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FREE EVERY WEDNESDAY | MAY 16, 2018 | DAILYPUBLIC.COM | @PUBLICBFLO | NOTHING IS WORSE THAN BEING LOUD AND WRONG.

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UPS & DOWNS: ON THE SHRINKING OF THE BUFFALO NEWS

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NEWS: REMEMBERING TONYA “KITA” HARVEY

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ART: ADELE HENDERSON AT INDIGO ART GALLERY

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PERFORMANCE: THE INDETERMINACY FESTIVAL RETURNS

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / MAY 16 - 22, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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THE PUBLIC CONTENTS

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THIS WEEK

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ISSUE NO. 179 | MAY 16, 2018

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Y15W22 _________________

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LOOKING BACKWARD: The City of Detroit III, 1914.

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NEWS: Why no one wants to be interim New York State Attorney General.

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CENTERFOLD: Artist Timothy Englert’s homage to the late, great Harbor Inn.

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FILM: Deadpool 2, RBG, Disobedience, plus Nickel City Comic Con at the North Park.

CROSSWORD: Another devilish puzzle by Matt Jones.

ON THE COVER: JOE GEORGE is a Buffalo chef and photographer. He captured this scene, titled Uke Player and T-Rex, on Allen Street.

MUSIC: Gurf Morlix, Peter Case, and more at the Hamburg Place on Friday, May 18.

THE PUBLIC STAFF EDITOR-IN-CHIEF GEOFF KELLY MUSIC EDITOR CORY PERLA MANAGING EDITOR AARON LOWINGER FILM EDITOR M. FAUST CONTRIBUTING EDITORS AT-LARGE JAY BURNEY QUIXOTE PETER SMITH

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CONTRIBUTORS PRODUCTION MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNER DEEDEE CLOHESSY

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THE PUBLIC / MAY 16 - 22 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


LOCAL NEWS

THIS WEEK’S UPS AND DOWNS BY THE PUBLIC STAFF

UPS: NEIGHBORHOOD RESISTANCE TO BAD REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT:

When Severyn Development revealed its plans for new-build condominiums on a vacant lot at the corner of Jersey and 14th streets, neighbors were taken aback by the line of six garage doors and attendant curb cuts facing 14th Street. The renderings seemed to try to mitigate that visual impact by including a vision of roof gardens, residents enjoying second-floor balconies, and what appears to be a vintage red Porsche parked partway across the sidewalk in front of one of the garages. (The Porsche might be apropos; the six twobedroom units are meant to cost $525,000 each; the Severyn brothers said at a May 14 public hearing that the high price point would guarantee quality neighbors.) Homeowners saw only the loss of street parking, safety hazards, and a dead street corner, and they turned out in force to decry the project at Monday’s public hearing. The result: Severyn Development has withdrawn the proposal and promised to go back to the drawing board. They’ll be back in June with a new proposal. JUST RESISTING/BLACK LOVE  AND THE BUFFALO DEMOCRATIC SOCIALISTS are

hosting a free brake light clinic this Saturday at the Delavan-Grider Community Center (877 East Delavan Avenue) for folks to get their cars up to compliance. As we’ve reported extensively on the Buffalo Police Department’s focus on low-level offenses including high grass, lapsed vehicular inspections, window tints, and missing brake lights through its now disbanded Strike Force unit, organizers for the brake light clinic aim to reduce police involvement and negative police-community interactions across the board. The brake light clinic will be open from 10am through 3pm this Saturday, May 19. Pull on through and get your ride more pull-over proof.

DOWNS: Last week, Buffalo News editor Mike Connelly sent an email to his staff outlining drastic and immediate changes to the newspaper, precipitated, Connelly wrote, by the News posting, in the first quarter of 2018, “a substantial loss – the company’s first quarterly loss in more than 40 years.” (Connelly’s email was first made public by UB professor Bruce Jackson in his weekly Buffalo Report email of news and commentary; it has since circulated widely on social media and local websites, and it’s published in its entirety at dailypublic.com. We’d make room for it in print, but…well, read on.) The host of changes to the paper include elimination of the Life & Arts, Next, and Home & Style sections, all in service of reducing the weekday editions from three sections to two. The Niagara Weekend section is gone, as well, along with the Western New York edition, a somewhat different presentation of the paper circulated in suburbs and outside Erie County. There will be staffing changes, as well, which Connelly outlined as part of “much more aggressively reducing legacy costs”: Some people will be let go from the news and production staffs, others will be reassigned or pick up new duties. LOCAL PRINT JOURNALISM:

Since Connelly came to the News in 2012, the newsroom has diminished by perhaps 20 percent. Average weekday circulation has fallen by a third, to below 100,000; at its peak, well before Connelly’s time and the digital disruption that threatens print newspapers everywhere, the News’s weekday circulation exceeded 300,000. That decline, according to Connelly’s email to staff, has been attended by a loss in print advertising revenue: “Our print advertising this year is on track to be less than a third of what it was in 2006,” he wrote. The week before sending this email, Connelly published a short piece in the News describing the impact of the Trump administration’s tariffs on Canadian newsprint, which were implemented last month. Not only had prices soared (The Public’s printing costs rose 33 percent overnight), but newsprint has become harder to source: Canadian firms are turning to clients outside the US to avoid the tariffs, and domestic producers are few and have never been able to meet domestic demand. That scarcity is especially problematic for the News, which contracts to print other publications, too, including the national edition of the New York Times. Those contracts are profitable, while the decline of print advertising revenue makes the News’s principle product appear less so. Connelly concluded his email with this: “We are in a race. Can we change fast enough to create the new News before the old News fades? Together, let’s win the race.” (To which Jackson responds, “What race? There isn’t any race. The job is to tell the truth, as best you can. Nothing in Connelly’s memo addresses anything close to that.”) As much as we criticize the News, its reportage and its priorities, we offer this with not a hint of schadenfreude: The diminution of the P local daily is a huge threat to the region’s vitality and discourse.

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NEWS LOCAL teenager. The Boo who snuck out of the house at age 14 to go to Club Marcella downtown, the Boo who started spending a lot of time in a hair salon on Main Street, the Boo who was brave enough to attend Lafayette High School in women’s attire. “I had blinders on, as a mom, now that I look back on it,” Harvey said. Inside that hair salon, Harvey, known there as “Ace,” started to evolve. A gay stylist took Ace under his wing. Vaughn Mciver, who now owns and operates another Main Street salon called Garth Beauty, remembers a bold, even annoying gay kid in the shop. “Honestly I gravitated towards Kita because so many people in the community kind of did not like her. She was a lot to deal with. At that time, I felt I could take her underneath my wing before somebody really hurts her,” Mciver told The Public.

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ON THE ENVIRONMENT WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6 @ 7 PM THEODORE ROOSEVELT INAUGURAL SITE Enck is a former top EPA and state official who has a lot to say about climate change, the assault on environmental regulations and more-talk-than-action involving renewable energy. Admission free to Investigative Post members; $10 for non-members

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Thank you for advertising with THE PUBLIC. Please review your ad and check for any errors. The original layout instructions have been followed as closely as possible. THE PUBLIC offers design services with two proofs at no charge. THE PUBLIC is not responsible for any error if Tonya “Kita” Harvey was Buffalo’s first homicide victim of 2018. not notified within 24 hours of receipt. The production department must have a signed proof in order to print. Please sign and fax this back or approve by responding to this email.

REMEMBERING KITA HARVEY

Attendance includes free admission to the inaugural site’s museum between 6 and 7 pm.

THE FIRST HOMICIDE of 2018 appeared

to check off the usual boxes for murders in Buffalo. It occurred near Broadway and Bailey, an area that is no stranger to gun violence in one of the poorest and most racially segregated cities in America. A “35-year-old man,” Buffalo Police disclosed to local media, had been shot to death. The outlier was the date, of February 6, late in the year for the city to see its first homicide. In 2017, there were three on New Year’s Day.

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TOM TOLES & THE OUTLYERS

A day or two later, a bigger picture emerged. Two days after her murder, the Buffalo News identified the victim as a transgender woman named Tonya, or “Kita,” Harvey. Harvey was described by a friend as a “big staple” in the LGBT community and had performed extensively in Western New York’s “ballroom” and “showgirl” scene.    Harvey’s mother told The Public that while neither police nor medical examiner officials shared information about the nature of her injuries, her funeral director informed her five days after the murder that Harvey had been shot six times “in the head, in the neck, in the butt, in the groin, and back.” According to the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), Harvey was, at that point, the fourth transgender person to be killed in 2018. As of this report, GLAAD tallies nine, seven of them women of color. Trans advocate Arrie Moore told the Buffalo News at the time that “the hatred, the bigotry, and the aggressive attacks on trans people is almost an everyday occurrence in our lives.” The office of District Attorney John Flynn released a statement that week saying it acknowledged the disturbing “spike in homicides of transgender people across the country” and would be evaluating evidence as the case is investigated to weigh it as a possible hate crime.  Last month, Flynn told The Public

THE PUBLIC / MAY 16 - 22 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

Advertisers Signature that the case would be “looked at potentially as a hate crime, and if it was in fact a hate crime ____________________________ it would be pursued aggressively.” He added, “IDate have_______________________ no indication that it is a hate crime as GEOFF Y18W19 of right now.” This was still the case last week when asked Flynn’s office for an update. Issue: we ______________________

Asked whether the locations of gunshot IF YOU APPROVE ON wounds on herERRORS body WHICH mightARE indicate the THIS PROOF, THE PUBLIC CANNOT BE that presence of a hate crime, Flynn stated “it could potentially PLEASE be,” or EXAMINE it could THE mean HELD RESPONSIBLE. ADthe perpetrator was a “bad shot.” THOROUGHLY EVEN IF THE AD IS A PICK-UP.

THIS PROOF MAY ONLY BE USED FOR PUBLICATION IN THE PUBLIC. EARLY LIFE Arnester Harvey knew from a young age that her child was different, but she couldn’t put her finger on it. It first came to head when she was living in the Ferry Grider homes, when Harvey was seven or eight years old. Other parents would tell her that her son was gay, but she didn’t see it. “I was, like, ‘He’s a kid, he should be able to do what he want to do,’” she recalled. “You can’t put anybody in a box.” Though divorced, Harvey asked to be referred to by her married name for this story.  But things got worse. “When I saw Boo being bullied and everything, I was, like, ‘I gotta get him out of here,’” she said. “I gotta work hard and get my kids out of the projects.” “Boo” was the gender versatile name they used in the place of her given name, “Mark,” after her father. Arnester got Boo and her little brother by six years off of Donovan Drive, first to an apartment on Burgard Street and then to a tidy home in the Bailey-Kensington neighborhood. Harvey has been working as nursing assistant for New York State Department of Corrections for nearly 20 years. But family stability did not translate into stability for Boo. Her mother and other family members were slow to understand Boo as a

Ace became what Mciver calls his “first gay child,” the first in a line of younger gay and questioning people with whom he’s developed paternal relationships over the years. Until the end, Kita called him “Dad.” “A lot of families, they don’t know how to cope with homosexual children,” Mciver said. “I came from a super supportive family, so I didn’t identify with those things. So it was easier for me to talk to their parents and help them understand like my parents understood.” Mciver had such conversations with Kita’s mother, who struggled reconciling her faith and her daughter’s identity. “My struggle come in is that I don’t want to be a disappointment to God,” Arnester Harvey said. “I don’t want God mad at me. At the same time, God gave me a child that I know felt like a woman, that I believe deep down inside was a woman.” It’s something that Harvey and her family still struggle with; they alternate between gender pronouns when talking about her. Though Harvey was wearing feminine clothing and hairstyles at time, she tried to enlist in the armed services as “Mark” after finishing at Lafayette High School. During the recruitment process, she was met with devastating news: Not only was she not eligible to enlist, she learned she had a potentially life-threatening medical condition.

THE SHOW MUST GO ON As a woman, Kita Harvey was “a show-stopper,” and “a beautiful girl, not just on the inside, but on the outside as well,” Ebony M. Johnson told The Public. Johnson looked up to Kita, even though Kita was eight years her junior. Both Kita and Johnson were inspired by seminal 1990 documentary Paris Is Burning about the burgeoning ballroom scene in New York City, and both had spent time in New York City at different periods.  “When I first seen her I was traumatized how beautiful she was,” said Kita’s friend Ealise Watson, who recalled meeting her before her own male-to-female transition at age 15. “She was the epitome of looking like a woman.” Watson said Harvey was more of a “showgirl” than a “ballroom girl,” meaning she would perform in a cabaret style in nightclubs rather than “walk” in a ballroom fashion competition.  In her transition, Kita was a fearless trailblazer. “I talked to her and she gave me a lot of advice on how she started her transition,” Johnson said. “She went to Mexico and when she came back, she set this LGBT community on fire.” To Johnson, she was a “sister.” They lived together, traveled together, and helped each other to survive. “Throughout the years she gave me, you know, tactics—what I needed to do. She was a big staple in the LGBT community here in Western New York. She brought back a lot of things, she inspired a lot of young trans women that came out in this community around this time.” She was bold, and bright, a talented singer, lyricist, and dancer. “Honestly, she was an entertainer,” said Mciver. “She was very good. We used to call her the rig queen because she could rig anything. She could take a T-shirt and turn it into a doll. She was very, very creative, very articulate.”


LOCAL NEWS “She was a great performer,” said Johnson. “She was very talented.” Arnester Harvey keeps videos of her daughter’s performances and poems saved on her phone. She labored over a short poem she wrote for her daughter’s funeral, hoping to hold a candle to her daughter’s talent. Watson, who Kita called Lola, treasured the talks she had with Kita over the years, which often turned to spirituality. Kita was religious and unceasingly optimistic. Watson was several years younger than Harvey, and Harvey served as a role model and mentor. Watson described Harvey as an intelligent and gifted writer, that Harvey would turn to writing poetry as therapy while undergoing drug rehabilitation treatment.  Watson remembers Kita’s “loving heart.” “She’ll put you before she put herself,” Watson said. “If she had a shirt and I liked the shirt, she would give me the shirt. She would always look out for me. She would make sure when I didn’t have nowhere to go, when I was going through my downs in my life, she made sure I had a roof over my head, made sure I had somewhere to go.” Kita loved everybody. Arnester Harvey was amazed at her daughter’s ability to forgive her father, who died several years ago. Mark Harvey struggled with drugs. He would steal from the family to support his habit and was physically violent with the family as well. According to her friends and family, Kita’s downfall was caused by her own drug use. They saw her less and less as time went on. She lived in and out of the supportive housing, the only thing keeping her from full-time homelessness. No one, including Kita, harbored illusions about her lifestyle and its inherent dangers. No one really knows the people she was hanging with in her last days. “I asked Boo, ‘Boo, if something ever happened to you, how would you like to be buried?’” her mother said. “And Boo grabbed my hands and held both of them and said, ‘Mom, whatever makes you happy.’” “She had literally just came into my salon a week before she got killed,” Mciver said. “There is nobody but God that brought her in there. And she just said, ‘Dad, just wanted to say I love you and I need to use the bathroom.’” Mciver told Kita he loved her, too, and told her to be safe.

