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A Kids-Eye View of the Palouse

magazine

Eating the Rainbow Getting your child to eat more (and more types of) fruits and vegetables

Keep it Simple, Sweetie Advertising Supplement |

ALSO INSIDE:

February 26, 2014

| Moscow-Pullman Daily News

Books for Growing Up | How to make flossing easier for kids


2 | February 26, 2014 |

MOSCOWPULLMAN DAILY NEWS

Got Talent? Awards Night & Talent Show

Showcasing community youth talent & recognizing volunteers in Latah County

A Kid’s-Eye View of the Palouse

| tag

2014 LATAH COUNTY YOUTH ADVOCACY COUNCIL VOLUNTEER AWARDS The Latah County Youth Advocacy Council is honoring our community’s outstanding youth and adults who are making a difference through volunteer work. During our LCYAC Awards Night and Talent Show, volunteers will be recognized for their contributions to our community by receiving the awards listed below. If you know someone whose volunteer efforts deserve to be recognized on a community wide basis, complete a nomination form today! All nominees will receive a nomination certificate and award recipients will receive a recognition plaque that will be presented at the event. For questions contact LCYAC at 208.883.2268 or email lcyac@latah.id.us. Forms are also available at www.latah.id.us/yac NOMINATION FORM (for a group nomination, please attach a list of all names and addresses of group members)

Nominee’s Name or Group Name: ______________________________ _________________________________ ___ __ Address _________________________City _______ Zip __ Phone #__________________ E-mail __________ Nominator’s Name: __ Address _________________________City _______ Zip __ Phone #__________________ E-mail __________ Relationship to Nominee ____ __ How long have you known the nominee? __ Select both a Division and an award Category that fits the nominee and the kind of service given. List only one Division: _____ 1. Youth 2. Adult 3. Group List only one Category: _____ 1. Commissioners Award 2. Community Service 3. Leadership 4. Cameron Award Nominator’s Signature __ List two people other than yourself who can verify the service provided by the nominee: Reference 1_________________________________Phone __ Reference 2_________________________________Phone __ Submit this form and a one-half page (150-300 words) letter that specifically describes the nominee’s activities and character. Include any special attributes or challenges that set this nominee apart from others. Describe the impact this volunteer has on the people and/or programs they serve. Include information about how much time, energy or skill was involved in their service. Describe the nominee’s level of commitment or dedication.

Thursday, May 8, 2014 6PM-8PM Kenworthy Performing Arts Center Follow the Latah County Youth Advocacy Council on Facebook for updates on award nominations, auditions and how you can get involved.

DIVISIONS Youth. Under 18 years of age (or still in high school) Adult. 18 and over (no longer in HS) Group. Any group of youth, teens, adults CATEGORIES Commissioners Award

Presented to an individual who has shown great effort in creating a positive change in reducing substance use in Latah County Community Service

Volunteer work that meets a need in the community through action, education, or service in promoting healthy lifestyles for our youth Leadership Award

Volunteer work that betters the lives of youth in our community and demonstrates the ability to lead others toward a positive goal Cameron Award

Presented to a deserving Latah County youth who has provided leadership in

working with a community coalition or on their own to facilitate positive youth development opportunities targeted toward reducing substance use in collaboration with youth, families, schools or communities within Latah County NOMINATION CRITERIA Emphasis is given to nominees whose significant contributions have been made in the last 18 months. The contribution of the individual or group must be within Latah County. Any community member (adult or youth) may nominate any youth, adult or group. A nomination form must be completed for each nominee. A one-half page (150300 words) letter that specifically describes the impact of the nominee’s actions must be included.

