I don’t really know what happened.” “One minute I was taking pictures of my loved ones,” he wrote in a text, ”and enjoying a great show and then before I could blink my eye it [was] sprayed and I was being slammed on the ground and beat on.” Singletary claims he has chemical conjunctivitis in his right eye, a trapezius muscle strain, a chemical burn on his face, and a laceration on his wrist from being cuffed. Singletary says he was not charged with any crime and released.   Organizers from Just Resisting were troubled not just by the heightened presence and aggressive conduct they perceived from the Buffalo Police

McKnight told us.

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To tax lawyer Heidi Jones, who was instrumental in helping Dreamland launch in 2014 and is THE PUBLIC. Please review your ____________________________ assisting them currently in getting their doors ad and check anyuseerrors. The casino � CHECK IMPORTANT DATES Department, butfor by the of the park’s as back open, the connection between Dreamland original layout instructions have a temporary security base during the weekend fesand Juneteenth is clear: “the over-policing of been as closely as possible. tival. followed Natasha Soto and Phylicia Brown recounted Date _______________________ black bodies.” � CHECK NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE #, THE PUBLIC offers design services CALL FOR RESERVATIONS: 551-0001 how they witnessed a young black youth detained with proofs no charge. & WEBSITE According to McKnight, someone may have tarafter two a scuffle and at brought into theTHE casino instead 376 GRANT ST. BUFFALO PUBLIC is not responsible for any Y15W22 GYPSYPARLOR.COM geted the space and she isn’t sureIssue: why. The public of into a police car. ______________________ error if not notified within 24 hours of assembly license, for example, shouldn’t apply to During The a reporter’s visit on Monday, the casino receipt. production department Dreamland in her estimation because her space � PROOF OK (NO CHANGES) door still a sign: “No admission, semust havebore a signed proofpublic in order is under the square footage allowance for that curity only.” A worker inside the casino who was to print. Please sign and fax this license. McKnight says she’s had withONLY BE USED FOR busy on renovations confirmed that THISfriction PROOF MAY back or the approve by responding to that sign the Allentown Village Society in years past, and had been placed on the door over the weekend. PUBLICATION IN THE PUBLIC. � PROOF OK (WITH CHANGES) this email. McKnight insinuated to Buffalo News reporter The use of the casino as a “detention facility” irked Colin Dabkowski that it was likely that group, reBrown, who grew up in the surrounding area. “We sponsible for the staging of the annual Allentown used to come here and play in that building, so Arts Festival, that complained to the city. seeing that building used to detain an individual In the midst of a social media backlash against was very traumatic,” she told reporters. AVS last week, we contacted its president, Rita Lopez, Soto, and Brown all stated they witnessed Lippman, who tried to put the allegation to bed. other unnecessarily aggressive contact between ofLippman denied any prior conflict with McKficers and people at the festival. Another unnamed night or Dreamland and said, “The last thing we bystander who attended the parade said there was would ever do is shut down an arts group. I’m very as many police at Juneteenth as there usually are hurt by this.” at the St. Patrick’s Day parade, which is attended Meantime, friends of the collective have raised by many more people. She also said she witnessed over $4,000 for legal and other expenses associpolice checking people’s cups for alcohol, someated with getting the space back up and running. thing she said she had never seen at the Delaware Jones, McKnight, and others are set to meet with Avenue parade. Brown pointed out to reporters the city’s office of licenses and permits around that at other large-scale festivals in Buffalo, you the time this paper goes to print on Tuesday. don’t see people “surrounded by police officers asking them to put their shirts on, asking them “The response to Dreamland getting shut down what’s in their backpacks, asking them to stop has been absolutely breathtaking,” McKnight gathering with their friends.” told The Public. “It’s like: ‘Oh, people do appreThe Buffalo News reported a single arrest during the event: A “’known gang member’” (the News put this in quotes) was seen by police and after “being stopped for questioning,” he “al-

ciate this.’ We did carve a space for people to actively be themselves outside of the trappings of subculture. All of our work is rooted in really P tender justice, and now we see it worked.”

Dreamland

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NEWS COMMENTARY

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BY JEFF MERKLEY & STEVE ENGLEBRIGHT On June 5, the country’s boldest statewide climate legislation, the Climate and Community Protection Act, was reintroduced in the New York state Assembly. The Assembly, under the leadership of Speaker Carl Heastie, passed the CCPA when it was first introduced last spring, and we applaud his leadership. Now it is up to the state Senate and Governor Andrew Cuomo to do their part in finally ratifying this critical piece of legislation and signing into law its bold and equitable vision for a fossil fuel-free economy in New York state. With the Trump administration exiting the Paris Accord—jeopardizing global stability and forfeiting American leadership in the burgeoning renewable energy market—now it is up to states like New York, the world’s 12th largest economy, to lead the way for the rest of the country. Some of the most promising leadership, in New York and other states, is being driven by grassroots campaigns that are forging a new kind of politics, one that unites climate goals with the fight against inequality and racial injustice. The CCPA is backed by NY Renews, a statewide coalition of more than 100 member organizations, with environmental justice groups on the front lines of climate change joining forces with organized labor and economic justice groups, as well as more traditional environmental groups. NY Renews and the CCPA are exemplary for the kind of bold, equitable and people-centered climate action we need all across the country. This is a vision that we both share, and a vision that is embraced by the federal 100 by ‘50 Act, which one of us, US Sen. Merkley, introduced in April, along with Senators Sanders, Markey and Booker. The 100 by ‘50 Act is a bold frame4

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work that for the first time lays out a detailed set of national policies to transition the United States to a completely fossil fuel-free economy, while ensuring a just transition for workers and low-income and disadvantaged communities. Much like the federal 100 by ’50 Act, the CCPA mandates a shift to 50 percent renewable energy by 2030, and 100 percent by 2050, across all sectors. This is critical, as much of New York’s progress to date has focused on the electricity sector, though buildings and transportation also represent huge sources of emissions. If the bill becomes law, New York State will be doing its share of the clean energy transition framework put forward in the federal 100 by ‘50 Act.  In the process, New York would create over 100,000 new jobs per year for the next few decades, vastly accelerating employment trends that are already demonstrating the economic benefits of clean energy. But setting the state’s renewable energy goals in law will be critical to reaping these benefits; laws are needed to ensure the goals’ durability over the next 33 years, and to lend certainty to clean energy investors. Crucially, the CCPA and the 100 by ‘50 Act have something else in common. When the 100 by ’50 Act was unveiled outside the US Capitol on April 29, the first advocate to speak at the press conference announcing the bill was Elizabeth Yeampierre, a NY Renews leader and director of the environmental justice organization UPROSE based in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. As Yeampierre urged, “Policy makers on the state and federal levels must follow the lead of communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis—low-income communities and communities of color—and put justice at the core of their agenda.” Both the 100 by ’50 Act and the CCPA do exactly this.

Embracing the proposals of grassroots leaders, each bill requires that at least 40 percent of public investment is targeted to ensure that the transition benefits disadvantaged communities. Further, all publicly-supported investment dedicated to the transition must adhere to high-quality workforce standards, ensuring that workers share in the benefits of the transition.   Whatever else it means, the result of the election of 2016 surely means that the best—and maybe the only—way we can do our part to mitigate the self-made crisis of climate change is by winning bold policies at the state and local level, state by state and city by city. Protecting the planet from catastrophic climate disruption is a huge responsibility; it is also a huge opportunity for investment in our communities. But the opportunity will be tragically lost if our elected leaders do not do their part, which is exactly that—to lead. By passing the CCPA, New York state leaders can inspire New Yorkers, our nation and people everywhere at this critical turning point for people and planet alike. Jeff Merkley is a United States senator from Oregon and the author of the 100 by  ’50 Act.  Steve Englebright, chairman of the Assembly’s  Environmental Conservation Committee, is the lead sponsor of the Climate and Community Protection Act. This article appears courtesy of content-sharing agreement with  City State magazine. and Western New York.

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LABOR VIEW: AMERICAN TOTALITARIANISM BY RICHARD LIPSITZ When Joseph Stalin made a speech to the Communist Party Congress in the Soviet Union, it was often interrupted by sustained ovations. It is reported by many historians of the period and confirmed by the contemporaneous minutes of the proceedings that the adulation would go on for many minutes. It is further reported from survivors of that dark period that the ovations would continue because those in attendance were afraid to be the first to stop clapping. The reason for this phony adulation was no one wanted to find him or her self in front of a tribunal for being an “enemy of the state.” Once charged with such a crime there was no chance of acquittal and the next stop was either the Gulag or the execution cellars. On June 12, Trump held his first full cabinet meeting. It appears the first order of business at this meeting was a public pledge of loyalty to Trump himself and the public debasement of the office that each cabinet member holds. We have never seen such disgusting and anti-democratic behavior on the part of those who have been given enormous power to shape the direction of the country. It is a very dangerous trend. If this fawning cult of the personality should continue, the democratic freedoms we now have will be destroyed. Fascist authoritarianism and suppression of any political opposition, whether achieved with violence or without, delivers wealth and glory to a privileged few at the expense of the overwhelming majority of the people. It tolerates no dissent, and if needed and allowed will end even the pretense of democracy and the Bill of Rights. Trump and his henchmen, led by neo-fascist demagogues, must move in this direction if they are to stave off defeat. They really have no choice. These people are not ordinary con-

servative politicians. They are practitioners of the black political arts, and want to align the United States with the international neo-fascist united front led by Putin and his allies in Europe and Asia, (including Le Pen, Farage, Erdogan and Duterte). To push this trend, they are constructing an ultra-nationalist and racist program. While it claims to be aimed at “elevating” the working class, in fact, it is nothing but a front for the gas and oil oligarchs in Russia and around the world. If successful they will plunge the world into a nightmare of economic depression and war. Trump is their representative in the United States. He demands unswerving obedience and unquestioning loyalty. We know this from the experience with James Comey. He is seeking to bring to heel, even the “independents” in the Republican Party. He wants to limit freedom of the press. His group is moving in the direction of a party/state totalitarian regime, where only the leader determines what are facts and what is “fake.” We are not living in “ordinary” times where debate is normal and facts are based on empirical data. The defense of democracy, even as imperfect as ours, is the order of the day. There is no half-way measures or compromise in this fight. Trump and his henchmen have usurped the executive branch of government, and are seeking to purge those elements that are the first to stop clapping for the “great leader.” Let us learn from the tragic lessons from the past, and unite in opposition to this virulent and ugly form of American fascism. Richard Lipsitz is president of the Western New York Area Labor Federation, AFL-CIO. P

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NEWS COMMENTARY The contempt that local elites had for rowdy preservationists was generational, but it was also rooted sturdily in class. Thus did penniless Boomer activists, and a few not-quite-penniless Boomer attorneys channelling the spirit of Nader’s Raiders in the post-Watergate era, thrive on the contempt of their elders.  So before the current “official” Buffalo renaissance began, there were the grassroots fights, led by educated middle-class Boomers, to preserve the downtown telephone building, but also the Olmsted Park system, crystallizing in 1982 with the founding of Friends of Olmsted Parks, the predecessor of the Olmsted Conservancy. Educated middle-class Boomers were consciously or unconsciously emulating the City Beautiful movement, but they were mainly rejecting suburbanization and Robert Moses and his epigones like Harry Quinn, chief engineer of the Kensington Expressway, which destroyed Frederick Law Olmsted’s Humboldt Parkway. When the Preservation Coalition took on City Hall on its tendency to allow Friday-afternoon emergency demolitions of handsome sites like Ohio Street’s Harbor Inn, or the Squire Building at Main near Utica, it was guerrilla theatre. When activists met in Days Park in 1997 and gathered up rakes, snow shovels, and garden spades and took them down to the then-buried Commercial Slip to confront state officials with a threat to “dig history or we will,” it was class and generational rebellion—another assertion for the genuine, the unique, the irreplaceable, the local.

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A garden on Summer Street. PHOTO BY DON ZINTECK, COURTESY OF GARDEN WALK BUFFALO

THE GROWING SEASON BY BRUCE FISHER

THE GARDEN WALK, CANALSIDE, THE PRESERVATION OF THE OLMSTED PARKS: ALL THE RESULT OF GRASSROOTS EFFORTS THAT PAVED THE WAY FOR PUBLIC AND PRIVATE INVESTMENTS EIGHT YEARS AGO, a former Cleveland public

official and garden aficionado visited us in Buffalo during Garden Walk weekend. She’d heard good things about summer in Buffalo and was delighted by her visit—so delighted that she came back a year later, and brought a busload of Clevelanders to the 2010 Garden Walk. Cleveland is a big Buffalo, or a small Detroit. It has pro baseball, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, a fabulous art museum, a fabulous symphony, literally world-class healthcare, a river as dirty as Buffalo’s, and a death spiral. Cleveland has experienced hollowing-out almost as complete as Detroit’s, losing fully 25 percent of its population between 2000 and 2010 (with a metro dropoff of 17 percent), while Buffalo has dipped only a few points in a stabilized (stagnant?) metro population. But Cleveland had also by 2010 seen a surge to 150 urban farms from a handful a few years before. And the Clevelanders who came to Buffalo in 2009 and 2010 were infected with our renaissance spirit and responded by starting their own garden walk in 2011, expressly modeled on Buffalo’s.  The Cleveland Garden Walk is back on schedule for July 8 and 9 in 2017, and is once again focused on four city neighborhoods. Despite Cleveland being more than twice the size of Buffalo (whether one measures city alone or metro), the Buffalo event is older (begun in 1995), has more gardens (400 compared to 6

Cleveland’s 100), and is expected to draw more than 60,000 visitors compared to Cleveland’s 1,000. It’s impossible to measure the value of the word-of-mouth, but the lesson is clear: A bigger, richer community has decided to imitate Buffalo’s obvious success.

curiously persisted in fights against the forces of homogenization, suburban sprawl, and the pernicious financial mechanics of bankers who have thrived on relentless abandonment of the urban core that has created ever-greater opportunities from suburban sprawl.

Cleveland is rather like the ruling class in Buffalo, which has decided to endorse a middle-class, grassroots, neighborhood-centered program of self-celebration because its monument-centered program of revival hasn’t quite done the trick of turning back the massive forces of deindustrialization, capital flight, middle-class abandonment, and racial centrifuging. Monuments like the Jake, the fortress-like Cleveland Clinic, the downtown casino, and the Flats haven’t brought the people back. The constituencies of the Darwin Martin House, the Albright-Knox, and even the Canalside diversions are, withal, local, and despite the aspirations of the cultural elite, mainly amenities for the already-resident.

These days, smart elites have joined the long-existing, homegrown, middle-class embrace of Buffalo’s oldest distinctive icons. That embrace was helped along by the 1999 publication of Classic Buffalo, a book of architectural photography that included monuments but also neighborhood vistas.

Buffalo’s Garden Walk, however, has been a remarkable home-grown success that draws from far and wide—and because of that success, it has reshaped elite behavior.

NOPE, NOT GENTRIFICATION Buffalo may have lost its homegrown industrial ownership class in the 1930s, and its unique leverage as the fulcrum of Great Lakes trade in the 1950s, and its university in the 1960s, and its international intellectual leadership in the arts, cancer research, and aeronautics in the 1970s—but Buffalo’s glory days, between 1860 and 1920, bequeathed it architecture, parks, and visual arts whose appreciation and revival are the cornerstones of its current renaissance.  For that, we can thank Buffalo’s middle-class pioneers in historic preservation and parks revival, and small groups of individuals who

THE PUBLIC / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

The most enduring autochthonous work has been in historic preservation. The Allentown Historic Preservation District has existed since 1978. There has been a vernacular understanding since then that the mid-to-late-19th century housing stock in Allentown area was special zone, a destination for a relative handful of well-off attorneys, physicians, and business-owners, but also for a far greater number of artists, graduate students, and a diverse rental clientele that has sustained that housing stock precisely because its aesthetic character has ever been priced approximately at the same level as Cheektowaga’s—which is to say, higher than the largely African-American East Side, but lower overall than Amherst, Orchard Park, East Aurora, or even the city’s own Delaware and Parkside neighborhoods. Living in this preservation district has never had a high barrier to entry in Buffalo. Generational conflict helped shape that district just a few years after downtown business leaders (ahem) made insane decisions, like demolishing Shelton Square, erecting the Main Place Mall and the Convention Center at the expense of old Pearl Street and of the hub-and-spoke design of Buffalo’s ancient renown.

