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yourdailyglobe.com

TUESDAY , M ARCH 15, 2011

DAILY GLOBE IRONWOOD, MICHIGAN — VOLUME 92, EDITION 61

75 CENTS

Dogs won’t be allowed on trail near cemetery By RALPH ANSAMI ransami@yourdailyglobe.com

Marissa Balyeat, Sarah Carroll & Kristle Jackson

Your hugs and kisses on your visits mean more than you’ll ever know. The Michael Maurin Family

IRONWOOD — The Ironwood City Commission Monday took no action on a proposal to allow dogs in an undeveloped area of city property adjacent to Riverside Cemetery. Noting considerable public opposition to the proposal, commissioners considered draft language for an ordinance to allow

dogs on the trail near the cemetery, but didn’t act on it. Commissioner Gemma Lamb noted if the ordinance allowing dogs in the undeveloped area was approved by the city commission, it would go to a public meeting. She said a lot of people misunderstood the proposed change, thinking approval would allow dogs in the cemetery. That was never the intention of the proposed

ordinance changes. Commissioner Will Lucius said a public hearing would be “a waste of time and the city’s resources.” Commissioner Kim Corcoran said she feels the same way. As a result, no one made a motion for the ordinance change that Mayor Bob Burchell said came from the city parks and recreation committee. Dogs have not been allowed in the

cemetery since around 2000. Ironwood Public Safety Department co-director Ron Carpenedo said he couldn’t recall any citizens’ complaints about dogs prior to 2000 or after they were prohibited. Lamb said the move to prohibit dogs from the cemetery came after two dogs on the north side of Coolidge Avenue were (See CEMETERY — Page 2)

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INSIDE

Airport board finds concrete solution By MARGARET LEVRA mlevra@yourdailyglobe.com

IRONWOOD TOWNSHIP — A tentative agreement between Gogebic-Iron County Airport officials and Ruotsala Concrete Construction on a near five-month dispute over removal of concrete left in the ground by the contractor was reached Monday. After adjourning into closed session for nearly an hour, the board voted to accept a counterproposal drafted by Marquette attorney Ray O’Dea on behalf of Ruotsala Construction, general

contractor for the $1.3 million new terminal building project. According to the tentative agreement, the concrete walls that do not interfere with the structural integrity of the new terminal building can remain in the ground. Ruotsala Construction, however, must provide a $50,000 guarantee bond for the next 10 years that there will not be any problems resulting from the concrete in the ground, according to (See AIRPORT — Page 2)

Ontonagon village council chooses Cane for vacancy By JAN TUCKER jantuck@jamadots.com

ONTONAGON — Ontonagon business-owner John Cane was selected by the Ontonagon Village Council Monday as its new trustee. Cane was selected from among six “highly qualified applicants,” said village president Bill Johnson. Cane, owner and operator of Cane Funeral Home, previously served on the Ontonagon Memorial Hospital Board and the Aspirus Ontonagon Hospital Board. He was very involved in

bringing the Aspirus Health system to ownership of the hospital. Cane also serves on the village housing commission and is president of the Ontonagon-White Pine Rotary. He replaces Bruce Watt, who resigned when he obtained a job out of the community. Johnson said that all the applicants were outstanding and it was difficult to select just one. Also applying were Tony Smydra, Christine Brees, Jason (See ONTONAGON — Page 2)

DOUBLE TROUBLE Ironwood, Ewen-Trout Creek fall in MHSAA region semifinals Monday — Page 9

WEATHER INDEX Monday High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Last year this date High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Records High. . . . . . . . . . . . 63 (1995) Low . . . . . . . . . . . -16 (1993) Precipitation To 7 a.m. Monday . . . . . . None Snowfall To 7 a.m. Monday . . . . . . None Snow on the ground . . . . . 7 in. Season to date . . . . . 148.8 in. Last season to date . . 166.6 in.

—More details, Page 2

INDEX Business . . . . . . . .11 Classifieds . . . .13-15 Comics . . . . . . . . .16 Community . . . . . . .5 Health . . . . . . . . . .12 Obituaries . . . . . . . .8 Opinion . . . . . . . . . .4 Sports . . . . . . . .9-10

Township amends water, sewer ordinance By DAVID SIM dsim@yourdailyglobe.com

IRONWOOD TOWNSHIP — The Ironwood Township Board of Trustees approved an amendment to the Public Water and Sewer ordinance at its regular meeting on Monday night. The amendment to the ordinance allows the township to charge a deposit to an owner/landlord or tenant who applies for water or sewer system services as security for the payment of the services.