RETURN NOMINATION FORMS TO Latah County Youth Advocacy Council 220 E. 5th Street, Suite 325 P.O. Box 8068 Moscow, ID 83843 Fax: (208)882-8505 OR complete an on-line form at: http://www.latah.id.us/yac


tag | A Kid’s-Eye View of the Palouse A Kids-Eye View of the Palouse

magazine

MOSCOWPULLMAN DAILY NEWS

Eating getting the rainbow: your child to eat more By Sarah MacDonald

Moscow Food Co-op Communications Coordinator

TAG ADVERTISERS KIDS ARE THEIR BUSINESS

Latah County Youth Advocacy Council . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Zeppoz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Emmanuel Lutheran Preschool . . . . . 5 Moscow Food Co-op . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Community Health Association of Spokane . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Palouse Empire Gymnastics . . . . . . . 10 Bookpeople . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Hodgins Drug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Eastside Marketplace . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 A Kids-Eye View of the Palouse

magazine

Eating the Rainbow Getting your child to eat more (and more types of) fruits and vegetables

Keep it Simple, Sweetie Advertising Supplement |

ALSO INSIDE:

February 26, 2014

| Moscow-Pullman Daily News

Books for Growing Up | How to make flossing easier for kids

ABOUT TAG Tag is published three times a year in the Moscow-Pullman Daily News. The full magazine is available for viewing online by visiting dnews.com and clicking on the Special Sections link. For more information on how to advertise, contact the Daily News at (208) 882-5561.

| February 26, 2014 | 3

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f you’re a kid, it’s recommended that you consume 20 cups of fruits and veggies a week, coming to just over 1,000 cups per year, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. But the difference between recommendations and actual practice is pretty stark—a study conducted by the National Fruits and Vegetable Alliance found that kids ages 2-12 were actually consuming only 200300 cups a year. While the sheer quantity of fruits and vegetables is important to achieve, it’s also important not to overlook the variety of produce—and therefore, the variety of nutrients—your child is eating. But don’t panic. It’s actually really easy to introduce kids to fruits and vegetables, especially if you know a couple tricks of the trade. At the Co-op, our weekly playgroup Co-op Kids utilizes an excellent method that’s been proven to trump even the pickiest of eaters. It’s called “Eat the Rainbow” and it encourages kids to use their senses, including their sense of adventure, to try different foods that are separated by color. This lesson has been quite successful, and to our surprise, the kids latched on to some of the more unique items like toasted seaweed, edamame and herbal tea. Here are some of our rainbow-inspired foods: Red: red bell peppers, strawberries, tomato soup, cherry tomatoes, radishes and cranberry juice Orange: sweet potato chips, carrots, orange bell peppers, dried papaya, cheddar cheese and tangerine herbal tea Yellow: applesauce, corn, yellow summer squash, yellow bell peppers, yellow pear tomatoes, dried mango, pineapple and lemon slices in water Green: toasted seaweed, celery, green apple, kiwi, edamame, peppermint tea, baked snap pea crisps, cucumber slices and a leaf tasting with spinach, basil, butter lettuce and bok choy Purple: beet chips, purple cabbage, eggplant, plums, huckleberries and purple grapes White: cauliflower, jicama, parsnips, button mushrooms and fennel Tips: Start small! When trying out new, excitSee Rainbow Page 10

(and more types of) fruits and vegetables

Erica Wagner/Co-op Digital Media Coordinator

While the sheer quantity of fruits and vegetables is important to achieve, it’s also important not to overlook the variety of produce—and therefore, the variety of nutrients—your child is eating.


4 | February 26, 2014 |

MOSCOWPULLMAN DAILY NEWS

A Kid’s-Eye View of the Palouse

| tag

Keep it simple, sweetie A

t the end of a recent after-school “It’s a new tradition,” my daughter added, outing on cross-country skis, as their dad pulled into the parking lot on my 10-year-old seemed to have his way home from work, and we urged developed a strange new compul- him to join us. He declined, though I’m sion. He stood at the edge not sure why, since he of the recently-plowed routinely cracks hard-boiled parking lot, reaching down eggs on his head. and bopping himself in the By now it was dark, and head with big blobs of snow, my daughter and I were sitagain and again. ting in the car drinking hot “Mom, you have to try chocolate. “Um, how long this! It’s surprisingly fun!” are you planning on doing he exclaimed, bending this?” I called to my son. down to whap himself on “Until this whole thing the head. “The chunks have is gone,” he said cheerfully, to be kind of big. Just yank surveying the snow berm, one out!” which extended about a BY JudY SoBeloff Reluctantly, I reached good hundred yards on down and tried it myself. either side of him. “It is fun!” I had to admit. His sister, 12, Something interesting was going on here, tried it, too. “It is fun,” she agreed, all of us I realized. The skiing had been fun—but puzzled. that had been my idea, and involved equip“It hits your head, and then it explodes ment and preparation and a significant and it rains down on you,” my son noted. amount of exertion to get the kids off our