Nowadays, everyone celebrates the food and the extraordinary spaces at the magnificently restored Lafayette Hotel, with its Art Deco ornament, its intricate 1940s inlaid-wood murals of the Buffalo airport and of Buffalo harbor, and its restored trompe l’oeil ceilings—except, of course, when everyone is celebrating the extraordinary spaces of the magnificently re-imagined H. H. Richardson Buffalo Psychiatric Center, now home to the Hotel Henry, where the food is great, the drinks deep, the ceilings impossibly high, the light of late spring a revelation. The million-dollar donors and their followers all followed more than two decades of public investment in restoring the Darwin Martin House complex, which is now nearly complete in a Parkside neighborhood whose homeowners have enjoyed a sensible scale of life in homes that by any other measure than Frank Lloyd Wright’s would have been more than adequately, more than comfortably luxurious—but with all that public money and private philanthropy pouring in, the whole surround is even prettier than before. The big donors followed the grassroots and the public money. The grassroots embraced the area west of Main Street until the officialized Olmsted Conservancy helped spread the wealth to Martin Luther King, Jr., Park, but the Garden Walk stretches eastward only as far as Main Street, and not past. The African-American middle-class homeowners and rental-property owners have not joined in. Nor have their counterparts in South Buffalo, Riverside, or North Buffalo. Yet it is all a digestible portion. Very modest-income households participate in this endeavor, because creating a pretty yard needn’t be a matter of earthworks, fountains, exotic cultivars, or ceramic faeries—just seeds, and watering, and sun, or shared hostas and shade. The sense of place has taken root. The volunteers who set up model railroads in one of the houses of the Botanical Gardens have stepped up their game, thus: There are scale models of downtown Buffalo buildings, including Shea’s Buffalo theatre, and the building next door with the white glazed-tile facade that used to house Laube’s Old Spain restaurant, and George & Company costumes, and the Hippodrome billiard parlor. There’s the old Erie County Savings Bank in miniature with its gold dome, and the Liberty Building, and even the building that used to house the music store where young Al Boasberg sold jokes and routines to visiting performers like Jack Benny and Bob Hope, until


COMMENTARY NEWS the Buffalo jokester left home to write A Day at the Races and A Night at the Opera for the Marx Brothers. The protesters of the 1970s fought back against their elders and rescued old buildings, Olmsted’s parks, and the Commercial Slip. They made it safe for the local plutocracy—which has not erected a single iconic office building, opera house, library, museum, or concert hall—to embrace a philanthropy of preservation, restoration, and of tax-credit-driven adaptive re-use of structures from Buffalo’s former great age. Local vandals used to kick in windows at the Darwin Martin House. The Buffalo Psychiatric Center was largely abandoned. Bethune’s Lafayette Hotel was an SRO flophouse. Now, because of activists, Buffalo may yet conceive a re-use for the Central Terminal, the DL&W Terminal, and other sturdy stone and concrete bequests, probably with public funds, probably with preservationists’ litigation, and, eventually, when it’s socially safe, with philanthropy from

those plutocrats who aren’t just taking tax credits or claiming that they’re donors when they’re actually just using their businesses’ advertising budgets. In the meantime, there is Garden Walk, a very democratic event, a dramatic assertion of more than 20 years of the power of individual caring, in a general sort of collusion or conspiracy with similarly souled neighbors, nothing terribly complicated except of course for the formidably talented and the admirably committed—but withal, a very sane rebuke of the old idea, left over from the sad age of deindustrialization and suburbanization, that Buffalo isn’t a place worth tending. Given that there is still an aggregate of more than 1,500 acres of parcels that are assessed at under $10,000, there is precisely no quantifiable case that vernacular, popular efforts at aesthetic uplift are displacing low- or moderate-income households; and given that the overwhelming majority of real-property wealth in the region remains beyond city limits, there’s also no evidence that vernacular beautification, preservation, and adaptive re-use projects are making rehabbers and parks-promoters into tycoons. But let’s not shrink from asserting what Clevelanders and other admirers have already figured out—which is that Buffalo’s activists have reclaimed, restored, and reinvigorated the built environment here, and have driven politicians from the late Daniel Patrick Moynihan to Andrew Cuomo to invest in unique structures and spaces, and that it’s citizen participation that has made it safe for the economic elite to pitch in. Of such embrace of ancient wealth, with new energy and new combativeness, is a renaissance made. 

A 2001 protest aimed at preserving the Commercial Slip at Canalside.

Bruce Fisher is visiting professor at SUNY Buffalo State and director of the Center for P Economic and Policy Studies.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BUFFALO HISTORY MUSEUM

LOOKING BACKWARD: FERRY CIRCLE “People must be taught and made to realize the advantages of a beautiful city. They must understand that beauty in a city pays, not only in the added pleasure in existence given to its citizens, but in a purely financial way, that it is, in truth, a civic asset of very great value.” —Dr. Matthew D. Mann, Society for Beautifying Buffalo, 1909 —THE PUBLIC STAFF

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NEWS COMMENTARY every two citizens, Lebanon is dealing with a massive increase in demand for public services such as health care and education. In addition to the 250,000 Lebanese students in the state school system, the Lebanese government has had to find a way to educate 450,000 Syrian children. To help meet this need, we have created the Reaching all Children with Education (RACE) initiative, focused on improving access to formal education for Syrian refugees and underprivileged Lebanese. Because it is crucial that we provide an education for all children, we have had to stretch our resources as far as possible. Today, many school-age Syrian refugees are studying under the same teachers as their Lebanese peers, and many of our schools are running double shifts in mornings and afternoons to accommodate refugees. So far, Lebanon has already accommodated around 40 percent of all UNHCR-registered school-age refugee children. Annually, this outlay costs approximately $343 for a Syrian child studying in the morning shift, and $550 for a child in the afternoon shift. It is neither fair nor sustainable for Lebanon to shoulder this burden alone. Although the 2016 Supporting Syria and the Region Conference in London garnered aid pledges totaling $12 billion, many of these funds have been severely delayed or have never materialized. A recent study from the children’s charity Theirworld finds that just $400 million of the $1.4 billion pledged for education has been delivered.

PHOTO BY FATIMA, ZAATARI REFUGEE CAMP, COURTESY OF BRENDAN BANNON.

WHAT WE OWE REFUGEE CHILDREN BY ELIAS BOU SAAB

ONE OF THE BEST WAYS TO MITIGATE THE PLIGHT OF REFUGEE CHILDREN—BUFFALO’S FASTEST-GROWING POPULATION—IS TO PROVIDE THEM WITH AN EDUCATION LAST YEAR, images of desperate refugees, many of them chil-

dren, stirred our collective conscience and prompted world leaders to take action. But a year of political upheaval has diverted media attention from refugees’ plight. Against the backdrop of Brexit, terrorist attacks, and national elections in the United States, France, and Britain, we have lost sight of the fact that the refugee crisis is getting worse. On Tuesday, on World Refugee Day, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) launched its #WithRefugees petition, to remind governments that they must work together to end the crisis. Indeed, a renewed sense of urgency is needed. All refugees and asylum-seekers need help, but children are especially vulnerable. One of the best ways to mitigate their plight is to provide them with an education. And yet host countries, which are often near war zones, have struggled to integrate refugee children into their education systems. Among UNHCR-registered refugees, including those fleeing from Afghanistan and Somalia, 3.75 mil-

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lion children—900,000 of them Syrian—are not in school. All told, the chance that a refugee child will be deprived of schooling is five times higher than the global average. This is a stain on the international community. It is crucial that refugee children receive an education, so that they can someday return to their home countries with the skills and knowledge needed to create functioning states. One young refugee girl I met wants to do just that. When I asked her about her future plans, she told me that her dream is to become an engineer so that she can rebuild her country. Education is also a vital instrument for combating violent extremism, which can capture the minds of young people with no hope for the future. And school attendance is essential for children’s welfare, because it gives them access to basic health-care services and protects them from the horrors of child labor and prostitution. Fortunately, countries such as Greece, which is on the front line of the refugee crisis in Europe, are now adding more permanent education provisions to their refugee-care model. But, in Lebanon, we have had to resort to creative thinking to accommodate the influx of refugees from Syria. When Syrian refugees first arrived, Lebanon’s education system was already in need of repair and reform. Now, Lebanon is host to some two million migrants, including 1.5 million Syrian refugees, in addition to its population of 3.75 million. With one refugee for

It is difficult to confirm if individual governments are meeting their pledges, but it has become abundantly clear that the international community overall is moving far too slowly. We cannot keep starting and stopping children’s schooling while waiting for funding. The longer children are out of school, the harder it becomes to get them back in the classroom and on track to complete their studies. Beyond meeting its funding commitments, the international community needs to increase its investment in mobile and scalable education technologies. For example, remote-learning tools would be especially useful for educating children in refugee communities. One good teacher would be able to reach anywhere that has satellite technology, solar-powered computer hardware, and an interactive live feed. This is the idea behind Teach to Reach Remote Classrooms, a UNHCR-funded distance-learning program overseen by the Varkey Foundation. With TRC, a teacher in a studio in Ghana’s capital, Accra, can live-stream lessons to around 300 school-age refugee children, many of whom have fled conflict in Côte d’Ivoire and now attend a primary school in the Ampain Refugee Camp in western Ghana. These displaced children are now catching up on their basic education, while also learning the language of their host country. And they will be well positioned to pursue secondary or higher education in the future. TRC shows what governments, charities, and the private sector can accomplish through creative collaboration. But politicians must step up and take action. Leaders around the world, especially those who have been recently elected, should put responding to the global refugee crisis at the top of their agendas. To that end, I was proud to join the Atlantis Group as a founding member. After launching at the Global Education & Skills Forum this year, we are bringing together former education ministers and heads of state from around the world to advise governments and policymakers on tackling the major issues of our time, not least refugee education. The world cannot expect a small group of countries on the borders of war zones to bear sole responsibility for displaced people. To solve the refugee crisis, countries that are fortunate enough to have peace and security must do their part. Elias Bou Saab is a former Lebanese education minister. This essay was fisrt published by Project Syndicate.

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ON STAGES THEATER

PLAYBILL = OPENING THIS WEEK GODOT RODEO: Six one-act plays riffing on Waiting for Godot presented by Buffalo Writers’

Theater. Through June 25 at Rust Belt Books, 415 Grant Street, 716-885-9535.

HAY FEVER: A farce by Noel Coward, in which the eccentric members of the Bliss family invite

guests to their country estate. High-toned hilarity ensues. Through June 25 at the Irish Classical Theatre’s Andrews Theatre, 625 Main Street, 716-853-4282, irishclassicaltheatre. com. THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR: Shakespeare in Delaware Park opens its 2017 season with

Sir John Falstaff and an all-female cast. Runs June 22-July 16 on Shakespeare Hill in Delaware Park. 

RADIUM GIRLS: The Subversive Theatre Collective’s Youth Series present the infamous story

of female factory workers who used radium-based paint that slowly poisoned them, and the impact of their plight on the labor movement. Starring students from Buffalo Academy for Visual and Performing Arts. Runs June 22-July 1 at the Manny Fried Theatre, 3rd floor, Great Arrow Building, 255 Great Arrow Avenue, 716-408-0499, subversivetheatre.org.

PLUS, AT THE SHAW FESTIVAL:  1837: THE FARMERS’ REVOLT: A play about the Rebellions of 1837, which led eventually to

Canadian nationhood.

1979: More Canadian history, this one a comedy about former Joe Clark, prime minister for

just 10 months.

ANDROCLES AND THE LION: An interactive take on Shaw’s re-telling of the well-known fable. DANCING AT LUGHNASA: 1990 memory play by Irishman Brian Friel.

Rinse out your coolers, stock up on sauvignon blanc: Shakespeare in Delaware Park open this Thursday with Pamela Rose Mangus and an all-women cast in The Merry Wives of Windsor.

THE MADNESS OF KING GEORGE III: Alan Bennett play about the monarch’s struggles with

mental illness.

TIMON OF ATHENS: How not to succeed in business, win friends, and influence people? 

ME AND MY GIRL: Musical comedy from the 1930s, revised by Stephen Fry in the 1980s.

TREASURE ISLAND: Adapted for the stage by Nicolas Billon.

SAINT JOAN: Shaw’s study of the sainted French military hero and martyr.

TWELFTH NIGHT: A comedy with everything: a shipwreck, sassy servants, cross-dressing, a

WILDE TALES: Four stories by Oscar Wilde adapted for the stage. Playing now at the Shaw Festival, 10 Queen’s Parade, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, 1-800-511-7429, shawfest.com.

PLUS, AT THE STRATFORD FESTIVAL:  BAKKHAI: In Euripides’s play, Dionysos arrives in Thebes, bent on revenge. THE CHANGELING: Treachery, madness, murder, lust—all the elelments of a Jacobean tragedy.

dissolute uncle.

THE VIRGIN TRIAL: A thriller about the young Princess Elizabeth navigating Tudor intrigues Season previews opening this week at the Stratford Festival, 55 Queen Street, Stratford, Ontario, 1-800-567-1600, stratfordfestival.ca Playbill is presented by:

GUYS AND DOLLS: Frank Loesser’s classic musical. HMS PINAFORE: Gilbert and Sullivan’s high-seas operetta. ROMEO AND JULIET: Shakespeare’s second-most frustrating tragedy. THE SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL: Witty society comedy by Richard Brinsley Sheridan.

Information (title, dates, venue) subject to change based on the presenters’ privilege. Email production information to: info@dailypublic.com.

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FeaturingOur Lady Peace and Collective Soul with special guest, Tonic JuNE 29, 2017 6 pm rain or shine

Photograph of Collective Soul courtesy of the artists. Photograph of Our Lady Peace by Ashley Osborn.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

TO purChASE TICKETS:

$45 general admission $42 for albright-Knox members

Visit www.albrightKnox.org/rocKin2017 call 716.270.8292 Visit the albright-Knox admissions desK

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ARTS REVIEW

WHAT IT MEANT TO BE MODERN, 1910-1965 BY JACK FORAN

JOHN MARIN, OSCAR BLUEMNER, STUART DAVIS, CHARLES SHEELER, AND CHARLES BURCHFIELD AT THE BURCHFIELD PENNEY THE BURCHFIELD PENNEY show in the rooms usually reserved for just Charles Burchfield works currently features watercolors by five modern artists: John Marin, Oscar Bluemner, Stuart Davis, and Charles Sheeler, along with Burchfield. Works for the most part from the Karen and Kevin Kennedy collection. The show is called What It Meant to Be Modern, 1910-1965. 

To generalize, based on the works on display, what it meant conceptually was abstraction. What it meant visually—what you saw before you could think about what it meant—was flattening. The radical modernist departure from classical three-dimensional perspective rendering. As invented by the Greeks and codified by the Renaissance, and maintained in constant usage since the Renaissance, until the late 19th century, when the usage began to be contested. The representation of forms and figures in space the way they actually appear. Supposedly.  Though artists in other traditions eschewed or neglected or otherwise did without three-dimensional perspective rendering, and happily enough for their artistic productions. Such as through the whole of the Middle Ages. Or in Egypt prior to the Greek classical innovations, or countless other non-European cultural situations prior or since. Or in kids’ art.  (What is it that is so wonderful about kids’ art? What makes it so great? Above all, the complete absence of modes and manners writer James Herndon would have characterized as “the way it spozed to be.” Which is to say, classical learned lessons about the “right” way to represent figures and forms in space.)  All the flat art traditions differed from the classical tradition— again to generalize—not just in flatness, but in an iconic character somehow, that non-classical tradition art possessed, and classical tradition art by and large did not. Classical tradition art—by the middle of the 19th century at least—had devolved into basically art as representation. The flatness tradition art—including kids’ art—was art as icon. Sacred object, or quasi-sacred. Mana object almost. Visual mana. But representation not the primary concern. Among the items on show, flattening effects—and basic-stage abstraction—most prominent in works by Charles Sheeler and

IN GALLERIES NOW = ART OPENING 1045 Elmwood Gallery for the Arts (1045 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-228-1855, photographics2.com/store/welcome-to-our-studio1045-gallery-store): Yab-yum, Mount Sumeru and Dukkha, by Xiao Yang on view through Jun 30. Thu & Fri 11-6, Sat 11-4 and by appointment. Albright-Knox Art Gallery  (1285 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 882-8700,  albrightknox. org): Menagerie: Animals on View,  through Jun 4. Shantell Martin:  Someday We Can,  on view through Jun 25.  Tamar Guimarães and Kasper Akhøj: Studies for  A Minor History of Trembling Matter;  Jacob Kassay:  OTNY; Eric Mack:  Vogue Fabrics;  Willa Nasatir, photographs, all on view through Jun 18. Camille Henrot:  October 2015 Horoscope  through Jul 9.  Tue-Sun 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays (free) until 10pm.  Amy’s Place Restaurant  (University Heights Arts Association) (3234 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214,  716-833-6260,  uhartsgroup.com/amysplace): Every day: 7am-9pm. Art Dialogue Gallery (5 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14209 wnyag.com):  Automobiles and the Golden Age of Advertising in Print,  through Jul 28. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm.  Artists Group Gallery  (Western New York Artists Group)  (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, 716-

Stuart Davis, Skyline.