The amendment states if a tenant is responsible for payment of water and sewer charges, the deposit will be equal to six times the average monthly of these services. The deposit will be refunded after completion of the services. The amendment was adopted unanimously. In other action, the township: —Appointed Faith Newberry to the township’s planning com(See TOWNSHIP — Page 2)

David Sim/Daily Globe

Leilah Anderson, 6, sleds down a hill in her front yard in Ironwood on Monday afternoon. Her sister Anneka, 4, waits her turn. The Ironwood Area School District had a half-day off of school Monday because the district needed multiple buses for fans to follow the Ironwood boys basketball team to its regional game in Escanaba.

Wakefield officials aim to close financing for sewer work soon By JON HAWLEY jhawley@yourdailyglobe.com

WAKEFIELD — Wakefield officials intend to close financing soon for millions of dollars in sewer system upgrades for the city. During Monday’s city council meeting, Wakefield city manager John Siira said closing financing for the city’s sewer project, managed by engineering firm AECOM and financed through the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development, was scheduled for March 29 at the Gladstone, Mich., USDA-RD office. Siira said the total project is worth more than $9.4 million; this includes a roughly $7 million loan at a 2.5 percent interest (See WAKEFIELD — Page 2)

Jon Hawley/Daily Globe

Wakefield mayor Joe DelFavero, left, listens to city manager John Siira Monday during the Wakefield city council meeting.

Bruce Crossing man killed while walking along highway BRUCE CROSSING — A 35-yearold Bruce Crossing resident was killed when struck by a vehicle early Sunday morning in Bruce Crossing, according to the Ontonagon County Sheriff’s Department. Kenneth McGeshick was pronounced dead at Aspirus Ontonagon Hospital after being struck by the vehicle around 3:41 a.m. on U.S. 45, near One Mile Road. A Long Lake, Minn., man, 21, was driving north on U.S. 45 when he saw McGeshick walking in his lane of traffic, according to the sheriff’s department. The driver swerved to avoid McGeshick, but was unable to do so. Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation was initiated at the scene and McGeshick was transported by Sonco South ambulance to the hospital, according to the report.

The driver was arrested on a charge of being involved in a moving violation causing death, reckless driving and possession of marijuana, according to the sheriff’s department. Bond was set at $4,000, subject to posting 10 percent, and the Minnesota man was required to submit to a urine test before being released from the Ontonagon County Jail. The vehicle sustained considerable damage and was removed by a wrecker. Deputies said the Bruce Crossing Fire Department assisted with traffic control. McGeshick, the son of John and Judy (Pete) McGeshick, worked in the tribal maintenance department at Lac Vieux Desert resort in Watersmeet. —Ralph Ansami

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TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011

CEMETERY (Continued from Page 1) allowed to run loose and had “terrorized” passers-by years ago. This time around, dog owners would have been able to walk their animals on leashes entering the undeveloped area of the cemetery from Coolidge, where the walking trail starts, or the

THE DAILY GLOBE

FIVE-DAY FORECAST FOR IRONWOOD

visitors’ center on U.S. 2. The proposed amendment would have required dog owners to clean up waste from their animals along the trail. Commissioner Rick Semo said while allowing dogs on the walking trail would make it more attractive for visitors, it’s impor-

tant that the commission “respect the wishes of people who don’t want dogs in the cemetery proper.” Commissioners briefly discussed sending the ordinance to a public hearing, but after Lucius’s remarks, they decided to let sleeping dogs lie.

TODAY

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county attorney Richard Adams. If there is concrete that must be removed, the airport board agreed Ruotsala can begin working as soon as proof of the bond is available. Ruotsala agreed the $3,200 cost for X-raying the ground in front of the new terminal building (already paid by the airport) will come out of the amount still owed the contractor, $83,232, which includes an additional $10,545 for costs stemming from a change order in May 2010. The board also agreed the current attorneys would stay involved until the work is done.

large document. He said that a building inspector is needed to do inspections and something would have to be worked out with local inspectors. If not licensed inspectors the findings would not be valid. We need that to have the clout we hope to have,” he added. The board reviewed the proposed budget for the coming fiscal year. Frazer said he anticipates a reduction of real property as much as 5 percent, reduction in personal property taxes and $35,000 less in revenue sharing. The council was able to view the proposed sign to be placed outside the Ontonagon Historical Museum. Steve DeLong, Keweenaw Heritage Site official, said he has OK’d the application of the historical society for the sign, but since the village owns the land, it would need village approval. The approximately 12foot sign would be similar to other Keweenaw Heritage Site signs advertising the Ontonagon County Historical Museum and Lighthouse Tours and the Onton-

agon County Chamber of Commerce Tourist Information center. It will be funded with U.S. Park Service dollars. The council approved the sign, curbage and landscaping. For many years there has been a sign at the end of U.S. 45 in Ontonagon denoting it as the “most northern end of U.S. 45.” The sign rotted and was not replaced. The council approved purchase of a cedar sign with the designation on both sides for $2,546.59. In other action the council: —Approved advertising for two summer helpers. —Authorized new clerk Brenda Farley to be a signatory on village checks. —Heard U.S. Rep. Dan Benishek, R-Crystal Falls, will be in Ontonagon March 23 for a short meet-and-greet in the village council chambers at 5:30 p.m. —Heard the Waterfront Growth Readiness Assessment Program will be held March 23 at 6 p.m. at the council room.