LIVING WITHOUT A SAFETY NET “It was devastating. That’s the only word. It was devastating,” said Mciver. “I’m devastated,” Arnester Harvey said at a public event in March. “I don’t know how I can continue to go on. I have so many questions, so few answers.” Kita’s murder sent ripples through the whole LGBTQ community and beyond. “I mean it’s really scary,”  Damian Mordecai, executive director of the PRIDE Center, told The Public. “You hear about this stuff, we know that trans women of color, the murder rate is just— and these are just the numbers that we know about—is very high and it continues to increase year after year.

“What folks don’t realize is that trans people, because they’re discriminated against in employment and housing, often times they turn to—they have to survive—they turn to survival sex work.” The lack of a safety net for some of the most atrisk people in our society affects us all, Mordecai said. “Again, when trans people turn to sex work, oftentimes the people that are hiring them are men who identify as straight who may have girlfriends or wives, and if they get any kind of STI or infection, they pass that on or could pass that on to a partner. And so the things that affect my community affect your community. They affect the greater community.” Johnson is no stranger to the fast money realities of being a young trans woman of color in America, but she’s always had on-the-books jobs. She went through the long and costly process—several hundred dollars for court filing fees, new driver license and passport—of having her government identity changed. “If your name is Charles and you’re looking like Christine, people are not gonna hire you,” she said. Not having proper ID creates a substantial barrier for trans women seeking employment and sometimes healthcare and basic services. “They get discouraged and they wind up wanting to do the sex work. Then they may indulge in some kind of drug activity, and then it leads into whatever. Nine times out of 10 it doesn’t end well,” Johnson said. Johnson is hoping to take her message and Kita’s story to young women in the lifestyle. She has approached the MOCHA Center, an agency which assists LGBTQ people of color with health-related issues, to help lead groups for young trans women. “I used to tell a lot of girls you can’t file taxes being an escort. That type of sex work, it wears you thin. It’s all negativity in it. It might start off well because of the dollars, but in reality it’s horrible. It’s just so horrible. I don’t know, maybe this whole thing with Tonya, maybe it might influence some girls to get their life together. Then there’s others, I don’t know. Drugs can be very addictive.” “I want her death to mean something,” Arnester Harvey said. “Boo was the type of person that encouraged others that came into the lifestyle, that it’s okay. Her legacy is that if this is the way you feel you have to go, it’s okay. She helped a lot of people accept who they were. That’s part of how Boo was.” “The transgender community is ostracized, they don’t get the opportunities a lot of us are able to get,” Harvey said at State of Our City event in March. “They need housing. They need counseling. They need rehab facilities. They need to be loved just as all of us need to be loved.”

POLICE AND JUSTICE Mordecai, of the PRIDE Center, has had often rich engagement with many levels of law enforcement agencies in Western New York, including the FBI, Homeland Security, and the Buffalo Police Department. He’s developed a special relationship with the BPD, assisting in training new recruits. “Unlike other cities where these kinds of trainings have been kind of forced upon different kinds of departments, this wasn’t,” Mordecai said. “This was, ‘We recognize the value in this and we want to offer this to our officers.’ It’s unique really.” On the other side, the PRIDE Center recognizes the historical mistrust between the LGBT community and law enforcement. “Our movement started as a riot,” Mordecai said. “I guess at everything that was happening, but fighting police officers.” At large events, PRIDE sometimes has to hire private security because attendees don’t want to see armed, uniformed police.

Kita and her mother, Arnester Harvey.

Mordecai explains this history to law enforcement administration and officers in trainings, and also how trans people are easily drawn into illegal sex work and then feel targeted by police for attempting to survive.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6 DAILYPUBLIC.COM / MAY 16 - 22, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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The trainings have improved relations, according to Mordecai: Some officers stop in to talk, gather information, or check in after a reported attack on an LGBT person, though he said, to his knowledge, no one from the BPD has checked in at the PRIDE Center about Tonya Harvey’s murder.

Cooley also declined to speculate whether Tonya Harvey’s murder was drug- or gang-related.

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Harvey clarified that shefor had been in touch PUBLIClater is not responsible any error if with Buffalo within detectives in theoffirst monthThe after not notified 24 hours receipt. her daughter’s murder,must but have communication production department a signed faded she felt frustrated. proof and in order to print. Please sign and fax

1122 Hertel Ave. Bflo 14216 716.322.6209 joeysonhertel.com

thisa back or call, approve by responding thisthey In phone Buffalo police said to that email. are pursuing leads and that the investigation is Asked if anything about Harvey’s � ongoing. CHECK COPY CONTENT murder has indicated that a hate crime had � CHECK Detective IMPORTANTSergeant DATES Bill Cooley told occurred, The Public,NAME, “I wouldn’t feel PHONE comfortable divulging � CHECK ADDRESS, #, & WEBSITE some of that information at this juncture because � aPROOF OK investigation (NO CHANGES) it’s sensitive and we don’t want to compromise investigative leads.” � PROOF OKany (WITH CHANGES)

Meantime, Arnester Harvey ponders justice. “If the killer was there at the [funeral] service, I don’t know, but that’s my message to them. You may be living, but you have to live with the memory of what you’ve done. That has to be a horrible life, to always look back over your shoulder because you’ve taken someone’s life. My baby’s free. Smiling. Magnified more than when she was alive.” The funeral program cover offered split images of Mark and Kita. On the back was Arnester Harvey’s poem for her child. In her living room, with her daughter’s ashes in an urn on the mantle and also inside a heart-shaped locket she had made, she read it aloud:

Cooley said nothing about the investigation so far has led him to believe that there is an specific Advertisers Signature threat to the LGBT community.

“Hi my Boo, you go to heaven and get your wings, spread them far so the angels sing. Down on Earth they will see they haven’t done nothing to thee. Don’t you know now you’re free? No more pain, abuse and bad names for thee. Rest, yes rest my child and receive your wings. Your mother loves you more than you could ever know. It’s OK my Boo you’re free to go.”

Speaking broadly about the low clearance rate ____________________________ for homicides in Buffalo, DA John Flynn said MARIA Date there _______________________ that were twoY18W16 categories of homicides in Buffalo, that 80 percent of homicides can Issue: ______________________ be classified as gang-related, and for those homicides, the clearance rate is even lower. IF YOU declined APPROVEto ERRORS WHICH ARE ONhomicide Flynn categorize Harvey’s

Buffalo police say they are conducting an active investigation into Kita Harvey’s murder. The Buffalo Police Department maintains a confidential tip hotline that can P receive calls or texts at 716-847-2255.

THIS PROOF, THE PUBLIC CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINE THE AD THOROUGHLY EVEN IF THE AD IS A PICK-UP. THIS PROOF MAY ONLY BE USED FOR PUBLICATION IN THE PUBLIC.

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THE PUBLIC / MAY 16 - 22 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

LOOKING BACKWARD: THE CITY OF DETROIT III, 1914 The Great Lakes passenger steamer has gone the way of the horse and buggy, but photographs remain. Here, in 1914, the lake liner City of Detroit III is hauled by the tug W. I. Babcock on the Buffalo River. The Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Company, abbreviated D&C, made regular express runs between Buffalo and Detroit, docking the liner at the foot of Main Street. When it was completed in 1911, the City of Detroit III was the largest, most expensive, and most luxurious passenger liner on the Great Lakes, considered the crowning achievement of naval architect Frank E. Kirby. The liner was sold and scrapped in Detroit harbor in 1956. - THE PUBLIC STAFF


STATE NEWS

New York City Public Advocate Letitia James is one of several strong candidates for interim AG who have asked not to be considered.

CITY AND STATE

NO ONE WANTS TO BE INTERIM ATTORNEY GENERAL AVAILABLE NOW FROM THE PUBLIC BOOKS AND FOUNDLINGS PRESS:

BY JEFF COLTIN

HEAVY HITTERS ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO THE FALL ELECTIONS AND AVOIDING THE APPEARANCE OF BACKROOM DEALMAKING ON TUESDAY, May 15, the state Legislature

began interviewing candidates to be the next New York attorney general—but not a single one of the major players who have the best chance to actually get elected to the post this fall will be there. Not New York City Public Advocate Letitia James, who as recently as Thursday looked like she had the job locked up. Not Representatives Kathleen Rice or Sean Patrick Maloney, experienced Democrats who have run for the seat before. Not state Senator Michael Gianaris, with his deep ties in both houses of the state Legislature. Not former US Attorney General Preet Bharara, who is eminently qualified with a national profile. And not Alphonso David, counsel to Governor Andrew Cuomo, who could run with the support of the state’s most powerful politician. Why doesn’t anybody want to be appointed attorney general? They all have their own reasons, but the simplest answer is that none of them are in the mix on Tuesday since they’re looking ahead to a different date: the September 13 statewide Democratic primary. The state Legislature—led by Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie thanks his near-majority of 104 seats out of the combined 213 seats in both houses— has the constitutional duty to replace former Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. It’s being led for now by acting Attorney General Barbara Underwood, who has served as number two in the office for more than a decade as solicitor general. It seems increasingly likely that Heastie and the Legislature will choose Underwood—and not any of the other 12 candidates—to lead the office until a new attorney general can be chosen by the voters in the regularly scheduled November elections. (Underwood has said she will not run.) And the rest of the potential candidates have reasons for opting out of the process. James surprised many on Friday by declining to take part in the Legislature’s screening process. A former assistant attorney general with years of political experience who would bring gender and racial diversity as a black woman, James seemed like many to be a perfect candidate. But where there was excitement in some camps over reports that she had the  job all but locked up, there was fear in others. Major newspapers’ editorial boards argued against a legislative appointment other than Underwood, and good government groups and the governor agreed. The Times made the message clear: “No Back-Room Deal to Replace Schneiderman” over a photo of James. Meanwhile, a quiet opposition campaign began, including the typical political game of hunting for and placing stories of dubious validity. Internally, James’s team feared that her inauguration was being ruined. Being appointed attorney general by the Legislature would give the benefit of incumbency

to a run later this year, but by Friday afternoon consensus in the political world seemed to be that an appointment would leave James tainted by backroom dealmaking.

WHERE THE STREETS ARE PAVED WITH RUST

Said one Albany Democrat who asked to remain anonymous, “At a certain point, Tish just sort of decided that she was hurting herself in the September primary.”

Essays by Bruce Fisher about Rust Belt economies, environments, and politics.

James’s decision may also have been helped along by a number of other prominent, potential candidates declining to participate in the screening process. Bharara, knowing he didn’t have a chance among the lawmakers he once terrorized as US Attorney, said he wouldn’t submit to the screening process, while keeping the door open to running in November. Gianaris also declined to join the screening process. If he were picked, Democrats would have lost a seat in the hotly contested state Senate.

The financial decline of the middle class is the issue of our time. Bruce Fisher’s Where The Streets Are Paved With Rust is a must read for anyone seriously trying to understand why it happened and how to fix it.

Rice and Maloney both have political complexities to sort out. As reported by Newsday, Rice is already the nominee for reelection in her Long Island congressional seat, and election law prohibits a candidate from being nominated for two offices at once. A source familiar with Rice’s thinking told City & State that she and her team were still finding out if an attorney general run would be legal.

—Ted Kaufman, former United States Senator and advisor to Vice President Joe Biden

To understand Rust Belt politics, you can’t do better than to read Bruce Fisher’s excellent essay collection. —Catherine Tumber, Senior Research Associate with Northeastern University’s School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Fellow with the Massachusetts Institute for a New Commonwealth’s Gateway Cities Innovation Institute, and author of Small, Green, and Gritty

“We didn’t have a definitive answer to those questions by Friday, so she couldn’t put herself into the mix for that process without knowing how the legal questions are going to sort of shake out,” the source said. Maloney’s office did not respond to a request for comment, but the Hudson Valley Democrat would run into the same issue regarding his congressional seat. Maloney had actually submitted his name for consideration by the state Legislature on Friday before announcing Monday that he would drop out of the process. He is still considering running in the Democratic primary. Other possible contenders seemed to decline for similar reasons. Former Democratic gubernatorial candidate Zephyr Teachout would have an easier time gathering grassroots support as a staunch progressive than she would winning over legislators. David would have also had a tough time being picked by the Legislature thanks to his close ties with Cuomo, and may have an easier time at the Democratic state convention starting May 23. There, candidates will fight to earn the necessary 25 percent support necessary to get on the September ballot. Candidates who don’t get on at the convention can still submit petitions to earn a spot. Republicans are now looking for strong candidates to run for the open attorney general seat as well. No prominent Republicans applied to the Legislature’s screening process. Though state Senate Majority Leader John Flanagan said that his conference will participate in the screening process, the joint session is dominated by Democrats.

Order your copy at https://gum.co/SCKj or email foundlingszine@gmail.com

BOOK SIGNING AND AUTHOR TALK!

