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STATE: LEGALIZE MARIJUANA, CURB OPIOID DEATHS

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LOCAL: THIS WEEK’S UPS AND DOWNS IN LOCAL NEWS

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COMMENTARY: TRUMP: MAKING AMERICA WHITE AGAIN

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ART: AT CEPA, STUDENTS AND ARCHITECTS

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LOOKING BACKWARD: Main and Eagle Streets, 1964.

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THEATER: What’s playing on local stages this week.

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FILM: Call Me by Your Name and more, plus capsule reviews and cinema listings.

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CENTERFOLD: Photographer Orin Langelle’s work at CEPA Gallery.

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talk about deficits, and how Social Security is And should a workingman or woman pay higher underfunded. They never provide any solutions tax rates than somebody who lives off of dividends to the problems. The only answer they give us and doesn’t really “work” for their money? WHAT WOULD SENATOR MOYNIHAN SAY? is: “We are going to make cuts to the program.” Mr. Politician: I really don’t want to answer that We, the average American wage earners, fund During the Senate’s 1996 debate over a bill this program. This program supports Americans question. I’m here to help you. to reform welfare in America, Senator Daniel whose parents, brothers, and sisters have paid into Mr. Taxpayer: Mr. Politician, do you really believe Patrick Moynihan rejected its treatment the system for years and years. The politicians have that factories will open again, with fair wages and of children. recently released a “Great Tax Cut” that they claim benefits for unskilled labor? will create jobs and lift many of us outDAILYPUBLIC.COM of poverty. Mr. Politician: I really don’t want to answer that He wrote (in a 8/1/96 press release): I read about the tax cut, and I see things that I question either. As I have stated on this floor many times, this do not agree with. The tax cut takes away many legislation does not ‘reform’ Aid to Families deductions that we all benefit from, and depend Mr. Taxpayer: Mr. Politician, can you give the with Dependent Children; it simply abolishes upon. My father was a columnist for a now defunct taxpayers a list of corporations that are on board it. It terminates the basic Federal commitment newspaper, the Buffalo Courier Express. Back in to build new factories in the United States that of support for dependent children in hopes of the 1970s, when Buffalo was deciding on what feature good paying jobs, with health benefits altering the behavior of their mothers. We are type of stadium to build and where to build it, and pensions? putting those children at risk with absolutely my father beat the drum for a domed Stadium in Mr. Politician: Again, I don’t want to answer no evidence that this radical idea has even the downtown Buffalo. He understood that building that question. slightest chance of success. a stadium downtown would point Buffalo in the right direction after experiencing years of Mr. Taxpayer: Mr. Politician, I make about In our haste to enact this bill—any bill—before population decline. He wrote columns from a $60,000 a year, and according to the tax cut, I the November elections, we have chosen to third-party point of view. He named one of his stand to receive an extra $25 per week in my ignore what little we do know about the subject characters “Mr. Erie County.” My character, Mr. paycheck. Can I see your tax returns for the last of poverty…the premise of this legislation Taxpayer, has some interesting questions for our 5 years, so I can figure out how much you will is that the behavior of certain adults can be local politicians, you can fill in the blanks with the save in taxes? Mr. Politician, I know you won’t changed by making the lives of their children as show me your tax returns, but I made a decision local politician’s name: wretched as possible. anyways. I don’t want your tax cut. I would like the The Urban Institute estimated that the bill would Mr. Taxpayer: Mr. Politician, I read about my government to keep my $25 per week, and use it to cause 1.1 million dependent children to fall below tax cut in the newspaper, and also sat through a repair the roads and help veterans who are in need. commercial on television telling me how great my the poverty line. Mr. Politician, some of my working friends told tax cut will be. Why are you helping me so much me that your tax cut will drain the Treasury. As a Fast-forward to 2017. A 12/21/17 New York with this tax cut? true patriot, I don’t want a tax cut, because without Times editorial reads: Mr. Politician: Because I care about you and your that money, who will pay for the endless wars that As Republican lawmakers celebrate the passage family. You pay too much in taxes, Mr. Taxpayer. many politicians promote? of a tax bill that will make the wealthiest Mr. Taxpayer: Mr. Politician, now that we are Mr. Politician: This interview is over! You’re a Americans richer, many lower income friends, let DAILYPUBLIC.COM me tell you about my parents. My wise guy! families are faced with the real possibility father fought in World War II as a Marine. He that their children will soon lose their health cared about others, so he joined the service, even Mr. Taxpayer: Mr. Politician, before you go, could insurance because Congress didn’t care enough though he had recently married my mother. He I have a list of all of the politicians that voted for to renew funding it (the Children’s Health served for his country for three and a half years. this tax cut, along with supporting documentation Insurance Program). When he passed away, he didn’t have much showing their net worth and income? Some guy President Trump and his fellow Republicans savings, although he did pay taxes his entire life. in the donut shop told me that most politicians were desperate to pass a tax bill by Christmas He couldn’t take advantage of the estate tax, are millionaires, and the tax cut will benefit them but seem unconcerned about the more urgent because he spent all of his money on his family. the most. That guy also told me that he thinks the and important work of making sure children Mr. Politician, my father and mother worked very tax system is rigged against the average guy, and that none of the average guys are in politics. He can get the health care they need. That will be hard, and they never received any money for free. said most politicians are millionaires, and they quite a legacy. Mr. Politician, now that we are friends, could you don’t represent him. He wants the American Estimates are that about nine million kids depend please tell me how much money you received from people to vote on such a large tax cut, not on CHIP for health care. your family that was untaxed? Oh, before you millionaire politicians. Senator Moynihan’s final word: “No child answer that question, I will tell you that in 45 years My father, Phil Ranallo, a.k.a. “Mr. Taxpayer,” in America asked to be here.  Why, then of working, I have paid quite a bit of tax on my would take a drag on his Lucky Strike cigarette are we determined to punish them?”  meager earnings. and say, “There goes another empty suit” as the Mr. Politician: I really don’t want to tell you what politician walked away. —PAUL RANALLO —RONALD FRASER I received in untaxed money or inheritance, or how Ronald Fraser, a former land use planner, Paul Ranallo lives in Amherst and is the much I’ve made…it’s too personal. lives in the Town of Colden. author of What’s New, Harry?, a collection Mr. Taxpayer: Mr. Politician, I have heard you of his father Phil Ranallo’s columns from the say derogatory things about needy people who Buffalo Courier-Express. THE BIG HEIST receive government benefits. Do you think that As an American whose grandfather fought in large untaxed transfers of wealth help the economy World War I, and whose father fought in World and our great country? Do you think a worker Have you got something to say and just War II, I take offense at the behavior of our elected should be taxed at a higher rate than someone can’t let it go? Email info@dailypublic.com. P officials in Washington. The elected officials who inherits huge estates (over $11.3 million)? We might just print it.

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related deaths.

According to data from the US Center for Disease Control, New York had ranked fifth in the nation in terms of opioid-related deaths in 2016, the most recent year for which numbers are available. That’s over 3,500 deaths, nearly 1,000 more deaths than in 2015. Erie County, an area hit particularly hard by the MESSAGE TO ADVERTISER Thank you for advertising with THE epidemic, also saw its fourth straight year of PUBLIC. Please review your ad and increased deaths.

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check for any errors. The original layout “While further research is needed from states instructions have been followed as closely have recently enacted legislation policies, as possible. THE PUBLICthat offers design services with two proofsthere at no is charge. reasonTHE to believe legalization and PUBLIC is not responsible for any of error if regulation marijuana in New York will have not notified within 24 hours of receipt. Theon the opioid epidemic and a favorable impact production department must have a signed on broader health outcomes,” Arnsten said. proof in order to print. Please sign and fax this back or approve by Marijuana respondingnot to this only provides an alternative to email. opioid painkillers, it is also far safer than even

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STUDIES SHOW TO STATES THAT MAKE MARIJUANA LEGAL ARE DOING BETTER IN ADDRESSING THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC THAN STATES THAT PROHIBIT IT. to end the growing scourge of opioid abuse. Trump’s attorney general, Jeff Sessions, has paved the way for prosecuting the nascent marijuana industry legalized in a growing number of states. But the dual federal efforts may be at odds, experts say, citing evidence that expanding access to marijuana could actually help combat the opioid epidemic. Dr. Julia Arnsten, a professor at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, said at a state Assembly hearing last week that states that have medical marijuana average a lower rate of opioid-related deaths than states without. She pointed to one study from a 2014 by her colleague Dr. Marcus Bachhuber that showed those states saw about 25 percent fewer deaths in comparison. Arnsten noted the states with

meaning it destroys brain matter over the long term, cannabis actually can protect against brain injury. … The vast majority of American adults are unharmed by the use of cannabis.”

GEOFF / Y18W3 _______________________ the New York State Sheriffs’ Association and

medical marijuana programs still had rising one of the few naysayers at the hearing, said ______________________ deaths due to opioids, butIssue: they rose at a slower he feared legalization would worsen the opioid rate. She added that those findings have since epidemic. But Holland rejected that view of IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS WHICH ARE ON been confirmed by two subsequent studies marijuana as a so-called “gateway drug,” saying THIS PROOF, THE PUBLIC CANNOT BE conducted by different researchers. that the majority of people who use it do not go RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINE THE AD Arnsten said that it wouldHELD appear that patients on to use other illicit drugs. THOROUGHLY EVEN IF THE AD IS A PICK-UP. in states where medical marijuana is available DanaFOR Beal, a longtime marijuana advocate, THIS chronic PROOF MAY ONLY BE USED are opting to use that to relieve or severe said the drug can be used to treat substance pain rather than relying onPUBLICATION opioid painkillers. IN THE PUBLIC. abuse. He said marijuana is a “frontline detox” “Avoiding opioid medication in favor of medical and works better than drugs like naloxone or marijuana lowers the risk of opioid overdose methadone. However, Assemblyman Michael either because individuals do not progress to DenDekker said that currently he is not aware opioid use disorder, or they do not accidentally of any study that examines the efficacy of using overdose on the opioids prescribed to them,” medical marijuana as a treatment for substance Arnsten at the Assembly hearing, which abuse, adding that he would like documentation centered on whether to legalize recreational for people who just “don’t get it.” marijuana by passing the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act, now in its third go-around in New York decriminalized the private the state Legislature. possession of small amounts of marijuana in New York already has a medical marijuana 1977. If the legislation debated at Thursday’s program, which was authorized in 2014. hearing passes, the state would be the ninth in However, the law restricts what it can be the country to allow legal, regulated marijuana prescribed for to a specific list of conditions. use for adults.  Assemblyman Richard Gottfried has introduced legislation that would eliminate that list, but it has failed to advance. Arnsten said This article first appeared in City & State, a that fully legalizing and regulating marijuana politics and polkicy journal with which The P Public shares content. would expand access and lead to fewer opioid-

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buildings, would be razed from 1965 to 1968 to make way for the Main Place Mall, Edward A. Rath County Office Building, One M&T Plaza,

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Robert B. Adam Parking Ramp, and Church Street Extension Mall. —THE PUBLIC STAFF PHOTO COURTESY OF THE E.H. BUTLER LIBRARY.


LOCAL NEWS

THIS WEEK’S UPS AND DOWNS BY THE PUBLIC STAFF

UPS: The PARTNERSHIP FOR PUBLIC GOOD unveiled their 10 major policy focus areas for 2018 last week at a very well attended forum in Buffalo’s Frank Merriweather Library. Tops on the list were criminal justice reforms including ending solitary confinement in Erie County, increased training for both Buffalo Police and the Erie County Sheriff ’s office, making marijuana the lowest police priority. NFTA reform made a return visit to PPG’s list, seeking three voting members for the board from folks who actually ride the bus, and a relocation of the state’s Office for People With Developmental Disabilities to a site that is actually accessible to people with disabilities. We encourage all to visit PPG’s website for more information and to get involved. JOHN WASHINGTON.

The indefatigable PUSH Buffalo organizer made an impassioned plea for housing reform to the above body, asking for the community to organize to save public housing. Washington choked back emotion describing how spent much of the last two weeks with the last tenant at the Shoreline apartments, John Schmidt, who was finally forced to leave his apartment when it was flooded last week, a deliberate action by the company that owns the property, Norstar, in Washington’s estimation.

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DOWNS: In a deposition last August concerning the Richard Metcalf travesty, ERIE COUNTY SHERIFF TIM HOWARD either couldn’t

or refused to answer basic questions about the training of his deputies and officers, saying “I don’t know” 68 times, according to the Buffalo News. It’s frankly terrifying that the man in charge of hundreds of people, many of whom are only accused of wrongdoing and not yet convicted, could flaunt such wanton disregard for what should be his basic responsibilities. For shame.