UNPLUGGED

new beanbag chair. This snow-whapping was more fun, for our ten-year-old anyway, because it was his idea, because it was unexpected, because no one was making him do it. Aha! I thought: simple pleasures. I was still pondering this a couple of days later during the Moscow Safe Routes to School Polar Walk, when we participated in a “walking school bus” with about 40 other kids and parents. My kids resisted this, too, at first—we had to leave our house about half an hour earlier than usual—but everyone involved seemed to have a great time. Afterwards, a few other parents and I decided that this had been so much fun that we would continue doing the walking school buses once a month. This small decision thrilled me, and I celebrated our ability to come up with a plan that represented a “just-noticeable difference,” the smallest possible step we could take that would be an improvement from our starting point when attempting to do more would cause

distress. Which brings me to the real topic of this column: Keep it simple, sweetie. Small changes, simple pleasures. I did not have to discover, much less invent, a new winter sport for this column—I could let my child do it for me. Time after time, some among us bust our butts where our kids are concerned. I’m not saying a certain amount of parental buttbusting isn’t warranted, only that recently I have felt the liberation and joy that comes from scaling back. Sometimes there are those among us who come forward and take big steps; they start schools or keep schools afloat or run the city or the science fair, and the rest of us do what we can to chip in. But in situations where the stakes are not dire, I have recently felt great relief in agreeing with other parents that we will simply do what we feel good about doing, and not more. See Simple Page 11

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| February 26, 2014 | 5

Books for Growing Up by Jesica DeHart and Carol Spurling

“G

for Tag!

rowing pains” aren’t just physical. The transition from child to adult is never easy. Fortunately, lots of books are being written for just this in-between age. The common element is the angst of growing up, searching for one’s way in the world, and trying to fit in, along with the excitement and adventure of learning more about oneself and discovering one’s strengths.

A Death-Struck Year by Makiia Lucier (March 2014) ages 12+ This compelling and well-researched historical novel by Moscow author Makiia Lucier features 17 year old Cleo, a headstrong girl whose already unconventional life is turned upside down when the Spanish flu arrives in her hometown of Portland, Oregon, in 1918. Cleo is supposed to remain quarantined in her boarding school, but she sneaks out and, because she knows how to drive and has access to a car, ends up volunteering for the Red Cross. Disease and death cross her path her very first day on the job, but so does Edmund, a young medical student working in the makeshift hospital where Cleo brings people stricken by the flu.

Ophelia and the Marvelous Boy by Karen Foxlee (Jan. 2014) ages 9+ Within only a few pages, we knew this book would prove to be an all nighter. This is a story within a story intertwined with a lustrous retelling of the story of the Snow Queen in a language absolutely dripping with invitation. Ophelia, her father, and older sister have moved temporarily to a city where it always snows so that her father can complete a

short assignment at a museum with endless different needs met? Ava is determined to corridors, keyholes and mysteries. Behind not only fit in herself but find a way to one door, Ophelia discovers the Marvelous solve her sister’s extreme shyness. Boy and with this meeting unfolds yet another story of wizards and queens and spells The Geography of and swords. Ophelia will risk everything to You and Me save the Marvelous Boy, who has been waitby Jennifer E. Smith ing for her to help him save the world. (April 2014)

West of the Moon by Margi Preus (April 2014) ages 10-14

ages 12+

Steering Toward Normal by Rebecca Petruck (May 2014) ages 9-13 This book richly steeped in the world of 4-H and FFA has so many outstanding things going for it, we don’t know quite where to begin, but we are especially excited that the author has expressed an interest in visiting Moscow this summer on her book tour. Diggy Lawson is heading into 8th grade and things are looking good, but then his family unit dramatically changes with the arrival of a half brother and now there are a lot of new relationships and dynamics to stumble through. This is a book rich with father-sonbrother communication, struggles, determination, humor and also plenty of cow poop. Sometimes what you thought was normal gets steered in a whole new direction in this coming of age book thick with ranching parallels. Jesica DeHart and Carol Spurling work together at BookPeople of Moscow, and are learning a lot as their own children navigate the shark-filled waters of pre-adolescence.