Pick up a copy of the book, chat with the author, and find out what’s next from The Public Books and Foundlings Press.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 • TALKING LEAVES BOOKS •

951 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo

7 - 9PM

Jeff Coltin reports for City & State, a politics and policy journal with which The Public P shares content. DAILYPUBLIC.COM / MAY 16 - 22, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

7


ART REVIEW

ADELE HENDERSON: RED LIST BY JACK FORAN

AT INDIGO ART GALLERY, A GRIM CONSIDERATION OF ANIMAL EXTINCTIONS OVER THE PAST 100 YEARS ARTIST ADELE HENDERSON’S exhibit at the Indigo art gallery is in reference to the startling

information that since the turn of the 20th century, approximately half of all animal species worldwide have become endangered or extinct. The exhibit is entitled Red List and consists of 50 or so illustrations from the 1898 edition of the Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia of nowadays extinct or endangered species. Engravings or similar technique representations by numerous anonymous artistic hands, enlarged and reproduced as lithographs, plus various additional effects, including marginal handwritten relevant facts and commentary, collage items, found objects, and subdued background graphical and verbal content of seemingly problematical relevance but ultimately suggesting dimensions beyond the ostensible strict scientific presentation regarding the scope and magnitude of current world species extinction— more indicating the tragedy of it all, the industrial world crime against nature. The titular Red List is a comprehensive global inventory of conservation status and extinction risk for plant and animal species published by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. (Don’t tell Trump about it; he’ll want us to drop out of it.) Henderson’s list starts with the late, lamented passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius), once the most abundant bird species in North America. Flocks would blot out the sun for minutes as they passed across the sky. Incredibly, the species was extinguished by hunting, by humans, with guns. Copious minuscule script handwriting in the picture margins informs—among other interesting data—that the passenger pigeon was last seen in the wild in 1901, and the last example of the species died in captivity, in the Cincinnati Zoo, in 1914. Among other well-known species depicted, the whooping crane (Grus americana), the snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus), the great auk (Alca impennis), the hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbriacata), and the European bison (Bison bonasus). Among the more spectacular species, the marvelous spatuletail (Loddigesia mirabilis), with its extraordinary tail feathers. Amid a target image circle and crosshairs, extending on the horizontal axis from “past” to “future,” on the vertical axis from “nostalgia…flow” above, to “regret…worry” below. Among the more biologically interesting, the alternately designated Tasmanian tiger or zebra wolf (Thylacine dasyure), a marsupial resembling a dog or wolf, and that occupied a similar ecological niche—that is, predatory—to the wolf. Also depicted is the polar right whale (Balaena mysticetus), which is Melville’s right whale, Greenland whale, true whale, great mysticetus, and various other names he applies to the species, the second overall in rank and eminence in his comprehensive catalog of cetaceans, right behind the sperm whale, Moby Dick’s species. The lithographs are in black and white, like the originals in the source 10-volume dictionary and cyclopedia, but with occasional color additions, such as for the Carolina parakeet (Conuropsis carolinensis), the bird itself depicted in black and white, but under the picture is a strip of seven paint color swatches, including red, orange, and five shades of green to blue-green. Or the rufousthroated dipper (Cinclus schulzi), with a touch of red applied—rouge-like—over the throat feathers.

for Spirituality, “as the doomsday clock ticks toward midnight…reawaken inner spirituality with celestial inspired colors” like “Solar flare,” a bright yellow, or “Andromeda,” a peaceful blue. Or for Cocooning, in a time of “heightened levels of political polarization,” colors such as “Trickle-down bling,” a deep pink, or “Bourbon smash,” brown to mauve. The other smaller series is entitled The Sun and consists of circular graphs—of some complexity, it should be noted—on various solar data for various locations around the world: Seattle, Tel Aviv, Reykjavik, Copenhagen, Bangkok, Moscow, and Buffalo. To interpret which, it would be useful to have an advanced degree in meteorological science and another in reading complicated graphs. Maybe best settle for appreciating the colorful circular graph patterns. The Adele Henderson exhibit continues through May 27.

Two smaller series by the same artist are in a small room off the gallery main room. One is entitled Color Forecast and consists of sheets of various paint color swatches, in hues on a given sheet appropriate to a particular inner directional purpose or thematic—such as, namely, Authenticity, Spirituality, Connectivity, Cocooning, and Sanctuary—together with brief verbal expositions as to why each purpose or thematic might be useful or appropriate in the Trumpian era. For example,

ADELE HENDERSON: RED LIST

IN GALLERIES NOW

works from the Gerald Mead Collection, on view through May 28. Mon-Fri 10am-3pm. Buffalo & Erie County Central Library (1 Lafayette Square, Buffalo, NY 14203, 858-8900,  buffalolib.org):  Buffalo Never Fails: The Queen City & WWI, 100th Anniversary of America’s Entry into WWI, on second floor.  Building Buffalo: Buildings from Books, Books from Buildings, in the Grosvenor Rare Book Room. Catalogue available for purchase.  Mon-Sat 8:30am-6pm, Sun 12-5pm.Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Fourth Fridays till 8pm. Burchfield Penney Art Center  (1300 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY  14222, 878-6011,  burchfieldpenney.org):  Messages/Visual Platform, through Jul 29; Philip Koch: Time Travel in the Burchfield Archives, through July 29; Merton & Lax: Image and Word, through August 26; Suddenly I Awoke: The Dream Journals of Charles E. Burchfield, through July 29; Opems: Verbal Visual Combines, Michael Basinski, on view through Jun 24.  Cargo, WayPoints, and Tales of the Erie Canal,  through Jul 29. Wright, Roycroft, Stickley and Roehlfs: Defining the Buffalo Arts and Crafts Aesthetic, through November 26.  Under Cover: objects with lids from the permanent collection, through Apr 29.  At This Time, group show, through May 27.  M & T Second Friday event (second Friday of every month). 10am5pm & Sun 1-5pm. Admission $5-$10, children 10 and under free. Café Taza  (100 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY

ists Group) (1 Linwood Ave, Buffalo, NY 14209, 716-885-2251, wnyag.com): The Niagara Frontier Watercolor Society, Spring 2018 = ART OPENING = REVIEWED THIS ISSUE Members Transparent Watercolor Show,  on view through Jun  1. Reception  and awards 125 Art Collective Tattoo Studio  (125 Elmwood ceremony Sat, May 19, 2-4pm.  Tue-Fri  11am5pm, Sat 11am-3pm. Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14201): Jennifer Ryan. Albright-Knox Art Gallery  (1285 Elmwood Ave- Betty’s Restaurant  (370 Virginia Street, Buffanue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 882-8700,  albright- lo, NY 14201, 362-0633,  bettysbuffalo.com): knox.org):  Introducing Tony Conrad: A Retro- Betty’s annual staff, friends, and family show. spective, on view through May 27. We Wanted Through May 20. Tue-Thu, 8am-9pm, Fri 8ama Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85, 10pm, Sat 9am-10pm, Sun 9am-2pm. on view through May 27. Matisse and the Art of Jazz, on view through Jun 17.  Picturing Benjaman Gallery (419 Elmwood Avenue Buffalo, NY 14222, thebenjamangallery.com): Works Niagara, paintings by Stephen Hannock, on from the collection. Thu-Sat 11am-5pm.  view through Sep 30.  B. Ingrid Olson: Forehead and Brain,  through Jun 17. Tue-Sun BOX Gallery (Buffalo Niagara Hostel, 667 Main 10am-5pm, open late First Fridays (free)  un- St, Buffalo, NY 14203): Feel Me, a multi-layered installation by Kyla Kegler, on view til 10pm.   through Jun 15. Every day 4-10pm. Anna Kaplan Contemporary (1250 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213, 604-6183, annakaplancon- Buffalo Arts Studio  (Tri Main Building 5th temporary.art): Rebecca Allan:  Debris Fields, Floor, 2495 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14214, a solo exhibition on view through Jun 16. Sat 833-4450,  buffaloartsstudio.org): Solo exhibitions by Chuck Tingley and Mizin Shin. 12-4 or by appointment. Tue-Fri 10am-5pm, Sat 10am-2pm, Fourth FriArt 247  (247 Market Street, Lockport, NY days till 8pm. 14094, theart247.com): Wed-Sun, 10am-5pm. Buffalo Big Print  (78 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY Art Dialogue Gallery  (5 Linwood Avenue, Buf- 14202,  716-884-1777,  buffalobigprint.com): falo, NY 14209  wnyag.com):  Len Biszkont: Benjamin Minter, recent paintings and mixed Stories Told, on view through Jul 6. Opening media, through June 1. Mon-Fri 9am-5:30pm. reception, Sat May 19, 2-4pm.  Tue-Fri 11amBuffalo Center for Arts and Technology (1221 Main 5pm, Sat 11am-3pm.  Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 259-1680,  buffaArtists Group Gallery  (Western New York Art- loartstechcenter.org):  Our Community: Art-

8

THE PUBLIC / MAY 16 - 22 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

INDIGO ART GALLERY • 47 ALLEN STREET, BUFFALO, NY 716.984.9572 • INDIGOARTBUFFALO.COM

P

14201): Momentary Canvas, aerial photographs by Jim Cielencki. Caffeology Buffalo (23 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY, 14201): Rachel D’Alfanso, paintings from series Still. Carnegie Art Center (240 Goundry Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120,  carnegieartcenter. org):  CAC Members Exhibition, through May 19. Thu 6-9pm & Sat 12-3pm. The Cass Project  (500 Seneca Street, Buffalo, NY 14204,  thecassproject.org):  Chroma Soma, work by Kyla Kegler. Thu  129pm, Fri & Sat 12-5pm. Castellani Art Museum  (5795 Lewiston Road, Niagara University, NY 14109, 286-8200, castellaniartmuseum.org): Think Big: The Artists of Autism Services, through Jan 14, 2019. Writing on the Wall, text-based works from the collection, through July 29;  The Lure of Niagara: Highlights From the Charles Rand Penney Historical Niagara Falls Print Collection, through Sep 9; Of Their Time: Hudson River School to Postwar Modernism, through Dec 31, 2019. Tue-Sat 11am-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. CEPA  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 856-2717,  cepagallery.org): Vicious Cycle,  Kate MacNeil,  through Jun 15.  The Unseen Marion Faller, through Jul 8.  MonFri 9am-5pm, Sat 12-4pm. The Corridors Gallery at Hotel Henry, A Resource:Art Project  (444 Forest Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14213, facebook.com/resourceartny): Solo in-


GALLERIES ART stallations by Rebecca Allan, Jack Drummer, Gigi Gatewood, Julian Montague, Eric Magnuson, Gary Sczerbaniewicz curated by Resource:Art. On view through mid-May. Checkin at second floor front  desk. Artist talk by Gary Sczerbaniewicz and Eric Magnuson Sat, May 19, 6pm. Dana Tillou Fine Arts  (1478 Hertel Avenue Buffalo, NY 14216, 716-854-5285,  danatilloufinearts.com):  Wed-Fri  10:30am5pm, Sat 10:30am-4pm. Eleven Twenty Projects  (1120 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209, 882-8100, eleventwentyprojects.com):  Biff Henrich:  The Structure of Things Part II.  On view through  Jun  3.  TueFri, 10am-4pm, or by appointment. El Museo  (91 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 464-4692,  elmuseobuffalo.org): Real? Real!, affordable housing designs by the UB Small Built Works Program.  Also showing the Old First Ward Benches Project and the newly retored gallery! Wed-Sat 12-6pm Enjoy the Journey Art Gallery (1168 Orchard Park Road, West Seneca, NY 14224, 675-0204, etjgallery.com): Happiness exhibit through May 26. Tue & Wed 11-6pm, Thu & Fri 2-6pm, Sat 114pm. Galerie PACT (Former St Francis Xavier School, 147 East Street, Buffalo, NY 14207):  Michael Bevilacqua: EXHziTIbitio. N. Title. [A.r E—A X ] Gymnesia,  on view through Jun 30. Opening reception Fri, May 18, 5-9pm. Wed-Sun 11am4pm, Thu 1-7pm and by appointment: melissa@galeriepact.com, 716-491-8901.  Green Window City  (Allentown, Buffalo, NY): Month-long installation in 13 storefronts (ACME Cabinet Company, Allen Street Dress Shop, Alley Cat, Caffèology, Hair by Jose, Freshly Dipped Clothing, Grindhaus Cafe, High Klass Hair, Hyatt’s All Things Creative, Les Jardins, Pawprints by Penny & Co., Rick Cycle Shop, and Salon Bandelian)  in Allentown by artists  Ani Hoover, Bob Melnyk, Bobby Allen, Caesandra Seawell advising Pelion Community Garden, Emma Percy, Janna Willoughby-Lohr, Jessica Widmer, Kayleigh Small & Sarah Barry, Leah Bogdan, Melissa Swiatek-Odien, Suzie Molnar, Tina Bethge-Kaczynski, and Virginia Melnyk. GO ART!  (201 East Main Street, Batavia, NY 14020):  Where Do I Go From Here?  by Shirley Nigro  in the Rotary Club Room Gallery. Thu-Fri  11am-7pm,  Sat  11am-4pm,  Second Sun 11am-2pm. Hallwalls  (341 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202, 854-1694,  hallwalls.org):  Jeremy Boyle and Mark Franchino:  five.  On view  through  June 29.  Tue-Fri  11am6pm, Sat 11am-2pm. The Harold L. Olmsted Gallery, Springville Center for the Arts (37 N. Buffalo Street, Springville, NY 14141, 716-592-9038).  Reflection of Nature and Spirit, by John Merlino, on view through Jun 2. Artist also offering painting workshops. Wed & Fri, noon-5pm, Thu noon8pm, Sat 10am-3pm.  Indigo Art Gallery  (47 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14202, 984-9572,  indigoartbuffalo.com): “…and what’s the use of talking”: recent work by Kristina Siegel and Jörg Schnier. Wed 126pm, Thu 12-7pm, Fri, 6-9pm Sat 12-3pm, and by appointment Sundays and Mondays. Jewish Community Center of Greater Buffalo Bunis Family Art Gallery (2640 N Forest Road, Benderson Family Building, Amherst, NY 14068, 688-4033, jccbuffalo.org): Mon-Thu 5:30am10pm, Fri 5:30am-6pm, Sat-Sun 8am-6pm. Karpeles Manuscript Library (North Hall)  (220 North St., Buffalo, NY  14201):  The Young Abraham Lincoln, the drawings of Lloyd  Ostendorf. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.   Karpeles Manuscript Museum (Porter Hall)  (453 Porter Ave, Buffalo, NY 14201):  Maps of the United States. Tue-Sun 11am-4pm.  Main Street Gallery (515 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203): Buffalo Society of Artists Open Members Exhibit, through May 18. Artist talk Thu May 17. Online gallery: BSAonline.org. Meibohm Fine Arts  (478 Main Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 652-0940, meibohmfinearts. com): Nancy Treherne Craig:  Eyes Open, on view  through  May  26.  Tue-Sat  9:30am5:30pm. Niagara Arts and Cultural Center  (1201 Pine Avenue, Niagara Falls, NY 14301, 2827530,  thenacc.org):  Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat & Sun 12-4pm. Nichols School Gallery at the Glenn & Audrey Flickinger Performing Arts Center  (1250 Amherst Street, Buffalo, NY 14216, 332-6300, nicholsschool.org/artshows): Work from the collection. Mon-Fri 8am-4pm, Closed Sat & Sun.