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SAM HERBERT AND THE GROUP CALLING FOR THE REMOVAL OF THE MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. STATUE in

Martin Luther King, Jr. Park: It’s a little depressing to see the advances of social and aesthetic progressivism of a generation or more prior be eradicated by a narrowminded, contemporary conservatism. What Herbert wants is a representational statue of MLK, and he’s blaming an artwork for what it isn’t, asking for it to be destroyed. The artist who created the bust, John Woodrow Wilson, is a seminal figure in modern African-American art history. God bless anyone who organizes for positive change in their community, but let’s pick battles that really matter. P DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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US PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP’S RECENT REMARKS ABOUT HAITI, EL SALVADOR, AND AFRICAN COUNTRIES HAVE CONFIRMED ONCE AND FOR ALL THAT HIS ADMINISTRATION’S IMMIGRATION POLICY AGENDA IS DRIVEN LARGELY BY RACIAL ANIMUS. THE LAST TIME THE US TOOK SUCH AN APPROACH, IT WAS APPLAUDED BY NONE OTHER THAN ADOLF HITLER. SEE IF YOU can guess the author of this quote:

“The American Union feels itself to be a NordicGerman state and by no means an international porridge of peoples. This is revealed by its immigration quotas…Scandinavians…then Englishmen and finally Germans have been accorded the largest contingent.” Those words were written by Adolf Hitler in 1928, in praise of American immigration laws at the time. To be sure, references to Hitler should not be invoked lightly. For all the ugly things coming out of President Donald Trump’s White House, not least his denigration of Haiti, El Salvador, and African states as “shithole countries,” the United States is still a long way from resembling Nazi Germany.1 Trump is a kneejerk authoritarian and a throwback to the old days of white supremacy in America, but many more institutional checks would have to fail before he could bring about the end of American democracy. And even with respect to immigration policy, there is a profound difference between the Trump administration’s mass deportations, however cruel and stupid, and mass murder. Nonetheless, it has become increasingly clear that the 2016 US election installed an ignorant, 6

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BY JAMES Q. WHITMAN racist president in the White House. Worse still, Trump’s statements in office hark back to a period in history when Hitler found inspiration in US immigration law. Specifically, Hitler admired the US Immigration Act of 1924—also known as the Johnson-Reed Act—which had erected openly racist barriers to immigration on the basis of a “national quota” system. The law banned Arab and Asian immigration outright, and made immigration from Africa close to impossible. As Hitler noted, it also favored “Nordic-German” candidates for immigration and eventual US citizenship over Southern and Eastern Europeans, including Jews. (My own Jewish ancestors made it to Ellis Island in 1922, just under the wire.) It was this restrictive law that served as the legal basis for not accepting Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany in the years before the Holocaust. The 1924 law is getting a lot of media attention in the wake of Trump’s suggestion that the US should take more immigrants from Norway (who are unlikely to immigrate), rather than places like Haiti. But it is hardly the only example of racist immigration policies in the US. During the period of the so-called Yellow Peril in the late nineteenth century, the US enacted a raft of anti-Asian legislation, including an 1882 law banning immigration from China outright. And all the way back in 1790, the US Congress revealed its racist outlook by offering naturalization to “any alien, being a free white person.” Hitler, for his part, was not the first or only right-wing racist to find inspiration in these dark chapters of American history. By the time he came along, everyone on the European hard right was already well acquainted with the US model of race-based immigration barriers. After all, Theodor Fritsch, one of Europe’s most vile anti-Semites, had touted it decades earlier, in his 1893 Handbook of the Jewish Question. In Hitler’s manifesto, Mein Kampf, he praised

America as “the one state” that was making progress toward becoming a racially healthy order. And when the Nazis came to power in the 1930s, Nazi lawyers carefully studied the US’s long history of policies to close its doors to non-whites. Looking back, it is important to remember that it was not until the 1965 US Immigration and Nationality Act that the US began to separate itself from the worst aspects of its racist past. And, as Trump’s presidency makes clear, that past has yet to be permanently overcome. Trump’s recent vulgar remarks about immigration should prompt all Americans to remember that Hitler and his fellow Nazis were once big fans of America. And as we approach the first anniversary of Trump’s inauguration, his immigration policies should give pause to those taking comfort in the idea that American democracy has not yet been fatally undermined. Whether or not American democracy will survive is not the standard by which to judge Trump’s presidency. After all, for white males at least, American democracy has always been alive and well, even when racist immigration laws were passed in 1790, in the late nineteenth century, and in the 1920s. America’s history of democratically enacted racism is too sordid for people to be complacent about Trump’s recent comments and toxic immigration policies. Americans who love their country should feel sorrow when reading what Hitler said about it in 1928. And they should be dismayed to hear their president openly yearning for an immigration policy that would put Nordic people at the front of the line once again. James Q. Whitman is Professor of Comparative and Foreign Law at Yale Law School, and the author of Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of P Nazi Race Law.


ON STAGES THEATER

Kelsey Mogensen and Kate LoConti in The Constant Wife, opening January 19 at the Irish Classical Theatre Company. Photo by Gene Witkowski.

PLAYBILL = OPENING SOON

AN ACT OF GOD: Joey Bucheker takes a comic turn as the Almighty in David Javerbaum’s play. Through February 11 at O’Connell & Company, in residence at the Park School, 4625 Harlem Road, 848-0800, oconnellandcompany.com. BENNY ANDERSON AND BJORN ULVAEUS’S MAMMA MIA!: The music of ABBA, transformed into an international hit musical, with a stellar local cast. Through January 28 at the Kavinoky Theatre, 320 Porter Avenue, 829-7668, kavinokytheatre.com. THE BOY AT THE EDGE OF EVERYTHING: A coming-of-age story woven through with travels through time, space, and dreams.  Opens January 20 at Theatre of Youth, 884-4400, theatreofyouth.org. THE CONSTANT WIFE:  W. Somerset Maugham’s biting comedy about marriage, infidelity, and London high society. Opening January 19 at Irish Classical Theatre Company, Andrews Theatre, 625 Main Street, 853-4282, irishclassicaltheatre.com.

HOW I LEARNED TO DRIVE: Paula Vogel’s Pulitzer-winning drama whose main character reflects on her youth, replete with incest, pedophilia, and misogyny. Opening January 18 at Subversive Theatre Collective, Manny Fried Theatre, 3rd floor, Great Arrow Building, 255 Great Arrow Avenue, 408-0499, subversivetheatre.org.

THE NETHER: In the near future, the Internet has evolved into the “Nether,” a place where gender, age, identity, and truth are malleable, and your darkest desires and fears are obtainable. Opening January 19 at

Road Less Traveled Productions, 500 Pearl Street,

629-3069, roadlesstraveledproductions.org.

SKELETON CREW: The third play in Dominique Morisseau’s prize-winning Detroit trilogy tells the story of workers and their families reacting to the closure of an auto stamping plant. Opening January 19 at Paul Robeson Theatre, 350 Masten Avenue, 884-2013, aaccbuffalo.org.

Playbill is presented by:

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Information (title, dates, venue) subject to change based on the presenters’ privilege. Email production information to: theaterlistings@dailypublic.com DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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ART REVIEW similar design principles and elements in constructing poems. Then wrote their own ekphrastic poems—basically, poems about art, or in this case, architecture—about architectural examples of their choosing. And built models of the structures they wrote about, which are on display along with some of the poetry. Michael Marks’s poem is about various aspects and qualities of the hemisphere main fireplace of the Darwin Martin House. He writes: “…the red and the gold, / As if the sun had split in two…” Brian Manning’s poem is entitled “Big, Tall, and Ugly,” about an unidentified architectural example that could only be the former HSBC building that straddles lower Main Street like an eyesore colossus. Manning writes: “Tall, ugly, tan…what were they thinking?” His suggestion is to tear the monstrosity down. Olmsted Middle seventh graders did a project called “Resilience,” about designing for extreme weather/climate events. For floods (houses on stilts), earthquakes (constructions reinforced with popsicle stick supports), drought (buildings with substantial rooftop rain water collection systems), and tornadoes, (a geodesic dome).

LITTLE ARCHITECTS BY JACK FORAN

AT CEPA GALLERY, A PROJECT THAT BROUGHT TOGETHER BUFFALO PUBLIC SCHOOLS STUDENTS AND PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS FRUITS OF COLLABORATIONS among volunteer professional architects, university students, and teachers and students in some Buffalo Public Schools are currently on exhibit at the CEPA galleries.

Projects on display range from a colorful construction paper and cardboard community of block forms and silos and teepees and— for good measure—one pirate ship by Bennett Park Montessori pre-school, pre-kindergarten, and kindergarten students, to one about some rather more sophisticated architectural considerations, like tension and compression forces, positive and negative spaces, and light and shadow effects, by Visual and Performing Arts Academy high schoolers. In another project, the Visual and Performing Arts students considered ideas about confinement and liberation and imagined these concepts as sculptures. Liberation as a butterfly emerging from a cocoon, or a bird escaped from a cage. Confinement as a

IN GALLERIES NOW = ART OPENING

Albright-Knox Art Gallery (1285 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 882-8700,  albrightknox.org):  Takashi Murakami: Takashi Murakami: The Deep End of the Universe, on view through Jan 28. Out of Sight! Art of the Senses, on view through Jan 28. Picturing Niagara, paintings by Stephen Hannock, on view through Mar 25.  Tue-Sun 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays (free) until 10pm. Amber M Dixon Dixon Gallery at the Buffalo Center for Arts and Technology (1221 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 259-1680,  buffaloartstechcenter.org): 3X3: Dianna Derhak, Natalie Dilenno, and David Simpson on view through Feb 2. Mon-Fri 10am-3pm.

8

person in a cage. Or more abstractly, a black ring of spiky forms projecting inwards. The Bennett Park Montessori students also did a project called “The Bennett Park Building Sculpture,” based on a sculptural work by Syrian architect and artist Mohamad Hafez that looks like urban war ruins such as we’ve seen too much of in recent news footage from Aleppo and Raqqa. The student project involved thinking about basic human needs—food, shelter, and clothing, but also personal safety, and spiritual needs in the largest sense of the term—and construction of a sculptural tower community built on an open suitcase, symbolic of preparedness to hurriedly leave whatever current living arrangement in the event of war or other perhaps environmental calamity. The Montessori students also made of list of occupational categories that answer to basic needs. Police and firefighters and architects near the top of the list. Lower down on the list, teachers, farmers, and artists. Olmsted Middle School eighth graders worked on a multi-part project called “The Architecture of Poetry.” They learned about architectural design principles and elements through a visit to architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s Darwin Martin House and observation of their own school building, the Art Deco former Kensington High School. They then studied how poets use

Anna Kaplan Contemporary (1250 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183, annakaplancontemporary.art): Safe World, an exhibit of erotic art on view through Feb 3. Curated by Dana Tyrell and Emily Tucker (Benjaman Gallery). Friday 12-7pm, Sat 12:30-4 or by appointment. Art Dialogue Gallery (5 Linwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14209 wnyag.com): Paintings by Robert Glisson. On view through Jan 26. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm.  Artists Group Gallery  (Western New York Artists Group)  (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, 716-885-2251,  wnyag.com):  8th  Annual Non-Juried Members Exhibition. On view through Feb 9.  Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Argus Gallery (1896 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207) A collaboration with Arts Work

THE PUBLIC / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

School 53 Community School kindergarteners worked on basic structural forms and made popsicle stick houses and the like. Second-graders learned about maps and landscape categories— urban, suburban, rural—as groundwork for planning an ideal community. Their centerpiece work is a civic center sculptural model of a city with interspersed commercial and residential areas, and plenty of green spaces. Third-graders did a project called “Jefferson Renaissance.” They redesigned Jefferson Avenue to provide more amenities and answer to the full scope of area residents’ needs. The redesign included a community playground and garden, a bakery, a police station, more housing, an ice cream parlor, a hotel, and a community pool. Another third-grade project was called “Then and Now.” The students compared community maps from the early 1900s with present day maps. One thing they noticed was the number of “voids,” that is, empty and unused or underused spaces now versus then. The project included building three-dimensional models of community segments with prominent empty areas, and making two-dimensional collage illustrations of some possible infill for the blank spaces. Ideas for public gardens, playgrounds, handsome to spectacular architectural additions for new restaurants, a movie house. And DaVinci High School students did a project called “Geoluminaries” in which they made lanterns—somewhat like jack-o’-lanterns—intended to project patterns and colors on surrounding walls or whatever. The architects in the schools program—called Architecture + Education—is a project of the Buffalo Architecture Foundation, a public charity entity supported by the area chapter of the American Institute of Architects. The purpose of the Architecture + Education program is “to increase awareness of the built and natural environment and provide architecture as a multidisciplinary form of active learning” in the schools. This exhibit is a short-timer, only a week in duration, continuing P through Friday, January 19.