It all begins with two relative strangers on an elevator in New York City, when the Newbery Honorelectricity goes out. Lucy and Owen are winning author Margi trapped in a dark elevator for hours. Once Preus was inspired to free, they set out to discover the darkened write this story after city under a rare star-filled night and in reading her greatthe process they form the beginning of a great grandmother’s journals chronicling delicate friendship. her journey from Norway to her new home Once power is restored, both their lives in America in the 1800’s. The story is told spin literally in different directions as Lucy by the fiercely independent and loyal Astri suddenly learns she is moving to whose hard life seems to be a way of life Europe, and Owen and his Dad that has become her normal. But deep find themselves once again upinside she yearns for something better and rooted and headed West. The year more important: to be reunited with her unfolds with these two tenuously sister. linked by one strange night Astri has an incredible imagination, and and postcards sent across lives in a time and place rich with myth, many time zones. Both Lucy magic and folklore. The journey is epic and Owen spend the year and the hardships to be endured along the searching to understand way are monumental but through it all where home exists and Astri reflects, endures and grows. who they are to each other. This isn’t a long drawn out Ava and Pip love story but a story rich with strong identifiable main by Carol Weston characters who are tumbling (March 2014) into near adulthood while holding tight to Advertisers in Tag! were invited to submit articles for ages 8+ the familiar. publication. This is one of those submissions. This is an absolutely endearing tale of two sisters told by Ava, the younger of the two. Their family loves Thursday, March 6th words and especially word play. Palindromes - words that are spelled the same 5:30 - 7:30 pm both forwards and backwards - are a big Makiia Lucier’s part of not only all of their names but their dinner time fun. *A Death-Struck Year* Ava is in 5th grade and trying to fit not only into her world but also her home. At (208) 882-2669 times she feels overshadowed by her par521 S. Main • Moscow ents’ extra attentiveness to her older sister. How do two sisters, as different as can be, www.bookpeopleofmoscow.com fit into the same family and get their very

Book Launch Party


6 | February 26, 2014 |

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A Kid’s-Eye View of the Palouse

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Using newspapers to teach kids in the classroom the facts without giving an opinion. This can prove a valuable lesson for kids to learn, ew resources are as inexpensive promoting reading comprehension and yet inherently valuable as the teaching kids to question the source of their daily newspaper. For as little as reading materials in an analytical way. the loose change in their pockets, l Encourage kids to read their favorite readers can get all their local news, as well sections of the newspaper. Kids are as learn what is going on overseas and, for kids, and they’re may not be interested in sports fans, what happened during last the front page stories or most of what’s night’s games. included in section A. However, there are For educators, newspapers can be a sections in every newspaper that can appeal valuable teaching tool as well. Younger kids to kids, and teachers and parents alike typically aren’t avid readers, but newspapers should encourage their kids to read those are often reader-friendly, with concise arsections that interest them. The entertainticles that aren’t as long-winded as chapters ment section might have stories about kids’ in a book. Teachers hoping to instill a love favorite movies, while young sports fans are of reading in their pupils can put the local likely to enjoy articles about their favorite newspaper to work in a variety of ways. teams and players. The goal is to get kids l Teach kids the “5Ws (and the H).” excited about reading, and many parts of Most adults recall the lesson of the “5Ws the newspaper are filled with articles kids (and the H).” The 5Ws and the H are can enjoy. Who, What, When, Where, Why, and l Use the local section as a teaching How. Newspaper articles are typically built tool. Kids may or may not be interested around the rule that encourages reporters in what’s going on in the world’s financial to answer these six questions in the first markets or even the nation’s capital. But the several paragraphs of an article. Teachers local section is something kids can often can give their students the newspaper and relate to, with stories about people and tell them to identify the 5Ws and the H. places they’re familiar with in their own Students are likely to embrace the readerfriendly nature of news articles, and might towns. Human interest stories about local just pick up their Mom or Dad’s newspaper residents doing good deeds or about local businessmen and women setting trends around the house as a result. l Teach the difference between editori- might give kids a greater sense of pride in their community. als and hard news stories. When using The local newspaper is a wonderful tool the newspaper as a teaching tool, teachers can give students two different articles, one for educators to use with their students. If there’s not one already, teachers should news and one editorial. Before explaincontact their local school board or even ing the difference, ask kids to identify the their local paper to see if an agreement can differences. Chances are, kids will pick up Metro Editorial be worked out where teachers can provide on the main difference, that an editorial is Newspapers are a valuable resource parents and educators can use to instill a their students with the local newspaper an opinion piece that uses facts to support an idea, while a news story simply reports love of reading in their kids and students. every day.