Nina Freudenheim Gallery (140 North Street, Lenox Hotel, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-8825777,  ninafreudenheimgallery.com): Peter Stephens: Oblique Logic, through May 15. TueFri 10am–5pm. Norberg’s Art & Frame Shop  (37 South Grove Street, East Aurora, NY 14052, 716-6523270,  norbergsartandframe.com):  Regional artists from the  gallery  collection.  TueSat 10am–5pm. Harold L. Olmsted Gallery, Springville  Center for the Arts  (37 N. Buffalo Street,  Springville, NY 14141,  716-592-9038,  SpringvilleArts. org): Wed & Fri, 12-5pm. Thu 12-8pm, Sat 103pm.  Parables Gallery & Gifts (1027 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY,  parablesgalleryandgifts.com): FLORA: A group  exhibit on view  through May 27. Wed-Sat,12-5pm, Sun 1-5pm. Pausa Art House  (19 Wadsworth Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 697-9069  pausaarthouse.com):  Transfer, work by Monica Angle, on view through  June 30. Thu, Fri & Sat 6-11pm. Live Music Thu-Sat. Pine Apple Company  (65 Allen Street, Buffalo, NY 14201, 716-275-3648,  squareup.com/ store/pine-apple-company)  Wed & Thu 11am6pm, Fri & Sat 11am-11pm, Sun 10am-5pm. Project 308 Gallery  (308 Oliver Street, North Tonawanda, NY 14120, 523-0068,  project308gallery.com): Tue & Thu 7-9pm and by appointment. Queen City Gallery  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 868-8183,  queencitygallery. tripod.com):  Art Under the Stars at 64 College Street.  Art by Neil Mahar, David Pierro, Candace Keegan, Chris McGee, Eileen Pleasure, Eric Evinczik, Barbara Crocker, Thomas Bittner, Susan Liebel, Barbara Lynch Johnt, John Farallo, Thomas Busch, Sherry Anne Preziuso, Tony Cappello, Michael Mulley. First Friday extended hours. Tue-Fri 11am4pm and by appointment.  Revolution Gallery (1419 Hertel Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14216,  revolutionartgallery.com): Impotent Gods, work by Anthony Freda and Nick Chiechi, on view through May 19. Thu 12-6pm, Fri and Sat 12-8pm.  River Gallery and Gifts  (83 Webster Street, North Tonawanda, 14051,  riverartgalleryandgifts.com): Wed-Fri 11am-4pm Sat 11am- 5pm.  Ró Home Shop (732 Elmwood Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, 240-9387, rohomeshop.com): Work by Catherine Willett. Tue-Sat 11am-6pm, Sun 11am-4pm, closed Mondays.  Sisti Gallery (6535 Campbell Blvd., Pendleton, NY 14094, 465-9138): Honoring Watercolor, works by Rita Argen Auerbach and Charles E. Burchfield. Fri 6-9pm, Sat & Sun 11-2pm. Squeaky Wheel  (617 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, squeaky.org): Tue-Sat, 12pm-5pm.  Stangler Fine Art  (6429 West Quaker Street, Orchard Park, NY 14127, 870-1129,  stanglerart.com): Mon-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat  11am3pm. Closed Sundays. Starlight Studio and Art Gallery  (340 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14202,  starlightstudio. org):  Studies in Paper Plastic Canvas, Sussan Giallombardo, through May  11.  MonFri 9-4pm. Sugar City  (1239 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14213,  buffalosugarcity.org): Charming Chillers:  Movie Poster Designs by Cassie Chu.  May 6-12.  Open by event  and  Fri  5:307:30.  UB Anderson Gallery  (1 Martha Jackson Place, Buffalo, NY 14214, 829-3754,  ubartgalleries. org):  Bracha: Pietà—Eurydice—Medusa,  Bracha Ettinger, on view through Jul 29.. Claire Falkenstein: Time Elements,  Cravens World: The Human Aesthetic.  Wed-Sat  11am5pm, Sun 1-5pm.  UB Art Gallery (North Campus, Lower Art Gallery) (201 Center for the Arts, Room B45, Buffalo, NY, 14260, 645-6913, ubartgalleries. org): Introducing Tony Conrad: A Retrospective, on view through May 26. No Plan for the Future, SCREEN Projects by virocode on view through May 26. Tue-Fri 11am-5pm, Sat 1-5pm. Villa Maria College Paul William Beltz Family Art Gallery  (240 Pine Ridge Terrace, Cheektowaga, NY 14225, 961-1833): Annual High School Photo Exhibit through May 25. Mon-Fri 9am6pm, Sat 10am-5pm.  Western New York Book Arts Center (468 Washington Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, 348-1430, wnybookarts.org):  I’m trying to remember, pero nunca olvidaré, a collaborative exhibition on view May 17 through Jun 2. Opening reception Thu, May 17, 5-8pm. Wed-Sat 12-6pm. 

To add your gallery’s information to the list, please contact us at info@dailypublic.com P DAILYPUBLIC.COM / MAY 16 - 22, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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10 THE PUBLIC / MAY 16 - 22 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


DAILYPUBLIC.COM / MAY 16 - 22, 2018 / THE PUBLIC

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TIMOTHY ENGLERT’s homage to the late, great Harbor Inn is titled The Night Paladino Shot the 1st Ward in the Heart. The landmark bar was demolished by Ellicott Development Corporation 15 years ago this month. See more of the artist’s work at tenglert.com.


EVENTS CALENDAR

NICKEL CITY CON: AN INTERVIEW WITH LOU FERRIGNO FRIDAY MAY 18

PUBLIC APPROVED

3PM / BUFFALO NIAGARA CONVENTION CENTER, 153 FRANKLIN ST / $15-$75 [COMIC CON] By displaying his massive physique during bodybuilding’s Golden Era and through his

turn as the Incredible Hulk on television in the 1970s and 1980s, Lou Ferrigno became world-famous for his larger-than-life musculature. Sure, it was easy to label Ferrigno as a one-dimensional “body” at the time, with the Hulk’s vocalizations limited mostly to grunts and a complete overdub of his lines as the titular character in 1983’s Hercules. Flash-forward to today, and Ferrigno gets work as a voice actor for critically acclaimed cartoons like Adventure Time and We Bare Bears. He also played “Lou Ferrigno”—no overdub required—for seven seasons on The King of Queens. Clearly, it’s been a unique path for Ferrigno, 66, who will visit with fans at the Nickel City Con this Friday through Sunday, May 18-20 at the Buffalo Niagara Convention Center. After over 40-plus years in the spotlight, Ferrigno told The Public that he still enjoys the convention experience, including the unique requests he gets from fans. “Sometimes they have me sign their body parts so they can get my signature tattooed. I’ve seen these crazy huge statues,” Ferrigno said. “They come up with stuff I’ve never seen before. It’s phenomenal.” Fans will have a unique opportunity on May 19, when a rare photo opportunity will be available with not one but two Hulks—“The Incredible Hulk” Lou Ferrigno and pro wrestling star Hulk Hogan. Ferrigno, who said he once turned down Vince McMahon’s appeals to enter the pro wrestling business, is looking forward to appearing with Hogan. “Everyone knows who the original Hulk was,” Ferrigno quipped. “And Hulk Hogan—I think he’s done a lot for the sport of wrestling. He really helped put wrestling on the map, and I have met him from time to time, and he’s a nice guy.” Although Ferrigno is happy to reminisce about his time as the Hulk, the Brooklyn native also enjoys discussing some of his lesser known roles, like his starring role in the 1988 movie Cage, where Ferrigno played a brain damaged character influenced into the world of underground fighting. “It was great because I did martial arts training for that film. I was excited to be part of it because it was the best way to stretch me as an actor as far as being mentally deficient after being shot in the head,” Ferrigno said. “It was one of my favorite movies.” Ferrigno continues to work in film and television, but his prime passion remains physical health.

Ferrigno has been in discussions to head up the President’s Council on Physical Fitness, where he says he can share his decades of experience in training and dieting. As an observer of health trends, Ferrigno says Americans are generally in better shape today than they were in past decades but still lagging in key areas. “We’re healthier today because we have more attention to cardio nutrition and dieting. Plus, we have different types of competitions, like the men’s fitness, that everybody wants to be a part of it. Which is great, because this country has a lot of obesity. That’s why I want to make America healthy again,” Ferrigno said. Ferrigno isn’t just adapting President Trump’s tagline, he’s following in his footsteps as a reality competition show “boss” on Pumped, which begins filming for Discovery Channel in June. “It’s like the Celebrity Apprentice of fitness and bodybuilding, where people come on the show and they bring their brand to the show to try and make it successful,” Ferrigno said. Lou Ferrigno and dozens of other stars of film, TV, comic books, and more will be on hand at the Nickel City Con, May 18-20. Ticketing information is available at nickelcitycon.com. -KIP DOYLE

HAMBURG ROCKS: PETER CASE, GURF MORLIX, AND FRIENDS FRIDAY MAY 18 6:30PM / HAMBURG PALACE THEATRE, 31 BUFFALO STREET / $17 PRESALE, $22 AT THE DOOR [AMERICANA] Peter Case lit out from Hamburg in 1973 at age 19, already a veteran of stages at

local bars, for California, where he formed the Nerves and later the Plimsouls, whose hit “A Million Miles Away” made the band famous and Case, at least briefly, fairly comfortable for a kid who’d been busking and couch-surfing and hitchhiking to gigs just a couple years earlier. His solo career began in 1986, and in the decades since Case has established himself as one of the country’s finest songwriters, the sort of artist about whom other musicians nod in quiet appreciation. Gurf Morlix left Hamburg a couple of years after Case, in 1975, destination Austin, Texas, where he hooked up with the legendary country music singer/songwriter Blaze Foley. From there Morlix moved to LA, where he joined Lucinda Willams’s band and served as producer for a couple of her records. He went on to produce records for Slaid Cleaves, Mary Gauthier, and Robert Earl Keen, among others, all while recording his own albums, 10 of them, and establishing his own reputation as a songwriter and performer, both on stage and in studio. Case and Morlix are bona fide members of the modern Americana canon; and have known each other a long time, but have never shared a stage in their hometown—until now. On Friday, May 18, the Hamburg Place Theatre hosts Hamburg Rocks, featuring Case and Morlix together, backed by a host of local talent: Singer-songwriters Alison Pipitone and Tom Stahl open the show, with assistance from Graham Howes; Case and Morlix’s best-of-the-region’s-

WEDNESDAY MAY 16

THURSDAY MAY 17

Jake Miller

Michael Bevilacqua Pop-up Exhibit

7:30pm Rapids Theatre, 1711 Main St. $22-$37

5pm Galerie PACT, 147 East Street Free

[POP] Florida's Jake Miller understands the power of visual allure, using YouTube (and his easy-on-the-eyes appearance) to his great advantage: the 25-year-old singer-cumrapper eventually landed a deal with Warner Brothers on the strength of leveraging his video presence. But Miller isn't afraid to work hard, having since gone indie and putting some rigorous touring under his belt behind last year's 2:00am in LA and the new Silver Lining, out in March. His urban-pop hybrid is alive and well on his Hit and Run Tour, which stops at the Rapids Theatre in Niagara Falls on Wednesday, May 16. -TPS

[VISUAL ARTS] A former Catholic school at the corner of Amherst and East streets on Buffalo’s East Side will host a pop-up art exhibit, courtesy Paris’s Galerie Pact. The show, which opens with a reception Thursday, May 17, 5-9pm, is titled EXHzibitio. N. Title. [A.r.E-AX] Gymnesia—a mouthful, to be sure, if one dared try to say it out loud. The artist is Michael Bevilacqua, a California native whose work has been exhibited at an impressive catalog of galleries internationally and is in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others. If this—an out-of-country museum hosting a six-week pop-up exhibit of work by an internationally known, out-of-town artist in Buffalo—sounds rare, that’s because it is. Thursday’s opening is likely to draw collectors, curators, and journalists from out of town, too. And maybe that will result in such happenings becoming less rare in the future. The show runs through June 30. Check our gallery listings for viewing information, should you miss the opening. -TPS

THIS, The Great Lakes, Citizen Jane, and Church Girls 8pm Nietzsche's, 248 Allen St. $5

[INDIE] A solid lineup of indie and alternative rock is set up for Nietzsche’s this Wednesday, May 16 thanks to the folks over at NYS Music. Come early and stay late for rock band THIS, folk punks the Great Lakes, Toronto-based folk-pop band Citizen Jane, and post punk band Church Girls. -TPS

12 THE PUBLIC / MAY 16 - 22 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

best backup band comprises multi-instrumentalist Jim Whitford (also a Hamburg native), guitarist Mark Winsick, and drummer Rob Lynch. This is, quite literally, a dream come true for promoter Dan Sawers and local fans of roots rock and transcendent songwriting. Tickets will sell out. Get them now at purchase.tickets.com. -GEOFF KELLY

Todd Glass

Brand X

8pm Helium Comedy Club, 30 Mississippi St. $20-$35

7pm Tralf Music Hall, 622 Main St. $40-$45

[COMEDY] It’s fun to watch Todd Glass talk about stuff. He's very irreverent and that's why the stuff he talks is funny. That’s good, because Todd Glass is a comedian, in case you didn’t know. He’s so good at talking about stuff and being funny that he almost won a contest doing it called Last Comic Standing. Watch Todd Glass talk about stuff and be funny in person at Helium Comedy Club this Thursday, May 17 through Saturday, May 19. -CP