ARCHITECTURE + EDUCATION NOW THROUGH JANUARY 19 CLOSING RECEPTION JANUARY 19 5:30 - 7:30PM CEPA GALLERY 617 MAIN STREET, BUFFALO, NY 14203 716.856.2717 CEPAGALLERY.ORG

for Autism Services Inc. The Argus Gallery presents,  HEY LOOK: Paintings by Daniel Maysonet and Jim Bilger. On view through Jan 12. By appointment only. Betty’s Restaurant  (370 Virginia Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 362-0633,  bettysbuffalo. com): New work by the artists from Autism Services Inc., on view through Mar 18. Opening reception, Mon, Jan 22, 6-8:30pm. TueThu, 8am-9pm, Fri 8am-10pm, Sat 9am10pm, Sun 9am-2pm. Benjaman Gallery (419 Elmwood Avenue Buffalo, NY 14222, thebenjamangallery.com): See Anna Kaplan Contemporary. Works from the collection. Thu-Sat 11am-5pm.  Big Orbit (30d Essex Street, Buffalo, NY 14222,  cepagallery.org/about-big-orbit):  Ian DeBeer and Craig Sheperd:  In a Better Place. Fri-Sun 12-6pm.

BOX Gallery (Buffalo Niagara Hostel, 667 Main St, Buffalo, NY 14203):  Altars of ERIE,  an installation and sound piece by Lara Buckley. Through Jan 31. Every day 4-10pm.  Buffalo & Erie County Central Library (1 Lafayette Square, Buffalo, NY 14203, 858-8900,  buffalolib.org):  Buffalo Never Fails: The Queen City & WWI, 100th Anniversary of America’s Entry into WWI, on second floor.  Mon-Sat 8:30am-6pm, Sun 12-5pm.Tue-Fri 10am5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm. Burchfield Penney Art Center  (1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 878-6011, burchfieldpenney.org): Divine Messengers,  work by Craig LaRotonda, through Jan 28.  Art in Craft Media, through Jan 28. The Flying Slatherpuss and Other Portals Into the World of M. Henry Jones, through February 25. Charles Burchfield: The Ohio Years, works by Charles Burchfield, through March


GALLERIES 24. Milton Rogovin: A Trip to Chile, 50 Years After, through March 25. Angels and Demons: Works in Paper by David Schirm, through March 31. Images (Of Us By Us), through April 1. Cargo, Way-points and Tales of the Erie Canal, through July 29. 10am-5pm & Sun 1-5pm. Admission $5-$10, children 10 and under free. Caffeology Buffalo (23 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY, 14201): Saffi Rigberg and Christina Riccio, ceramics and photography.  Carnegie Art Center (240 Goundry Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, carnegieartcenter. org): Buffalo Society of Artists: Winter Exhibition. Opening reception: Thu, Jan 18, 6:308:30pm. Thu 6-9pm & Sat 12-3pm. The Cass Project (500 Seneca Street, Buffalo, NY 14204, thecassproject.org): The Blues of Collaboration,  Team Razor Wire (TRW) Nick Miller & Christopher Kameck. On view through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm.  Castellani Art Museum  (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200, castellaniartmuseum.org): Appealing Words: Calligraphy Traditions in WNY (see review). Western New York Collects: Nancy Dwyer, on view through Feb 4. Mark Snyder: Muscle & Bone, on view through Jan 21. Dana Tyrell: Blue, on view through Jan 21. Painting Niagara, Thomas Kegler, on view through Jan 21. Tue-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. CEPA  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 856-2717,  cepagallery.org): Photos by Tara Jain;  Through the Blue Hour, works by Natalie DiIenno;  Visions,  selection of photographs taken by emerging photographers from many of Buffalo’s social justice organizations, Portraits of Struggle, photos by Orin Langelle; CEPA Gallery Members’ Exhibition. All shows on view through Feb 24 and open with reception on Fri, Jan 26, 7-10pm. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. Dana Tillou Fine Arts (1478 Hertel Avenue Buffalo, NY 14216, 716-854-5285,  danatilloufinearts.com):  Contemporary collection including Hans Moller, Edith Geiger, Lee Adler,

Claire Burch, and more on view through Nov 30. Wed-Fri 10:30am-5pm, Sat 10:30am-4pm. El Museo  (91 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 464-4692,  elmuseobuffalo.org): Wed-Sat  126pm.  Enjoy the Journey Art Gallery (1168 Orchard Park Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 675-0204, etjgallery.com): Tue-Fri 11-6pm, Sat 11-4pm. GO ART! (201 East Main Street, Batavia, NY 14020): Cabal and Zen by Jim Burns on view through Feb  3. Thu-Fri  11am-7pm,  Sat  11am4pm, Second Sun 11am-2pm. Hallwalls  (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694, hallwalls.org): Tony Conrad @ Hallwalls, on view through Mar 2. Opening reception, Fri, Jan 19, 8-11pm. Tue-Fri 11am6pm, Sat 11am-2pm. Indigo Art Gallery (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572, indigoartbuffalo.com): Wed & Fri 12-6pm, Thu 12-7pm, Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sundays and Mondays. Jewish Community Center of Greater Buffalo Bunis Family Art Gallery (2640 N Forest Road, Benderson Family Building, Amherst, NY 14068, 688-4033,  jccbuffalo.org): Teresa Alessandra on view through Feb 28. Mon-Thu 5:30am10pm, Fri 5:30am-6pm, Sat-Sun 8am-6pm. Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall)  (220 North St., Buffalo, NY  14201):  The Young Abraham Lincoln, the drawings of Lloyd Ostendorf. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.   Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall)  (453 Porter Ave, Buffalo, NY 14201):  Maps of the United States. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.  Meibohm Fine Arts (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940, meibohmfinearts. com):  Original Originals:  Vintage Drawings by WNY Artists, on view through Feb 10. TueSat 9:30am-5:30pm. Nina Freudenheim Gallery  (140 North Street, Lenox Hotel, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-8825777,  ninafreudenheimgallery.com):  TueFri 10am–5pm. Norberg’s Art & Frame Shop  (37 South Grove Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 716-652-

3270, norbergsartandframe.com):  Regional artists from the gallery collection.  TueSat 10am–5pm. Parables Gallery & Gifts (1027 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY,  parablesgalleryandgifts.com): Sat & Sun 12-5pm. Pausa Art House (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 697-9069 pausaarthouse. com): The Allegory of Color, show by Cassie Lipsitz. Thu-Sat by event. Pine Apple Company  (224 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-275-3648,  squareup.com/ store/pine-apple-company) Wed & Thu 11am6pm, Fri & Sat 11am-11pm, Sun 10am-5pm. Project 308 Gallery (308 Oliver Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 523-0068, project308gallery.com): Tue & Thu 7-9pm and by appointment. Queen City Gallery  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 868-8183, queencitygallery.tripod. com): Neil Mahar, David Pierro, Candace Keegan, Chris McGee, Tim Raymond, Eileen Pleasure, Eric Evinczik, Barbara Crocker, Thomas Bittner, Susan Liebel, Barbara Lynch Johnt, John Farallo,  Thomas Busch, Michael Mulley. First Friday extended hours. Tue-Fri 11am4pm and by appointment.  Revolution Gallery (1419 Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216, revolutionartgallery.com): Fathom, work by Tricia Butski, on view through Feb 17. Thu 12-6pm, Fri and Sat 12-8pm.  River Gallery and Gifts (83 Webster Street, North Tonawanda, 14051, riverartgalleryandgifts.com): Wed-Fri 11am-4pm Sat 11am- 5pm. Ró Home Shop  (732 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 240-9387,  rohomeshop.com): Work by Catherine Willett. Tue-Sat 11am-6pm, Sun 11am-4pm, closed Mondays. Sisti Gallery (6535 Campbell Blvd., Pendleton, NY 14094, 465-9138): Honoring Watercolor, works by Rita Argen Auerbach and Charles E. Burchfield. Fri 6-9, Sat & Sun 11-2pm. Slosson Gallery (7601 Seneca Street, Elma, NY 14059, 652-0930, observethis.homesteadcloud.com): Robert N. Blair, on view through

Jan 30. Tue, 2-5pm, & by appointment. Squeaky Wheel  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203,  squeaky.org): Let Me Remember: first North American solo exhibition of artist and videoactivist belit sag, on view through Mar 23.  Opening reception, Fri,  January 19,  7–9pm.  Conversation with belit sağ and Jasmina Tumbas at  7:30pm  Tue-Sat,  12pm5pm.  Stangler Fine Art (6429 West Quaker Street, Orchard Park, NY 14127, 870-1129,  stanglerart.com): Mon-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Closed Sundays. Starlight Studio and Art Gallery (340 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202,  starlightstudio. org):  3X3: Heather Swenson, Ricky Hogan, & David Feickert, on view through Feb 28. MonFri 9-4pm. Sugar City  (1239 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213,  buffalosugarcity.org): 20th Century: Drawings by Curtis A. Guy. Open by event and Fri 5:30-7:30.  UB Anderson Gallery  (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 829-3754,  ubartgalleries. org): Wanderlust: Actions, Traces, Jouneys 1967-2017. Cravens World: The Human Aesthetic. Wed-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm.  Unity Gallery (1243 Delaware Avenue,  Buffalo, NY  14209,  716-8820391)  Impact Artist’s Members on view through Feb 28. Opening reception, Sun, Jan 21,12-2pm.  Villa Maria College Paul William Beltz Family Art Gallery (240 Pine Ridge Terrace, Cheektowaga, NY 14225, 961-1833): Mon-Fri 9am-6pm, Sat 10am-5pm. Western New York Book Arts Center (468 Washington Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 3481430, wnybookarts.org): Printed Lives, an exhibition by Bob Fleming. On view Jan 25-Feb 23. Opening reception  Thu, Jan 25, 5-8pm. Wed-Sat 12-6pm.  To add your gallery’s information to the list, please contact us at info@dailypublic.com.  P

P

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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ORIN LANGELLE has spent decades documenti

10 THE PUBLIC / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


ing people around the world engaged in struggles for social, ecological, and economic justice. His new show opens at CEPA Gallery on Friday, January 26. This piece is called Riot Clown at G8 Protests, Rostock, Germany (2007). DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

11


EVENTS CALENDAR

PUBLIC APPROVED

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 17 Rita Bo Brown: The Gentleman Bank Robber 7pm Burning Books, 420 Connecticut St. [DOCUMENTARY] Rita Bo Brown grew up white and working class in rural Oregon in the 1950s. She participated in the queer liberation movements of the 1960s and 1970s, eventually joining in militant actions that included bank robberies and bombings of institutions that her underground group, the George Jackson Brigade, deemed enemies of the revolution it hoped was coming. She served eight years in federal prison, was released, and became active in prisoners rights and prison reform campaigns. A documentary about Brown, The Gentleman Bank Robber, screens Wednesday, January 17 at Burning Books. -TPS

THURSDAY JANUARY 18 Joe Goretti Electronic Quartet

THE EVERYTHINGNESS Music Box Mind ep Recommended if you like: James Taylor, Sufjan Stevens, Andrew Bird

On New Year's Day, Fredonia-based musican Paul Sottnik released

TALK THE TALK: SKYLAR BORGSTROM ON SARA ZAK AT HALLWALLS WEDNESDAY JANUARY 17 7PM / HALLWALLS, 341 DELAWARE AVE. / FREE

a new EP under the name The

[LECTURE] “The lush and buttery nature of Zak’s paintings seduces me,” Skylar Borgstrom says of fellow

Everythingness. The EP, titled

artist Sara Zak. “I literally cannot stop staring, analyzing. It is only when I walk away that I realize

Music Box Mind, features three tracks of pop music with a focus

how haunting the work is without ever being able to identify why. This discussion seeks to examine

on Sottnik’s observational lyrics

that tension between beauty and the disturbing.” Talk the Talk is a new lecture series at Hallwalls

and cheerful singing. Additional

Contemporary Arts Center, in which a regional artist presents and discusses the work of another

musical accompaniment is provided

regional artist. It’s a winning idea, and in the latest installment Bergstrom examines Zak, whose work

by drummer Trevor Jennings and

has been featured frequently in The Public. Borgsrtom’s talk takes place Wednesday, January 17 at

violinist Cortland Mahoney. Stream the first single, “Blockbuster Video

Hallwalls. -GEOFF KELLY

7pm Pausa Art House, 19 Wadsworth St. $5-$7 [JAZZ] Billed as “a celebration of the evolution of music,” Joe Goretti and his Electronic Quartet will perform at Pausa Art House on Thursday, January 18. The band will perform three sets that reinterpret jazz sounds and techniques through mostly electronic instruments. -CP

Ashley McBryde 7:30pm 189 Public House, 189 Main St. Free [COUNTRY] What a voice Ashley McBryde has—not just her singing but her songwriting. The Arkansas native’s “A Little Dive Bar in Dahlonega” was named one of the 54 best songs of 2017 by Jon Pareles of the New York Times, and for good reason. (“A hearty, expertly written country song about hope after hopelessness,” Pareles wrote.) McBryde plays Thursday, January 28 at the cozy 189 Public House in East Aurora, which is decidedly not a dive bar and which, like Sportsmen’s Tavern, has a knack for landing top-notch country and Americana acts between big engagements— for McBryde, that’s two nights at Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium, first week in February. And there's no cover charge. -GK

Spafford

Man” on Bandcamp.”