F

Metro Editorial

New rules for LATCH system and bigger kids

F

Metro Editorial

or years, the LATCH system standard for vehicles has been the preferred method of safely securing infant and child safety seats into a car. But the LATCH system many parents have grown accustomed to is changing. A new law says it is safer to stop using LATCH with car seats that cater to older, heavier kids. LATCH, which is an acronym for Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children, is a sys-

tem of restraints built directly into the seats and frames of vehicles. The LATCH system was introduced by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as a new child restraint securement system in 1999 in response to the challenges posed with seatbelt installation of child safety seats. The system has been available in many vehicle models since 2000. With LATCH, the child safety seat attaches to two anchors imbedded in the seats of the car as well as another anchor point located on the rear shelf, seat back, cargo area, or ceiling of the vehicle

when used with forward-facing seats. Many safety seats come equipped with LATCH straps that are compatible to the LATCH system in the vehicle. While the LATCH system has helped maintain the safety of young passengers for more than 10 years, newer safety seats that accommodate larger children could be pushing the LATCH system boundaries. Lower anchors of the LATCH system take the majority of the force in a crash, and many are currently rated to restrain a seat and child with a combined weight of

65 pounds. There is not yet significant evidence to suggest the anchors will hold up in a crash with a heavier seat/child combo. When the LATCH system was developed, many child safety seats maxed out at a 30pound passenger limit. Various health and safety organizations have deemed it safer to keep children in harnessed safety seats longer before moving them to belted booster seats, which has propelled the industry to develop seats that can hold older, heavier children. However, whether the LATCH system can handle the larger seats is largely unknown. See Rules Page 10


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MOSCOWPULLMAN DAILY NEWS

| February 26, 2014 | 7

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Coloring Contest!

Ready, set,

COLOR!

Enter to win a prize at Bonkerz Indoor Playcenter

Name: ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Age:_______________________________________________________________________________________________ City:_______________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone: ___________________________________________________________________________________________ 2305 S. Main, Moscow (208) 596-4320 Hours: Mon-Fri, 9-5; Saturday, 9-3

Schedule your Birthday Party at the Palouse’s new Play Place!

Indoor

Playcenter

2305 S. Main, Moscow ID 83843

Entries will be displayed at Bonkerz Indoor Playcenter during the contest. Winners will be chosen at random from all entries. There is no age limit for entrants. Entries should colored, then sent or hand-delivered to Bonkerz Indoor Playcenter.