FRIDAY MAY 18 Black Veil Brides 6:30pm Rapids Theatre, 1711 Main St. $29.50-$35

[METAL] Glam metal, emo, and hard rock collide for Hollywood’s Black Veil Brides. The over-the-top rock band, usually dressed in studded leather and torn black t-shirts are known for pretty spectacular live show. Their latest album, Vale, a dystopian hard rock epic with all of the hooks you’d expect from a KISS record. Catch Black Veil Brides at the Rapids Theatre in Niagara Falls on Friday, May 18 with support from English hard rock band Asking Alexandria. -TPS

[JAZZ FUSION] While Genesis was experiencing increasingly tense relations with lead singer Peter Gabriel, drummer Phil Collins got busy with Brand X, a London-based jazz fusion band featuring sometimes-Eno bassist Percy Jones, that'd originally called him in to potentially lend vocals to their debut. The record company wasn't keen on the results, but Collins came and went as Brand X's drummer as the decade progressed, leaving periodically to deal with his increasingly highprofile day gig. Fusion was a hot ticket in the mid-late 1970s, fortified on this side of the pond by bands like Weather Report, and Brand X made somewhat of a splash, especially given their prog-rock connections via Genesis, Eno, Bill Bruford, and the like. Six albums later, in the early 1980s, they went on hiatus. Since then, the collective has been intermittently active, most recently having released a pair of live albums recorded over the last two years. Founding guitarist John Goodsall and bassist Jones are still at the helm, with keyboardist Chris Clark, percussionist Scott Weinberger and drummer Kenny Grohowski supplying ample chops alongside. The Brand X sound

CONTINUED ON PAGE 14


CALENDAR EVENTS

PUBLIC APPROVED

PRESENTS

PEACH PICKS

LIVEMUSICEVERYNIGHTFOROVER30YEARS! WEDNESDAY

AT PEACH: We’ve been on a bit of a short fiction kick lately at the site. Last Friday, we published the short piece of prose, “it’s fall. the romance of your marriage is wilting,” by American poet Jessica Hite. The piece offers a peek into the mundanities of a deadened romance. In flash form, Hite manages to create the familiarity of a whole world in just a few hundred words. A feeling of coldness—both literally and figuratively—permeates the piece, while maintaining a devastating sense of vulnerability. It ends on a sort of dial tone; the story hangs up but we still have the phone in our hand. Yesterday’s feature—the short story, “Spirals,” by Bella Bravo, a Bloomington-based fiction writer and playwright, and author of The Unpositioned Parts (Monster House Press, 2016)—complements Hite’s piece in its exploration of a frustrating relationship. Whereas Hite’s piece deals with a romance on autopilot and takes on a solemn tone, the protagonist in “Spirals” confronts a difficult predicament with a mix of postromance resentment and regret. During a conversation between the protagonist and her ex, for instance, whole worlds of bitterness are revealed in a few economic lines; he says, “You’ve made it clear we don’t have much to talk about.” “He has seemed aware of his emotions,” the speaker likewise observes, “eager to name mine.”

MAY 16

THIs, great lakes, citizen jane, church girls 8PM $5

intrepid travelers may residency w/cosmic brownie

THURSDAY

MAY 17

9PM $5

INDETERMINACY FESTIVAL FRIDAY MAY 18

free happy hour w/jony james

FRIDAY

MAY 18

6PM FREE

Bindley Hardware Co.,

8:30PM / VARIOUS LOCATIONS,

Stationwagon, Jungle Steve & the Gypsophelias, Alberta

[FESTIVAL] For two days in May last year, Buffalo’s Silo City was transformed into the first annual

10PM $5

Indeterminacy Festival. The brainchild of Stanzi Vaubel, audiences wandered through an amalgamation of music, light, and dance all the while inside immersive bubbles. Centered around the idea that “indeterminacy” can be a site for fruitful possibility, Vaubel’s describes this year’s festival

gathered in their masses

SATURDAY

MAY 19

theme of Emergence as “focusing on the way in which unlikely things can come together in the

black sabbath tribute (pawsitives for heroes benefit)

formation of something new.” In a cultural climate where hearing one another is becoming increasingly difficult, the Indeterminacy Festival offers a valuable lesson in the generative nature of difference.

9PM $5

Initially based on scientific theorist Donna Haraway’s idea that to communicate, we must look outside ourselves, Vaubel tapped disparate members of Buffalo’s arts community from the Bird’s Nest aerialists to youth ensembles. Upping her game from last year, Vaubel has stretched the festival over an entire

SUNDAY

MAY 20

week beginning with educational workshops and lectures, finally culminating with two large-scale performances on May 18 and 19. The festival will open Monday, May 14 with a film on Donna Haraway and continue through the week with screenings of the film Particle Fever, both at Hallwalls. The weekend performances are Friday, May 18 at 500 Seneca Street and Saturday, May 19 at Silo City; both performances are 8:30pm-10pm. Workshops and lectures given by visiting artists in partnership with and sponsored by the Technē Institute and the NA Fund also run throughout the week. For more information visit the website: indeterminacyfestival.com. -ANDI COULTER

honeys for hounds fundraiser feat. pinups for a cause, the stripteasers, kind killers sword dancers, belly dancing by zuut and fire & ice 3-6PM $10

ann philippone’s 15th anniversary show w/orly bendavid 5PM FREE

MONDAY

MAY 21

IN PRINT​:

jazz happy hour w/donny frauenhofer 5:30PM FREE

Wildlives, 2nd ed.​

PUBLIC APPROVED

WEDNESDAY

MAY 23

By Sarah Jean Alexander Big Lucks Books / 2018 / poetry collection Recently out from Big Lucks Books is the second edition of Sarah Jean Alexander’s debut book of poems and short fiction, Wildlives, featuring 50 new pages of poetry. The new addition of poems, published in two sections entitled “You Have Made This Place a Home” and “When the Alarm Sounds, Accept the Fear That Has Manifested in the Dark Space Between Your Ears, Dwell on it Until it Bursts, and Recognize that the War You Fight Is Not Completely on Your Own,” is characteristic of what I love so much about Alexander’s poetry in that it explores intimacy through a fearlessly sincere lens. Alexander’s tone, at turns blunt and gentle, brightens and gives life to a sense of underlying smallness; she writes of feeling small, making herself smaller, and keeping safe the special sacred tininess that is nurtured by two people. In “It Is Easy to Find Someone,” she writes, “Last week I erased / every photo from my phone / of anyone who has left me / in the past year / It is an exercise in shrinking.” As a huge SJA fan, I predictably can’t recommend this collection enough.

—RACHELLE TOARMINO

9PM $5

THURSDAY

MAY 24

intrepid travelers may residency w/acid cats 9PM $5

WEEKLY EVENTS EVERY SUNDAY FREE

6PM. ANN PHILIPPONE

8PM . DR JAZZ & THE JAZZ BUGS

(EXCEPTFIRSTSUNDAYS IT’STHE JAZZ CACHE)

EVERY MONDAY FREE

8PM. SONGWRITER SHOWCASE 9PM. OPEN MIC W. JOSH GAGE

PORCHFEST SATURDAY MAY 19

EVERY TUESDAY 6PM. FREE HAPPY HOUR W/

1PM ELMWOOD VILLAGE, FREE [BLOCK PARTY] Maybe the Elmwood Village’s annual Porchfest block party is so popular

because by the time it rolls around, after approximately six months of winter, folks are dying to explore their neighborhoods again—and the Elmwood Village, with its historic homes and beautiful architecture, is a great place to explore. For those who don’t know how Porchfest works, folks around the Elmwood Village sign up to host local bands on their porch. If you don’t have a porch, then you’re the audience, who wanders from porch to porch taking in the performances, which range from acoustic guitar players to hip hop MCs, DJs, and full rock bands. The festival footprint usually stretches down Elmwood from around Bird Avenue roughly to North Street, and up and down all of the smaller side streets as far east as Linwood and as far west as Richmond. Porches participating

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chief j, skulking ghost, darth nader

in Porchfest will be designated with an official Porchfest sign, but you’re bound to come across some

THE STEAM DONKEYS 8PM. RUSTBELT COMEDY 10PM. JOE DONOHUE 11PM. THE STRIPTEASERS $3

EVERY WEDNESDAY FREE

6PM. TYLER WESTCOTT & DR. JAZZ

EVERY THURSDAY FREE

5PM. BARTENDER BILL PLAYS THE ACCORDION

EVERY SATURDAY FREE

4:30-7:30PM. CELTIC SEISIUNS

248 ALLEN STREET 716.886.8539

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unofficial parties, too. Get out there, this Saturday, May 19. -CORY PERLA DAILYPUBLIC.COM / MAY 16 - 22, 2018 / THE PUBLIC 13


EVENTS CALENDAR

ASBURY HALL

PLEASE EXAMINE THIS PROOF CAREFULLY

piece delivers that mix of musical dexterity and party spirit that fuels the best of that genre, and they've also got the Boston-area secret weapon going for them: Ripe is a Berklee outfit. With brass that sometimes reminds of early Chicago and a groove that channels vague bits of ska and reggae with bass-slapping funk, topped off with Robbie Wulfsohn's garage-soul pipes, Ripe has whipped up a musical smoothie MESSAGE TO ADVERTISER that hasTHE many familiar flavors but is somehow Thank you for advertising with PUBLIC. Please review your ad and unique. Then again, it doesn’t need to reinvent check for any errors. Thethe original wheel layout to put a smile on your face and some instructions have been followed closely spring inasyour step, which is essentially the as possible. THE PUBLICmission. offers design In that regard, Ripe is, well…ripe. For services with two proofsthe at no charge. THE band's Town Ballroom gig on Saturday, PUBLIC is not responsible error if Mayfor 19,any Ripe is joined by a host of local talent, not notified within 24 hours of receipt. The including singer-songwriter Max Muscato (with production department must have a signed special guests), First Ward, and Deadwolf. Did proof in order to print. Please sign and fax we mention it's a Rock Autism benefit? See this back or approve by responding to this more in this week's Spotlight. -CJT email.

PUBLIC APPROVED

APOCALYPTICA

PLAYS METALLICA BY FOUR CELLOS

WED 5/23 $35 ADV/$40 DAY OF GA SEATED

MARY LAMBERT W/MAL BLUM THU 6/7 $15 ADVANCE

AN EVENING WITH

YO LA TENGO

THU 9/23 $26 GA STANDING

RUFUS GIBSON PRESENTS: CHUCK DANIELS � CHECK COPY CONTENT SATURDAY MAY 19 10PM GYPSY PARLOR, 376 GRANT ST. $5

SUNDAY MAY 20

CHECK IMPORTANT DATES

CHECK NAME, ADDRESS, PHONE #, & WEBSITE

Slaid [HOUSE] Later this month, after Detroit-based DJ and producer Chuck Daniels makesOK his(NO wayCHANGES) to � PROOF

Cleaves

an intimate club here in Buffalo, he’ll kick off the last day of Detroit’s world renowned Movement 4pm Sportsmen's Tavern, 326 Amherst St. $20 � PROOF OKdaytime (WITH CHANGES) Festival, a three-day techno and house music festival held on Memorial Day weekend. His [COUNTRY] Yet another artist saved from the set at Movement Festival will be followed by a pair of fellow Detroiters in Golf Clap, who will clutches of total obscurity by the Americana themselves make their way to Buffalo later this summer to perform at Cobblestone Live along with fold, Austin-based Slaid Cleaves is an underSignature acts like Buffalo-based house music DJ and producer Rufus Gibson, who isAdvertisers at the heart of much appreciated gem. His dark character sketches of what happens in Buffalo’s house music scene. That includes trucking Daniels over to Buffalo and plain-stated approach to songwriting is ____________________________ for his gig this Saturday, May 19 at the Gypsy Parlor. Expect to hear some of the world’s best a shoe-in for listeners that want unabashed deep house and various other flavors from Daniels and Gibson and Buffalo’s Brandon Chase in/this Y18W20 Date CAITLIN _______________________ honesty in their country music, however warm up for Movement Festival. -CP bleak. On his latest, Ghost on the Car Radio, he ______________________ continues to inhabit the stories of folks trapped by circumstance and/or uninterested in the IF YOU APPROVE ERRORS WHICH ON flimsyARE direction that mainstream American THIS PROOF, THE PUBLIC CANNOT culture is BE barreling toward. The musical HELD RESPONSIBLE. PLEASE EXAMINE THE AD soundtrack sometimes rocks a little, but tends letting the inherent pathos run the THOROUGHLY EVEN IF THE to ADsimmer, IS A PICK-UP. show.FOR Throughout, a weary wisdom comes into THIS PROOF MAY ONLY BE USED focus, which suggests that despite the politics, PUBLICATION IN THE PUBLIC. these quietly miserable American souls might have a good handle on what's wrong with our picture. Cleaves comes to Sportsmen's Tavern on Sunday, May 20 for an afternoon gig at 4pm. -CJT Issue:

PUBLIC APPROVED

THE LONE BELLOW TUES 10/23 $27.50 RESERVED SEATING

9TH WARD

TUESDAY MAY 22 Dark Star Orchestra 7pm Town Ballroom, 681 Main St. $30-$34

LAUGH & OTHER DRUGS FRI 5/18 $8 ADV/$12 DAY OF GA SEATED

PRIMUS AND MASTADON WEDNESDAY MAY 23 5PM ARTPARK, 450 SOUTH 4TH ST. $45-$50 [ROCK] Primus and Mastodon are two huge bands that like to come to Buffalo pretty often.