,

9pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $20

PUBLIC APPROVED

ANTIROCKSTARS "This Beautiful Memory" single

Recommended if you like: Staind, Fuel, Stone Sour

Having debuted on New Year's Eve 2009, Spafford is a solid jam-ish band that's gone on to host many an official after-party for Furthur Festival and Widespread Panic, to name a couple. The focus is on having a good time with a dash of spiritual enlightenment, and there's a little something in the mix for everyone: blues, funk, and driving rock and roll. It's the sort of user-friendly stuff that's gotten the Arizona-born quartet recurring spots on the Vegas nightlife circuit at venues like Hard Rock and the Palms…these guys have skills. On Thursday, January 18, Spafford comes to Buffalo Iron Works with openers Goose, a folkie-funk (?!) quintet from Connecticut. 9:00 p.m., $20. - CJT

FRIDAY JANUARY 19

Buffalo-based journeyman musician antirockstars released a bizarre animated music video earlier this

belit sag: Let Me Remember

month. The song is a slow-burning

7pm Squeaky Wheel, 617 Main Street

alternative rock ballad featuring

[VIDEO] While the battle drums of rightwing extremism have only recently spilled into the daylight of American mainstream consciousness, in Europe the ambient hum of racially motivated hate groups has never truly subsided. Squeaky Wheel’s first show of 2018 is a big one, the North American debut of a video artist who plumbs the depths of hate crimes and right-wing terrorism. Blending archival footage of victims, images from crime scenes, and transcripts of the trials documented by activist groups, belit sag’s genre-bending work is provocative enough to draw two new essays and a public conversation with UB art professor Jasmina Tumbas into the show with her for the opening this Friday night. -AL

emotional vocals and dreary

GARY GULMAN THURSDAY JANUARY 18

instrumentation. The video for the song features a love story between

8PM / HELIUM COMEDY CLUB, 30 MISSISSIPPI ST. / $17 - $25

an androgynous young person and a

[COMEDY] When Gary Gulman logs onto Netflix, he likes Netflix to recommend his own comedy

green humanoid alien that ends with a heartbreaking twist.

specials to him. “I’m always being suggested comedians who aren’t me, and I have to admit, I am my favorite comedian, because I talk about all of the things I’m interested in, so Netflix really missed to

DO YOU MAKE MUSIC? HAVE A RECOMMENDATION?

boat as far as suggesting me to me,” the comedian told The Public in a 2015 interview. Now that’s

CONTACT CORY@DAILYPUBLIC.COM TO BE CONSIDERED IN OUR WEEKLY PUBLIC PICKS.

Where his previous special, In This Economy, was mostly about, well, the economy, It’s About

even more likely, as since then Gulman has released another Netflix special, titled It’s About Time.

Time touches on his own personal short falls—his laziness, his various neuroses—and, of course, Hitler. The 47-year-old Boston-based comedian comes to Helium Comedy Club for five shows, this Thursday, January 18 through Saturday, January 20. -CORY PERLA

12 THE PUBLIC / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

CONTINUED ON PAGE 13


CALENDAR EVENTS

PUBLIC APPROVED

PRESENTS

PEACH PICKS AT PEACH: Yesterday, we published two poems at Peach by Alain Ginsberg, an agender writer and performer from Baltimore “Self Portrait as Waluigi,” is a

SNAPCASE SATURDAY JANUARY 20

beautiful meditation on identity.

7PM / TOWN BALLROOM, 681 MAIN ST. / $26-$30

City, Maryland. The poem,

“It is no effort to figure out who I am / without knowing how I have lived; / without knowing how I have ended.” “Self Portrait as Waluigi” deals with friendship, self image, relationships, childhood, gender,

[HARDCORE] If Buffalo leaves a hardcore legacy, Snapcase will be prominently featured. Born in a West Seneca basement in 1989, the then-teen quartet went on to record for Chicago’s Victory label (Hawthorne Heights, Taking Back Sunday), releasing a half dozen albums in 14 years before disbanding in 2005. Several reunions have transpired since, including one last year to celebrate the band’s 25th anniversary. The party continues into year 26 at Town Ballroom on Saturday, January 20. Arrive early for opening sets from locals Pimento, Philly-based Kite Fight, and Ontario melodic hardcore quartet Counterparts. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY

and more. This Friday we will be featuring several images by local photographer and book artist Joel Brenden. The series,

The Grammar of Your Question (about white houses), features

PUBLIC APPROVED

several stunning spreads of homes and neighborhoods. In pale pink and black, Brenden’s pieces explore solitude and occasionally the surreal.

Buffalo’s Premier Live Music Club

IN PRINT​: Malacqua: Four Days of Rain in the City of Naples, Waiting for the Occurrence of an Extraordinary Event By Nicola Pugliese (trans. by

◆ FRIDAY, JANUARY 19 ◆

happy hour: dj nicholas reid 5PM ◆ FREE

BYRON STRIPLING AND THE BPO: ELLA, DUKE, CAB AND MORE SATURDAY JANUARY 20

be locust or alone

cassette/digital release show

lara buckley, pat kewley, velvet bethany ◆

Shaun Whiteside) And Other Stories / fiction

After not being published at the time it was written, Malacqua was then picked up by Nicola Pugliese and inexplicably withdrawn from publication even though it was widely successful. It was re-released after the author’s

8PM $5

◆ SATURDAY, JANUARY 20 ◆

8PM / KLEINHANS MUSIC HALL, 3 SYMPHONY CIRCLE / $29-$84 [JAZZ] Trumpeter Byron Stripling’s CV reads like the index of a jazz history textbook: He

has toured and recorded with Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan, Sonny Rollins, Woody Herman, Paquito D’Rivera, and Lionel Hampton, to pull just a half dozen names from the list. On Saturday, January 20 at Kleinhans Music Hall, Stripling takes a soloist turn in the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra’s pop series, in a program featuring the music of Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Cab Calloway, and others from the American jazz canon. This is definitely one of the highlights of the BPO’s winter season. -GEOFF KELLY

death in 2012, and was translated into English by Shaun Whiteside in 2017. Written during a period

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

of political unrest and frequent

Born a Rebel: A Tribute to Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers

terrorism in Naples, Malacqua takes place during a fourday long rainstorm of biblical proportion, where more and more mysterious events begin to transpire. The tale is told through the various points of view of the residents living through the experience.

7pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $8-$10 [TRIBUTE] Since singer/songwriter Tom Petty died suddenly in October, there have been a few tributes to the legendary artist, but maybe not one quite as big as this one. A whole bunch of well known Buffalo-based musicians have banded together to pay tribute to Petty, and on top of that, a portion of ticket sales go to the Puerto Rico Relief Fund. Check out Born a Rebel this Friday, January 19 at Buffalo Iron Works. -CP

Laugh and Other Drugs

PEACHMGZN.COM

7pm , $10-$12 [COMEDY] There’s no shortage of aspiring comics floating around these days, but this recurrent series seems to focus on the best

talent Buffalo has to offer. January’s edition features Rick Matthews, Dan Mahoney, Greg Bauch, Nora Hurley, Ryan Henry, and Sam Minney taking turns at the mic. We could all stand to be more amused during the current political shitshow, so consider it $10 (or $12 at the door) well spent – because laughter is the best medicine. Friday, January 19 at Babeville’s 9th Ward. -TPS

arcadia

wolf tickets, the clockers, off the avenue, grain assault 6PM ◆ $5

◆ SUNDAY, JANUARY 21 ◆

ftmp events presents:

fernway

ghostpool, previous love from ann arbor, mi fallow land sparkplug ◆ 6:30PM $10 ADV./$12 DAY OF SHOW

◆ TUESDAY, JANUARY 23 ◆

after dark presents brings you:

marigold

Heave, Greg Priester (of Into The Wake) 7PM ◆ $10

◆ FRIDAY, JANUARY 26 ◆

after dark presents brings you:

Be Locust or Alone 8pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $5

[INDIE] Local drone-hybrid Be Locust or Alone, featuring Bill Nehill on vocals, celebrates the release of a new album, Silly, available digitally or on cassette! On Friday, January 19 at Mohawk Place, they’re joined by a delightfully oddball lineup, featuring

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14

out last

deep valleys, terrorbyte, squatch,◆ the scarecrow show 6:30PM $10 ADV./$12 DAY OF SHOW

47 East Mohawk St. 716.312.9279

BUFFALOSMOHAWKPLACE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/MOHAWKPLACE

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / THE PUBLIC 13


EVENTS CALENDAR

PLEASE EXAMINE THIS PROOF CAREFULLY

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

PUBLIC APPROVED

innovative songstress (and Hickory Sanctuary proprietress) Lara Buckley, writer/performing artist Pat Kewley and garage-y duo Velvet Bethany. -CJT

SATURDAY JANUARY 20 MESSAGE TO ADVERTISER

Thank you for advertising with THE PUBLIC. Please review your ad and Arcadia, Wolf Tickets, the Clockers, Off check for any errors. The original layout the Avenue and Grain Assault instructions have been followed as closely 6pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $5 as possible. THE PUBLIC offers Ifdesign [ROCK] you’re looking for some homegrown services with two proofsalternative at no charge. THEthis weekend, head to rock PUBLIC is not responsible for any errorfor if a solid line up. Arcadia, Mohawk Place, not notified within 24 hours receipt.the TheClockers, Off the Avenue Wolf of Tickets, production department and must Grain have a signed Assault will take over the proof in order to print. downtown Please signvenue and fax on Saturday, January 20 this back or approve by to responding to this deliver some grungy, fuzzy rock music all email. night long. -TPS

LIVEMUSICEVERYNIGHTFOROVER30YEARS! WEDNESDAY

JAN 17

spacey stacey 9PM $5

THURSDAY

JAN 18

chris eves & the new normal, weazildust, cypher 9PM $5

FRIDAY

JAN 19

free happy hour w/jony james 6PM FREE

all wny news & radio presents:

tokyo monsters,

nuke fun, groove nektar, humble state 10PM $5

SATURDAY

JAN 20

MONDAY

JAN 22

WEDNESDAY

JAN 24

litz, cold lazarus 10PM $8

jazz happy hour w/adam bronstein 5:30PM FREE

ZAZ & ELI

PHOENIX RISING FUNDRAISER W/CIRCULAR LOGIC, DEBOUCH, 20,0000 STRONGMEN, UNIFLORA, AND BURLESQUE 9PM $5

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dark road duo,

HENRY ROLLINS SUNDAY JANUARY 21

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CHECK NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE #, & WEBSITE

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Women’s Solidarity March

one year after the largest worldwide protest in history? Last January, the Women’s March turned out millions in Washington, DC, New Advertisers Signature 7PM / TOWN BALLROOM, 681 MAIN ST. / $30-$155 York City, Los Angeles—in cities and towns of all sizes, actually—to demonstrate for all ____________________________ [PRESENTATION] Rather than just running off at the mouth, which he’s exceptionally good at, manner of causes, from gender equality to police reform, from basic human rights for Date _______________________ Henry Rollins has opted for something a little different this tour, using his wide library of personal all to an end to militarism. The anniversary will be marked on Sunday, January 21, with Issue: _____________________ GEOFF / Y18W3 photographs as jumping-off points for anecdotes about his traveling adventures—it’s a “Travel more marches in cities across the country (and around IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS WHICH ARE ONthe world), and the focal point Slideshow.” There’s an intimacy to sharing personal photos, which often reveal viewpoints not as in Western New York is Buffalo’s Niagara THIS PROOF, THE PUBLIC CANNOT Square. TheBEmarch begins on the steps of easily articulated in other mediums, making this an unusual opportunity toHELD understand RollinsPLEASE RESPONSIBLE. EXAMINE AD wends its way through City Hall atTHE 2:30pm, downtown, then returns to Niagara Square THOROUGHLY EVEN IF THE AD IS A PICK-UP. in ways that are less obvious in his music and writing. Anything is possible, but we’re told photos slate of speakers. The WNY Peace THIS PROOF MAY ONLY BE for USEDaFOR Center is sending a bus to Seneca Falls, the from the Middle East, Africa, Central Asia, South America, and AntarcticaPUBLICATION will be highlighted, IN THE PUBLIC. cradle of the US women’s suffrage movement, on Saturday, too: Check out wnypeace.org if Sunday, January 21 at Town Ballroom. -CHRISTOPHER JOHN TREACY you’re interested in that. -TPS