8 | February 26, 2014 |

MOSCOWPULLMAN DAILY NEWS

A Kid’s-Eye View of the Palouse

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How to make flossing easier for kids Children should be urged to floss regularly in addition to brushing. However, t is well known that a combination flossing can be cumbersome for youngof brushing, flossing and periodic sters who have yet to develop the dexterity dental checkups are essential to oral needed to manipulate dental floss. There health. Some parents teach their are many products available and techniques children to brush thoroughly early on, that can be used to assist children with even taking them for dental visits at young cleaning between their teeth. The following ages so youngsters can become acclimated are some flossing tips for kids. to the dentist’s office. But flossing is one l Begin the introduction to floss early. component of oral hygiene that may be The younger children are introduced to overlooked because many kids simply don’t floss, the more likely they are to embrace enjoy it. flossing as part of their oral hygiene rouFlossing is one of those tasks that people tine. understand they must do regularly, but l Show visual proof of the benefits of many still do not. According to Humana flossing. Oftentimes, children are more Dental, flossing cleans bacteria and trapped likely to respond to something they can see. food from between the teeth. Brushing only Show pictures of dental decay and what reaches the surface of the teeth, but floss occurs when proper oral hygiene is not folis required to get into the small crevices to lowed. This may help make the concept of prevent bacteria from turning into plaque flossing more attractive. buildup. The American Dental Association l Get the proper tools. Kids cannot recommends flossing at least once per day. floss unless they have floss products on It is far better to floss once a day and do hand. There are various age-appropriate a thorough job rather than several times a flossers and types of dental floss available. day and miss areas of the mouth by doing Children may not be able to use dental it quickly.

I

Metro Editorial

Emmanuel Lutheran Preschool

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(208) 882-1463

emmanuellutheranpreschool@gmail.com

Metro Editorial

Flossing is one component of oral hygiene that may be overlooked because many kids simply don’t enjoy it. floss properly because of a lack of dexterity. However, floss picks are much easier to hold and work between the teeth, particularly for kids with small hands. Floss should always be on hand, whether at home or when you go on vacation. l Let kids choose. Take kids down the dental aisle at the store and let them pick and choose which products they want to use. They may be more excited to brush and floss if they’re using something they picked out themselves. l Lead by example. Children will be more likely to floss if they see their parents flossing. That means adults should floss regularly and let their children watch and learn.

Benefits of flossing Removing bacteria and trapped food

from teeth has a number of benefits. Bacteria can cause bad breath, but flossing and brushing helps to keep breath smelling fresh. Dirty teeth can lead to dental carries. Children may be more inclined to floss if they know they’ll be preventing cavities and avoiding potentially painful trips to the dentist. Plaque trapped between the teeth and along the gum line that leads to periodontal disease puts a person at a greater risk for heart disease. There are some studies that show bacteria from the mouth can end up in the bloodstream. Flossing is a necessary component of good oral hygiene. Everyone should floss, no matter their age, and children should begin flossing as soon as their mouth starts to fill out with pearly whites.


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MOSCOWPULLMAN DAILY NEWS

| February 26, 2014 | 9

Differentiating colic from acid reflux

I

Metro Editorial

Acid reflux

According to the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, acid reflux affects more than half of all babies under three months old and usually resolves itself between the child’s first and second birthdays. Acid reflux occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter, or LES, muscle remains open and enables stomach contents to flow back up through the esophagus and mouth. Infants have immature muscle development, and their LES may not open and close only when swallowing, enabling food to come back up. The reflux can occur Colic when the baby cries, strains or eats too When crying goes on and on with seem- quickly. ingly no cause, this could be indicative Symptoms may include excessive of something more significant than just a amounts of spit-up, crying and pain while fussy baby. Infants use crying as a method eating. An infant may drink breast milk or for telling their caregivers that something is bottles quickly and gulp the liquid down amiss. Cries can indicate dampness, pain, because it is soothing, only to find that this sleepiness, or other conditions. But crying exacerbates the problem. Infants with reflux with no apparent cause is defined as colic. may begin to cry when lying down. They Colic is not a disease but rather a behav- may also arch their necks and backs during ioral condition. Babies with colic cry for or after eating or spitting up. Some children seemingly no reason and very often at the have silent reflux, where the acid does not same time each day. Nothing seems to com- come out of the mouth, but rather the baby fort them. In addition to crying, the child swallows it back down. Reflux babies may may thrash around or clench fists. learn to associate food with pain and can Some believe that colic has its roots in develop aversions to feeding. the digestive tract, where there is the presWhenever a child is exhibiting signs ence of lots of air that may stem from slow that go against the norm, parents can talk intestinal motility. Others believe colic is first to their child’s pediatrician. Different linked to an overstimulated central nervous feeding or sleeping strategies may alleviate system. Still, colic is not a diagnosis, but some of the crying. Medication or surgery rather a way to describe how a baby is may be needed in extreme cases, and a parbehaving. The colicky behavior may be ent may be instructed to visit a specialist in indicative of another underlying condition, gastrointestinal conditions for an accurate such as acid reflux. diagnosis. f infants were born with an instruction manual, early parenting would be much less stressful. Unfortunately for new mothers and fathers, tending to a baby is often a system of trial and error. Every child is different, and what works for one may not work for the other. Similarly, a child may be born who is easily comforted and takes to sleep, while its sibling seems to cry all day long. Getting to the root of those crying fits can prove rather challenging.