WHAT IT MEANT TO BE MODERN, 1910-1965 BURCHFIELD PENNEY ART CENTER, 1300 ELMWOOD AVE., BUFFALO / BURCHFIELDPENNEY.ORG

Stuart Davis. Davis’s handsome little harbor scene with vaguely personified small craft fishing boat looking eager to get out on open water and at the day’s labors. Or a simplified formalist commercial-industrial cityscape. Sheeler’s monotone blocks of pure geometrical forms architectural scenario, featuring monumental silo forms reminiscent of Buffalo waterfront grain silos. Or moreadvanced-stage abstraction in a brickwork and rooflines depiction with prominent cubist inspiration fragmentation effects.  Whereas, terminal-stage abstraction in several colors of the fall season gestural works by Marin. Splashes of forms and color in the vein of Kandinsky. While for Bluemner, a more pictorial brand of abstraction, with a northern romanticist sensibility. Some mystery house in the forest scenes. A little dour, a little gloomy. And a kind of centerpiece Bluemner work, an enormous moon with aura concentric rings around it, and below, ambiguous possible human figures in ostensible lunar cult semi-ecstasy poses. Vein of Stravinsky, his Rite of Spring.  Burchfield—as always—somewhat anomalous in his interests and in his approach. Not particularly interested in the whole perspective matter, or for that matter abstraction. Burchfield’s consuming interest was vitalist. About how everything in the universe pul-

885-2251, wnyag.com): Botanical Artists:  Karen Carbonara, Carol Koziel Clark, Pat Fortunato, Eileen Graetz, Marie Hassett, David Hays, Norm Hornung, Marti Kutas, Bill McCullagh, Julie McIndoo, Cindi O’Mara, Donald Scheller, Vicki Schneider, Alice Seeley, Carol Siracuse, Diane Sterbak, and Dennis Stierer through Jul 7. TueFri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Ashker’s on Elmwood (1002 Elmwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14222, 716-886-2233,  ashkersbuffalo.com): Ashley Kay: This Realm: Ladies of Night, through Jun 4. Mon-Sat 7am-10pm, Sun 9am-5pm. Betty’s Restaurant  (370 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 362-0633,  bettysbuffalo.com): ITCHING:  New Work by Kate Simonds through Jul 24. Tue-Thu, 8am-9pm, Fri 8am-10pm, Sat 9am10pm, Sun 9am-2pm. Benjaman Gallery  (419 Elmwood Avenue  Buffalo, NY 14222,  thebenjamangallery.com):  Toma Yovanovich: Tongues of Flame, on view through Jun 3. Thu-Sat 11am-5pm. The Blue Plate Studio  (69 Keil Street,  North Tonawanda, NY 14120,  725-2054): Work by Alicia Malik. Box Gallery (Buffalo Niagara Hostel, 667 Main St, Buffalo, NY 14203):  Compulsion at the End of the World, video portals into the tangible graphic inquiries of Marc Tomko. Every day 4-10pm.  BT&C Gallery (1250 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183, btandcgallery.com): Stitch, work by Jack Drummer on view through Jun

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sates with life force. To express which vision and message he had major recourse to symbolism, a sub-genre of abstraction. One of the Burchfield paintings is of what looks like the moon— with concentric rings around it again—as a kind of pendulum weight suspended menacingly in the night sky, over an otherwise peaceful houses and gardens scene. But not the moon this time but the sun. The work is called Sun Setting in a Bank of Smoke, from 1917. The concentric rings, industrial-era atmospheric pollution effects.  So much for the old romanticism. What it meant to be modern for Burchfield, really to be postmodern. In corollary with the vitalist thematic, to perceive and express in his work the industrial world threat to the natural environment. A century beforehand.  It didn’t make him cynical, however. Another Burchfield nature work, featuring the actual moon this time, with extensive brilliant aura, illumining a dense stand of dandelion full seed heads, set to disperse at the least breeze, is stunningly beautiful. A late work, from the early to mid 1960s.  What It Meant to Be Modern exhibit continues through June 23. P

10. Fri 12-7pm, Saturdays 12-4pm (during exhibitions), and by appointment. Big Orbit (30d Essex Street, Buffalo, NY 14222, cepagallery.org/about-big-orbit): Eric Evinczik: The Long Afternoon. Fri-Sun 12-6pm. Buffalo Arts Studio  (Tri Main Building 5th Floor, 2495  Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, 8334450, buffaloartsstudio.org): Colleen McCubbin Stepanic & Laura Borneman. Opening reception Fri, Jun 23, 5-8pm. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm. Buffalo & Erie County Central Library  (1 Lafayette Square, Buffalo, NY 14203, 858-8900,  buffalolib.org):  Celebrating 400 Years of Shakespeare: Reflecting on the Life of the Bard. Milestones on Science: Books That Shook the World!  35 rare books from the history of science, on second floor.  Mon-Sat 8:30am-6pm, Sun 12-5pm.TueFri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm Burchfield Penney Art Center  (1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY  14222, 878-6011,  burchfieldpenney.org):  What  It  Meant  to Be  Modern, 1910-1965;  American works on paper from the Karen and Kevin Kennedy Collection through Jul 23.  Community:  Immigrant  and  Refugee  Artists in Western New York through Oct 15. Glass Within Glass: The Magic of the Trabucco Studio; the paperweight artistry of Victor, David, and Jon Trabucco through Sep 17.  Reunion: Chess, through Jun 25.  Artists Seen, photographs of

contemporary artists by David Moog. The First Exhibition: 50 Years with Charles E. Burchfield, on view through Mar 26.  Charles Cary Rumsey: Success in the Gatsby Era,  through Jun 25.  10am-5pm  & Sun 1-5pm.  Admission $5-$10, children 10 and under free. Canvas Salon & Gallery (9520 Main Street, Clarence, NY 14031, STE 400): Work by Anne Valby, on view through June 30. Cass Project  (500 Seneca Street, Buffalo, NY 14204): The Clufffaloes by Charles Clough. Castellani Art Museum (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200, castellaniartmuseum.org): Ebru: Floating Emotions featuring ebru by İpek, Ali Burak, and Musa Saraçoğlu, on view through Jul 9. Chinese Folk Pottery: The Art of the Everyday through Jul 2. Painting Niagara, Thomas Kegler, on view through Jan 21, 2018. Tue-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. CEPA (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 8562717, cepagallery.org): Karsten Krejcarek:  (However) the Owner of the Living (Death) May Pierce (an Abscess) and Spread Ruin, BabalúAyé  through May 21.  Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 124pm. Dana Tillou Fine Arts  (1478 Hertel Avenue Buffalo, NY 14216, 716-854-5285,  danatilloufinearts. com):  Contemporary collection including Hans Moller, Edith Geiger, Lee Adler, Claire Burch, and more. Wed-Fri 10:30am-5pm, Sat 10:30am-4pm. Daily Planet Coffee Company (1862 Hertel Avenue,


REVIEW ARTS is filled salon style artwork he has collected over decades reflecting his generous and encyclopedic palate. About his curatorial process, Tyrrell writes that “the artists included in this exhibit all identify as LGBTQIA, and it is the breadth of that range that is expressed therein. A lot of the work, and the show moreover, delves into identity; as it is expressed individually, how it can be deployed toward political ends, as it serves as a mutable device, and how identity is constantly evolving and self-fashioned within the gay community.” Artists included in this exhibition are: Steve Ardo, Eric Bellman, Lawrence Brose, Nick Butler, Craig Centrie, Jack Edson, Florian Ayala Fauna, Keith Gemerek, Jim Goodrich, Anthony Peter Gorny, Amy Greenan, Carlos Gutierrez-Solana, Andrew Hershey, Justin Higner, Scott McCarney, Dana McKnight, Tommy Nguyen, Alice O’Malley, Cristiano Pereira, Paul Rybarczyk, Tara Sasiadek, Donald Siuta, Peter Stephens, C.J. Szatkowski, Adam Weekley, and Joe Ziolkowski.

Andrew Hershey is one of 26 artists featured in Contemporary Queer ar Sugar City.

CONTEMPORARY QUEER BY BECKY MODA

CURATOR DANA TYRELL’S SURVEY OF LGCBTQIA& ARTISTS CLOSES JUNE 30 THE SUGAR CITY ARTS COLLABORATIVE is an essential part

of Buffalo’s cultural ecosystem, and it is kin to a long line of DIY spaces. The names and locations have changed, and some of the organizations have established a national presence along the way, but the feeder system of smaller spaces with the freedom to experiment and establish communities remains intact thanks to places like Sugar City and Dreamland. The Contemporary Queer exhibit that opened on the Friday of Pride weekend is a testament to the queer community’s many contributions to that fringe over the years, as well as its the many avenues it has followed into the mainstream. 

Buffalo, NY 14216, 716- 551-0661): Andrea Oswald’s traditional paintings. Dreamland  (387 Franklin Street, Buffalo, NY 14202,  facebook.com/dreamlandarts.buffalo/ timeline): Open by event. Eleven Twenty Projects  (1120 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 882-8100,  eleventwentyprojects. com): Lesley Maia Horowitz:  Course of  Empire through Jul 29. Fri-Sat 11am-4pm. El Museo (91 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 4644692,  elmuseobuffalo.org): Photography, creative writing, and group activities by students at International Prepatory School at Grover Cleveland High School. Wed-Sat 12-6pm.  Enjoy the Journey Art Gallery  (1168 Orchard Park Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 675-0204, etjgallery.com): C.Mari, Grace Wilding and Serena Way. Tue & Wed 11-6pm, Thu & Fri 2-6pm, Sat 11-4pm . Hallwalls  (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694, hallwalls.org): There’s More To Explore: Up Close and Personal With Ryder Henry, on view through Jun 30.  Tue-Fri 11am-6pm, Sat 11am-2pm. Indigo Art Gallery (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572, indigoartbuffalo.com): Biophilia, work by Dorothy Fitzgerald, Kevin Kegler, Elizabeth LaBarge, Lynn Northrop on view through Jul 1. Wed & Fri 12-6pm, Thu 12-7pm, Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sun & Mon.  Jewish Community Center of Buffalo, Bunis Family Art Gallery​  (2640  North Forest Road, Getzville, NY 14068 jccbuffalo.org): Exhibit by Jerry Birzon. Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall) (220 North St., Buffalo, NY 14201): The Young Abraham Lincoln, the drawings of Lloyd Ostendorf. On view through Apr 26. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.   Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall) (453 Porter Ave, Buffalo, NY 14201):  Maps of the United States. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm. 

Buffalo curator and writer Dana Tyrell has selected the work of 26 LGBTQIA-identifying artists from the Gerald R. Mead Collection. These works are meant to highlight the essential contributions these artists make in the community of Buffalo. By showing these works together Tyrell is giving us a snapshot of Buffalo’s ability to create space for queer artists that challenge the worldview of the community while at the same time highlighting Buffalo as a destination for contemporary art. Artist, independent curator, and art advocate Gerald Mead has worked tirelessly for decades to collect artworks by artists associated with this region by birth or residency. Mead has over a thousand pieces in his collection. The work selected for Contemporary Queer seeks to illuminate and investigate identity through a comment narrative in different artworks. Tyrell refers to Mead as the “Yoda” of the Western New York art scene. Mead’s home

Kenan Center House Gallery (433 Locust Street, Lockport, NY 14094, 433-2617, kenancenter.org): Three Generations of Burchfields: Works from the Schoene Collection, on view through June 16. Mon-Fri 12-5pm & Sun 2-5pm. Meibohm Fine Arts  (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940,  meibohmfinearts. com): Benefit Exhibition for the WNY Land Conservancy:  The Art of Native Plants, featuring work by 31 regional artists through Jul 29. TueFri 9:30am-4pm, Sat 9:30am-2pm. Niagara Arts and Cultural Center (1201 Pine Avenue, Niagara Falls, NY 14301, 282-7530, thenacc.org): NF125. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat & Sun 12-4pm. Nina Freudenheim Gallery  (140 North Street, Lenox Hotel, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-882-5777, ninafreudenheimgallery.com):  Roil, new work by Kyle Butler through Jun 14. Tue-Fri 10am–5pm Norberg’s Art & Frame Shop (37 South Grove Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 716-652-3270, norbergsartandframe.com): Local artists: Kathleen West, Bradley Widman, Peter Potter, and Miranda Roth. Tue-Sat 10am–5pm. Parables Gallery & Gifts (1027 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY, parablesgalleryandgifts.com): Paintings by: Karen Carlton through Jun 30. Wed-Fri, 12-7pm (until 9pm on first Fridays), Sat & Sun 125pm. Pausa Art House (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 697-9069 pausaarthouse.com): Resonance by Kathleen Sherin. Opening reception Fri, Jun 23, 6-11pm. Live music Thu-Sat. Pine Apple Company  (224 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-275-3648,  squareup.com/store/ pine-apple-company): Unicorns! LGBTQ Invitational.Wed & Thu 11am-6pm, Fri & Sat 11am-11pm, Sun 10am-5pm. Queen City Gallery  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 868-8183,  queencitygallery.tripod.

A few images that Tyrrell has sent out for the show, show a focus on the body. Cristiano Pereira’s photograph, Selfie Steam 1, is exactly as stated—a portrait of himself through a fogged-up mirror, his body obscured so heavily by the steam one can barely perceive anything beyond the tone of the body and its flat background. Naked, yet hidden. In Adam Weekley’s Untitled, is a gouache painting of a male body, sitting semi-naked, the figure is taking off his white t-shirt. The viewer sees his knees, chest, lower hip, and the top part of his head hair sticking out from the shirt. These works both give the viewer little information about the subject of the work. Both pieces highlight bodies but make the viewer make up their own narrative about the work. These are just two pieces selected by Tyrrell that embody his vision for bringing these pieces all together for Contemporary Queer. Contemporary Queer is on view through July 1. There will be a closing reception at Sugar City (1239 Niagara Street) next Friday, June 30, including a walkthrough with the curator 5:306:30pm, followed by a punk rock show.

CONTEMPORARY QUEER ON VIEW THROUGH JULY 1 CLOSING RECEPTION FRIDAY, JUNE 30 / 5:30-6:30PM SUGAR CITY, 1239 NIAGARA ST., BUFFALO BUFFALOSUGARCITY.ORG

com): Art by Neil Mahar, David Pierro, Candace Keegan, Chris McGee, Tim Raymond, Eileen Pleasure, Eric Evinczik, Barbara Crocker, Thomas Bittner, Susan Liebel, Barbara Lynch Johnt, Kisha Patterson, Steve Siegel, John Farallo, Michael Mulley. Tue-Fri 11am-4pm and by appointment. Resource:Art (Various locations,  resourceartny. com, 249-1320):  Community, Milton Rogovin photographs, in conjunction with Max Collins public art project at the Buffalo Center for Art and Technology (1221 Main Street in Buffalo). By appointment.  Revolution Gallery  (1419 Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216,  revolutionartgallery.com): Drawn Together  group show with work from: Craig LaRotonda, Esther Neisen, Jaclyn Alderete, Jel Ena, Joe Vollan, Joseph Pfeiffer-Herbert, Maria Pabico LaRotonda, Matthew Robertson, Megan Buccere, Melissa Morgan, Michael Mararian, Rob Lynch, Sandra Yagi, Shaunna Peterson, Tricia Butski, and William Herod through Jul 22.  Ró Home Shop (732 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 240-9387,  rohomeshop.com): Somatic Color, Kyla Avery Kegler. Tue-Sat 11am-6pm, Sun 11am-4pm, closed Mondays.  Rust Belt Books (415 Grant Street): Recent works on paper by Hetta and Esther Gardner through Jun 30. Sports Focus Physical Therapy (531 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY, 14202, 332-4838,  sportsfocuspt. com): Photography by Joe George through May 30. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, 6-9pm on first Fridays.  Squeaky Wheel  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, squeaky.org): Tue-Sat, 12pm-5pm.  Starlight Studio and Art Gallery (340 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, starlightstudio.org): The Bold and the Beautiful, featuring Andy Calderon from Starlight with James Marino and Ben

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Brauen from Autism Services, Inc. with  Debbie Medwin, Jeremy Pratt, and Ron Steele. Opening reception Fri, Jun 23, 6-9pm. Mon-Fri 9-4pm. Stangler Fine Art (6429 West Quaker Street, Orchard Park, NY 14127, 870-1129,  stanglerart. com): Buffalo Society of Artists Open Members Exhibition through Jun 30.  Mon-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm.  Sugar City  (1239 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213,  buffalosugarcity.org): Contemporary Queer, works from the Gerald R Mead Collection curated by Dana Tyrrell. Work by  Steve Ardo, Eric Bellman, Lawrence Brose, Nick Butler, Craig Centrie, Jack Edson, Florian Ayala Fauna, Keith Gemerek, Jim Goodrich, Anthony Peter Gorny, Amy Greenan, Carlos Gutierrez-Solana, Andrew Hershey, Justin Higner, Scott McCarney, Dana McKnight, Tommy Nguyen, Alice O’Malley, Cristiano Pereira, Paul Rybarczyk, Tara Sasiadek, Donald Situa, Peter Stephens, C.J. Szatkowski, Adam Weekley, and Joe Ziolkowski. On view through Jul 1.  Open by event and on Fri 5:30-7:30.  UB Anderson Gallery  (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 829-3754,  ubartgalleries. org):  The Human Aesthetic, Cravens World. The Language of Objects on view through  Jul 30. Wed-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm.  Western New York Book Arts Center (468 Washington Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 348-1430,  wnybookarts.org):  Words and Pictures:  A Collaborative Exhibition by Trudy Stern and Michael Morgulis, through Jun 23. Wed-Sat 12-6pm.