MONDAY JANUARY 22 SYML

PUBLIC APPROVED

7pm Tralf Music Hall, 622 Main St. $1.07-$10 Barcelona frontman Brian Fennell's solo project, SYML, allows him to explore more pared-down, singer-songwriter fare that he's recorded at his basement studio just outside Seattle in Issaquah, Washington. Moodier and more heavily textured than his work in Barcelona, SYML debuted in 2016 with an EP, Hurt for Me, which he's now followed up withIn My Body, out last week—both EPs contain the track "Where's My Love," which makes an excellent example of the hushedbut-emotionally-charged territory Fennell's in with SYML. The word SYML means "simple" in Welsh—a nod to Fennell's roots, with which he's only recently become connected, having been an adopted child. He brings unannounced special guests with him to the Tralf Music Hall on Monday, January 22. Doors are at 7pm and, as the show is sponsored by 107.7 Alternative Buffalo, tickets are $1.07 in advance and $10 at the door. -CJT

CINDY HAIGHT & THE LOVES 9PM FREE

FRIDAY

JAN 26

happy hour w/the fibs 6PM FREE

swimmer skyepilot, haewa 10PM $5

SATURDAY

JAN 27

BLOUSES OF THE HOLY 9PM $7

WEEKLY EVENTS EVERY SUNDAY FREE

6PM. ANN PHILIPPONE

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KEYS N KRATES WEDNESDAY JANUARY 24

TUESDAY JANUARY 23 Marigold

8PM / TOWN BALLROOM, 681 MAIN ST. / $23-$27

THE STEAM DONKEYS 8PM. RUSTBELT COMEDY 10PM. JOE DONOHUE 11PM. THE STRIPTEASERS $3

[ELECTRONIC/DANCE] Canadian trio Keys n Krates do well what many artists struggle to do—

EVERY WEDNESDAY FREE

good about both styles. A talented turntablest in Jr. Flo, is joined by drummer Adam Tune, and

6PM. TYLER WESTCOTT & DR. JAZZ

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248 ALLEN STREET 716.886.8539

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combine electronic dance music with live instrumentation. They really combine everything that’s

keyboardist David Matisse to create a sound that flows like a DJ set while wowing audience by their live collaboration. The three-piece band from Toronto has released records on Steve Aoki’s Dim Mak record label as well as the Diplo run Mad Decent label. Their latest, Midnite Mass, is an EDM spectacle with a hint of hip hop inspiration that the band says was influenced in equal part by Caribou and Drake. Catch Keys n Krates at the Town Ballroom on Wednesday, January 24 with support from Falcons and Jubilee. -CORY PERLA

14 THE PUBLIC / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

P

7pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $10 [INDIE] Marigold is the recently minted solo project of Head North's Benjamin Lieber; he played his first show under the Marigold moniker just last February. His album, Counterfeit Art, is an impressive watershed of multi-instrumental creativity. And in this case, solo doesn't mean precious or terribly folksy—more introspective, perhaps—but Counterfeit Art has plenty of high-octane moments that are well complemented by volume. Lieber really pours himself into these tunes and, at times, shreds his pipes a bit, but there's enough melodic ear candy to create a balance with his edgiest moments. Show up to Mohawk Place on Tuesday, January 23 and show a little support for one of our more promising talents as he embarks on a short run of Northeastern gigs. Heave and Greg Priester (of Into the Wake) round P out the bill. -CJT


PHOTO BY TOM SICKLER

Welcome to The Public, Partner. Right now, locally and nationally, the independent, alternative press is more important than ever. Here at The Public, we aim to get BIGGER and BETTER. Subscribe to The Public at PATREON.COM/THE PUBLIC . Your pledge will help us to keep bringing you the work of some of the region’s best WRITERS, ARTISTS, and DESIGNERS. (It’ll also earn you some sweet rewards and our undying gratitude.) Visit our Patreon page today. You’re our public. We’re your Public. Let’s tell our stories together.

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FILM REVIEW movie. That’s not to say that it isn’t appropriate for kids, and if you are tasked with the care of any by all means take them to see these newest adventures of the “short but polite” talking bear, as good a role model as you could ask for. But it takes an adult to truly appreciate Paddington’s good nature, so lacking everywhere you turn. (The trailers for two upcoming animated movies, filled with fart and ass jokes, that opened the show drove this point home.) Likewise, kids are unlikely to derive full pleasure from such sights as the Downton Abbey’s Earl of Grantham, a.k.a. Hugh Bonneville, doing yoga splits, or Dr. Who (Peter Capaldi) as a neighborhood crank, or The IT Crowd’s Richard Ayoade as a forensic investigator. (Director Michael Bond is best known for the cult comedy show The Mighty Boosh, so it’s no surprise that this is a bottomless font for Anglophiles.) Best of all is Hugh Grant as a villainous ham actor who gets to dress up in any number of ridiculous costumes before ending the film with a production number that only Mel Brooks has ever matched. ***

Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name. The star-studded cast of The Post.

POST HOC THE POST, PADDINGTON 2, THE COMMUTER, THIS GIANT PAPIER-MÂCHÉ BOULDER IS ACTUALLY REALLY HEAVY BY M. FAUST AS A DRAMATIC location, you can’t beat a newspaper office in the pre-computer era. If anyone ever makes a movie set in the offices of a major newspaper in 2017, they won’t need a tracking camera to follow editors around the offices as they interrupt reporters furiously banging on manual typewriters. Nor will that movie have the benefit of giant clanking presses to visualize the importance of it all.

The Post is set in 1971, and it takes advantage of all that stuff. But Steven Spielberg’s movie, which tells the story of the Washington Post’s struggles to publish the top-secret Pentagon Papers, is no more about Nixon era politics than The Crucible was about the Salem with trials. Rushed into production earlier this year, The Post is clearly about the need for a free press to stand up against the lies that fuel Trumpism. Which is not to say that it isn’t a canny piece of dramatic entertainment. Tom Hanks may not be able to get into a character as complex as Post editor Ben Bradlee, but he isn’t really called to, and he’s just fine at rousing bluster. Similarly, the Katherine Graham that Meryl Streep is asked to play is probably more cowering and timorous than the real lady who

AT THE MOVIES A selective guide to what’s opening and what’s playing in local moviehouses and other venues

OPENING THIS WEEK CALL ME BY YOUR NAME—James Ivory scripted this coming-of-age story set in an Italian villa where an intellectual young man (Timothée Chalamet) experiences first love with his father’s summer intern (Armie Hammer). With Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar, and Esther Garrel. Directed by Luca Guadagnino (A Bigger Splash). Reviewed this issue. Dipson Amherst DEN OF THIEVES—“Thieves without fear. Cops without limits,” proclaims the exhausting trailer for this LA thriller in which I can’t tell who we’re supposed to be rooting for. With Gerard Butler, Pablo Schreiber, O’Shea Jackson Jr., and 50 Cent. The directorial debut of London Has Fallen writer Christian Gudegast. Dipson Flix, Regal Transit HANGMAN—Serial killer thriller with detective Al Pacino, criminal profiler Karl Urban, and journalist Brittany Snow on the track of a killer who bases his murders on the titular game. Directed by Johnny Martin

became publisher of the paper after the death of her husband, but that makes it all the more inspiring when she stands up to the personal and financial advisors who want her not to rock the boat. (Several scenes of women lining up to see Graham in public places have clearly chosen appealing to a contemporary audience over verisimilitude.) The real acting comes from a less expected role, Bob Odenkirk’s portrayal of reporter Ben Bagdikian, who was instrumental in getting a hard copy of the papers after the New York Times was enjoined by Nixon from publishing them. Enjoyable as it is, The Post may not meet the measure of success that Spielberg probably wants: Will it inspire Americans to remember our real values, or will it only preach to the choir? Bradlee’s earnest plea that “The way they lied—those days have to be over. We have to hold them accountable. If we don’t, who will?” may, in the long run, be seen with bitter irony as a cri de coeur for a battle that was lost years ago. *** On the topic of films that are not what they may appear to be, don’t be fooled into thinking that Paddington 2 is a children’s

(Vengeance: A Love Story). Hamburg Palace PHANTOM THREAD—Daniel Day-Lewis reunites with There Will Be Blood director Paul Thomas Anderson for this drama set in England in the 1950s about a famous dressmaker whose well-ordered life is disrupted by his inexperienced new model (Vicky Krieps). Co-starring Lesley Manville, Harriet Sansom Harris, Camilla Rutherford, and Gina McKee. Reviewed this issue. Dipson Amherst, Dipson Eastern Hills 12 STRONG—Jerry Bruckheimer production based on a true story of the Special Forces team that was the first US unit sent into Afghanistan after 911. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Michael Shannon, Michael Peña, Navid Negahban, Rob Riggle, and our own William Fichtner. Directed by Nicolai Fuglsig. Dipson Flix, Regal Transit

ALTERNATIVE CINEMA THE BIRD WITH THE CRYSTAL PLUMAGE (Italy, 1970)—Dario Argento’s directorial debut set the pattern for his distinctive oeuvre: An innocent man becomes involved in the hunt for a seemingly psychotic, brutal murderer, whose attacks form the set pieces around which the film is built. The music (by Ennio Morricone) and widescreen photography (by Vittorio Storaro) are both first-rate. Starring Tony Musante and Suzy Kendall. Thu 5

16 THE PUBLIC / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Still, perhaps you are not the sort of viewer who appreciates a film in which people blurt dialogue like, “I have just been spilled upon by chilled liquid!” In that case, you may find The Commuter  more to your liking. The latest of Liam Neeson’s roles as a kickass action star (surely the most unexpected career shift in acting history since Leslie Nielsen turned to comedy) reunites him with director Jaume Collet-Serra, who has made better-than-average use of Neeson in films like Unknown, Ride All Night,  and  Non-Stop.  Like that last one, which was set on an airplane in flight, The Commuter takes place almost entirely on an evening train out of Manhattan to the suburbs. Neeson’s character is again tasked with a mystery to be solved before it reaches its destination, about which the less said the better. It’s not as well-tooled as Non-Stop, and if I hesitate to lay out the mechanism of the plot it’s partly because discovering it in the movie is better than how it plays out. (I had a lot of “But what about…” questions on my way out of the theater.) The proceedings have just enough action to keep you awake without making you feel bludgeoned, if not quite enough plot to make you feel that it was worth all the build up. *** You may suspect that any film called This Giant Papier-Mâché Boulder Is Actually Really Heavy is unlikely to be as interesting as its title. That depends on how much of a fan you are of cheesy old science fiction movies, or of Star Wars. Made in New Zealand on a budget that probably went entirely to film editing software, this comedy takes a trio of geeks at a sci-fi convention into the movie they’re watching. Literally. Writer-director Christian Nicolson, who also had to become the film’s star when his actor quit at the last minute, clearly spent as much of his youth watching Monty Python as he did Flash Gordon and The Giant Gila Monster. He cheerfully turns his shortcomings into an advantage, or at least a joke, and if it gets tiresome along the way rouses itself for a likeable ending. Those who check it out at the Screening Room this week may bear in mind that making no-budget genre spoofs in New Zealand was exactly how Peter Jackson got started. P

7:30pm. Screening Room

CONTINUING

LIFEBOAT (1944)—The first and most successful of Alfred Hitchcock’s usually self-defeating experiments in restricting his cinematic canvas. A lifeboat in the Atlantic ocean holds nine people: eight survivors of a ship torpedoed by a German submarine, and one of the sub’s crewmen. The war propaganda aspect dates it (even Spielberg might consider the Nazi caricature a bit excessive), but it remains interesting as an exercise in style. With William Bendix, Tallulah Bankhead, Walter Slezak, and Hume Cronyn. Fri 7:30pm, Sat 9pm, Tues 5:30pm. Screening Room

ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD—Ridley Scott’s depiction of the 1973 kidnapping of John Paul Getty III, whose grandfather, at the time the richest person in the history of the world, refused to pay his ransom, the kind of “based on actual events” drama that you sit through eager to go to Wikipedia to find out what really happened. The differences are substantial enough to make you wonder what director Ridley Scott and screenwriter David Scarpa (adapting a book by John Pearson) were thinking. Scott clearly loves shooting in Italy, but most of the characterizations are implausible other than Getty (Christopher Plummer), a monster whose motivations you wish they had devoted more time to. By contrast Michelle Williams (laboring under a bad accent and worse wig) and Mark Wahlberg feel like afterthoughts. —M. Faust Regal Elmwood, Regal Quaker, Regal Walden Galleria COCO—An aspiring young musician visits the Land of the Dead for guidance in this new Pixar animated movie. Voices of Anthony Gonzalez, Gael García Bernal, Benjamin Bratt, and Alanna Ubach. Directed by Lee Unkrich (Toy Story 3) and Adrian Molina. Four Seasons, Regal Quaker THE COMMUTER— Non-Stop director Jaume Collet-Serra and star Liam Neeson reunite

MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE (1987)—Because how often do you get to see Dolph Lundgren, Frank Langella, and Billy Barty in the same movie? Langella once told an interviewer that playing Skeletor was one of his favorite movie roles, and to his credit he does look like he’s having a good time. With Meg Foster and Courteney Cox. Directed by Gary Goddard. Sat-Sun 11:30am. North Park THIS GIANT PAPIER-MÂCHÉ BOULDER IS ACTUALLY REALLY HEAVY—Sci-fi spoof from New Zealand. Starring Daniel Pujol, Sez Niederer, Lewis Roscoe, Joseph Wycoff, and Christian Nicolson, who also directed. Reviewed this issue. Fri 9:30pm, Tue-Wed  7:30pm. Screening Room

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IN THEATERS FILM intense sexual affair and deep mutual affection. This happens only gradually and hesitantly. The movie’s pacing is leisurely. What must be the mutual tension between the two is often obscured by this slow, interrupted progress. There’s sometimes a languorous feel to Call Me, and this is part of its pull, its seductive appeal. (It may, however, make some viewers impatient.)