If infants were born with an instruction manual, early parenting would be much less stressful. Metro Editorial

Students seeking private music lessons have options

T

Metro Editorial

ime and again research has proven the benefits of music education. Children who study music typically score better on standardized testing and exhibit improved language and reasoning skills, and music education helps students with advanced mathematics lessons by improving their spatial and temporal reasoning. Involve-

ment in music and the arts can improve a student’s SAT scores and make the student well-rounded. Despite these benefits, music and art education is slowly disappearing from the classroom. At many schools across the nation, stages are dark and band and chorus rooms are empty. Budget cuts have been unkind to music education programs. To See Music Page 10

WWW.CHAS.ORG

208.848.8300


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MOSCOWPULLMAN DAILY NEWS

Music from Page 9 keep up with the demand for technology in the classroom, certain school programs have to be scaled back, and art and music are generally the first to go. This leaves it up to parents to involve their kids in music education. Private lessons have long been a great way for kids to learn music, and many such music coaches are former music teachers. With private lessons, kids get to benefit from working with certified instructors, and parents are happy to make music a part of their youngsters’ lives. The following are a handful of ways parents can find private lessons for their kids. l Word of mouth: Begin by asking neighbors or friends in the community if they know of any reliable music teachers. Someone is bound to know a person or have a connection to a music teacher. Speak with members of a community music ensemble, such as a church choir, or even amateur or professional musicians you see playing at a restaurant or bar. There’s a good chance you can get a referral. You may also have a friend or neighbor who is a talented musician and

will agree to offer lessons on the side. l Community music programs: While schools may not have music classes, community centers offer programs for both adults and children. A community arts center may offer instrument training and/or vocal lessons, so look into such organizations in your community. A community YMCA or a similar organization also may have after-school music programs. l Nearby colleges: Music students at local colleges may want to make extra money by offering music lessons. They may be able either to meet at your home or use the music room on campus to conduct lessons. l Newspaper classifieds: Tutors frequently advertise their services in the newspaper. Look in the classified section to see if anyone is offering music lessons. Many newspapers now offer their classifieds both online and in print, so utilize both options to ensure your search is as thorough as possible. Music education is important, but those seeking instruction may have to look outside of school. Private instructors are available to help foster a love of the arts and mold creative, well-rounded children.

It’s more than just bars, mats and trampolines. They’re Building Blocks for Life!

A Kid’s-Eye View of the Palouse

The child safety seat regulations that were in effect when he was a toddler may no longer be applicable now that he is a grade-schooler. Metro Editorial

Rules

owner’s manual as well as the instruction guide provided with the child safety seat. Seat belts will need to be fully extended and from Page 6 “locked” before they can be routed through As a result, drivers who have a child and the safety seat. Drivers are advised to still a car seat that together weigh more than 65 use the top tether of the LATCH system to pounds are urged to stop using the LATCH further secure the head of the safety seat. Drivers unsure about regulations can system to secure the safety seat into the car consult with their pediatricians and have and rely on the vehicle’s seat belts instead. child safety seat installation checked at The new law was put into effect in the United States in February 2014 and may be various police stations, fire stations and first aid buildings. adopted elsewhere as time goes on. Parents and other caregivers need to stay Using the car’s seat belts may require a abreast of changes in safety guidelines for refresher course in safety and how to route their children, as recommendations for the belts properly. Refer to your vehicle child safety seats are always evolving.