To add your gallery’s information to the list, please contact us at info@dailypublic.com

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ENDI POSKOVIC’S El Triumpho is featured in an exhibition of immigrant and refugee art at the Burchfield Penney Art Center titled Community, on view through October 15.


EVENTS CALENDAR PUBLIC APPROVED

WEDNESDAY JUN 21 Live at Larkin: John and Mary and the Valkyries 5pm Larkin Square, 745 Seneca Street free [FOLK] Live at Larkin continues this week with a performance from John and Mary and the Valkyries. John and Mary are of course John Lombardo and Mary Ramsey, who perform as a duo with the popular alt folk band 10,000 Maniacs—Lombardo the lead songwriter of the band, and Ramsey the talented vocalist and violist who replaced original singer Natalie Merchant. For this project, Lombardo on guitar and Ramsey on violin are joined by a local all-star roster—Kent Weber, Patrick Kane, Joe Rozler, and Robert Lynch—to perform their unique brand of folk rock. They’ll take the stage this Wednesday, June 21 for a free concert at Larkin Square for their third Live at Larkin concert of the year. -TPS

Height Keech

PASSED OUT "summer thing" single Recommended if you like: Blink 182, The Get Up Kids The new track from Buffalo poppunk band Passed Out is an upbeat, driving emo-inspired punk song. The song, “summer thing” has frontman Andy Pothier waxing poetic over lost summer love, just in time for summer to begin. Equal parts Blink 182 and the Get Up Kids, the hooky track crashes together soaring synth lines and muscular drums. Released last week on the band’s bandcamp page, "summer thing" was recorded by Cody Morse at Afterglow Studios.

SHEILA E. THURSDAY JUNE 22 5PM / CANALSIDE, 44 PRIME ST. / $5 [POP] The second concert in the formerly free (now $5) Canalside Live series features the iconic pop vocalist Sheila E. For many, their introduction to the Mexican-American pop star came with Prince’s “Let’s Go Crazy” b-side “Erotic City.” The racy, Rick James-eqsue pop song featured Sheila E. on vocals and helped to launch the multi-instrumentalist’s career. Her Warner Brothers-released albums in the 1980s and early 1990s, like The Glamorous Life and Sex Cymbal, solidified her solo career, but following those records she continued to collaborate with musicians of all kinds, from Ringo Starr to Beyonce. She has more recently contributed movie soundtracks including the D.C. superhero movies Man of Steel and Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice, playing drums. Don’t miss Shelia E. when she comes to Canalside for an outdoor concert this Thursday, June 22. -CORY PERLA

AL POLANSKI

DO YOU MAKE MUSIC? HAVE A RECOMMENDATION? CONTACT CORY@DAILYPUBLIC.COM TO BE CONSIDERED IN OUR WEEKLY PUBLIC PICKS.

METZ 7pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $13 [PUNK] Here in Buffalo, we’re lucky to have such easy access to a band like METZ, which hails from Toronto and makes a whole lot of noise. The band has visited Buffalo a few times before, including once with legendary art-noise band Lightning Bolt and once with the band formerly known as Viet Cong (now known as Preoccupations). Both bands were appropriate bedfellows for Metz, whose sound somehow expertly crosses psychedelia and avantgarde noise punk, but this time around the Toronto based three-piece is arriving as headliners. And that’s how it should be, because Metz certainly deserves our full attention. The Sub Pop-signed band, which formed in Ottawa in 2008, broke out with their self titled debut in 2012. The hardcore punk leaning album arrived to critical acclaim, and was followed in 2014 with the equally acclaimed II, which essentially doubled down on the band’s sound. Now they’re due for a third fulllength this spring, which is likely to complete their noise-punk trifecta, but not before they complete a spate of summer concert dates, including one at Buffalo’s Mohawk Place this Wednesday, June 21. They’ll be joined by fellow Canadian indie rock act Chastity and Buffalo punk band the Drains. Consider this the first must-see club show of the summer. -CP

FRIDAY JUN 23

"Blue Funk" single Recommended if you like: Andres, J Dilla, Session Victim The latest release from producer Al Polanski, is a track titled "Blue Funk." Almost like a slow-motion deep house track, “Blue Funk” unfurls in waves, first introducing a rolling syncopated hip hop beat and moody Rhodes piano line, before breaking down into a funky synth jam. The track has a driving character to it despite its fairly low key arrangements—perfect for after the party. 

7:30pm Sugar City, 1239 Niagara St. $5 [HIP HOP] An indie-rap artist from Baltimore, Height Keech might be familiar to fans of acts like Future Islands and Beach House. The eccentric artist, who has toured with the aforementioned acts, recently released a single, “Ace,” as part of a collaborative project called Shark Tank. The high energy hip hop track follows Keech’s non-stop flow with a chunky guitar riff and grooving drum beats. Think Beastie Boys meet Danger Mouse. Height Keech will some to Sugar City on Wednesday, June 21 with local support from Jack Topht and UBV76. -CP

Jean-Luc Ponty

SHAKESPEARE IN DELAWARE PARK: THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR. THURSDAY JUNE 22 7:30PM / DELAWARE PARK, 84 PARKSIDE AVE / DONATION [THEATER] There’s much ado about the outdoor production of Julius Caesar in New York City, but Buffalonians know that’s nothing: Shakespeare in Delaware Park commences its 42nd season providing free, professional-grade theater to the masses six days a week for two full months this Thursday, June 22 on Shakespeare Hill, next to the Rose Garden in Delaware Park. (No other city in the country has anything quite like it, and this is no renaissance product: This is oldschool Buffalo culture at its best. ) This year’s comedy is The Merry Wives of Windsor, with an all-female cast (Pamela Rose Mangus as Falstaff!) directed by Eileen Dugan, who directed an all-female prodiction of Macbeth in 2010 in Delaware Park. There is no charge, but of course donations are accepted at intermission. Bring a blanket, bring a picnic, get there early. The Merry Wives of Windsor plays every night except Mondays through July 16. Then a new production of Macbeth, directed by Saul Elkin, begins on July 27. -GEOFF KELLY

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8pm Seneca Niagara Bear's Den, 310 4th St $45 [JAZZ] At 74, Jean-Luc Ponty is jazz-rock royalty—a violin virtuoso who came to the United States from France at the urging of Frank Zappa, who'd composed the music for the 1970 album King Kong, which later got picked up by Blue Note. Already considered a bad boy by jazz purists reluctant to admit the violin into their stable of preferred instruments, Ponty went on to work with Elton John and the Mahavishnu Orchestra before landing a contract with Atlantic that found him selling millions of records in the wake of successful fusion acts like Weather Report. Since the late 1970s, he's favored an electric five-string violin (with a low C, and occasionally a sixstring with low C and F), and has incorporated pedals and effects into his performances, resulting in an idiosyncratic signature sound. More recently, he joined forces with keyboardist Chick Corea in the group Return to Forever, teamed up with badass bassist Stanley Clark and guitarist Bireli Lagrene for an acoustic trio project; last year, he released an album and toured with Yes vocalist Jon Anderson. For this show on Friday, June 23, at the Bear's Den in the Seneca Niagara Casino, he'll concentrate on his Atlantic material. -CJT

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CALENDAR EVENTS PUBLIC APPROVED

LIVEMUSICEVERYNIGHTFOROVER30YEARS! WEDNESDAY

JUNE 21

THURSDAY

JUNE 22

Kathryn Koch

Historic Quarries and Stone Industry in Erie County New York LOVEJOY 1820-1930 PIZZA Two Great book Locations! 1,600-page on CD 900 MAIN ST MAC/PC Compatible

883-2323 (btwn Virginia & Allen)

$35 all inclusive

9PM FREE

Rustbelt Reunion & Vodka Tasting FEAT. Zamir VODKA HOSTED BY ZAMIR Gotta & Nelson Starr

1244 E. LOVEJOY ST www.stoneindustryresearch.com

891-9233 (at N. Ogden)

WE DELIVER! LOVEJOYPIZZA.COM

WE

9PM $5

Free Happy Hour w. Randle & the Late Night Scandals

FRIDAY

JUNE 23

INTERVIEW: BLACKBERRY SMOKE SATURDAY JUNE 24 7PM TOWN BALLROOM, 681 MAIN ST. $25-$29 [ROCK] As bands go, Blackberry Smoke isn’t much interested in chart numbers and sales figures. But the Georgia-born, Southern-fried quintet, who play Town Ballroom on Saturday, June 24, make for an excellent study of how chart success and sales figures don’t equate like they once did. Having a Billboard #1 record used to mean big numbers, not to mention the cumulative sales of having a record consistently selling (relatively speaking) as it moved up and down the chart. Now, a record’s first week is usually the highest it gets with a dramatic drop right afterwards. Blackberry Smoke’s latest, Like an Arrow, and its 2015 predecessor, Holding All the Roses, both debuted at #1 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart. For both, that translated to roughly 20,000 copies sold out of the gate. Like An Arrow went on to sell just 4,200 copies in its second week—and this is entirely normal. But they were #1 albums—and Blackberry Smoke is quite successful as indie bands go. Lead vocalist/guitarist Charlie Starr is just happy knowing that the band’s fan base made it a #1 record. “That comes from fans who are excited about a new release, and it tells us they’re still listening,” he said during a one-week tour break while babysitting his three-year-old son. “Since we’re not working with a major label, we couldn’t give a fuck who’s selling records, and our fans don’t care what’s happening on the pop charts either. It’s a completely different industry now. I was discussing this just recently with Tom Keifer from Cinderella. All of us make our money on the road now and it’s a funny thing to see when you consider this guy was all over MTV, has sold millions of albums…but I think I saw a flicker of relief when he was speaking of it, probably because there’s not this huge expectation anymore. For us, we’re not willing to sacrifice our integrity to do it, but I feel as if I’ve watched other folks dumbing down their music in hopes that it’ll be accepted on a broader level.” It’s just as well, since sanding down the corners of what Blackberry Smoke does would completely kill the vibe. Plus, there’s enough ear candy naturally present in their music to satisfy the average pop sweet tooth: if you enjoy the way the Allman Brothers straddled the lines between AM and FM idioms, Blackberry Smoke is bound to have some appeal. At a time when America’s identity is becoming politically maligned and so much country music is just part of the corporate pop machine, it’s refreshing to hear such an unmistakably American band make Southern music that isn’t trying too hard to be anything other than what it is—rock and roll with a twangy edge. Over a dozen years they’ve released five albums on five labels, finally opting this time around to form their own—3 Legged Records—and handle the production themselves as well. The album is pared down from its predecessor and stays faithful to the original demos. Under other circumstances it’d seem like a reclamation, but Starr says there’s really nothing to reclaim. “We’ve enjoyed 100 percent creative control on all of our other records as well. We’ve never had to answer to anyone,” he said. “I guess we’ve been lucky because we’ve never had anyone say we have to do this to be successful, and at each of the previous four labels, nobody has ever said, ‘This sucks, start over.’ We’ve never had a major label beating down our door, which allows for certain freedoms. We’ve worked with great people all along and they’ve seen that we’re stubborn and determined… they’ve helped rather than steered.” Starr, who is in his 40s, grew up listening to the classic rock bands you might imagine: Aerosmith, Rolling Stones, AC/DC, Grateful Dead, Lynyrd Skynyrd, and Little Feat. But the Allman Brothers hold a special place in his heart. It seems fitting, then, that one of the late legend’s last recorded contributions to another artist’s album would be the final track on Like an Arrow, “Free on the Wing.” Blackberry Smoke also played with him at the Laid Back Festival in Atlanta last October—Allman’s last show. “I can say most definitely that we wouldn’t be making the music we make were it not for Gregg Allman,” Starr said. “I think he hated the ‘Southern rock’ tag…I think he found it redundant, and what that term had come to mean for some people might have been taxing to him. We were looking at old Allmans footage from 1969 the other day and I kept thinking how there was nothing else like that then. What they did was special, and even when they were just kids, they were like giants walking the earth. I didn’t have any contact with him after the Atlanta gig, but we’d heard he had to cancel some shows. We hadn’t been told anything about the severity of his illness, but we had heard he wasn’t doing a very good job of resting. It’s very special to have ‘Free on the Wing’ on our record, and we performed the song the night he died, somewhere around Knoxville. I get goosebumps thinking about it. It was very emotional.” -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

6PM FREE

Adam Bronstein’s Freehand Band, Elliot Scozzaro, Erica Wolfling, Jack Topht 10PM $5

SATURDAY

JUNE 24

Intent to Sell CD Release

JUNE 25

Two Great Locations!

900 MAIN ST

883-2323

w/ Chuckie Campbell & the Phaction, Mad Dukez

1244 E. LOVEJOY ST

JOHN BRADY

(at N. Ogden)

9PM $5

SUNDAY

LOVEJOY PIZZA

6-8PM FREE

(btwn Virginia & Allen)

891-9233

WE DELIVER! LOVEJOYPIZZA.COM

MONDAY

JUNE 26

Jazz Happy Hour w/ Paul Sottnik 5:30PM FREE

THe Gage Brothers, The Observers, Arthur Buezo (of the Blind Owl Band)

WEDNESDAY

JUNE 28

9PM $5

Buffalo’s Premier Live Music Club ◆ WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21 ◆ Post-punk noise from Toronto:

METZ

Chastity, The Drains

7PM DOORS/8PM SHOW ◆ $13 ADVANCE

◆ THURSDAY, JUNE 22 ◆

THURSDAY

JUNE 29

FRIDAY

JUNE 30

Kevin Urso, Jazz Cabbage, Paul Sottnik 9PM $3

Coldboydjs & C.M.G present: Roc the Mic Hosted by WBLK’s Michelle Visa and Steel Bout Money.