DANIELLE NICOLE W/TOMMY Z BAND THU 5/24 $12 ADVANCE GA SEATED

JOHNNY HART & THE MESS W/TEN CENT HOWL FRI 5/25 $8 ADVANCE

DOORS 7PM / SHOW TIME 8PM VISIT BABEVILLEBUFFALO.COM FOR COMPLETE EVENT LISTINGS

This, however, is the first time they’ve shared a bill, which makes this—one of Buffalo’s first major outdoor concerts of the year—pretty special. Primus delivers with their weird, sometimes goofy yet challenging sets led by eccentric bassist Les Claypool, while Mastodon brings a more straight forward heavy metal set that stands out for its epic prog metal passages and general bad-assery. Both bands are touring in support of records released last year—Primus with The Desaturating Seven, and Mastodon with Emperor of Sand—the stronger of the two being Mastodon’s Emperor of Sand, which is both doom metal heavy and also one of their most diverse records. Primus on the other hand, maybe has the edge as far as hits go with classics like “Jerry was a Race Car Driver” dating back to the early 1990s. Add Nashville-based psychedelic hard rock band All Them Witches into the mix and it’s more than a solid lineup as the first concert of the year in Artpark’s P Coors Light Concerts series, this Wednesday, May 23. -CORY PERLA

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12 has morphed into something funkier than how it originally came across, but there's certainly no shame in a hot riff. They're at the Tralf Music Hall on Friday, May 18—this is a general admission seated show. -CJT

Exmaids, Orations, Uniform Operator 7pm Sugar City, 1239 Niagara St. $8

TICKETS: BABEVILLEBUFFALO.COM / BABEVILLE BOX OFFICE (M-F 11AM-5PM) RUST BELT BOOKS (415 GRANT) / TERRAPIN STATION (1172 HERTEL AVE) OR CHARGE BY PHONE 866.777.8932

[PUNK] Fuzzy punk band Exmaids rolls in from New Jersey for a show at Sugar City on Friday, May 18. The Don Giovanni Records-signed band will be joined by Buffalo-based post punks Orations and Uniform Operator. -TPS

341 DELAWARE AVE (AT W. TUPPER) BUFFALO, NY 14202 716.852.3835

Soul Patch 9pm Buffalo Iron Works, 49 Illinois St. $12-$14

[TRIBUTE] A lot of 1990s rock can be deemed summer jam material: The Smashing Pumpkin’s

14 THE PUBLIC / MAY 16 - 22 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

“1979,” Oasis’s “Don’t Look Back in Anger,” or pretty much any hit by Beck or No Doubt goes right in the summer jam pocket. Not to say Soul Patch will be playing any of these obvious summer jams, but if kicking off the summer is what they aim to do, then the popular 1990s cover band, featuring Every Time I Die’s Keith Buckley as lead singer, has a lot to choose from. Catch Soul Patch live at Buffalo Iron Works on Friday, May 18. -CP

SATURDAY MAY 19 Ripe 7pm Town Ballroom, 681 Main St. $20

[JAM] It's hard to know what the term "jam band" even means anymore, but whatever it is, Ripe qualifies. Sorta. The Boston-based seven-

[TRIBUTE] Haters gonna hate, but the music of the Grateful Dead will never die. Long after the currently touring Dead and Co. (featuring John Mayer, performing impressively in the Garcia spot) is forced to hang it up, the band's legacy will be carried forward into new generations of listeners by folks like the Chicago-born Dark Star Orchestra. DSO brings it's magic to Town Ballroom on Tuesday, May 22, and if you enjoy the Dead at all, or are just curious what all the fuss is about, the live experience they produce as a seven-piece unit far exceeds that of your average tribute band. It's about attention to detail. In this case, they actually dig through the well-documented catalogue of archived GD shows and select a different night to emulate each time they play, thus recreating a little piece of the Dead's storied history as they continue on the path they began traveling some 20 years ago. Perhaps the best proof of DSO's prowess exists in having had five GD members join them onstage throughout the years: Bob Weir, Bill Kreutzmann, Donna Jean Godchaux-MacKay, Vince Welnick, and Tom Constanten have all gotten up to perform with them at one time or another. It's the best endorsement there is. -CJT

Crunk Witch 7pm Mohawk Place, 47 E Mohawk St. $6

[ELECTRONIC/DANCE] Whatever you call it, bit pop, chip tune, chip pop, what Crunk Witch does best is craft music inspired by early video games. And the Maine-based husband-andwife duo make it as bassy and spectacular as they can. Catch them this Tuesday, May 22 at Mohawk Place with Chew, in from Atlanta; and Buffalo’s PizzaDoughnuts and Tr38cho. -CP P


SPOTLIGHT MUSIC Rock Autism has been able to fundraise and spread awareness at Edge Comedy Night, the monthly comedy showcase that is produced by The Edge.  “[The Edge] does a lot of charity and that’s an important part of a responsible local brand,” said Kurdziel. “For me, it was really Max educating me about some of the things that face the autistic community especially as they reach adulthood. Frankly, there was so much I didn’t know and would never have known if it weren’t for Max. From there, we just wanted to be involved in any way we could help.” New York Beer Project also joined in the fundraising efforts, and in February, a music and comedy fundraiser was held there, featuring local comics Brandon Trusso, Clayton Williams, as well as Kurdziel, and hosted by Nicky Spin. The audience immediately recognized and appreciated the nonprofit, and was supportive in donating and willing to learn more.  Max Muscato and Alea Conte, center, are the founders of Rock Autism.

ROCK AUTISM BY VILONA TRACHTENBERG BUFFALO HAS ALWAYS been an ardently

flourishing music town, filled with people who want to help the scene and benefit worthy causes. Recently, those passions have escalated, as two individuals came together to start a new music and philanthropic movement in the Buffalo area. That’s where musician Max Muscato and event planner Alea Conte come in. The friends, who met each other three years ago by chance at one of Max’s concerts at Mr. Goodbar, started a nonprofit called Rock Autism this past October. Rock Autism combines the element of live entertainment, with goal of raising autism awareness, while also raising necessary funds for arts programs for young adults with autism.  The idea of the nonprofit started with a dream that Max’s father, Marc, had, which was based on of the experiences his son, Sonny, underwent as a young adult with autism. Sonny had been diagnosed with autism at a young age, and with that he faced years of struggles—struggles that became an important catalyst to the founding of Rock Autism.  Sonny had moved around to many schools, and his teachers were not prepared to teach students with autism. Sonny would exhibit aggressive behavior, but music class changed Sonny’s demeanor in school. Every time Sonny went to music class, he was able to zone in and enjoy it, and exuded only positive energy.  After music class, though, Sonny would regress into negative behavior, and his father made the decision to put him in an institution. In the 1990s, institutions hosted other children with a broad range of developmental disabilities and weren’t highly focused on children with autism. Sonny wasn’t getting the help he needed.  Marc noticed that when Sonny would come home, he would act differently, and Sonny would come home with bruises. Marc hired a private investigator to go Sonny’s school and watch him, and through those measures, he uncovered that Sonny’s caretakers were physically and mentally abusing him. The same thing happened at another institution at which Sonny stayed.

ROCK AUTISM SATURDAY, MAY 19 @ 7PM ADMISSION $20 TOWN BALLROOM 681 MAIN STREET, BUFFALO

Marc had enough of the poor treatment for his son, as the institutions that he relied upon and trusted to help his son turned out to be part of a broken and detrimental system. Marc became an advocate for youths with autism, and would represent the cause in Albany.  At age 18, Sonny gained his freedom as an adult, but with that, he was led down a more frightening path. Sonny would take walks in South Buffalo and, through some friendships he made, he became a drug mule and selfmedicated with drugs. With that came a cycle of Sonny going from jail to rehab, and back to jail. Music and creativity were the impetus for Sonny to overcome that cycle.   In present day, Sonny is attending college at Alfred State and is learning creative tasks such as movie-making and editing. He is building a repertoire of life skills that he wasn’t able to before.  Max and Alea, along with Marc, recognized that those creative skills are vitally important, and those skills would be how people with autism would gain marketable skills for a college resume, or a future job in music, art, graphic design, photography, and film.  Max and Marc know that autism doesn’t have enough awareness surrounding it, even though one in every 59 people is now identified with an autism spectrum disorder. The spectrum is broad, and the face of autism isn’t one specific diagnosis. The community needed to be aware of that, and they wanted to put a new spin on the autism image.  The nonprofit officially launched in October, and the deep-rooted efforts kicked off immediately. A busy and successful soft launch during a Thanksgiving Eve concert played by Max at Mr. Goodbar sealed the fate of the nonprofit, and the movement started that night. They played another concert at Buffalo Iron Works in January, and 150 people showed up to support, even in the minus-20-degree weather.  “Buffalo is filled with people who are just so ready and willing to help,” said Conte. “If your idea is cool and helps so many people, everyone is going to jump on board.”  Helium Comedy Club, as well as James Kurdziel, program director for 103.3 The Edge and his team, have been supportive since the very beginning. Through their partnership, Max and his band have performed at Deep South Taco for The Edge’s Cinco De Mayo party, as well as fundraise at Edge Comedy Night.  Max has been friends with Kurdziel for three years, and after hearing the story of Rock Autism’s inception, he immediately asked to emcee fundraisers, and linked Rock Autism to Helium Comedy Club. Because of the support from Helium and local comedians,

In addition, Thin Man Brewery brewed a new beer, Sonnyboi IPA, named after Sonny, and the beer was launched right at the start of Autism Awareness Month in April. A portion of the proceeds sold from each pour at Thin Man, Cole’s, Liberty Hound, Colter Bay, and World of Beer goes directly to Rock Autism. The money raised from all of these well-supported efforts goes to many different causes. 

The Indeterminacy Festival Presents:

EMERGENCE

May 18 & 19 / 8:30pm sharp Performances at Silo City A guided, collaborative journey that carries audience and performers through time. Learn more and buy tickets at

indeterminacyfestival.com.

Buffalo’s Premier Live Music Club ◆ WEDNESDAY, MAY 16 ◆

Equal parts primal, early rock’n’roll, deviant hill country blues & avant-garde art

Tav Falco & Panther Burns

From the start, Rock Autism partnered with People Inc., and donates money to their fine arts programs, and Rock Autism wants to feature a few artists that benefit from People Inc. at an upcoming Rock Autism fundraiser. 

7PM DOORS/8PM SHOW◆ $12 ADV./$15 DAY OF SHOW

Rock Autism also benefits Autism Services, and they are currently working with Oshei Children’s Hospital to fund programs for children with Asperger’s, so that they can learn social skills through arts programs such as Garage Band and animation clinics. 

Fernway, Denim Playground, Townhouse Warrior, Scathed, Apologies Unspoken

This is just the start for Rock Autism, say Max and Alea, who hope to be able to bring these efforts to the national and even international level in the near future, with interest shown in New York City, and even Australia. The duo is looking forward to being able to start more Rock Autism chapters, with Buffalo being the flagship chapter.  Rock Autism has an upcoming fundraiser this Saturday, May 19 at Town Ballroom, produced by Sensu Music featuring headliner, Ripe. Also performing that night will be Max Muscato & Special Guests, First Ward, and Deadwolf. Sonnyboi IPA will also be poured that night with $1 of each pour benefiting Rock Autism. Admission is $20, and doors open at 7pm. Rock Autism is also currently working on putting on its biggest fundraiser, which will be a music festival—Rock Autism Music Festival—in P Ellicottville, on September 1.

The Good

◆ THURSDAY, MAY 17 ◆

FTMP presents

So Last Year 6PM ◆ $5 ADV./$8 DAY OF SHOW

◆ FRIDAY, MAY 18 ◆

mr. conrad’s rock’n’roll happy hour 5PM ◆ FREE

iron fist

shanzig,8PM ish◆ $5kabibble ◆ SATURDAY, MAY 19 ◆

early show

ball cheeze psychotics huh?

8PM ◆ $5

late show

hip-hop karaoke

with dj lil gabby & host michelle visa 11PM ◆ $5 BEFORE MIDNIGHT, $10 AFTER

◆ SUNDAY, MAY 20 ◆

early show

harkness spring showcase Isaac Carroll, VCTi, Young OPSE, NO1, Muddle 3PM

indie-rock dance from cincinnati

founding fathers coral collapse, this 8PM ◆ $5

◆ TUESDAY, MAY 22 ◆

bass heavy nerd-pop from maine

crunk witch chew

fuzz-laden psych from atlanta

pizzadoughnuts, tr38cho 7PM DOORS/8PM SHOW◆ $6

◆ WEDNESDAY, MAY 23 ◆

the parker gispert ofwhigs

smug, andrew kothen 7PM DOORS/8PM SHOW◆ $7

◆ THURSDAY, MAY 24 ◆

americana punk from virginia

mike frasier & the dying wild

the eaves,rust belt brigade, first ward 8PM ◆ $10

47 East Mohawk St. 716.312.9279

BUFFALOSMOHAWKPLACE.COM FACEBOOK.COM/MOHAWKPLACE

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / MAY 16 - 22, 2018 / THE PUBLIC 15


FILM REVIEW

NICKEL CITY CON AT THE NORTH PARK

LOCAL THEATERS AMHERST THEATRE (DIPSON) 3500 Main St., Buffalo / 834-7655 amherst.dipsontheatres.com AURORA THEATRE 673 Main St., East Aurora / 652-1660 theauroratheatre.com EASTERN HILLS CINEMA (DIPSON) 4545 Transit Rd., / Eastern Hills Mall Williamsville / 632-1080 easternhills.dipsontheatres.com

BY M. FAUST

FLIX STADIUM 10 (DIPSON) 4901 Transit Rd., Lancaster / 668-FLIX flix10.dipsontheatres.com

WITH SCREENINGS TIED to the Nickel City Con this weekend

taking up a substantial chunk of the North Park’s schedule, the theater’s bookers have filled the gaps with something for just about everyone. The weekend is dominated by films featuring stars in town for the comic con, all of whom will be at the theater for post-screening Q&As. Friday night at 9:30pm is the 1995 cult classic Tank Girl, whose singular star Lori Petty has recently been introduced to a new generation of fans with a role on the cable hit Orange Is the New Black. Kevin Smith mainstay Jason Mewes, the chatty

and 7pm, and Wednesday and Thursday at 2pm and 4:30pm. And because documentaries about filmmakers exist to make you want to see their films, stick around for Kubrick’s  Lolita  (1962, 6:45pm) and one of those films that you absolutely have not seen until you’ve seen it on the big screen, Barry Lyndon (1975, Tue 12:45pm and Wed 9:50pm).

half of the “Jay and Silent Bob” duo, can be seen Saturday in

Sunday morning brings a benefit screening for Buffalo

Smith’s Clerks  (1994, 2pm and 9:30pm), Mallrats  (1995,

actress Diane Gaidry who has been diagnosed with aggressive

4:30pm), and Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back (2001, 7pm). And

metastatic breast cancer. At 11:30am the theater will show her

Richard Dreyfuss, who has now been around for long enough

best-known film, Loving Annabelle, in which Gaidry stars as a

to qualify as Hollywood royalty, appears on Sunday in the Steven

boarding school teacher whose new student falls in love with

Spielberg films that made him a star, Close Encounters of the

her. Both the theater and the film’s distributor will be donating

Third Kind (1977, 1:30pm) and Jaws (1975, 7pm). Q&As will

all proceeds to the crowdfunding campaign. Advance tickets are

be after the evening shows only.

available on the North Park’s website.