Rainbow from Page 3

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| tag

ing foods with kids, it’s natural for them to reject a few of the items you give them, regardless of how fun you make it. For this reason, we encourage parents to purchase smaller amounts of items when possible. Salad bars are a great place to start, as they often feature a wide variety of vegetables, fruits and grains to choose from. For instance, the Co-op salad bar features items like edamame, pickled red onion, beets with mint, spinach and sliced bell peppers. Make Rainbow Rice! Cook up some brown rice and let kids add vegetables to it, naming the colors along the way. Some favorites include corn, peas, cauliflower, purple cabbage, broccoli and red pepper. For fun, vibrant colors, steam the vegetables before adding to the rice. During colder months, this technique can be applied to

Rainbow Soup, letting kids choose their own vegetables and beans to add to the stock. Dip it! Even the pickiest eaters like to dunk their food in sauces, dips, and spreads. Providing an array of dips and spreads makes trying new foods fun while empowering the child to make choices. Try serving cut vegetables with almond butter, hummus or a mixture of applesauce, cinnamon and wheat germ. Use your senses! The eating experience is so much more than just taste. Encourage kids to describe the texture and smell of each new food they try, and then when they taste it, ask them to make a comparison. Does star fruit taste a little like grapes? Do sweet potato chunks look like carrots? Making comparisons to fruits and vegetables the child already enjoys will encourage them to accept the new food.

Advertisers in Tag! were invited to submit articles for publication. This is one of those submissions.


tag | A Kid’s-Eye View of the Palouse

MOSCOWPULLMAN DAILY NEWS

| February 26, 2014 | 11

Dress Up & Costumes Can you picture a hair salon, ballroom, pirate ship or fairy land in your house? With our high-quality role-play sets, your child can! Give dress-up playtime a creative boost with costumes that inspire the imagination.

Dean Hare/Daily News

Sarah Thaller helps her daughter, Mila Johnson, 7 months, both of Pullman, reach for a floating toy during a Parent-Tot swim lesson Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014, at the University of Idaho Swim Center in Moscow.

Simple

catching my eye is All Joy and No Fun by Jennifer Senior. I can’t claim to have read beyond the opening pages, but the from Page 4 premise resonates. For middle-class parents, our children’s importance in our lives has I was at the University of Idaho pool increased to the point where they become the other night when the parent-tot class was beginning, and beheld 18 babies being not merely our projects but our employers in a sense, as we devote increasingly introduced to the water by their parents. more of our time, energy, and resources to Watching them, I remembered when Fred molding them into the best people they can and I did similar classes with our babies, be. Which can leave some of us feeling as if and how right that felt—how we were dowe’re busting our butts, when maybe they ing something totally aligned with our desire for them to grow into fulfilled, healthy, and we would be happier if we backed off a little. happy bigger people. To which I raise a glass and repeat, As our kids get older, the path is often “Simple pleasures, small changes.” So, dear less clear, which is partly what was so apReader, when the snow conditions are next pealing about seeing those babies with their right, maybe you too will be tempted to beaming parents. My friend, Amy, mother of four, recently pull over on some recently cleared road quoted a line from a parenting book that I or parking lot and yank out a good-sized happened to also remember, though neither chunk with which to whap yourself gently in the head. of us could remember which book it came from. Amy mentioned that she hardly ever Judy Sobeloff is a teaching artist and freelance writer reads parenting books any more, and I who lives with her family in Moscow. realized that the same is true for me; now I tend to content myself with gleaning inspiration from reading their titles. The parenting-book title currently

HODGINS DRUG

307 S. Main • Moscow, ID • (208) 882-5536 hodgins@turbonet.com • www.hodginsdrug.com

Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 am - 6:00 pm Saturday 9:00 am - 4:00Pm • Sunday 12:00 pm - 4:00 pm


12 | February 26, 2014 |

MOSCOWPULLMAN DAILY NEWS

A Kid’s-Eye View of the Palouse

| tag

Tag Magazine - February 2014  

A kids-eye view of the Palouse

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