LOCAL THEATERS AMHERST THEATRE (DIPSON) 3500 Main St., Buffalo / 834-7655 amherst.dipsontheatres.com AURORA THEATRE 673 Main St., East Aurora / 652-1660 theauroratheatre.com

Guadagnino and cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom have created a voluptuously appealing movie, its surface and compositions elegant and compelling. Call Me delivers what cultural critic Susan Sontag once called movie’s “sensual elaboration.” New York Times reviewer Manohla Dargis said the film is “a ravishment of the senses.” Its visual depiction of a glorious natural setting and glamorously picturesque towns and villages is sensuously seductive.

EASTERN HILLS CINEMA (DIPSON) 4545 Transit Rd., / Eastern Hills Mall Williamsville / 632-1080 easternhills.dipsontheatres.com FLIX STADIUM 10 (DIPSON) 4901 Transit Rd., Lancaster / 668-FLIX flix10.dipsontheatres.com

Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer in Call Me by Your Name.

FOUR SEASONS CINEMA 6 2429 Military Rd. (behind Big Lots), Niagara Falls / 297-1951 fourseasonscinema.com

PEACHES AND CREAM

HALLWALLS 341 Delaware Ave., Buffalo / 854-1694 hallwalls.org

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME

HAMBURG PALACE 31 Buffalo St., Hamburg / 649-2295 hamburgpalace.com

BY GEORGE SAX MORE THAN 30 YEARS ago, in an afterward to his groundbreaking study of the movie industry’s use and misuse of gay characters and themes, The Celluloid Closet, Vito Russo wrote that he’d decided “that what we need is no more films about homosexuality.” The ones then being made were really for non-gays, part of a weak attempt to remedy Hollywood’s abusive history. Russo said he wasn’t interested in convincing Americans “that…I’m not interested in molesting their dreary children or that the Bible doesn’t really say I’m headed for their world-famous but quite imaginary Hell… The history of the portrayal of lesbians and gay men is politically indefensible and aesthetically revolting.” What was needed, he wrote, were movies that took gay lives for granted.

LOCKPORT PALACE 2 East Ave., Lockport / 438-1130 lockportpalacetheatre.org MAPLE RIDGE 8 (AMC) 4276 Maple Rd., Amherst / 833-9545 amctheatres.com MCKINLEY 6 THEATRES (DIPSON) 3701 McKinley Pkwy. / McKinley Mall Hamburg / 824-3479 mckinley.dipsontheatres.com NORTH PARK THEATRE 1428 Hertel Ave., Buffalo / 836-7411 northparktheatre.org REGAL ELMWOOD CENTER 16 2001 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo / 871–0722 regmovies.com

Decades later, even in the stridently reactionary Trump era, the place of gays in American society is so much closer to being “taken for granted.” Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me by Your Name is a bit of a curiosity now, even though it aims to deliver a liberational message. Guadagnino’s movie is both reflective of the great changes that have occurred in gays’ lives and opportunities,

REGAL NIAGARA FALLS STADIUM 12 720 Builders Way, Niagara Falls 236–0146 regmovies.com

and at least a little anachronistic. Adapted from André Aciman’s 2007 novel of the same title, it portrays a crucial affair between a young man in his 20s and a 17-year-old youth having his first physical homosexual experience. It’s also about the changes in the boy’s heart and mind. Elio (Timothée Chalamet) is the son of a wealthy, prominent American professor or Greco-Roman archeology (Michael Stuhlbarg) and a rather idle, Renaissance poetry-reading mother (Amira Cesar). The Perlmans, a secularly Jewish family, summer in an ancient villa in Northern Italy. The first words of dialogue in Call Me are Elio’s utterance of “The interloper,” as he gazes from his bedroom window at a man exiting a car below. He’s been fooling around with a girl (Esther Garrel) who has begun to consider herself his. The alleged interloper is Oliver (Armie Hammer), an American grad student who’s come to the villa to spend six weeks as the professor’s assistant. It’s not clear why Elio should react that way, or if he’s just kidding, but a slightly tense and teasing relationship between the two eventually grows into an

Ravishment is an apt term because this is also a seriously erotic movie. It celebrates carnality. (There’s an incident involving Elio’s employment of a place for self-gratification that will probably linger long in some people’s memories.) Chalamet is persuasive as the conflicted, exploring youth who learns about himself and others through his affair with Oliver. The actor almost perfectly embodies his character; he’s at once both coltishly graceful and adolescently ungainly, rather than merely pretty. Hammer has a moderately harder chore in personifying an older, more mature lover who finds himself vulnerable to the boy’s desire even as his sexuality is supposed to be more settled. (It was probably a mistake to have him on dance floors so much; he’s not a terpsichorean natural.) Whatever imbalance there is isn’t critical. What’s more problematic is Call Me’s seemingly deliberate isolation from most of the real world. The Perlmans’ elevated social and economic situation, the setting so gorgeously atypical and almost otherworldly (we’re only told that we’re “somewhere in northern Italy” in 1983) that when, at the end, Guadagnino and script writer James Ivory (Maurice) want to suggest something important about life, love and selflearning, it rings a little hollow. Call Me has an implicitly softening nostalgic appeal. It’s technically impressive and its entrancements are easy enough to yield to, but its very limited social and historical relevance restricts its attempts at a deepened impact. P

REGAL QUAKER CROSSING 18 3450 Amelia Dr., Orchard Park / 827–1109 regmovies.com

and sometimes gimmicky DOWNSIZING—A utopian science fashion. While there has been fiction story about saving our for another enclosed-space no lack of Churchills on screens planet’s natural resources by thriller, this one involving a small and large recently, this is encouraging people to submit to criminal conspiray unfolding likely to remain the one huge a process that shrinks them to on a commuter train. With numbers of people remember. a size of four inches is probably REGAL WALDEN GALLERIA STADIUM 16 Vera Farmiga, Patrick Wilson, With Ben Mendelsohn, Kristin not what you were expecting One Walden Galleria Dr., Cheektowaga Jonathan Banks, Sam Neill, and Scott Thomas, and Lily from filmmaker Alexander Payne 681-9414 / regmovies.com Elizabeth McGovern. Reviewed James. —George Sax  Dipson (Election, About Schmidt). And this issue. Dipson Flix, Regal Amherst, Dipson Eastern Hills despite all the intriguing details RIVIERA THEATRE Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, ENDS THURSDAY that such a premise calls out 67 Webster St., North Tonawanda Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, THE DISASTER ARTIST certainly to explore, it’s really not what 692-2413 / rivieratheatre.org Regal Walden Galleria doesn’t provide everything you get. Matt Damon stars as DARKEST HOUR—Gary Oldman may you’ve always wanted to know the everyman who finds that THE SCREENING ROOM not seem like a likely candidate about Tommy Wiseau, but it’s getting small doesn’t bring in the Boulevard Mall, 880 Alberta Drive, to portray Winston Churchill, everything he’s willing to let you him satisfaction in a world that Amherst 837-0376 /screeningroom.net but beneath cosmetic padding know. The auteur behind The still holds different people as and facial reconstruction he Room, the Plan 9 From Outer unequals, and his quest for SQUEAKY WHEEL gives a bravura performance of Space of the new millennium, has meaning takes him away from 712 Main St., / 884-7172 the great as he becomes kept>> his background a secret, and what would seem to have been VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM FOR MORE FILMman LISTINGS & REVIEWS squeaky.org prime minister of England at this good-natured movie directed the movie’s central idea, which one of the lowest points in that by James Franco (who also plays is a shame. The witty satire of SUNSET DRIVE-IN country’s history, in he early Wiseau) has no revelations the film’s first half and its more 9950 Telegraph Rd., Middleport days of World War II. Churchill to offer. Like Tim Burton’s Ed heartfelt denouement seem to 735-7372 / sunset-drivein.com was one of the Western world’s Wood, the film is less interested belong to different films. With greatest political actors, a man in getting cheap laughs than in Christoph Waltz, Hong Chau, TJ’S THEATRE acutely aware of his effect on the paying tribute to characters who Kristen Wiig, Rolf Lassgård, Udo 72 North Main St., Angola / 549-4866 public, and Oldman captures him fought against substantial odds, Kier, and Jason Sudeikis. —MF newangolatheater.com VISIT DAILYPUBLIC.COM MORE FILM not LISTINGS REVIEWS as variouslyFOR pugnacious, smugly least of all&their utter lack >> Four Seasons, Regal Quaker self-possessed, rhetorically of talent, to get a movie made. FERDINAND—Animated adaptation TRANSIT DRIVE-IN soaring, acerbic, and sometimes With Dave Franco, Seth Rogen, of the children’s book about a 6655 South Transit Rd., Lockport privately abashed. Joe Wright Ari Graynor, Alison Brie, Jacki peaceable bull. With the voices 625-8535 / transitdrivein.com (Atonement) directs in his Weaver, Zac Efron, and Megan of John Cena, Kate McKinnon, Anthony Anderson, Bobby customary technically emphatic Mullally. –MF Regal Elmwood

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 16

REGAL TRANSIT CENTER 18 Transit and Wehrle, Lancaster / 633–0859 regmovies.com

CULTURE > FILM

CULTURE > FILM

Cannavale, Peyton Manning, and Gina Rodriguez. Directed by Carlos Saldanha (Rio). Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria THE GREATEST SHOWMAN—Musical based on the life of circus magnate P. T. Barnum. Starring Hugh Jackman, Michelle Williams, and Zac Efron. Directed by Michael Gracey. AUrora (OPENS FRI), Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY—Horror sequel. Starring Lin Shaye, Angus Sampson, Leigh Whannell, and Josh Stewart. Directed by Adam Robitel. Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria I, TONYA—Though the story of “white trash” skater Tonya Harding and her involvement with an attack on her Olympic rival Nancy Kerrigan is less than 25 years old, the truth of what happened is less than clear. So director Craig Gillespie (Lars and

CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

CULTURE > FILM

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FILM AT THE MOVIES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 17 the Real Girl) and writer Steven Rogers start out their biopic with a disclaimer that it is “Based on irony-free, wildly contradictory and totally true interviews with Tonya Harding and [her ex-husband] Jeff Gillooly.” The result is an entertainment that borrows equally from Fargo and Goodfellas, directly addressing the tabloid-reading audience just enough to let them feel off the hook about their complicity in creating such stories. Margot Robbie doesn’t much resemble the real Harding but plays the role with gutsy brio, doing much of her own skating. Allison Janney nearly steals the film as LaVona Harding, who as a mother makes Joan Crawford look like June Cleaver. With Sebastian Stan and Bobby Canavale. —MF Dipson Eastern Hills, North Park, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE—Reboot of the 1995 movie about a board game that pulls its players into an all too real situation. Starring Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Black, Karen Gillan, and Bobby Cannavale. Directed by Jake Kasdan (Sex Tape). Aurora (ENDS THURSDAY), Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria LADY BIRD—Greta Gerwig makes her debut as a writer-director in this winning comedy-drama inspired by her own youth as a teenager desperate to get away from a bland suburb of Sacramento. Saoirse Ronan stars as a senior at a Catholic high school, an ordinary girl desperate to be extraordinary, though it’s hard to be special when the exact nature of your specialness isn’t quite clear to you. This generous and perceptive movie covers a year in her life in short, concise scenes. Laurie Metcalf is excellent in a tailor-made role as Lady Bird’s mother, a psychiatric nurse who can’t recognize the nature of her passiveaggressive reactions to her frustrations with family and financial problems. Also starring Tracey Letts. —MF Dipson Eastern Hills (ENDS THURSDAY), Regal Elmwood, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit MOLLY’S GAME—Aaron Sorkin moves from screenwriting to directing (from his own script) with this drama based on the true story of Molly Bloom, a former Olympic skier who ran a high-stakes poker game for movie stars, business titans, and the Russian mob. Sorkin acquits himself admirably, having clearly studied the Martin Scorsese playbook, but his trademark rat-a-tat dialogue never gets in the way of the star performance by Jessica Chastain, who is mesmerizing despite make-up that looks as if was designed by someone who studied with the Ringling Brothers. In retrospect, you may feel that there is both less and more to the real Bloom than is revealed here, but the details of the world of high-stakes poker and the sure pacing make the 140 minutes an easy ride. Co-starring Idris Elba, Kevin Costner, Michael Cera, and Chris O’Dowd. —MF Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS—Having spent much of the last decade playing the Swedish police inspector Kurt Wallander on British TV, Kenneth Branagh turns to Belgium’s most famous detective, Hercule Poirot, in a performance that will remind no one of David Suchet. Even if you’ve never seen Sidney Lumet’s 1974 Oscar-winning adaptation of the Agatha Christie novel, you’re likely already to know how it ends, but that’s not necessarily a drawback: it more even be more interesting watching the plot unfold if you know where it’s going. Branagh (who also directed) puts an all-star cast through their paces with the finest sets and costumes that money can buy, with camerawork as flamboyant as Poirot’s moustache (which in this incarnation is saying a lot). On board are Penélope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Johnny Depp, Josh Gad, Derek Jacobi, and Michelle Pfeiffer. —MF Dipson McKinley, Four Seasons, PADDINGTON 2—For Anglophiles of all ages, the return of the beloved “short but polite” talking bear   (voiced by Ben Whishaw) of children’s books. With Sally Hawkins, Hugh Bonneville, Julie Walters, Jim Broadbent, Tom Conti, Hugh Grant, Peter Capaldi, Richard Ayoade, Brendan Gleeson, and Joanna Lumley. Directed by Paul King (The Mighty Boosh). Reviewed this issue. Dipson Flix, Hamburg Palace (ENDS THURSDAY), Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria PITCH PERFECT 3—Sequel. Starring Ruby Rose,

BACK PAGE CROSSWORD Anna Kendrick, and Brittany Snow. Directed by Trish Sie (Step Up All In). Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria THE POST—Steven Spielberg felt that this docudrama about the Washington Post’s battle to publish the Pentagon Papers during the Nixon administration was important enough in the current climate that he rushed it into production to get it into theaters within a few months. But the distributor couldn’t be bothered previewing it for critics. Starring Meryl Streep, Tom Hanks, Sarah Paulson, Bob Odenkirk, Tracy Letts, Bradley Whitford, Bruce Greenwood, Alison Brie, and Michael Stuhlbarg. Reviewed this issue. Dipson Amherst, Dipson Flix PROUD MARY—Taraji P. Henson as an assassin for the Boston mob who reforms for the sake of a child whose parents she killed. With Neal McDonough, Danny Glover, Xander Berkeley and Margaret Avery. Directed by Babak Najafi (London Has Fallen). Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria THE SHAPE OF WATER—Guillermo Del Toro’s tribute to his favorite movie monster, the Creature From the Black Lagoon, is a sophisticated fable for adults as well as a declaration that the Mexican director can make a great film even within the Hollywood studio system. His love for the gill man drips from the screen, but he has much more on his mind than making a creature  feature. Sally Hawkins stars as a mute woman, romantically repressed, who works as a cleaning woman at a seaside military installation. Here scientists are conducting experiments on an “amphibian man” captured in the Amazon. Because he cannot speak the two bond, and she determines to set him free in a plot that hews closely to that of Splash, only with far deeper  rewards. Del Toro packs a lot into the two hour running time, including numerous valentines to cinema  itself. With Michael Shannon, Richard Jenkins, Octavia Spencer, Michael Stuhlbarg, and Doug Jones. —Gregory Lamberson Dipson Amherst ENDS THURSDAY, Dipson Eastern Hills OPENS FRIDAY STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI—Having paid George Lucas $4 billion for the Star Wars franchise, Disney sets about capitalizing on its investment with what they project will be a yearly series of movies. Picking up where J. J. Abrams’s The Force Awakens left off, The Last Jedi finds Rey (Daisy Ridley) imploring Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill, giving the best performance of his career) to train her in the ways of the Force. Meanwhile his twin sister, General Leia (Carrie Fisher, in her final performance), desperately tries to save the Resistance fleet from encroaching enemies. There are space battles galore, featuring the most spectacular special effects yet, a large dose of welcome humor, and the passing of the torch from old characters to new ones. The central conflict between Rey and Darth Vader wannabe Kylo Ren has sufficient weight to hold writer-director Rian Johnson’s pastiche of The Empire Strikes Back and The Return of the Jedi together, but this Disneyfied universe still doesn’t make much sense: Stay tuned for the next installment. —GL  Dipson Flix, Regal Elmwood, Regal Niagara Falls, Regal Quaker, Regal Transit, Regal Walden Galleria THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI— Frances McDormand stars as a mother whose grief at the rape and murder of her teenaged daughter turns to rage as a year goes by and the police have failed to turn up a culprit. So she hires the titular signs to accuse the local sheriff (Woody Harrelson) of dragging his feet. McDormand manages a remarkable portrayal even as the movie drives her character beyond the borders of implausibility. Writerdirector Martin McDonagh (In Bruges), whose working motto is “Guns. Explosions. Blood,” directs in a careful, conservative style and his cast performs impressively, but the behavioral extremes he imposes on his characters work against the redemptive theme he seems to desire. He’s tried too hard to juxtapose divergent moods, ranging from an adolescent-like mischievousness to domestic melodrama. With Kerry Condon, Sam Rockwell, Peter Dinklage and Abbie Cornish. —GS Dipson Eastern Hills WONDER—In what sounds like a remake of the 1980s movie Mask, a 10-year-old boy born with a facial deformity hopes to fit in when he goes to public school for the first time. Starring Jacob Tremblay, Julia Roberts, Owen Wilson, and Mandy Patinkin. Directed by Stephen Chbosky (The Perks of Being a Wallflower). Four Seasons, Regal Transit P

18 THE PUBLIC / JANUARY 17 - 23, 2018 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

“PORTRAYED-OFF” -SOMETHING’S LOST IN THE INTERPRETATION JONESIN’ BY MATT JONES / ©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords editor@jonesincrosswords.com

ACROSS

56 Time periods

1 Trivia contest locales

60 “Free Willy” whale

5 Went over like ___ balloon

61 “Give it up!” (or what the theme answers do)

10 Sheep sounds

63 Clock face

14 Racecar driver Luyendyk whose son is currently “The Bachelor”

64 Pulitzer-winning novelist Alison

15 How some rooms are lit 16 Shrek or Fiona, e.g. 17 Hanging around, being a particle, losing its charge, catching up on reading, etc.? 19 Like some histories 20 Piece of property 21 Gym fixture 23 Take out 25 May honoree

65 Spiced tea beverage 66 Gardener’s purchase 67 Streisand title role of 1983 68 Russian ruler, before 1917

DOWN 1 NATO phonetic alphabet letter after Oscar 2 Web addresses

28 “The Dark Knight” trilogy director 29 “Lady Bird” writerdirector Gerwig 30 Hyphenated descriptor for a repairperson 31 Recurrent theme 32 Not-so-subtle promos 33 Contacts online, for short 36 Abbr. on military mail 38 Spellbind 40 Sumptuous 42 In a self-satisfied way, maybe 43 Little bite 46 Flow’s counterpart 47 Look forward to

3 Confirmation ___

50 Covers with turf

4 Iroquois League nation

51 Muse, for one

33 Furor

5 Big bother

52 Antioxidant-rich berry

34 Leachman of “Young Frankenstein”

6 Pick-me-up

53 Heavy metal’s Mötley ___

7 Abu Dhabi leader, for instance

54 “Freak on a Leash” band

8 Lip balm ingredient

55 Barbecue rod

26 Anticipating a little devil?

35 Caffeine-containing nut 37 “Rebel Without a Cause” costar Sal

9 Phenomenal performers

57 Satisfied sounds

39 “Superman” archvillain Luthor

10 Soundstage equipment that hangs high

58 March Madness gp.

40 Abate

11 Cultural leader?

41 Tennis player Wawrinka

12 Kazakhstan border “Sea” that’s really a lake

42 Copper coating 44 “May ___ now?” 45 Nonexistent grades like “G+”? 48 “Westworld” network 49 Photos, slangily 50 Chain that sells a lot of cups

13 Auction off 18 Exterior finish for some houses 22 Palme ___ (Cannes Film Festival prize) 24 ___ Tuesday (“Voices Carry” group) 26 Water filter brand name 27 Kidney-related

59 Make Kool-Aid 62 ___ Aviv, Israel LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS


TO PLACE AN AD EMAIL CLASSIFIEDS@DAILYPUBLIC.COM OR CALL (716)856.0737 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM/CLASSIFIEDS CLASSIFIEDS THE PUBLIC’S NOTICE The Public encourages you to use caution while participating in any transactions or acquiring services through our classified section of the newspaper. While we do approve the ads in this section, we do not guarantee the reliability of classified advertisers. If you have questions, email classifieds@dailypublic.com.

NORWOOD BTWN SUMMER & BRYANT: Freshly painted 1BR, carpets, appliances, mini-blinds, parking, coin-op laundry, sec. sys. Includes water & elec. No pets, no smoking. $695+sec. 912-0175. ----------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Ashland Ave. Bright lg BR, private, all util & appl. No pets/smoke. $690. 435-3061. ----------------------------------------------------D’YOUVILLE COLLEGE AREA: 3BR $900, 1BR $500-600, utilities incl. Must see. Call 415-385-1438 -----------------------------------------------------

FOR SALE

RIVERSIDE AREA: 2BR $550/4BR $770 + utilities. Between Tonawanda & Ontario. Call 415-385-1438. ----------------------------------------------------BUFFALO STATE AREA: 3BR single family home $950-1200 + utilities. Call 415-385-1438. ----------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Lancaster, lg bright 2BD upper, hrdwd flrs, laundry, parking. $1200 incl all. 884-0353.

EAST AURORA HOME FOR SALE: 496 Grover Rd. Spectacular waterfront home. Spacious open floor plan with breathtaking views of Cazenovia Creek. Gourmet kitchen, formal dining room, cozy fireplaces, wraparound decks. Stunning perennial gardens. Lots of natural light, ideal for artist studio. Perfect home for entertaining, short drive to ski areas. Must see to appreciate. Call today! 716-998-1343. Coldwell Banker Aubrey Leonard Realty 259 Main St. East Aurora, NY 14052.

FOR RENT SUPER LOCATION ! AMHERST ST. APARTMENT Available January 1 Spacious 2BDRM, LG. Kitchen w/ Pantry, Office, LG Living Rm.& Dining Rms. Refinished Hrdwd. Flrs.,Carpeted Bdrms. 1 Bathroom ,Off Street Parking, Yard, 5 mins walk from Wegmans, Spars, Dapper Goose, Rohalls, Casey’s and 10 minutes from Sportsmans No pets, 1 Mon. Security Deposit, $850+Utilities, Water incl.

716-713-3566 ELMWOOD VILLAGE, COLONIAL CIRCLE/LIVINGSTON: 2BR apts, hardwood floors, skylights, porch, off-street parking, coin-op basement laundry, $1095/$1150. No pets, no smoking. All included, must see. 912-2906. --------------------------------------------------ANDERSON PLACE: Lovely 1BR, 3rd flr, open loft in bedroom. Includes stive & fridge, 700+, electric included. 882-2260. --------------------------------------------------D’YOUVILLE AREA: 1 bdrm., water, appliances. No pets/smoking. $395 + security. 475-3045. --------------------------------------------------WEGMANS AREA: Studio with utilities and appliances. No pets, no smoking. 479-9313. --------------------------------------------------BRECKENRIDGE: Large 2BR lower. Appliances, hardwood, porch, yard. $760+. 435-8272. --------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Richmond Ave. 2 story, 1+ BR, appliances, laundry, off-street-parking, porch, hardwood + granite. No smoking. $895+. 882-5760. --------------------------------------------------GORGEOUS 3000 ft. 3/2 ELMWOOD MANSION: 2nd flr, W/D, off-st prking, fully renovated. Insulated, granite kitchen, huge bedrooms, hardwood flrs, private porch, huge yd, DR, L/R. Ann: 715-9332.