Monday through Thursday will be devoted primarily to

Rounding out the week are two screenings of the 1976 Led

the work of Stanley Kubrick. The centerpiece is the new

Zeppelin concert film The Song Remains the Same  (Mon and

documentary Filmworker, which explores the reclusive director’s

Tue 9:30pm), a day of the Animal House follow-up Caddyshack (Fri

career with the help of his longtime assistant Leon Vitali. It will

2pm, 4:30pm, and 7pm), and a Saturday matinee of The Lego

be shown Monday at 2pm, 4:30pm and 7pm, Tuesday at 4:30pm

Batman Movie at 11:30am.

P

FOUR SEASONS CINEMA 6 2429 Military Rd. (behind Big Lots), Niagara Falls / 297-1951 fourseasonscinema.com HALLWALLS 341 Delaware Ave., Buffalo / 854-1694 hallwalls.org HAMBURG PALACE 31 Buffalo St., Hamburg / 649-2295 hamburgpalace.com LOCKPORT PALACE 2 East Ave., Lockport / 438-1130 lockportpalacetheatre.org MAPLE RIDGE 8 (AMC) 4276 Maple Rd., Amherst / 833-9545 amctheatres.com MCKINLEY 6 THEATRES (DIPSON) 3701 McKinley Pkwy. / McKinley Mall Hamburg / 824-3479 mckinley.dipsontheatres.com NORTH PARK THEATRE 1428 Hertel Ave., Buffalo / 836-7411 northparktheatre.org REGAL ELMWOOD CENTER 16 2001 Elmwood Ave., Buffalo / 871–0722 regmovies.com REGAL NIAGARA FALLS STADIUM 12 720 Builders Way, Niagara Falls 236–0146 regmovies.com REGAL QUAKER CROSSING 18 3450 Amelia Dr., Orchard Park / 827–1109 regmovies.com REGAL TRANSIT CENTER 18 Transit and Wehrle, Lancaster / 633–0859 regmovies.com

FUNNY BUSINESS

REGAL WALDEN GALLERIA STADIUM 16 One Walden Galleria Dr., Cheektowaga 681-9414 / regmovies.com RIVIERA THEATRE 67 Webster St., North Tonawanda 692-2413 / rivieratheatre.org THE SCREENING ROOM in the Boulevard Mall, 880 Alberta Drive, Amherst 8370376 /screeningroom.net

DEADPOOL 2

SQUEAKY WHEEL 712 Main St., / 884-7172 squeaky.org

BY GREGORY LAMBERSON

SUNSET DRIVE-IN 9950 Telegraph Rd., Middleport 735-7372 / sunset-drivein.com YOU KNOW SPRING has finally arrived when a new superhero

TJ’S THEATRE 72 North Main St., Angola / 549-4866 newangolatheater.com

movie opens every other week. Deadpool 2 marks Ryan Reynolds’s

TRANSIT DRIVE-IN 6655 South Transit Rd., Lockport 625-8535 / transitdrivein.com

third outing as the emotionally and physically scarred slapstick

CULTURE > FILM

title hero, following a poorly received appearance in X-Men Origins: Wolverine and a surprisingly well received and entertaining

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solo feature. This energetic sequel manages to be even more

from the future attempting to change the course of history via an

outrageous, humorous, and in-your-face than the previous film. At

assassination in our time. He’s as effectively grim as Reynolds is

CULTURE > FILM

a time when superheroes dominate the multiplexes at the expense

ebullient in this gleefully violent, R-rated comedy. Reynolds, who

of adult cinema, it makes perfect sense that a film skewering the

will go to any length for a laugh (no doubt aided by an army of

genre might prove to be the funniest of the year. Josh Brolin

stunt men), may be the Keaton, or at least the Jackie Chan, of our

(fresh off his CGI enhanced turn as Thanos in Avengers: Infinity

day. Morena Baccarin returns to provide emotional weight and

War) plays the popular X-Men character Cable, a Terminator

tenderness as Deadpool’s girlfriend.

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CULTURE > FILM

FIND OUT WHAT’S SHOWING IN LOCAL THEATERS AND READ CAPSULE REVIEWS AT

DAILYPUBLIC.COM

P

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16 THE PUBLIC / MAY 16 - 22 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM


REVIEW FILM

Ruth Bader Ginsburg in RBG.

TWO FILMS, TWO WOMEN’S STRUGGLES WITH TRADITIONALISM RBG, DISOBEDIENCE BY GEORGE SAX RUTH BADER GINSBURG may be an unlikely candidate for

pop-culture idol, but, rather obviously, that’s part of her appeal. Ginsburg was the second woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court (after Sandra Day O’Connor) but she’s the first to be the subject of a graphic (comic) biography, The Notorious RBG, playing off rapper B.I.G.’s moniker. In Marvel Comic’s Deadpool 2, the title character pauses over her photo as he considers her for his X Force. Kate McKinnon’s hyper-burlesqued parody of Ginsburg may not be the first time a “Supreme” has been lampooned on SNL—I couldn’t verify that—but it does certify Ginsburg’s luminary status. Even her exercise trainer has written about her, and there’s a Hollywood film in the works. Julie Cohen and Betsy West’s RBG, an intelligent, deftly made and very entertaining documentary about Justice Ginsburg, makes all this expansive mashup of the weighty institutional role of the Supreme Court and a lot of show business ballyhoo more understandable. At 85, the Ginsburg in RBG is an impressive person on both personal and professional levels and probably deserves to be the feminist heroine she’s become. Cohen and West are less successful in promoting the justice as a historically consequential jurist. Her historical mark is clearer as a groundbreaking litigator and advocate for women’s rights before Jimmy Carter appointed her an appellate judge in 1980.

a silver dollar?”) RBG makes a warmly human, informative case for Ginsburg’s character and importance as an advocate in the 1960s and 1970s, but it’s less persuasive in suggesting she’s a major and creative figure as a jurist. Years ago, political scientist Peter Irons called her a “cautious” liberal, “sticking to precedent whenever possible, and writing careful, precise opinions that do not stake out any new constitutional ground.” Her record on the Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court has largely borne this out. She’s also exhibited a very flawed, conventionally liberal political judgment on occasion, as when she suggested a problem with Roe v. Wade was that it didn’t sufficiently allow the states to experiment with abortion law variations. The movie avoids this, but Ginsburg evinced a substantial political miscalculation. Ironically, RBG frames matters like this informatively, even when it’s inadvertent. *** SEBASTIAN LELIO’S Disobedience takes us into the patriarchically

traditional society of Ultra-Orthodox Judaism, one where women are expected to marry and serve their husbands, participating in their community in a distinctly secondary role. Our “guide”

into this ritually defined world, semi-separate from the bustling, churning secular society about it, is Ronit (Rachel Weisz), an art photographer in New York. She returns to North London and the faith-based world she was born into when her father dies. He was a rabbinical leader there, and she rather obviously seems to have been estranged from him and this Jewish society, but we learn very little about this. Lelio, who co-adapted Naomi Alderman’s novel, doesn’t ever really convey Ronit’s feeling about this faith or her father. He seems to content himself with capturing some of its atmosphere, in synagogue and the surrounding neighborhood. He uses a subdued color palette and some in-close photography, as well as some wide-angle long shots to bring us into this world, but he does little to evoke belief and doubt, or the shifting relationships involved here. Ronit is welcomed by Dovid (Alesandro Nivola) her father’s protégé. He’s married to Esti (Rachel McAdams), whose longrepressed attraction to Ronit is reawakened by her return. Lelio has successfully worked with female-centered stories before (Gloria, e.g.) but here he devotes effort to depicting the passion binding these two women without ever dramatizing what’s at stake. The characters are too opaque despite some skilled acting, especially Nivola’s blindsided Dovid. The movie is too P dramatically sterile.

As a person, she comes across here as a quietly, even shyly charming presence, but there are hints of steel here and there. One of RBG’s most winning scenes shows the giggling, chortling Ginsburg watching McKinnon’s zany caricature for the first time. (Her son and daughter explain that their mother may not even know how to turn on her TV at home.) The story RBG tells is both personal and generational. Ginsburg is shown to have overcome the serious, sometimes crippling impediments confronting females who sought careers in the law and in myriad other areas of American life. One of only eight women in a class of 500 at Harvard’s law school, she became a valedictorian who couldn’t get a law firm job in New York because most firms wouldn’t hire women in the 1950s. From her eventual position at Columbia University she undertook a series of largely successful challenges to the legally sanctioned, ingrained discrimination repressing women, arguing six cases in the Supreme Court, and winning five, over a fifteen-year span. This was historically important, and of both symbolic and practical importance. (The movie makes clear that the unusual domestic support of her late husband Marty was of substantial assistance, freeing the mother and wife to pursue this work.) Cohen and West cogently and accessibly summarize these lawsuits, including with a few fascinating audio excerpts of her oral arguments. (At one point, the rightist Justice Rehnquist flippantly asks her, “So, you won’t settle for Susan B. Anthony on

Alessandro Nivola and Rachel McAdams in Disobedience. P

DAILYPUBLIC.COM / MAY 16 - 22, 2018 / THE PUBLIC 17


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FOR RENT NORTH BUFFALO: Steps to Hertel, Delaware Park. Awesome 1+BR upper with den/study, LR with vaulted ceiling, porch. Freshly painted with new floors, appliances, trash service, garage, laundry hook-ups, basement storage. No pets, no smoking. $835 includes all; 1-year lease; security deposit. Call Steve: 716.912.4157. -------------------------------------------------HERTEL AVE/N. BUFFALO: 3 BR upper. $900+utilities & sec dep. No pets, off-street pkng. Call 716.308.6870 --------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Lancaster Ave. 3 BR upper w/2 porches, natural woodwork, w/d hookups. No pets, no smoking. $1100+utilities. Apartment of the week. 716-883-0455.

NORWOOD: Super 3 BR/2 BA w/2-car garage in heart of Elmwood Village w/ updated kitchen, appliances, granite countertops, classic bath, hardwood floors, French doors, private porch, laundry facility, etc. Superior condition & super location. $1800 includes all utilities. Call Reeves: 716-884-2871. -------------------------------------------------RICHMOND: Bright, spacious, 2 BR Victorian. Brand new kitchen, new appliances, granite countertops, classic bath, stain & lead glass windows, hardwood & parquet floors, French doors, private porch, laundry facility, etc. Superior condition & super location just minutes to UB Medical Center, colleges, art galleries, music hall, theater and Elmwood Village or downtown for shopping, dining, relaxation in outdoor cafes. $1800. Call Reeves: 716-884-2871.

------------------------------------------------PARKSIDE NEAR ROBIE: 1BD apt, all utilities included. $800. 386-344-5209. BIDWELL-ELMWOOD: 2nd floor 2 BR. No smokers, no pets. Utilities included. $950. 885-5835.

ELMWOOD VILLAGE, COLONIAL CIRCLE: Updated Victorian upper,1500 sq ft, 2 BR, A/C, new appliances, dishwasher, washer/dryer. Beautiful wdwrk, hrdwd flrs, pocket drs. Private porch & balcony. No pets, No smoking. $1350. 716-885-6958.

--------------------------------------------------SOUTH BUFFALO-MCKINLEY PARKWAY: 3-BR lower. Carpeting, appliances, no pets. $800 + sec. 697-9445. ---------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE, COLONIAL CIRCLE/LIVINGSTON: 2BR apts, hardwood floors, skylights, porch, off-street parking, coin-op basement laundry, $1095/$1150. No pets, no smoking. All included, must see. 912-2906. --------------------------------------------------BRECKENRIDGE: Large 2BR lower. Appliances, hardwood, porch, yard. $760+. 435-8272. --------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Richmond Ave. 2 story, 1+ BR, appliances, laundry, off-street-parking, porch, hardwood + granite. No smoking. $895+. 882-5760.

-------------------------------------------------D’YOUVILLE COLLEGE AREA: 3BR $900, 1BR $500-600, utilities incl. Must see. Call 415-385-1438.

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-------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Lancaster, lg bright 2BD upper, hrdwd flrs, laundry, parking. $1200 incl all. 884-0353. --------------------------------------------------UB SOUTH CAMPUS MAIN ST: 1,100 sqft 1brm Heat, Utilities, Appliances, Washer, Dryer, Parking, Furnished, NOW $800 812-6009; ron1812@aol.com. -------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Ashland Ave. 1 Bedroom, Carpeted Studio ,Utilities Included. 716-882-7297. -------------------------------------------------LINWOOD: Super 3 bedroom 2 bath w/2 car garage. $1200 total ($400 per 3 roommates). 884-2871. ---------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------------BIDWELL PKWY 850 SQFT, 1BR/1BA, Laundry, Hardwood Flrs, No Smoking, $975/mo incl heat+H2O. 882-3292. -------------------------------------------------UB SOUTH ROOMS renovated & spacious, incl. util + wifi, W/D, pkg, .2 mi. to campus. $495 & $595. 236-8600. -------------------------------------------------D’YOUVILLE GRAD STUDENT seeks female roommate. $600 per month fully furnished 1700 ft apartment. Walking distance to D’Youville, Elmwood, Allen Street. private bedroom, share common living areas, all utilities included, owner occupied. WIFI included. 919-830-3267 Elizabeth. 716-536-7119 Landlord Lisa.

OPEN AUDITIONS: Perform off-

ILLOS PIANO: PT 1-6 + Sats. Must read music, have knowledge of music history and theory. Positive demeanor, excellent customer service skills a must. 832-0013.

Broadway this summer with the National Theatre for Student Artists. High school and college students are invited to audition for our 2018 summer productions on May 19 at the

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Oakbrook Clubhouse (100 Oakbrook

INTERPRETER/TRANSLATOR: Do you enjoy helping others? Do you speak fluent English and at least one other language? Consider a job as an interpreter or translator. We are accepting applications for all languages, but currently are giving preference to individuals who speak Karen, Karenni, Burmese, Tigrinya, Farsi Dari (Afghan Persian), Nepali, Bengali, and Rohingya. Interpreters enable communication between two or more individuals who don’t speak the same language. If you are professional, punctual, self motivated, experienced, and communicative, consider applying today. Daytime availability, reliable transportation, and work authorization are required. Prior interpreter training is preferred. To apply please visit jersbuffalo.org/ index.php/employment or contact us at (716) 882-4963 extension 201 or 207 with any questions.