Music by Coldboydjs & Dj Smoove 9PM ◆ $10

◆ FRIDAY, JUNE 23 ◆

MR. CONRAD’s rock’n’roll happy hour

Free Happy Hour: The Fibs 6PM

5PM ◆ FREE

Wyatt Coin, DredNeks Murder City Outlaws, The Cage Kings 8PM ◆ $5

WEEKLY EVENTS EVERY SUNDAY FREE

6PM. ANN PHILIPPONE

8PM . DR JAZZ & THE JAZZ BUGS

(EXCEPTFIRSTSUNDAYS IT’STHE JAZZ CACHE)

EVERY MONDAY FREE

8PM. SONGWRITER SHOWCASE 9PM. OPEN MIC W. JOSH GAGE

EVERY TUESDAY 6PM. HAPPY HOUR

8PM. RUSTBELT COMEDY 10PM. JOE DONOHUE 11PM. THE STRIPTEASERS $3

EVERY WEDNESDAY FREE

6PM. TYLER WESTCOTT & DR. JAZZ

EVERY THURSDAY FREE

5PM. BARTENDER BILL PLAYS THE ACCORDION

EVERY SATURDAY FREE

4:30-7:30PM. CELTIC SEISIUNS

248 ALLEN STREET 716.886.8539

NIETZSCHES.COM

◆ SATURDAY, JUNE 24 ◆ early show PSYCHEDELIC INDIE POP FROM LA:

THe Black Watch The Good, Ex-Pat 6PM ◆ $5

LATE SHOW DANCE PARTY

As If: ~*Under The Sea*~

wear your best ‘90s/’00s formal wear. 10PM ◆ $5

◆ SUNDAY, JUNE 25 ◆ FTMP eVENTS presentS: Landon Tewers (of The Plot In You)

World War Me, Wide Awake, Winski Creating A Sinner, Nurse Joyful, Astrabula 5PM ◆ $15 ADV./$20 DAY OF SHOW

◆ MONDAY, JUNE 26 ◆ POST-PUNK DREAM-POP FROM CINCINNATI

The Yugos

Yali, Katmaz 8PM ◆ $5

◆ TUESDAY, JUNE 27 ◆

Her Crooked Heart (Rachel Ries w/ Shane Leonard) J.E. Sunde, Passing Time 7PM DOORS/8PM SHOW ◆ $5 ADV./$7 DAY OF SHOW

47 East Mohawk St. 716.312.9279

BUFFALOSMOHAWKPLACE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/MOHAWKPLACE

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / THE PUBLIC 15

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EVENTS CALENDAR

STAY IN THE

Miss May I

6pm The Waiting Room, 334 Delaware Ave. $18-$22 [METAL] If you’re in the mood for something a little harder and metallic, check out Miss May I at the Waiting Room this Sunday, June 25. Formed in 2007, they signed to Rise Records and released their debut album, Apologies Are for the Weak, all while still attending high school in Ohio. That album reached 76 on Billboard 200 with some material being featured in movies and video games. The five-piece band recently signed with SharpTone Records and released their sixth studio album, Shadows Inside, about two weeks ago. It’s fairly hardcore and not for everyone, but musically solid with blistering drums and metalcore riffage. Oh, and there are a ton of bands opening for them: Upon a Burning Body, Kublai Khan, Currents, A Story Inspired, and Burn Book. -LINDSEY MACHNICA

PUBLIC APPROVED

THIS WEEK'S LGBT AGENDA WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21 

Thursday

OUT FOR BUSINESS AT PRESERVATION PUB 5-7pm, 948 Main St.

Buffalo’s premiere LGBTQ networking event is always a great opportunity to meet and greet, a chance to have a drink with community friends you don’t always get to see and possibly make some new ones. This month’s mixer is at the Preservation Pub, also the monthly site for Bear Night, just around the corner from where Allen meets Main, and is sponsored by Roswell Park Cancer Institute.   

SATURDAY, JUNE 24  WE EXIST BUFFALO: TRANS AND GENDER EXPANSIVE RIGHTS RALLY AT MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. PARK Noon-5pm, near Museum of Science, Fillmore and Humboldt.

Organized by We Exist Buffalo, “a coalition dedicated to all people who identify beyond the gender binary as a way to rally together and demonstrate that we are, we exist, and we live. We intend for this rally to not only be led by trans and gender non-conforming speakers and to center the voices of those most marginalized in our community, but to also include TGNC performers of all kinds; spoken word, dance, music.”

SUNDAY, JUNE 25

MARY GAUTHIER AT SPORTSMEN’S TAVERN 5pm, 326 Amherst St. (Doors at 3pm.

Out and proud, Gauthier is a survivor— and her music conveys it. Once the owner of a successful Cajun restaurant in Boston, she had to lose an addiction to heroin in order to really find her voice as the revered singer/songwriter she’s become. Her music doesn’t make you tap your feet and there are no hooks that’ll have you humming on the way home. It’s more deeply penetrating than that, studying the darkness that sometimes envelops us in our moments alone. Now 55 and a resident of Nashville, she continues to tour and make records when the songs come, as they did for Trouble and Love, her latest, in 2014. She also teaches songwriting workshops and is currently working on a book about her craft for the Yale University Press. Tickets are $20 and worth every penny.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27 TRANS ART THERAPY AT EVERGREEN COMMONS 6-7:30pm, 262 Georgia St.

A byproduct of the TransGeneration Health Initiative and Support Group, this focusing activity helps channel energy into self-expression. This month’s theme is “self-reflection” and the group will be binding journals.

LOOPMAGAZINEBUFFALO.COM

TWIN PEAKS SATURDAY JUNE 24 7PM / TRALF MUSIC HALL, 622 MAIN ST. / $15 [INDIE] There’s been a lot of buzz about Twin Peaks recently. Fortunately for the faux-vintage garage rock band from Chicago, it’s not only about the reboot of the classic David Lynch TV series. The band, Twin Peaks, is also having a moment. Their latest record, Down in Heaven, released in May of last year, has been their strongest yet—full of low-key, expertly crafted garage rock tracks. The band, formed in 2009, has shown a solid amount of consistency across their three full-length records, which have attracted fans of Ty Segall and Parquet Courts—though, in comparison, Twin Peaks is far more straightforward. It’s obvious to any listener that the band is highly influenced by 1960s pop rock—the Beatles and Stones among the most obvious influences—but despite this, or maybe because of this, their music is instantly appealing and easy to dive into. Twin Peaks comes to the Tralf Music Hall for a show this Saturday, June 24 with support from the Regrettes. -CORY PERLA

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 14

The Plastic Cup Boyz 8pm Helium Comedy Club, 30 Mississippi St. $22-$25 [COMEDY] “We are the Plastic Cup Boyz because we like to drink,” says comedian Na’im Lynn one third of the comedy trio the Plastic Cup Boyz. Only problem is, his tolerance ain’t shit, so he says. But if they’re drinking during or before their act, it doesn’t show, because these guys seem to always be sharp and quick. Cosigned by Kevin Hart, the Plastic Cup Boyz, Joey Wells, Will “Spank” Horton, and Lynn, come to Helium Comedy Club for five show this Friday, June 23 through Sunday, June 25. -TPS

SATURDAY JUNE 24 Lost Elysium 7pm Studio at the Waiting Room, 334 Delaware Ave. $8-$10 [HARD ROCK] Buffalo-based hard rock band Lost Elysium are set to play a show at the Studio at the Waiting Room this Saturday, June 24. Their single, “Think Like the Enemy,” has amassed thousands of plays on Youtube since it’s release late last year. Featuring the vocals of lead singer Ashley Elle, the moody hard rock track is the vein of Volbeat or Evanescense. Catch the four-piece band live at the Studio at the Waiting Room with support from Gods Creatures, Of Night & Light, and Ritual Walk. -CP

Taste of Diversity

11am Grant Street between Lafayette and Auburn, free [FESTIVAL] In 2015, NPR did a story titled “Resettled Refugees Help to ‘Bring Buffalo Back.’” Though Buffalo has an active sanctuary movement, it's not listed as a "sanctuary city." Despite this, the story focused in on the West Side of Buffalo, where many refugees have ultimately settled and built businesses and lives. This makes the West Side of Buffalo a cultural melting pot, and in that pot are people, and therefore, foods from Iraq, Syria, Somalia, Myanmar, and Rwanda. So it's easy to see why it's the perfect location for something like the Taste of Diversity Festival. The festival, now in its 14th year, takes place on Grant Street in the heart of Buffalo’s West Side and features food vendors of all sorts,

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live music, dance, and activities for children. Entrance to the festival is free, and food tickets will be available for purchase. So head down Grant Street at Lafayette for the Taste of Diversity Festival this Saturday, June 24. -TPS

7pm Town Ballroom, 681 Main St. $28-$33 [POST HARDCORE] To some, Thursday is the quintessential post-hardcore screamo band. There’s a never-ending debate for those of us who spent our early teen years going to shows at Town Ballroom wearing band tees and too much eyeliner, comparing the stylistically similar Taking Back Sunday to Thursday—and maybe even to Brand New and Senses Fail and the rest of them—on who encapsualtes the sound the best. Thursday kind of started it all in some ways, forming in 1997 with Joy Division—the late 1970s English post-punk band—as one of their main influences. They went on to record six studio albums from 1997 to 2011 and are credited with being one of the key bands to popularize screamo as a genre. The last of their studio albums, No Devolución, was actually recorded in Fredonia, but unfortunately they broke up shortly thereafter, citing personal issues. Frontman Geoff Rickly ran a label (Collect Records) after the band broke up while drummer Tucker Rule toured with Yellowcard. As a huge shock to their fans, they recently (and quite randomly) reunited for Georgia’s Wrecking Ball music fest in 2016 and announced a tour in January of this year. Rickly confessed in a recent interview that he “never thought it would happen." No word yet on whether or not they’ll be recording music again, but catch them together again while you can, this Sunday, June 25 at the Town Ballroom with mewithoutYou and Big Jesus. -LM

Buffalo Brewers Festival 3pm Outer Harbor, 225 Fuhrmann Blvd. [FESTIVAL] It is completely unfair that it rains on every Buffalo Brewers Festival. (Forecast for Saturday, June 24, when the fourth edition of the festival takes place at Wilkeson Pointe on Buffalo’s Outer Harbor: wet.) But it is a testament to the dedication of local craft beer lovers that the event attracts big (and growing) crowds each year. It features two dozen local brewers, eight guest brewers from out of town, a number of festival-specific creations, a tent dedicated to ciders, and a host of food offerings to pair with all this ferment. A general admission ticket runs $35 and includes 20 tickets for sample pours; there are also two half-hour “Meet the Brewer” sessions available for an extra $5, and an early admission ticket for $45 that gets you in an hour ahead of hoi polloi. (If you’re a designated driver, you get a discount. Learn more and get tickets at buffalobrewersfestival.com.) If you love beer, grab an umbrella and be there. -GK

SUNDAY JUNE 25 Zac Brown Band 7pm Darien Lake, 9993 S Alleghany Rd $27-$228 [ROCK] Returning to Darien Lake on Sunday, June 25 for a third consecutive Buffalo area summer show, the Zac Brown Band is one of the better byproducts of country's ongoing identity crisis. On the one hand, they're praised for being purveyors of country realness with rootsy flair, and on the other, the eight-piece Georgian group has done some daring genre-melding. After 2015's Jekyll and Hyde blended everything from dance-pop to reggae, the new Welcome Home is a back-tobasics set with an overall acoustic feel that focuses on domesticity and reckoning with fame. Surely they'll bring a little bit of everything on Sunday, with special guests Darrell Scott and Caroline Jones. -CJT

TUESDAY JUNE 27 Brian Setzer’s Rockabilly Riot 6:30pm Artpark, 450 South 4th St. $12-$17 [ROCK] What, you may ask, is the difference between Brian Setzer's Rockabilly Riot, which will be featured at this week’s Tuesdays in the Park show at Artpark, and the Brian Setzer Orchestra, whose appearances most Decembers light up every Christmas? For this tour, the pompadoured guitarist behind the big Gretsch leaves the horns behind for shows that are a little less swing and a little more rockabilly, though his four-piece band otherwise mines the same 1950s vein he has been working since the heyday of the Stray Cats 35 years ago. The current setlist favors original material over covers, but Setzer’s new songs have always been sly reworkings of his influences, making his shows as much fun for rockabilly historians as for fans who just wanna dance. Opening the show on Tuesday, June 27 is Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, whose new album is a tribute to the music of Louis Armstrong, Louis Jordan, and Louis Prima, which means the audience is likely to be sweaty even before the headliner hits the stage. -MF

WEDNESDAY JUNE 28 Live at Larkin: The Jumpers and the Irving Klaws 5pm Larkin Square, 745 Seneca Street free [PUNK] The Jumpers, a five piece punk band from Buffalo featuring frontman Terry Sullivan are next in line for the free Live at Larkin concert series. The band, who helped cultivate Buffalo’s punk scene in the 1970s and 1980s, are still full of the same driving, punk energy and are sure to be entertaining live. Catch the band live in Larkin Square on Wednesday, June 28 with fellow veteran rockers the Irving Klaws -CP


CALENDAR EVENTS PUBLIC APPROVED

ASBURY HALL

PRESENTS

PEACH PICKS

PAULA POUNDSTONE

FRI 6/30 $35 ADV / RESERVED SEATING / 6PM DOORS / 7PM SHOW

ON PEACH​: Last Friday at Peach we featured a couple poems by Matthew Clinton Sekellick, an artist and writer who spent several years living in Buffalo as a graduate student, but who now lives in Troy. The first of the two, “living in a dystopia is a lot less fun than the movies make it out to be,” details the effects of our present political climate and how the speaker is managing to cope with the influx disturbing news he hears everyday. In one line, Sekellick makes a clever use of a footnote; he writes, “I read the news last Sunday and I cried* for a good fifteen minutes,” and later, “although one could more appropriately say sobbed, or more appropriately wept, or more appropriately bawled my god damn eyes out because in those brief moments they are too busy mourning to see more.” The poem is a modern peek into another person’s handling of our current media-saturated culture..

IN PRINT​: Notes of a Crocodile​ By Qui Miaojin (novel) NYRB Classics, 2017 I was thrilled to recently read Bonnie Huie’s new translation of Qui Miaojin’s cult classic coming-of-age novel, Notes of a Crocodile. The Taiwanese writer is considered a genius in China, and created a massive body of work during her lifetime, including novels, short stories, a short film, and volume of diaries, until her untimely death at the age of 26. Written as a series of notebooks, Notes of a Crocodile follows a young woman grappling with the realization that she is a lesbian, all while falling in love with her older female classmate. Miaojin was quite ahead of her time in the way that she rejected words like “lesbian” and “queer,” instead describing her desires in their simplest form. “You were like a realm that exposed me,” she writes. “You tore me open and exposed the man inside.” The novel was one of the first to explore sex, gender, and queerness in such a unique way.

THE NEW PORNOGRAPHERS W/ CLOUD NOTHINGS

TUES 7/25 $30 ADV / GA STANDING

STRANGE ALLURE VOLUME 11: JOHN FM SATURDAY JUNE 24

9TH WARD

11PM / TBA / $15-$20 [TECHNO] A last minute change to the next Strange Allure party bumps deep house twins Analog Soul—who canceled for undisclosed reasons—for Detroit electro DJ John FM. The 23-year-old DJ has enjoyed a rising profile due to his releases on FXHE, the label helmed by Detroit legend Omar-S. John FM also appeared on Omar-S’ recent critically acclaimed album, The Best, on the album’s final track “Heard’ Chew Single.” FM’s style is more dark and twisted than Omar-S’ usually brighter sound but it shares the same kind of raw realness that Omar-S has perfected—from scratchy, overblown hi hats to snappy snares, and facetious vocals on tracks like his latest, “Broken.” “My senior year of college, I met Omar-S at a Fundementals event, and then again at a Theo Parrish show the following night. He said I looked like MK both times, which was bullshit cuz I don't think I look like him but whatever. It went from there and here we are,” he said in an interview last year with Resident Advisor about his relationship with the producer, who has been a guiding force. John FM will set up at the next edition of the underground dance party, this Saturday, June 24 at an undisclosed location. Expect an opening set from DJ Nasor, visuals from Frankie NP, and sound by Emissary Sound. Location details will be released the day of the show via email for ticket holders and email subscribers. For tickets, ask around. Limited tickets available at the door.-CORY PERLA

PUBLIC APPROVED

SARA ELIZABETH CD RELEASE

W/ THE RUST BELT BIRDS

FRI 6/23 $10 (INCLUDES NEW ALBUM)

THE DUSTBOWL REVIVAL W/ FOLKFACES

WED 6/28 $12.50 ADVANCE

TIMOTHY ALICE W/ ANDREW KOTHEN THUR 6/29 $7

IN TOWN​: Last Friday was the latest installment of Just Buffalo Writing Center’s Showcase series, a biannual event in which Writing Center coordinator Robin Lee Jordan curates a night in celebration of the wonderful work achieved by the center’s young writers. Friday’s showcase featured 15-year-old Trinity Ridout, a poet, singer-songwriter, and student at City Honors High School, alongside 17-year-old Ikuris Perry, a poet, rapper, and student at Olmsted High School. Trinity performed a variety of poems in her characteristic whimsical and mysterious tone, and finished off with an original song, the chorus of which has been stuck in my head ever since: “Remember my name / but you will only remember a feeling.” Ikuris, a genius wordsmith, performed several rap tracks, and though her stage presence was full of lighthearted wit and humor, some of her raps flirted with darker themes. “The penalty for feeling,” she rapped, “is a chemical imbalance.” The young writers ended the night by performing an original song together, while Trinity’s erasure poem of Trump’s inauguration speech projected onto a nearby wall. Friday evening showcased the diversity of work—both in content and in form—that is currently being encouraged inside the writing center. Witnessing the quality of the teens’ work alongside their warm and welcoming friendships, my only wish is that there was such a place in Buffalo when I was in high school.