--------------------------------------------------UB SOUTH CAMPUS MAIN ST: 1,100 sqft 1brm Heat, Utilities, Appliances, Washer, Dryer, Parking, Furnished, NOW $800 812-6009; ron1812@aol.com. --------------------------------------------------LEXINGTON AVE/ELMWOOD VILLAGE: 1700 sq. ft. upper 2BR in owneroccupied Victorian. Large living room, dining room, hardwood floors. Study opens onto front porch, kitchen w/ ppliances, oak pantry, new washer/ dryer in unit. Separate gas furnace with AC. Water/user fee included. Lease and references. $1450. Available Nov. 1. 716883-1944.

ROOM FOR RENT $400 Per Mo. Incl. util./kitchen privileges Commonwealth off Hertel, 390-7543. --------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE, COLONIAL CIRCLE: Lafayette-Livingston. 2 BR. Hardwood floors, no pets or smoking. Must see. $1150 includes all utilities. 716-912-2906. --------------------------------------------------BIDWELL PKWY 2200 SQFT, 3BR/2BA, W/D, HW, patio, no smkg, $1800/mo, incl. heat+H2O. 882-3292. --------------------------------------------------1001 LAFAYETTE Large 2BR, offst pkg, 3rd fl, elec. incl., no pets/ smkg, WD connect avail, clean, $760. 698-9581. --------------------------------------------------UB SOUTH ROOMS renovated & spacious, incl. util + wifi, W/D, pkg, .2 mi. to campus. $495 & $595. 236-8600.

--------------------------------------------------D’YOUVILLE GRAD STUDENT seeks female roommate. $600 per month fully furnished 1700 ft apartment. Walking distance to D’Youville, Elmwood, Allen Street. private bedroom, share common living areas, all utilities included, owner occupied. WIFI included. 919-830-3267 Elizabeth. 716-536-7119 Landlord Lisa. --------------------------------------------------CHEEKTOWAGA: Meadowbrook Pkwy. Lower 2BR, one-car garage, washer h-ups. Avail now. $700 + utl. Call/text908-2753.

SERVICES

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CLAREMONT AVE: 2BD+den lower, w/ appl incl wash/dryer, Lg kitchen, formal dining room, parking. No pets/smokers. $1000 mo. 713-6681. -----------------------------------------------------

ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Classic, mint. Between Elmwood & Chapin. 2BR lower, hrdwd flrs, front & back porches. Must see. 881-1652.

BODIED BY LEA Full Body Conditioning Class! Lose Weight, Build Confidence, Feel Great! Every Saturday @ 8:30AM. 938 Genesee St. $10. Online meal plans and training available. Phone or text 716-939-7101.

MESSAGE TO ADVERTISER------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Thank you for advertising with THE

ELMWOOD VILLAGE: W. Ferry, 1BR, Please reviewNoyour RETIRED ad and PSYCHOLOGIST available living PUBLIC. room, kitchen w/appliances to assist adults in light daily check for any errors. The original layout pets, no smoking $700+sec., 882-6934. living.asPlease call for details at instructions have been followed closely 883-3216. ----------------------------------------------------as possible. THE PUBLIC offers design ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Ave. 1 at no charge. THE services withAshland two proofs Bedroom, Carpeted Studio ,Utilities for any error if PUBLIC is not responsible Included. 716-882-7297. not notified within 24 hours of receipt. The

HAPPY FOOT SPA

Foot production department must Chinese have a signed -----------------------------------------------------

Massage proof in order to print. Please sign and fax Stress• • Reduces LINWOOD: Super 3 bedroom 2 bath back or approve by responding to this w/2 carthis garage. $1200 total ($400 per 3 •Increases blood flow• email. roommates). 884-2871. •Rejuvenates Nerves• � CHECK COPY CONTENT -----------------------------------------------------

ELMWOOD VILLAGE Elmwood@ � CHECK IMPORTANT DATES 2784 Sheridan Dr. Tona. NY Auburn upper 1 bdr. Stove, refrigerator. CHECK Front � porch. No NAME, pets. ADDRESS, Must see. PHONE #, & WEBSITE Call 864-9595.

CALL 716-256-9087

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ELMWOOD VILLAGE 2 bedroom upper, newly renovated, front porch, appliances, laundry / $895 inc water. Advertisers Signature Must see. Call 913-2736.

CALL FOR WORK: Parables Gallery and Gifts, 1027 Elmwood Ave., Bflo. “The Element of Texture,” March 1-31. All mediums welcome. Please ----------------------------------------------------____________________________send samples of your work to: Glenn Kroetsch gdkroetsch@roadrunner. NORWOOD BTWN SUMMER & BRYANT: Y17W46 com Date _______________________ Fresh-painted 1BR, CY carpets, applnces, mini-blinds, prkng, coin-op lndry, --------------------------------------------------sec sys.Issue: Water ______________________ & elec inc. No pets, no FESTIVAL SCHOOL OF BALLET smoking. $695+sec. 912-0175. Classes for adults and children at all IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS WHICHlevels. ARE Try ON a class for free. 716-984----------------------------------------------------THIS PROOF, PUBLIC CANNOT BE 1586 festivalschoolofballet.com. ELMWOOD VILLAGE:THE Norwood Ave.

THE AD 2 BR, HELD study, RESPONSIBLE. porch, appliances,PLEASE must EXAMINE --------------------------------------------------see. THOROUGHLY No pets/smoking. EVEN$1,350+util. IF THE AD ISFREE A PICK-UP. YOUTH WRITING WORKSHOPS rsteam@roadrunner.com or THIS PROOF MAY ONLY BE USEDTue FORand Thur 3:30-6pm. Open to 716-886-5212.

writers between ages 12 and 18 at PUBLICATION IN THE PUBLIC.

-----------------------------------------------------

LAFAYETTE, 3 bdm, 2 bath, newly renovated, w/d hook-ups, steps to Elmwood $1195+, 984-7777, 812-4915 ----------------------------------------------------BLACK ROCK Marion St. 1 bdrm, $650. Available on 7/1/17. Includes: cable, wifi, laundry, parking. Month-to-month, no smoking or pets. jph5469@gmail.

the Just Buffalo Writing Center. 468 Washington Street, 2nd floor, Buffalo 14203. Light snack provided. --------------------------------------------------SOUTH BUFFALO ART STUDIO offers skills-based classes in drawing & painting, private or group, Jerome Mach (716) 830-6471 or jeromemach@ yahoo.com.-

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A State: December 27th, 2017 PERFORMERS NEEDED FOR NEW LIMITED LIABILITY CORPORATION: MUSICAL PRODUCTION AT ARTPARK: Office of the LLC: Erie County. The Artpark announces a casting call Name of LLC: St. Vil, L.L.C. for a new musical production of THE NY Secretary of State has been ODYSSEY to be performed on August Filed with SSNY on 12/27/2017. designated as the agent upon whom 4th and 5th, 2018. THE ODYSSEY Office: Erie County. SSNY designated process may be served. NYSS may is a 90-minute original musical as agent upon whom process may mail a copy of any process to the LLC adaptation of Homer’s classic story be served. SSNY shall mail service adapted by Todd Almond and Lear at: 26 Orchard Place, Buffalo NY 14214. of process to Christopher St. Vil 945 Debessonet, originally produced Eggert Road, Buffalo, NY 14226. Purpose of LLC: Kombucha Tea by the Public Theatre NY. It will join professional talent with local artists Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Production. and community groups, allowing the play speak directly to the need in all of us to be part of something greater than ourselves. The project will be directed by NYC-based director Roger Danforth, with Paschal Frisina III and MARCUS WISE CHARLIE RILEY Carin Jean White as the associate JUSTIN MCCARTHY SONDEL MARK C. LLOYD directors, music direction by Patrick Towey. ADRIAN LUCIA GONZALES-VERA ALLAN JAMIESON JR. GREGG MAXWELL Artpark invites you to join over 100 DIANE HINMAN of your fellow citizens for one of NATE SIEGEL ANNEMARIE FRANCZYK the largest collaborations between MARK DONNELLY professional artists and community LAUREN NEWKIRK MAYNARD JOHN DI SCIULLO performers that has ever been seen KAREN KING-SHELL in the area. THE ODYSSEY will take us JONI RUSS on a fantastic adventure, full of joy TERRI CVETAN GEORGE PULINTHITTA and danger, as we celebrate one of KRISTA CONSTANTINO JENNIFER PAGE the great sagas of world literature. Join us as Odysseus and his crew face dangers on the high seas, fight monsters and witches, and endure hardships and joys as they fight their way home from the Trojan War. Using the magic of song and dance, love and JACQUELINE TRACE TRE MARSH tears, this great adventure will delight JESSICA SILVERSTEIN BRETT PERLA the whole family as citizens from all WILLIAM MARTIN ANTHONY PALUMBO over Western New York come together to create a play that truly embodies ALEXANDER KIRST NANCY HEIDINGER ‘community,’ reaching out to people JORDAN HOXSIE DOUG CROWELL and changing their lives. ERIC RIZZI ALEJANDRO GUTIERREZ Artpark seeks performers for the KEVIN HAYES KRISTEN BOJKO following roles: CHRISTINE SLOCUM KRISTEN BECKER All ethnicities are desired and BARBARA CHRIS GALLANT welcomed. HANNA DEKKER EKREM SERDAR 1. ODYSSEUS (40-60, hero of the Trojan War) HARPER BISHOP, JENNIFER CONNOR MOLLIE RYDZYSNKI NISSA MORIN 2. SINGER (Male, narrator, any age) SUZANNE STARR PETER SMITH CHARLES VON SIMSON 3. PENELOPE/CIRCE (Female, 3555, dual role: Odysseus’s wife, and KEVIN PURDY JOSHUA USEN sorceress) PETER SMITH HOLLY GRAHAM 4. TELEMACHUS, (Male, 16-24, son of COLLEEN KENNEDY MARK GOLDEN Odysseus) RACHEL CHROSTOWSKI JOSEPH VU 5. ANTINOUS (Male, 25-50, lead suitor; TJ VITELLO STEPHANIE PERRY needs to ride a motorcycle) ROB GALBRAITH DAVID SHEFFIELD 6. CALLIOPES (Female, 3 back-up USMAN HAQ singers) JOANNA CELIA WHITE No role has specific vocal EVAN JAMES STEVE requirements; all roles are flexible MARCIE MCNALLIE and will be created from the group HEATHER GRING of performers hired. We welcome KARA JAMES LENKER everyone; both physically-abled ROB MROWKA CORY MUSCATO and persons with disabilities. All performers will be asked to bring a ALAN FELLER AMBER JOHN (EXTRA LOVE) sense of play to the development of the project. Skills playing any musical instruments or percussion, while not required, are a plus. Skills rapping or performing spirituals are also a plus. REHEARSALS: Monday July 16th - Fri August 3rd M-F: 6:30-10:30 (possibly afternoon rehearsals for anyone available) Sat-Sun: 10-2 PERFORMANCES: August 4th and 5th. MESSAGE TO ADVERTISER Please Thank contact you Casting Kate with THE forDirector, advertising LoConti,PUBLIC. to set up anPlease auditionreview time: your ad and kate.loconti@gmail.com, check for any716.510.0625. errors. The original layout instructions have been followed as closely as possible. THE PUBLIC offers design services with two proofs at no charge. THE ELMWOOD VILLAGE SALON looking PUBLIC is not responsible for any error if for hairstylist/assistant. Part or24full not notified within hours of receipt. The time, Call 886-9788. department must have a signed production proof in order to print. Please sign and fax is looking for a home where he can stretch his legs and Bluethis this back or approve by responding to run, run, run! He has a friendly , inquisit ive nature and is just a email. NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A super happy- go-luck y guy. Meet him at the SPCA! LIMITED CORPORATION: � LIABILITY CHECK COPY CONTENT Name of LLC: Dharna Bucha, LLC . YOURSPCA.ORG . Date � of CHECK filing IMPORTANT of Articles DATES of 300 HARLEM RD. WEST SENECA 875.7360 Organization with NAME, the NYADDRESS, Dept of PHONE #, & WEBSITE � CHECK

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