Drive, Williamsville). Full and partial scholarships available. Musical theatre students should arrive at 12 PM and be prepared to sing 32-bars a cappella. Drama students should arrive at 4 PM (no preparation necessary). All productions will be staged at the Theatre at St. Peter’s in NYC this July. Visit nationalstudenttheatre.org for more information. ------------------------------------------------CALL FOR WORK: Parables Gallery & Gifts, 1027 Elmwood Ave.Bflo. “FLORA,” May 1-30. All mediums welcome. Please send samples of your work to: Glenn Kroetsch, gdkroetsch@roadrunner.com. ------------------------------------------------FESTIVAL SCHOOL OF BALLET Classes for adults and children at all levels. Try a class for free. 716-9841586 festivalschoolofballet.com. -------------------------------------------------

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FREE YOUTH WRITING WORKSHOPS

CHEEKTOWAGA: Meadowbrook Pkwy. Lower 2BR, one-car garage, washer h-ups. Avail now. $700 + utl. Call/text908-2753.

Tue and Thur 3:30-6pm. Open to writers between ages 12 and 18 at the Just Buffalo Writing Center. 468 Washington Street, 2nd floor, Buffalo

SERVICES

14203. Light snack provided.

LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY: Name of LLC: Prestige Concrete & Construction, LLC

SOUTH BUFFALO ART STUDIO offers

Date of filing of Articles of Organization with the NY Dept of State: March 25, 2018

skills-based classes in drawing &

Office of the LLC: Erie County

painting, private or group, Jerome

LegalZoom has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. NYSS may mail a copy of

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ELMWOOD VILLAGE 2 bedroom upper, newly renovated, front porch, appliances, laundry. $895 inc water. Must see. Call 913-2736.

yahoo.com.

--------------------------------------------------NORWOOD BTWN SUMMER & BRYANT: Fresh-painted 1BR, carpets, applnces, mini-blinds, prkng, coin-op lndry, sec sys. Water & elec inc. No pets, no smoking. $695+sec. 912-0175. --------------------------------------------------ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Norwood Ave. 2 BR, study, porch, appliances, must

www.CBEWNY.com

Newly converted, 1 and 2 bedroom units starting at 530 square feet in a historic property located in the University Heights section of Buffalo. Apartment Rents 1 Bedroom $567 - $700 2 Bedroom $662 - $783 Stainless Steel Appliances Included

CONTACT: Leasing Office

(716) 322-6599

www.CBEWNY.com

18 THE PUBLIC / MAY 16 - 22 / DAILYPUBLIC.COM

BIDWELL PKWY 1400 SQFT, 2BR/1BA, Laundry, Hardwood Flrs, No Smoking, $1375/mo incl heat+H2O. 882-3292

HELP WANTED

Mach (716) 830-6471 or jeromemach@

Former Buffalo Campus North School is ready for occupancy!

Income Limits Do Apply

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THE ARTS

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NOW LEASING!!

Amenities • Duplex Units Available • Onsite Parking • Laundry Room • ADA Accessible Units available • Oversized windows for great natural light • Community Room • Onsite Storage

ROOM FOR RENT $400 Per Mo. Incl. util./kitchen privileges Commonwealth off Hertel, 390-7543.

ELMWOOD VILLAGE Elmwood@ Auburn upper 1 bdr. Stove, refrigerator. Front porch. No pets. Must see. Call 864-9595.

LOFTS AT UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS 91 Lisbon Avenue, Buffalo NY

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ELMWOOD VILLAGE, COLONIAL CIRCLE: Lafayette-Livingston. 2 BR. Hardwood floors, no pets or smoking. Must see. $1150 includes all utilities. 716-912-2906.

BUFFALO STATE AREA: 3BR single family home $950-1200 + utilities. Call 415-385-1438.

RICHMOND-LEXINGTON AREA: Spacious 2 BR with hardwood floor, updated utilities. Available now. 975+utilities. Call 480-2966.

BLACK ROCK Marion St. 1 bdrm, $650. Available on 7/1/17. Includes: cable, wifi, laundry, parking. Month-tomonth, no smoking or pets. jph5469@ gmail.com.

ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Ashland Ave. Bright lg BR, private, all util & appl. No pets/smoke. $690. 435-3061.

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RIVERSIDE AREA: 2BR $550/4BR $770 + utilities. Between Tonawanda & Ontario. Call 415-385-1438.

ELMWOOD VILLAGE/ANDERSON PL, lg upper 2 + BR, wdwrk, hrdwd flrs, all appliances, in unit lndry, 1100 + util, no smoking/pets, call/text 716-881-3564.

see. No pets/smoking. $1,350+util. rsteam@roadrunner.com or 716-886-5212.

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NORWOOD OFF LAFAYETTE: Super 1 BR in heart of Elmwood Village. $825 includes all, plus laundry, yard, etc. Call Reeves: 716-884-2871.

ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Beautiful 2nd floor 1 BR, hardwood floors, appliances included, street parking, laundry hookups in basement. Walking distance to shopping, restaurants, parks, etc. No smoking. No pets. Available now - $700 + util. First month and security due at lease signing. Contact Marc @ 716-864-1203.

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NORWOOD BTWN SUMMER & BRYANT: Freshly painted 1BR, carpets, appliances, mini-blinds, parking, coinop laundry, sec. sys. Includes water & elec. No pets, no smoking. $695+sec. 912-0175.

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ELMWOOD VILLAGE: Newly updated 3rd floor apt, stainless steel appliances, driveway parking, washer and dryer in apartment. Walking distance to shopping, restaurants, parks, etc. No smoking. No pets. Available now. $975 + util. First month and security due at lease signing. Contact Marc @ 716-864-1203.

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GORGEOUS 3000 ft. 3/2 ELMWOOD MANSION: 2nd flr, W/D, off-st prking, fully renovated. Insulated, granite kitchen, huge bedrooms, hardwood flrs, private porch, huge yd, DR, L/R. Ann: 715-9332.

Meet Zeus! BLUE BRUSH STUDIOS PAINTING AND HANDYMAN SERVICES: Call 262-9181 or visit bluebrushstudios. com.

PLEASE EXAMINE THIS PROOF CAREFULLY

IF P TH

M

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AGES 5-17 learn meditation, ESP games, healings. Williamsville. Begins 5/19. 807-5354 Marina Liaros Naples www.meeting-ike-series.weebly.com -------------------------------------------------

goofiest characte r Regal. Refined. Classy. Hahahah a! Just kidding! Our boy Zeus is the everywhe re (he’s at the SPCA! He’s full of joy and fun! He’s so happy that he trots into his path! incapable of walking!) and he has to say hi to everyone who comes the SPCA! We just love and adore this dog! Come meet Zeus and his pals at

RETIRED PSYCHOLOGIST available to assist adults in light daily living.MESSAGE Please call TO for ADVERTISER details at . SPCA.ORG . HARLEM RD. WEST SENECA 875.7360 YOUR Thank you for advertising with300 THE 883-3216. PUBLIC. Please review your ad and check for any errors. The original layout instructions have been followed as closely as possible. THE PUBLIC offers design services with two proofs at no charge. THE PUBLIC is not responsible for any error if not notified within 24 hours of receipt. The production department must have a signed proof in order to print. Please sign and fax this back or approve responding to this VISITby ONLINE @ DAILYPUBLIC.COM/CLASSIFIEDS email. �

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A

Avenue, Suite 202. Brooklyn, NY 11228

process may be served. NYSS may mail

DOMESTIC

Purpose of LLC: Handyman Contractor

a copy of any process to the LLC at: 238

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LIMITED

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COMPANY: Name of LLC: Buffalo Dance Ensemble, LLC Date of filing of Articles of Organization with the NY Dept of State: February 5, 2018

Herkimer Street, Buffalo, NY 14213. ---------------------------------------------------NOTICE OF FORMATION of a DOMESTIC

LIMITED

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COMPANY: Name: First Move - WNY, LLC. Orig filed Articles of Organization w/SSNY ON 2/22/2018 Office location: County of Erie. SSNY shall mail copy of any

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CROSSWORD BACK PAGE

“THE CURLY SHUFFLE” - IT’S STYLIN’ IN EACH THEME ANSWER.

Name: MADIBA JANITORIAL SERVICES, LLC. Date of filling of articles of organization with the Ny Dept. of State: February 20, 2018. The NY Secretary of State has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. NYSS may mail a copy of any process to the LLC at: 29 Riverside Ave, 14207.

process to: 2025 Delaware Ave, Suite

Proposed of LLC: We are providing

Office of the LLC: Erie County

1e, Buffalo, NY 14216. Purpose: Any

Cleaning services in Commercial and

The NY Secretary of State has been

lawful act or activity.

residential houses.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY CHERYL JACKSON

STEVEN CAROL

COLLIN GABRIEL

KERRYKATE ABEL-SMITH

GUMP TIBBS

MAKI TANIGAKI

JOAN BUKOWSKI

SCOTT “GLITTERBUG” URBANSKI

PARRISH VICTORIA

MARY GIN STARKWEATHER

MEGAN LYNN

NATE BUCKLEY

SETH PICCIRILLO

ELAINE GUNNER MCCLORY

AIDAN RYAN

CHRIS MALACHOWSKI

BILL BANAS

HANK NOWAK

ROASHEN CARMAN

ALEXANDER LEVINE

CHUCK BANAS

ERIK KOHLER

LUCINDA GILMARTIN

NATHAN VESTER MIKE “ROOTIN’” BLOOMQUIST

DAVID DERNER EVA HASSETT

ACROSS

58 Ending of many nonprofit URLs

1 Collaborative website

61 Old voting machine part

THANKS PATRONS

5 Not as many

63 Box office event

34 Guy with an eponymous scheme

10 Sign-___ (farewells)

LYDIA FRECHETTE

JILLIAN FIELDS

TRE MARSH

14 Like fine whiskeys

65 2001 Nintendo video game with a really thin premise?

35 Jason who plays Aquaman

JAY BURNEY

JESSICA SILVERSTEIN

BRETT PERLA

15 Up and about

68 Dot on a state map

16 Sci-fi royal

69 Mushroom in miso soup

17 Naomi Campbell or Cindy Crawford, e.g.

70 Holed, as a putt

GLORIA WISE

WILLIAM MARTIN

LYNN WILSON

ANTHONY PALUMBO

LESLIE MISENER

ALEXANDER KIRST

NANCY HEIDINGER

SHAWN LEWIS

JORDAN HOXSIE

DOUG CROWELL

LINDA BALL

ERIC RIZZI

ALEJANDRO GUTIERREZ

JOHN WHALEN

KEVIN HAYES

KRISTEN BOJKO

23 Article from France

ANJANA MALHOTRA

CHRISTINE SLOCUM

KRISTEN BECKER

24 Channel with “Wheel of Fortune” repeats

COLLEEN CHAHAL

BARBARA

CHRIS GALLANT

DOT KELLY

HANNA DEKKER

EKREM SERDAR

27 “Respect for Acting” author Hagen

ROSS SCHULTZ

HARPER BISHOP, JENNIFER CONNOR

MOLLIE RYDZYSNKI

BROOKE MECKLER

NISSA MORIN

SCOTT MECKLER

PETER SMITH

JESSICA NEUBAUER

KEVIN PURDY

BOB LAVALLEE

PETER SMITH

FOUNDLINGS PRESS

COLLEEN KENNEDY

MINDYJO ROSSO

RACHEL CHROSTOWSKI

JACQUELINE TRACE

TJ VITELLO

VILONA TRACHTENBERG

ROB GALBRAITH

KARA

USMAN HAQ

NAOMI LOWINGER

CELIA WHITE

DANIEL BRADY

STEVE

JEN KAMINSKY

HEATHER GRING

BRENDAN MCCAFFERTY

SUZANNE STARR

19 It might be hammered out 20 Chips go-with 21 Tooth material

28 Primus frontman Claypool 31 Chute opening?

71 Lion lairs 72 Star-___ mole 73 “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto)

DOWN 1 “Hey, how’s it going?” 2 Pet lizard

9 Be sympathetic

39 Top of the corporate ladder

10 “Ye ___ Shoppe”

JOANNA EVAN JAMES

46 Place to extract some chalcopyrite 49 Business reps.

42 Top quality 43 Sprung up 47 Come back after renovation 48 Nissan SUV named for a suburb of Venice 50 “Z” director Costa-___

56 State tree of North Dakota

38 Wireless company named after a Finnish city

45 Swashbuckler who left his initial as a mark

41 “Quiet!”

5 Direct relatives, slangily

HOLLY GRAHAM

DAVID SHEFFIELD

40 Scheme

52 Minigolf motion

36 Finnish Olympic runner Nurmi

44 Practiced

39 Lines at the checkout?

4 March middle

JOSHUA USEN

STEPHANIE PERRY

37 Impassioned

51 Advertising promos of sorts

33 It’s a real grind at dinner?

JOSEPH VU

32 “Not ___ out of you!”

3 Astronomer Johannes

CHARLES VON SIMSON

MARK GOLDEN

30 Bed frame piece

6 “Mr. Blue Sky” band 7 Expansive 8 Balance

11 Prefer 12 Ominous sight in shark movies 13 Took to the couch

59 Possesses 60 Mailing centers, for short 62 Facilitate 63 Pt. of PST 64 Long-handled farm tool 66 Make do, with “out” 67 Relieve LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

18 Dusting item 22 “Silas ___” (George Eliot novel)

MARCIE MCNALLIE

53 Start of many Quebec place names

JAMES LENKER

KARA

54 Opposite of old, in German

ERIC ANDO

CORY MUSCATO

ROB MROWKA

55 Pasture mom

26 Cal ___ Resort & Casino (Lake Tahoe property once co-owned by Frank Sinatra)

SERGIO RODRIGUEZ

ALAN FELLER

AMBER JOHN (EXTRA LOVE)

57 British isle that sounds like a number

29 Tiger Woods’s ex Nordegren

25 Email that gets filtered

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