PEACHMGZN.COM

KATIE ANN’S

RECORD RELEASE PARTY FRI 6/30 $15 ADV / 9PM DOORS / 9:30PM SHOW

SAINTSENECA

PICNIC IN THE PARKWAY: THE BPO TUESDAY JUNE 27

TUE 7/11 $13 ADVANCE

DOORS 7PM / SHOW TIME 8PM VISIT BABEVILLEBUFFALO.COM

7PM / BIDWELL PARK, ELMWOOD AVE AT BIDWELL PARKWAY / FREE [POP] One of the most popular Picnic in the Parkway events each year happens when the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra sets up in a temporary amphitheater along Bidwell Parkway. This year, as always, the BPO has an exciting night of music planned that includes, first, a set of musical classics like “Singing in the Rain,” “Aquarius” and the Suite from Beauty and the Beast. Then, after a brief intermission, the orchestra will return to perform John Williams Star Wars score—from the Main Theme to The Jedi Steps and Finale. So grab your lawn chairs, the little ones, and maybe even your lightsabres, and head down to the next, free, Picnic in the Parkway concert, this TuesP day, June 27.-CORY PERLA

FOR COMPLETE EVENT LISTINGS

TICKETS: TICKETWEB.COM / BABEVILLE BOX OFFICE (M-F 11AM-5PM) RUST BELT BOOKS (415 GRANT) / TERRAPIN STATION (1172 HERTEL AVE) OR CHARGE BY PHONE 866.777.8932

341 DELAWARE AVE (AT W. TUPPER)

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / THE PUBLIC 17


MUSIC SPOTLIGHT

Wynton Marsalis playing with Bobby Militello at the Newport Jazz Festival.

BOBBY MILITELLO BY PATRICK KEYES

THE LEGENDARY SAXOPHONIST KICKS OFF A NEW JAZZ SERIES AT THE KENAN CENTER’S TAYLOR THEATER GREAT ARTISTS, REGARDLESS of how friendly or “normal” they

may be, share a deep intensity. Despite a smiling presence and a laugh that is never far away, that intensity lives in both the playing and the speech of Buffalo saxophone legend Bobby Militello. And his ability to turn that inner fire into great music has led the West Side native all over the world and, most importantly, back. Over a lengthy career, Militello has played brilliantly with many prominent bands and musicians, for as few as a handful of fans and for as many as 50,000. Regardless of the setting, the instrument he’s playing (mainly alto sax and flute), the other musicians on stage, the tunes that are called, or even the paycheck, Militello’s approach to a performance remains the same. In a recent conversation, he made that point perfectly clear. “My job is to play, and to bring it wherever I go, to never bring less than my A game, and to surround myself with players who also do that,” he said. For 30 years, he brought his A game as a member of the legendary Dave Brubeck Quartet. Now Militello rolls with his strong and versatile presence on the Buffalo jazz scene, and everything he does is highly anticipated by music fans. This Friday, June 23, at the Kenan Center’s Taylor Theater in Lockport, the Bobby Militello Quartet—featuring Bobby Jones on piano, Jim Coleman on bass, and John Bacon Jr. on drums— presents “Bobby Plays Brubeck—and More,” the anchor attraction of the inaugural Kenan Center Jazz Series. Tickets are $15 for Kenan Center members, $20 for the general public, and may be purchased online at Ticketleap, in person at the Kenan Center (433 Locust Street, Lockport), or charged by phone at 716-4332617. Seats may be limited by the time this goes to press, so call or go to kenancenter.org for details. This is Militello’s first time playing the Taylor Theater. The intimate and underutilized space has recently hosted a couple of jazz concerts featuring sax stalwart Kelly Bucheger and various friends, as well as a limited run of the A. R. Gurney play Love Letters. Response has been good, and the Kenan Center is making money every time the space is used, which means audiences can expect to see more programming in this quirky and versatile Lockport room. Coming into his Taylor Theater debut, Militello is aware that everyone will expect to hear tunes like the ubiquitous “Take Five” or “Blue Rondo a la Turk,” from the 1959 smash jazz record Time Out  that made Dave Brubeck a most unlikely household name. But there are dozens of tunes beyond Brubeck’s “greatest hits” that offer a chance for both the musicians and the audience to discover the breadth of Brubeck’s craft, and those are the pieces Militello will focus on for the Lockport concert. Regardless of a song’s popularity, his natural tendency is to put his own stamp on the music, and to make it about much more than the notes on paper. “The best thing you can do is to not preconceive how you’re going to do something. Every time you play, you’re looking for a better way to express the music,” Militello said. “With [Brubeck)], he never played ‘Take Five’ the same way twice. I decided that I was going to play that tune my own way as well, and as time went on, I

18 THE PUBLIC / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

morphed it into me playing it, and I laid it back a little and brought a different approach [compared to the famous recorded solo by Paul Desmond].” Despite having played some of those tunes hundreds of times, Militello insists that they can still be fresh for a thinking player. “You can give a speech once and say those words. Then the second time, you have a better feel for the content. Then by the third time, you do better still because you’ll find better ways to express yourself within the speech. It’s the same thing with tunes that you’ve played for a long time.” Militello feels a duty to take the mantel of presenting Brubeck’s music, done in a way he thinks the legendary pianist would have liked. You do gain an understanding of someone after working together for 30 years. Militello’s arrangements are very similar to Brubeck’s, lending a unique authenticity, but Militello allows room for his current bandmates—consummate professionals all—to grow into the songs. “When you write out the charts, you first get their interpretation of reading the notes, but after a time, you get their interpretation of the music, and once it gets looser, that’s when magic starts to happen with the tunes.” Militello works to develop a rapport with the audience, something he’s done since he started playing locally as a teenager. He said that the intimacy of the Taylor Theater should offer him a chance to really connect with the audience, which he says is “a conscious element of what good musicians do when they perform.” It’s an important mindset for Militello, who consciously feels out the energy of the room when he is blowing. “I play with my eyes closed all the time, but I can feel whether they’re into me and what we’re doing or not. If I feel it, and if that feel is right, I can take them wherever I want to go and it’s going to groove.” Militello said that if he wants to play a certain song or in a certain way, he will do that, but he opens himself to a wide range of feedback from the audience. “It sounds a bit Zen, but it’s really a true connection,” he said. “Just like the musicians make a connection when they play, you make a connection with the audience, and that connection tells me what to do.” With 150 seats in a cozy U around the stage, the Taylor Theater is a great place to connect with the audience. Despite its versatility, it remains underutilized, according to Kathleen Rooney, who starred in Love Letters at the Taylor and produces the jazz series. She said the concert series was a “perfect storm,” noting the need for venues, the facility’s willingness to make better use of the theater, and Rooney’s past on Kenan’s board of directors and as a young actor and spectator, enjoying all kinds of performances in that theater.

BOBBY MILITELLO QUARTET BOBBY PLAYS BRUBECK AND MORE KENAN CENTER JAZZ SERIES KENAN CENTER’S TAYLOR THEATER 433 LOCUST ST., LOCKPORT FRIDAY, JUNE 23 @ 7:30 PM / $15 - $20

Still, it took a happy accident to develop the concert series. When plans to use the space for a holiday play fell through, Rooney stayed committed to the holiday theme. She reached out to Bucheger as a jazz musician she’d seen perform, and someone who might adapt songs of the season to his musical style. That idea led to two well-received “Tidings of Comfort and Jazz” concerts late last year. Soon thereafter, the 2017 jazz series was born. This week’s concert in Lockport is one of several summer bookings for Militello and his quartet, including being part of the Olcott Beach Jazz Trail on July 23. But the program for the Taylor Theater will have a more defined musical focus, and there is the added opportunity to strengthen the venue’s jazz credibility. Rooney has worked with Mark Filsinger, a local trumpeter and educator who heads up the Buffalo Jazz Collective, in programming the series, and they also agree that expanding into new facilities and communities is very important to the growth of the music and an audience. Through Filsinger, the Buffalo Jazz Collective creates varying ensembles from within its member players to perform at a variety of locales. They have gotten into the Buffalo History Museum, MusicalFare Theatre, Flying Bison Brewery, and now the Kenan Center, handling this upcoming concert and two more—a 100th birthday tribute to Buffalo’s own legendary songwriter Harold Arlen by the Buffalo Jazztet on November 4, and a special holiday show on December 2. Filsinger is working to build a jazz listener’s culture in the area again, with these concerts being important to aficionados, families, or anybody seeking something different. “When I was younger, there were more internationally known jazz artists and groups coming to Buffalo, with the Calumet Arts Cafe, and the chances to check all of those people out were really memorable moments for me,” Filsinger said. Militello, among others in the collective, is on that world-class level of musicianship, so the hope is that his presence will open even more doors to the music, literally and figuratively. Filsinger said the planning of concerts and series is complicated, once you consider the venues, the different audiences in different places, finding the right mix of players and themes, and on and on. To keep his perspective fresh, he seeks input from fellow musical directors in the collective, including Militello, versatile pianist/ composer George Caldwell, and John Hasselback Jr., whose trombone has been a mainstay of the scene for decades. They discuss the details for each booking that the Collective secures. “We get to hear a lot of music when we’re planning, and we get to think of how things might fit upcoming gigs,” Filsinger said. “So it’s also a lot of fun.” For future musical programs at the Taylor Theater, Rooney said that there are all kinds of styles and sub-genres of music that would work well in the space. But for now, it’s jazz, and she is excited to welcome Militello to the space. For the local jazz fans who say that they can never find anything good to see, or that they don’t want to go “all the way downtown,” or whatever other excuse offered for not checking out the great array of Western New York talent to be heard on a regular basis, catch “Bobby Plays Brubeck—and More” on June 23. It will be a P great start on the path to some amazing music.


PHOTO BY TOM SICKLER

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DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / THE PUBLIC 19


FILM REVIEW different. Scrawny, tattooed, with a haircut she clearly gave herself at a low moment, she has only the clothes she’s wearing and no possessions other than an old cel phone and a flashlight she uses to be able to sleep at night. Two women destined to be BFFs forever, right? Maybe not in real life, but of course drama thrives on contrasts. Like Crazy (a clumsy but understandable substitute for the Italian title, La pazza gioia) was an official selection of last year’s Cannes Film festival and a winner of the Italy’s Donatello Awards for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Actress. It was directed by Paolo Virzì, whose Human Capital played here early in 2015. Looking to make a warmer film about characters struggling for their individualism, Virzi and co-writer Francesca Archibugi (a noted director in her own right) did research with psychiatrists and psychotherapists as a way of looking for characters from the outside in. Their story takes place in 2014, just before Italy’s Judicial Mental Hospitals—jails for the mentally incompetent where patients received little help—where legislatively abolished. While the facility in  Like Crazy  isn’t one of those, Italian viewers were meant to recognize that they were a threat held over the heads of these women.

RUNNING FROM THE ASYLUM LIKE CRAZY BY M. FAUST WE FIRST SEE Beatrice (Valeria Bruni Tedeschi) parading the grounds at this antique Tuscan location as if she owns the place, barking out suggestions and orders to the staff and other residents. In her endless chatter (whoever wrote her subtitles clearly had to do a lot of condensing) are dropped so many names that for awhile it’s hard to take her seriously. Enough of it proves to be true that maybe

AT THE MOVIES A selective guide to what’s opening and what’s playing in local moviehouses and other venues

BY M. FAUST & GEORGE SAX

OPENING THIS WEEK BEATRIZ AT DINNER—An elegant dinner party brings together two people who would never otherwise have met: a Mexican immigrant who practices holistic medicine (Salma Hayek), and a billionaire (John Lithgow) who feels that anything is justified in the pursuit of his success. With Chloë Sevigny, Connie Britton, and Jay Duplass. Directed by Miguel Arteta (Chuck and Buck). Reviewed this issue. Dipson Amherst, Dipson Eastern Hills LIKE CRAZY—From Italy, a comedy-drama about a society woman and an ex-stripper who have only one thing in common: the psychiatric group home in Tuscany to which they have both been committed. Starring Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Morandini Valdirana,  and Valentina Carnelutti. Directed by Paolo Virzì (Human Capital). Reviewed this issue. Dipson Eastern Hills TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT—Sequel. Starring Mark Wahlberg, Anthony Hopkins, Josh Duhamel, and Laura Haddock. Directed, as usual, by Michael Bay. AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In

ALTERNATIVE CINEMA  BILL AND TED’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE (1989)— As comedies about dimwitted buds go, it’s better than Dumb and Dumber, though not by much. But Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter are appealing in the title roles; it’s a shame that Reeves turned his back on comedy, which was clearly his strength as a performer. With George Carlin; look for Go-Go’s guitarist Jane Weidlin as Joan of Arc. Directed by Stephen Herek (Mr. Holland’s Opus). Sat-Sun 11:30 am. North Park EMERALD CITY—Drama about Irish emigres doing construction work in Manhattan and struggling with addiction, unemployment and the demands of adulthood they’ve spent their lives trying to avoid. Writer-director Colin Broderick and star John Duddy will be present for the screening. Sat 4:30pm. North Park I CALLED HIM MORGAN—Lee Morgan was a star trumpet player, on the comeback after battling drug addiction in 1972, when he was shot in a Manhattan club by a woman identified

it all is, and so maybe this facility was a gift from her family. But Villa Biondi is now a psychiatric facility, and even though she has filled her quarters with all the clothing and perfume she could pack, her presence her is not voluntary.

Bruni Tedeschi, who was the trophy wife in Human Capital, has the showier role and makes the most of it. But her diva display doesn’t completely overshadow Ramazzotti (the director’s wife), whose story is the one that will have viewers clutching their handkerchiefs before the finale. The substantial variety of shooting locations and supporting characters (including actual mental patients at Villa Biondi) keep the film feeling much shorter than its nearly two-hour running time.

New arrival Donatella (Micaela Ramazzotti) couldn’t be any more

Opens Friday at the Dipson Eastern Hills Mall.

as his wife. Swedish filmmaker Kasper Collin, who investigated the mysterious death of another jazz legend in My Name Is Albert Ayler, recounts Morgan’s life as well as that of his killer, and her story may be the more compelling one. He has the help of her voice from a tape-recorded interview she gave shortly before her death in 1996. While the movie sends you away with more questions than you began with, those questions are better ones, providing a glimpse into corners of 20th-century American life that have been little explored. –MF Wed 5pm. Thu 8pm, Fri 9:30pm. Screening Room ROBOCOP: THE DIRECTOR’S CUT (1987)—Remastered version of Paul Verhoeven’s pitch black dystopian satire included the minute’s worth of cuts involving the title character’s murder that were made to prevent the film from getting an “X” rating. Starring Peter Weller, Nancy Allen, Dan O’Herlihy, Ronny Cox, Kurtwood Smith, and Miguel Ferrer. Tue-Thu  9:30pm. North Park SPACEBALLS (1987)—Like all of his genre parodies, Mel Brooks’s prodding of Star Wars  works best if you’re a fan of what he’s making fun of. Starring Bill Pullman, John Candy, Rick Moranis, Daphne Zuniga, and Brooks himself as the wizened “Yogurt.” Fri, Sat, Tue 7:30pm. Screening Room YOUR NAME—Acclaimed anime drama about two high school students, unknown to each other, who one morning wake up in each other’s bodies. Directed by Makoto Shinkai. Fri-Mon 9:30pm. North  Park

CONTINUING ALIEN: COVENANT—The latest chapter in director Ridley Scott’s ongoing effort to turn the Alien franchise into an auteur project, ignoring that the original 1979 film was a model of collaborative effort. It’  immediate predecessor, Prometheus, was as visually striking as any of Scott’s best films (Blade Runner, Black Hawk Down), but also one of the dumbest and most illogical big studio sci-fi films ever produced. Here, the screenplay Scott ordered at the takeout window recycles ideas and scenes from most of the preceding entries, including his own, as if he is competing with all of those other directors as well as his younger  self. His craftsman is undeniable, but we’ve seen these people and situations before. —Gregory Lamberson Starring Michael Fassbender, Katherine Waterston, Billy Crudup, Danny McBride, and Demián Bichir.  Dipson McKinley, Four Seasons ALL EYEZ ON ME—Biopic of rapper Tupac Shakur. Starring Demetrius Shipp Jr, Danai Gurira, and Kat Graham. Directed by Benny Boom (Next Day Air). AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal

20 THE PUBLIC / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

But this is less an issues drama than a story of two characters bumping up against each other and growing in the process. Beatrice and Donatella end up on the road together after an unintentional escape. Beatrice’s ability to talk her way into and out of any difficult situation gets them out of as many tight scrapes as it gets them into, and over the course of a trip that leads them to a variety of locations, we learn that their personalities and the circumstances that led them to Villa Biondi.

Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria BAYWATCH—Because Hollywood doesn’t think you’ll buy $250 million worth of tickets for a movie starring Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron unless it has a title you already recognize. With Priyanka Chopra, Alexandra Daddario, Kelly Rohrbach, and guest appearances by David Hasselhoff and Pamela Anderson. Directed by Seth Gordon (Identity Thief). Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In THE BOOK OF HENRY—An 11-year-old genius enlists his mother in a plan to rescue the abused girl who lives next door to them. Starring Jacob Tremblay, Lee Pace, Naomi Watts, and Sarah Silverman. Directed by Colin Trevorrow (Jurassic World). Dipson Amherst, Regal Elmwood, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit CHURCHILL—Brian Cox adds his name to the list of notable actors who have played Winston Churchill, by any standard one of the greatest men of the 20th  century, though one whose full life has oddly never been covered in a film biography. This one concentrates on the few days leading up to D-Day, the operation that turned the tide of World War II to the Allies, but one that the aged Churchill opposed as a potential waste of thousands of young lives. Directed by Jonathan Teplitzky (The Railway Man), Churchill presents an unexpected portrait of its subject, passive and indecisive. It offers a lot for an actor willing to seize the bit and gnaw on it, as Cox is more than capable of, most theatrically in a scene in which Churchill seeks help in prayer. But it’s a portrait in a fuzzy context, with other significant characters like Dwight Eisenhower (John Slattery) and Clementine Churchill (Miranda Richardson) reduced to supporting functions. —MF Dipson Eastern Hills ENDS THURS 47 METERS DOWN provides a new variation on the ever-popular shark summer thriller. Mandy Moore and Claire Holt play two sisters vacationing Mexico (really the Dominican Republic) coaxed by local romantic interests to descend into shark infested waters in a protective cage just like the one that failed Richard Dreyfuss in Jaws. The women spend the rest of the film on the ocean floor, trapped in the cage and surrounded by a school of Great Whites as their oxygen runs out. It’s primarily a two-character thriller, a souped-up version of Open Water that manages to be claustrophobic even in the expansive ocean. The dialogue lacks the bite of Spielberg’s classic, and is so shallow that whenever Matthew Modine (collecting a paycheck and a vacation) warns of some hypothetical danger, that scenario becomes fait accompli, but the direction and cinematography yield stunning visuals and the promised scares. Visual effects have come a long way since an uncooperative Bruce the shark forced Spielberg to fashion a more Hitchcock-

P

ian thriller than he had planned, and these sharks are entirely convincing. A film like this succeeds only if its audience is willing to go along with the increasingly preposterous situations the heroes face, and director Johannes Roberts, who co-wrote the screenplay with Ernest Riera, pushes all the right buttons. —Greg Lamberson Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal TransitAMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In I, DANIEL BLAKE—Ken Loach, who has been artistically delineating class divisions in Great Britain for over half a century, won the Palme d’Or at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. While he doesn’t directly address Brexit and the political turmoil around it, in its modest way it help illuminate British currents of a resentful mood. Veteran comedian Dave Johns stars as a 59-year-old master carpenter, ordered by his doctor not to work. His attempts to navigate the British social service system lead him through a maze of Orwellian-esque arbitrary requirements and rejection. This material arguably might be more audience-friendly if presented as satire, but Loach remains an earnest, closely observant humanist trying to dramatize working-class society and the injuries of class. Does he load the dice on occasion? Sure. But the bleak, neo-realist feel of his movie is softened by the subplot involving Daniels’ befriending of a young single mother of two who’s also brutalized by the system (Hayley Squires in a sharp, moving performance). —GS North Park IT COMES AT NIGHT—The high-tension trailer makes this look like a standard issue zombie movie, but that’s not the case at all: though set in an apocalyptic near future, the dead (killed by a plague) are less a problem than the living. Joel Edgerton stars as a father who is struggling to keep his wife and teenaged son safe from the mysterious disease in a secluded farmhouse. He makes the decision to share the house with another family, but can any of them be sure that the others are disease free? It’s a handsome low-budget effort, and cinematographer Drew Daniels squeezes atmosphere from the dim interior of the lantern-lit house. But persistent close-ups on the teenaged son seem to pose questions that the film never gets around to dealing with. –MF Co-starring Christopher Abbott, Carmen Ejogo and Riley Keough. Directed by Trey Edward Shults. Regal Transit, Transit Drive-In MEGAN LEAVEY—Drama based on the true story of a Marine corporal (Kate Mara) trying to adopt the dog she worked with while on duty in Iraq. With Bradley Whitford, Geraldine James, Common, and Edie Falco. Directed by Gabriela Cowperthwaite (Blackfish).  Dipson Amherst ENDS THURS, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit


REVIEW FILM

Beatriz is salt of the earth, but she’s also attuned to the goodness and power of nature, and seems to practice a personal sort of pantheistic faith. Her client, Kathy, the wife of a wealthy developer

(Connie Britton), seems to regard Beatriz with genuine gratitude and admiration, and when her car won’t restart, she doesn’t hesitate to invite her to the small but important dinner party that’s shortly to start at her family’s gated mansion. This setup isn’t entirely persuasive, but Arteta and his excellent cast handle it so capably, perhaps we can let that pass. Hayek acts her way through these scenes with an intriguing sense of emotional depth and curiosity. She approaches this turn of events with an air of inquisitive apprehension but innocent goodwill. The script will too soon let this gifted actress down. The pretext for the little gathering is a celebration of a hotel construction deal Kathy’s husband Grant (David Warshofsky) has with a real estate nabob, a man quickly revealed as the aggressive exemplification of earth destroying, society endangering capital.  Chomping on a cigar, he advises Grant to start construction immediately before anyone files an environmental objective.  Spying the silent Beatriz standing alone nearby, he mistakes her for a Hispanic hireling and asks for another drink. At dinner has asks, “Did you come here legally?  I’m curious.”  Did I mention that this avatar of corporate dominance and despoliation—marvelously played by John Lithgow—is named Doug Strutt. (I mean, really!) Since we can easily guess where this is going, it’s to the credit of Arteta and his cast that it holds our interest, and keeps our sympathy as long as it does. The movie’s smoothly directed and the visual scene setting is fluid and supportive. But Arteta and writer Mike White, long-time collaborators, have freighted the movie with simplistic assumptions and overdrawn conflict that comes across as self-righteously liberal and thin.  Beatriz’s naivete may be necessary to the emotionally pretentious resolution, but that’s part of the problem. Arteta and White may have sensed the problem. There are a couple of notes of ambiguity in Doug’s behavior, although part of the effect is surely due to Lithgow’s performance.  And Britton’s Kathy is treated as decent if subject to a privileged innocence.  It’s not enough to justify the movie’s general P strident tenor.

THE MUMMY—Hoping to copy the successful demandingly pleasant summer viewing. –MF Marvel Cinematic Universe formula, Universal With Iain Glen and Holliday Grainger. Dipson Studios launches a new “Dark Universe” fea- Amherst, Dipson Eastern Hills ENDS THURS turing its classic monsters with The Mummy, PARIS CAN WAIT— Take the comedy out of the REGAL NIAGARA FALLS STADIUM 12 starring Tom Cruise. It is no longer enough to three The Trip films (the third of which opens 720 Builders Way, Niagara Falls build a tent pole franchise around a single fan- in August), substitute Diane Lane for Steve 236–0146 tastic character; a studio must create a world Coogan, and the result might well be this lowin which several franchises intersect and sup- key semi-documentary filled with pleasant regmovies.com port each other. This time around the mummy shots of the south of France and plenty of is female and Tom Cruise (too old for the mil- food porn. Lane’s companion is French actor REGAL QUAKER CROSSING 18 itary grunt he plays) is chosen to serve as the Arnaud Viard as her husband’s business as3450 Amelia Dr., Orchard Park / 827–1109 host for an angry god. This gender swap is the sociate who agrees to chauffeur her to Paris. regmovies.com smartest move in an overly busy concoction. Whether or not he is actually trying to seduce The spectacular first third of the film, contain- her is a question left open until the end of REGAL TRANSIT CENTER 18 ing the requisite Egyptian flashback and sev- the film, and I was as uncertain of the answer Transit and Wehrle, Lancaster / 633–0859 eral action sequences with Cruise in Iraq, is as I was indifferent. Eleanor Coppola, wife of regmovies.com its best. Things get silly fast when the action Francis Ford, makes her dramatic directing deshifts to London, especially in a subplot featur- but with a project that runs the gamut from REGAL WALDEN GALLERIA STADIUM 16 ing Russell Crowe as Dr. Jekyll and his alter ego pleasant to bland. –MF Dipson Amherst, Dipson One Walden Galleria Dr., Cheektowaga the Incredible Hulk. There’s an army of zom- Eastern Hills, 681-9414 / regmovies.com bies, a character appropriated from An American Werewolf in London, and scenes reminis- PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO cent of Cruise’s Mission Impossible and Tobe TALES—Sequel. Because Johnny Depp can apRIVIERA THEATRE Hooper’s 80s opus Lifeforce. Sofia Boutella is parently spend money faster than he can earn 67 Webster St., North Tonawanda an effective mummy, but her character takes a it. With Javier Bardem, Geoffrey Rush, Paul 692-2413 / rivieratheatre.org backseat to an origin for yet another superhe- McCartney, and Anthony De La Torre, star of ro. –Gregory LambersonWith Annabelle Wallis the upcoming local production Johnny GrueTHE SCREENING ROOM and Courtney B. Vance. Directed by Alex Kurtz- some. Directed by Joachim Rønning Espen in the Boulevard Mall, 880 Alberta Drive, man. AMC Maple Ridge, Regal Elmwood, Regal Sandberg (Kon-Tiki). Regal Elmwood, Regal NiAmherst 837-0376 /screeningroom.net Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Re- agara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria gal Walden Galleria, Transit Drive-In SQUEAKY WHEEL MY COUSIN RACHEL—As always, Rachel Weisz ROUGH NIGHT—Kate McKinnon’s Australian ac712 Main St., / 884-7172 is reason to watch any film she >> stars cent is the only memorable part of this tired VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILMenough LISTINGS & REVIEWS squeaky.org in. She has the title role in this adaptation of “women get raunchy” comedy about a bacha Daphne du Maurier novel (previously filmed elorette party that geos awry after the male SUNSET DRIVE-IN with Olivia de Haviland and Richard Burton) stripper they hired is accidentally killed. Any 9950 Telegraph Rd., Middleport set in rural England of the early 19th century. similarity to Very Bad Things is minimal at best 735-7372 / sunset-drivein.com Sam Claflin co-stars as Philip, an orphaned boy in this laughless movie that wants to capture raised by his cousin Ambrose, a lifetime bach- the Bridesmaids audience but has no idea what TJ’S THEATRE elor until he marries Rachel on a health trip to made that one effective. –MF Starring Scarlett 72 North Main St., Angola / 549-4866 Italy. When news reaches Philip of Ambrose’s Johansson, Zoë Kravitz, Kate McKinnon, Demi and Jillian Bell. newangolatheater.com VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FORRachel MORE LISTINGS & REVIEWS >>Directed by Lucia Andeath, he blames andFILM vows revenge, a Moore vow that falters when she comes to visit and he iello (Broad City). AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson falls in love with her. Variously evoking Wuther- Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal TRANSIT DRIVE-IN ing Heights and du Maurier’s Rebecca, direc- Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, 6655 South Transit Rd., Lockport tor Roger Michell (Notting Hill) lets the story’s Transit Drive-In 625-8535 / transitdrivein.com ambiguities get out of control. Still, the coastal SNATCHED—It really shouldn’t have been hard scenery and Weisz’s performance make for un- to concoct a serviceable summer comedy

starting with the casting of Amy Schumer and Goldie Hawn (in her first film in 15 years) as a mother-daughter pair of tourists stuck in a South American jungle after a kidnapping. And to give writer Katie Dippold and director Jonathan Levine the benefit of the doubt, it looks like substantial chunks of the movie were hacked away before it got to theater screens. But given the lack of laughs in what remains, it’s hard to believe that more of this would have been an improvement. What few amusing moments the film offers come from the supporting cast: Wanda Sykes, Joan Cusack, Ike Barinholtz, Bashir Salahuddin, and Christopher Meloni. —MF Dipson McKinley, Four Seasons WONDER WOMAN—Following Zack Snyder’s dreary Man of Steel and dreadful Batman v. Superman, Patty Jenkins, who has been directing episodic TV since Monster, delivers a true crowd pleaser from the DC universe. The film traces the comic book heroine’s origin as an Amazon princess on Themyscira Island to her mission to slay Ares, the god of war, whom she believes is orchestrating World War I. Israeli-born actress Gal Gadot is perfectly cast as the feminist icon, and Chris Pine is charming as her love interest, American spy Steve Trevor. The first half of the film is true to the original comic, and may be the most romantic superhero adaptation since Richard Donner’s Superman. Diana is a relentless warrior, winningly embodying the phrase “Nevertheless, she persisted.” The film only goes awry in its last act, when Jenkins employs the same bleak color scheme as Snyder, and when a poorly cast actor assumes the role of Ares. You are forgiven if you’re unaware that a number of male comic book fans have been decrying “women only” screenings of the film. I saw it with my 11-year-old daughter, who could barely contain her excitement throughout. That’s the perfect antidote to Trumper  chauvinism. —Gregory Lamberson Co-starring David Thewlis, Robin Wright, and Chris Pine. Directed by Patty Jenkins (Monster).  AMC Maple Ridge, Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria, TranP sit Drive-In

LOCAL THEATERS AMHERST THEATRE (DIPSON) 3500 Main St., Buffalo / 834-7655 amherst.dipsontheatres.com AURORA THEATRE 673 Main St., East Aurora / 652-1660 theauroratheatre.com EASTERN HILLS CINEMA (DIPSON) 4545 Transit Rd., / Eastern Hills Mall Williamsville / 632-1080 easternhills.dipsontheatres.com FLIX STADIUM 10 (DIPSON) 4901 Transit Rd., Lancaster / 668-FLIX flix10.dipsontheatres.com FOUR SEASONS CINEMA 6 2429 Military Rd. (behind Big Lots), Niagara Falls / 297-1951 fourseasonscinema.com

THE DINNER PARTY AS A TRUMPIAN SYMBOL

HALLWALLS 341 Delaware Ave., Buffalo / 854-1694 hallwalls.org

BEATRIZ AT DINNER

HAMBURG PALACE 31 Buffalo St., Hamburg / 649-2295 hamburgpalace.com

BY GEORGE SAX

LOCKPORT PALACE 2 East Ave., Lockport / 438-1130 lockportpalacetheatre.org

MIGUEL ARTETA’S Beatriz at Dinner almost certainly wasn’t designed to reflect specific recent political events in the US, given the time it takes to complete a motion picture project, but it seems unmistakably apropos to the American condition in the Age of Trump. This intimate movie certainly tries to call attention to very unwholesome trends, especially our increasingly concentrated and dangerous economic and political advantage at the top. Its direct focus is mostly small bore, but there’s no reasonable doubt about the intentions and implications of the people behind this picture;

MAPLE RIDGE 8 (AMC) 4276 Maple Rd., Amherst / 833-9545 amctheatres.com MCKINLEY 6 THEATRES (DIPSON) 3701 McKinley Pkwy. / McKinley Mall Hamburg / 824-3479 mckinley.dipsontheatres.com NORTH PARK THEATRE 1428 Hertel Ave., Buffalo / 836-7411 northparktheatre.org

they’re all too obvious. You could also say they’re too obvious. Beatriz (Salma Hayek) is a 40ish, Mexican-born masseuse and spiritual healer at a clinic in southern California.  At the beginning, she makes a special visit to a wealthy client whose leukemia-suffering daughter Beatriz treated years ago.

REGAL ELMWOOD CENTER 16 2001 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo / 871–0722 regmovies.com

CULTURE > FILM

CULTURE > FILM

CULTURE > FILM

VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILM LISTINGS & REVIEWS >> DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / THE PUBLIC 21


CLASSIFIEDS TO PLACE AN AD EMAIL CLASSIFIEDS@DAILYPUBLIC.COM OR CALL (716)856.0737 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM/CLASSIFIEDS THE PUBLIC’S NOTICE The Public encourages you to use caution while participating in any transactions or acquiring services through our classified section of the newspaper. While we do approve the ads in this section, we do not guarantee the reliability of classified advertisers. If you have questions, email classifieds@dailypublic.com.

FOR RENT RICHMOND RHODE ISLAND AREA Very spacious 2 BR apts w/hdwd floors. Appliances, laundry hookups, porches. Newly renovated, painted$900-$975+utls. Must see. Call 716480-2966. ---------------------------------------------DOWNTOWN’S HISTORIC WEST VILLAGE: Whitney Place 2 BR w/ small yrd. & deck, laundry hookups. $900+ inc. water. 854-0510. ---------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Claremont Ave 2 BR, appliances, parking, laundry. 900+utilities. No pets. 9079346, no texts, call only. ---------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Colonial Circle-Lafayette-Richmond Area. 1, 2, & 3 BR apts. Hardwood flrs., offstreet prkg., coin-op lndry. No pets, no smoking. Very nice, must see! $940-$1475 Inc all utltys. Call 9122906. ---------------------------------------------LINWOOD: Super 3 BR, 2 bath w/2 car garage. $1200 total ($400 per 3 roommates). 884-2871. ---------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE Elmwood@ Auburn upper 1 BR. Stove, refrigerator. Front porch. No pets. Must see. Call 864-9595. ---------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE large 3 BR, appliances, laundry. $1175 inc all utilities. Must see. Call 913-2736. ---------------------------------------------3 BDRM HOUSE ON SHIRLEY AVE NEAR UB SOUTH. $900 PER MONTH 716-835-9000. AVAILABLE NOW. ---------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE NORWOOD 3 BR, 2 bath w/2 car garage,

Victorian, hwd flrs., porch etc. $1995 inc. all utilities ($665 per 3 roommates). Reeves: 884-2871.

---------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE Norwood Ave.

Two BR, study, porch, appliances, must see. No pets/smoking. $1350+util. rsteam@roadrunner.com or 886-5212.

---------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE W. Ferry, large 1 BR, hdwd floors, appliances, no smoking, no pets, $670 includes hot water. 882-6934. ---------------------------------------------BUFFALO STATE Lafayette/Hoyt Area. Super studio, $550 incl. all utilities. Reeves: 884-2871.

---------------------------------------------LAFAYETTE, 3 BR, 2 bath, newly renovated, w/d hookups, steps to Elmwood $1195+, 984-7777, 812-4915. ---------------------------------------------BLACK ROCK Grote St. 4+ BR. 2 bath, large single-family home. Clean, all-new tiled kit and baths. New rugs, hardwood flrs. No pets. Must see. 873-7097 leave message. $1500/mth. ---------------------------------------------BLACK ROCK Marion St. 1 BR, $650. Available on 7/1/17. Includes: cable, wifi, laundry, parking. Monthto-month, no smoking or pets. jph5469@gmail. ---------------------------------------------LG. APT FOR RENT Upper rear 1 BR,

living room, kitchen w /apls. $750 + utl. 345 Richmond Ave. 553-4006 .

---------------------------------------------ROOM FOR RENT $400/month. incl. util./kitchen privileges Commonwealth off Hertel. 390-7543. ---------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE Colonial Cir./Richmond Ave. lg 2 BR, hardwood flrs., appliances. No smoking, no pets, must see. 912-2906. $1295 incl. all utilities. ---------------------------------------------BIDWELL PKWY 2200 SQFT, 3BR/2BA, W/D, HW, patio, no smkg, $1800/mo, incl. heat+H2O. 882-3292. ---------------------------------------------1001 LAFAYETTE Large 2BR, offst pkg, 3rd fl, elec. incl., no pets/ smkg, WD connect avail, clean, $760. 698-9581. ---------------------------------------------UB SOUTH ROOMS renovated &

spacious, incl. util + wifi, W/D, pkg, .2 mi. to campus. $495 & $595. 236-8600.

SERVICES YOGA CLASS STARTING! June 20th. TUESDAYS 5-6 PM WEDNESDAYS 8:309:30 AM. Elmwood at St James. $10 for 1 hr class. Seniors & Beginners welcome. Contact billnowa@gmail. com / 882-9237. ----------------------------------------------RETIRED PSYCHOLOGIST available to assist ADULTS IN LIGHT DAILY LIVING. Please call for details at 883-3216.

THE ARTS LEARN AUTHENTIC GREEK FOLK DANCES in the Greek Orthodox Church

Community Center 146 West Utica, 7-8:30pm on June 26th. $15 per class.

----------------------------------------------FESTIVAL SCHOOL OF BALLET

Classes for adults and children at all levels. Try a class for free. 716-984-1586 festivalschoolofballet.com.

----------------------------------------------FREE YOUTH WRITING WORKSHOPS Tues. and Thurs. 3:30-6pm. Open to writers between ages 12 and 18 at the Just Buffalo Writing Center. 468 Washington Street, 2nd floor, Buffalo 14203. Light snack provided.

HELP WANTED EXPERIENCED ROOFER WANTED Transportation a plus. Great pay. Call Antonio 716-997-4680. ----------------------------------------------DEBT JUDGMENT SPECIALIST: Netherland & Netherland Debt

Judgment Enforcement Services are looking for part-time Debt Judgment Specialist to offer our services to clients with court judgments. Pay based on commission, work from home, flexible hours, phone provided. Interested applicants contact (716) 961-3233.

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY: Name of LLC: Buffalo Properties, LLC. Date of filing of Articles of Organization with the NY Dept of State: February 28, 2017. Office of the LLC: Erie County The NY Secretary of State has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. NYSS may mail a copy of any process to the LLC at: 407 Norwood Avenue Buffalo, NY 14222, Purpose of LLC: Real Estate/ Property Managing. ----------------------------------------------NOTICE OF FORMATION of a DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) pursuant to NY LLC Law section 206(c). The name of the company is Buckminster Enterprises, LLC. Articles of organization were filed with the NY Dept of State on 4/4/17. The company is located in Erie County. The NY Secretary of State has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. NYSS may mail a copy of process to 81 Highland Ave., Buffalo, NY 14222. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. ----------------------------------------------NOTICE OF FORMATION of a DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) Name of LLC: Our Humaniteez, LLC. Date of filing of Articles of Organization with the NY Dept of State: April 27,2017. Office of the LLC: Erie County. The NY Secretary of State has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. NYSS may mail a copy of any process to the LLC at: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave, Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose of LLC: Apparel/clothing brand. Marcus Holmes, 140 Schuele Ave Upper, Bflo, NY 14215 716-570-3602 ----------------------------------------------NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY: Common Roots Urban Farm, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/16/17. Office: Erie Co. SSNY desig agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process: Terra Dumas, 124 Coit Street, Buffalo, NY, 14206. ----------------------------------------------NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION NOTICE OF COMPLETE APPLICATION Date: 06/04/2017

Meet ! Willow

need Willow needs to be taught all those good things that puppies to learn in order to grow up to be great adult dogs! There’s nothing family! this little one would love more than to grow right up into your SPCA. the at pets ble adopta other and Come meet Willow . YOURSPCA.ORG . 300 HARLEM RD. WEST SENECA 875.7360

22 THE PUBLIC / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Applicant: BUFFALO NIAGARA RIVERKEEPER 721 MAIN ST BUFFALO, NY 14203

Person no later than 06/22/2017 or 15 days after the publication date of this notice, whichever is later.

Facility: BMGC & BLUE TOWER TURNING BASIN IN-WATER REMEDIATION BUFFALO RIVER, BUFFALO NY 14203

Contact Person:

Application ID: 9-1402-01129/00001

-----------------------------------------------

Permits(s) Applied for: l - Article 15 Title 5 Excavation & Fill in Navigable Waters 1 - Section 401 - Clean Water Act Water Quality Certification

NOTICE OF CITATION: To: RICHARD J. DELGADO, JR., if he be living, and if he be dead, to his heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, if any such there be all of whom and all of whose names, ages, places of residence and post office addresses are unknown to the Petitioner(s) and cannot after due diligence used be ascertained and HON. ERIC T. SCHNEIDERMAN– Attorney General of the State of New York.

Project is located: in BUFFALO in ERIE COUNTY Project Description: The Department has received and made a tentative determination to approve an application from Buffalo Niagara Riverkeeper for in-water and shoreline habitat restoration at two sites along the Buffalo River in the City of Buffalo. The two sites are the Blue Tower Turning Basin, which is located east of the Katherine Street Peninsula, 3.1 miles upstream from the mouth of the river and at the Buffalo Motor and Generator Corporation property, which is located south of the Michigan Avenue lift bridge and west of River Fest Park, 1.1 miles upstream of the mouth of the river. The project involves removing floating and near shore debris and invasive vegetation, placing a layer of planting substrate and planting submerged aquatic vegetation and emergent vegetation. Herbivory protection measures, rootwads and logs will be placed to protect the planting areas. The purpose of the project is to restore and enhance the ecological function of the river to address the Buffalo River Remedial Action Plan’s Beneficial Use Impairment for loss of fish and wildlife habitat and to provide effective and sustainable designs for restoring and naturalizing shorelines. As a tentative determination, the Department is seeking public comment prior to making a final determination on permit issuance. Availability Documents:

of

Application

Filed application documents, and Department draft permits where applicable, are available for inspection during normal business hours at the address of the contact person. To ensure timely service at the time of inspection, it is recommended that an appointment be made with the contact person. State Environmental Quality Review (SEQR) Determination: Project is an Unlisted Action and will not have a significant impact on the environment. A Negative Declaration is on file. A coordinated review was not performed. SEQR Lead Designated

Agency:

None

State Historic Preservation Act (SHPA) Determination: Evaluation using a StructuralArchaeological Assessment Form or other information has concluded that the proposed activity will not impact registered, eligible or inventoried archaeological sites or historic structures.

LISA M CZECHOWICZ NYSDEC 270 Michigan Ave Buffalo, NY 14203-2915 (716) 851-7165

A petition having been duly filed by JOLENE A. DELGADO, who is domiciled at 2427 SHADAGEE ROAD in the Town of EDEN, ERIE County, New York 14057. You are hereby cited to show cause before the Surrogate’s Court, ERIE County, held at 95 FRANKLIN STREET, BUFFALO, New York on July 11th, 2017, at 9:30 AS.M., why a decree of this Court should not be made in the estate of RICHARD J. DELGADO, deceased, lately domiciled at 4783 FREEMAN ROAD, in the Town of ORCHARD PARK, ERIE County, New York, granting Letters of Trusteeship to JOLENE A. DELGADO, as Successor Trustee of the “Richard J. Delgado and Marlene J. Delgado Living Trust”, dated February 6th, 1996. Dated, Tested, and Sealed, May 25th, 2017. HON. BARBARA HOWE, Surrogate, County of ERIE. Name of Attorney: ANDREW J. PACE, ESQ., 4513 S Buffalo St, Orchard Park, New York 14127, Ph: (716) 662-9808. ----------------------------------------------NOTICE OF CITATION: To: RICHARD J. DELGADO, JR., if he be living, and if he be dead, to his heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, if any such there be all of whom and all of whose names, ages, places of residence and post office addresses are unknown to the Petitioner(s) and cannot after due diligence used be ascertained and HON. ERIC T. SCHNEIDERMAN– Attorney General of the State of New York. Upon a petition having been duly filed by JOLENE A. DELGADO who is domiciled in Eden, New York, YOU ARE HEREBY CITED to show cause before the ERIE COUNTY SURROGATE’S COURT at Erie County Hall, 92 Franklin Street, 2nd Floor, Buffalo, New York on July 11, 2017 at 9:30am, why a Decree should not be made in the Estate of RICHARD J. DELGADO, late of the County of Erie and State of New York, admitting to Probate a Will dated August 29, 2013 directing that Letters Testamentary issue to JOLENE DELGADO, and directing such other and further relief as the Court deems just and equitable. Dated, Tested, and Sealed, May 25, 2017. HON. BARBARA HOWE, Surrogate, County of ERIE. Name of Attorney: ANDREW J. PACE, ESQ., 4513 S Buffalo St, Orchard Park, New York 14127, Ph: (716) 662-9808. -----------------------------------------------

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STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, COUNTY OF MECKLENBURG, IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE, DISTRICT COURT DIVISION, FILE NO. 16CVD 12538 Coastal Management: SIMON RAMIREZ BERNARDINO PLAINTIFF V CELESTINE HICKS This project is located in a Coastal WHITE DEFENDANT: CELESTINE Management area and is ERRORS subject to WHICH IF YOU APPROVE ARE ON THISTO:PROOF, THE HICKS WHITE, the above named thePUBLIC WaterfrontCANNOT Revitalization and BE HELD RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINE THEa AD defendant: TAKE NOTICE that Coastal Resources Act. THOROUGHLY EVEN IF THE AD IS AComplaint PICK-UP.seeking relief against you has been filed in the above entitled Comments on this project must be action. The nature the relief submitted in writing the Contact � CHECK COPY ofCONTENT MESSAGE TO toADVERTISER Thank you for advertising with THE PUBLIC. Please review your ad and check for any errors. The original layout instructions have been followed as closely as possible. THE PUBLIC offers design services with two proofs at no charge. THE PUBLICVISIT is notONLINE responsible@ for any error if not notified within 24 hours of receipt. The production department must have a signed proof in order to print. Please sign and fax this back or approve

being sought is as follows: That the plaintiff be granted recovery of less than $25,000 for injures and damages sustained due to a car accident. You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than the 10th of February, 2017, said date being forty (40) days from the first publication of this notice; and upon your failure to do so, the party seeking service against you will apply to the court for the relief sought, This the 29th of December ,2016. Butler, Quinn & Hochman By: Christine Camacho Attorney for Plaintiff 4801 Independence Blvd Suite 700 Charlotte, NC 28212 Tel: 704-569-9800 x 265 State Bar #4376

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SEEN & HEARD BACK PAGE

“THAT’S NOT A WORD!” - NOT ENTERING THE DICTIONARY ANYTIME SOON.

ACROSS 1 Newspaper revenue source 8 Used, as a saddle 15 Player seen in bars 16 Raw material used to make steel 17 *Mork’s epithet on “Mork & Mindy” 18 *Second word of “Jabberwocky” 19 Flynn of “Captain Blood” 21 “___ friend!” 22 Tax prep pros 26 Typeface embellishment 28 Chemical that makes a flea flee 29 Sound 31 “The Wizard of ___ Park” 33 “Science Guy” Bill 34 *Creatures questioned by Mr. Salt in “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” 37 Disreputable, slangily 38 Accompany to the airport, maybe 42 *Scuttle’s guess at naming a human artifact (really a fork) in “The Little Mermaid”

60 *Scrabble play by Bart (which Homer challenged) in the second-ever episode of “The Simpsons”

67 Dawn-related

35 Arthur ___, inventor of the crossword in 1913

68 Transcendentalist Ralph Waldo

36 Old photo shade

69 17th-century Dutch philosopher who wrote “Ethics”

39 Oil-producing gp.

70 7UP alternatives

41 “SNL” alum Armisen

40 Outdoor gala

43 Munchable morning mix

DOWN

44 Collected wisdom

1 Racecar driver Foyt and Backstreet Boy McLean, for two

45 Intertwines

2 “That’s, like, preschool level”

47 Decelerate

3 Musical genre from Jamaica 4 Candy with collectible dispensers 5 Xavier Cugat’s ex-wife Lane 6 Beer from Golden, Colorado 7 Minima and maxima, in math 8 Brother or sister 9 Musical adaptation abbr.

49 Big bankruptcy of 2001

12 Allergen with its own index

11 Lacking guidance

13 The Who’s “Baba ___” 14 Turn on its head

53 Ranks above viscounts

20 ___ Ishii (“Kill Bill” character)

55 Got all the questions right on

22 “Mangy Love” folkrocker McCombs

56 “___ the Wind” (Garth Brooks album)

23 Genre for the Ramones

58 “Super!”

30 Harriet’s TV spouse 32 Creme-filled cookies

10 “Hop ___!”

51 “Only ___” (Oingo Boingo song)

27 “It’s just a ___ wound!”

62 *May 2017 mis-tweet that won’t go away

46 Sony handheld console since 2005, briefly

50 Seven on “Sesame Street,” sometimes

25 Fitted for a ring, e.g.

24 “Whiles, like ___, I go to find my fawn”: Shakespeare

46 Winter coats

48 Ancient scroll materials 52 City known for mustard 54 Walk hard 57 Kia hybrid SUV since 2016 (what, you expected “Robert De ___”?) 59 Finished 61 “Moulin Rouge!” director Luhrmann 63 TGIF part 64 Id ___ (that is) 65 Moriarty, to Holmes 66 Low-ranking USN officer LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

SEEN & HEARD: HERDFEST PHOTOS BY COREY T MAHER

Local music blog, BuffaBLOG, held their annual music festival, Herd Fest—a SXSW style festival, which takes place in various bars and venues around the city—this past weekend. Indie rock was the focus and dozens of bands including dreambeaches (upper right and middle), Stress Dolls (center right), Filthy Gorgeous (bottom right), Humble Braggers (bottom left), and M.A.G.S. (center left) performed all over the city during P the four-day-long festival. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / THE PUBLIC 23


24 THE PUBLIC / JUNE 21 - 27, 2017 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

The Public - 6/21/17  
The Public - 6/21/17  
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