TOWNSHIP mission. Five people applied for the position. —Accepted four additions to the fire department roster, including Matthew Carlson, Scott Carlson, Lou Somero and Pat Olson. —Heard from supervisor Kim Mattson that some residents along Sunset Road had been receiving letters from a company in Detroit offering resi-

dents an option to purchase insurance on water lines that run from a residence to the main service line. Other board members questioned if the letters were a scam. Mattson said residents should read the letters very carefully and call the township office with questions. —Formed a committee to study how to prevent the gym from losing heat.

WAKEFIELD (Continued from Page 1) rate, and a grant for $2.4 million. The council approved invoices using project funds to pay for $3.9 million in refinancing of previous sewer work (currently being repaid at 4.5 percent interest), $285,000 in engineering costs for AECOM, and roughly $11,000 for project legal, advertising and filing fees. Siira said these invoices still need to be approved by the USDA. For project construction, AECOM project manager Mike Pond recommended low bidder Snow Country Contracting, in Bessemer Township, for the work. The council accepted its bid March 4 in a special meeting following the end of bidding in February. Though the project initially focused on new sanitary sewer lines for Castile, Plymouth and Wico locations, Siira said the low bid, which came in at $3.7 million rather than $4.1 million, allowed the city to explore additional work, such as extra water lines and more lift station improvements. “The construction bids came in a little less than anticipated. I’ve been working with Mike Pond to identify different projects that could be done,” Siira said. In a previous interview, Siira said construction might begin in May.

In other business, the council: —Adopted a resolution committing the city to pay the local share of a Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund grant, should the application for it be successful. The $100,000 grant application, with a 25 percent local share, would renovate various Eddy Park facilities, including the restrooms, change houses and the pier. —Set March 28 as the first reading and April 11 as the second reading and public hearing for an ordinance which would define where medical marijuana dispensaries could be established in Wakefield. Siira’s report said the ordinance is meant to preempt any confusion, should someone approach the city about a dispensary. The ordinance would allow such a dispensary only in the downtown/highway commercial district. Siira said Gogebic County Sheriff Pete Matonich recommended the ordinance after passage of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act. —Authorized city electric department working foreman John Granato and other city staff to seek bids for a folding machine, which would let the city send an energy bill to a customer as a single, enveloped document, rather than the two “postcard bills” they currently receive. Granato said he would seek a refurbished machine — a new one could cost about $10,000. He

yourdailyglobe.com

and Siira also predicted the machine would quickly pay for itself in reduced postage costs. —Approved a Consumer Confidence Report regarding the city’s drinking water, copies of which will be sent to the Gogebic Range Water Authority, Indianhead Mountain Resort, Blackjack Ski Resort, as well as Wakefield and Bessemer townships. The report is available to the public upon request. —Went into closed session to discuss the city’s electric rate case with Xcel Energy. The council reviewed the settlement which includes lower rates than Xcel initially wanted, as well as reimbursements of excess billing.

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SUN AND MOON Sunrise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:14 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:06 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2:17 p.m. Moonset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4:38 a.m.

NATIONAL WEATHER Minocqua 46/30

ALMANAC

MOON PHASES Full

Last

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First

3/19

3/26

4/3

4/11

Ashland Duluth Eau Claire Escanaba Grand Rapids Green Bay Madison Marquette Rhinelander St. Paul Wausau

Today 45/30 ra 41/28 ra 44/29 ra 41/29 s 45/34 s 44/30 s 48/30 s 51/32 s 45/28 s 43/27 ra 46/30 s

Wed. 49/37 45/37 52/39 45/34 50/37 48/36 55/40 44/35 47/34 50/39 49/37

Today 41/34 pc 67/50 pc 51/35 s 75/55 s 50/38 s 82/58 s 87/59 s 51/43 ra

Chicago Dallas Kansas City Los Angeles New York Orlando Phoenix Seattle

REGIONAL WEATHER

Temperature High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Precipitation none Yesterday . . . . . . . . . . . .

Winds: 5 mph W

Today we will see mostly sunny skies with a slight chance of showers, high temperature of 46º, humidity of 49%. South wind 10 to 15 mph. The record high temperature for today is 62º set in 1990.

Marenisco 45/29 Watersmeet 2 48/29

Bessemer Hurley 46/30 47/31 51 Mercer 46/31 Manitowish 44/32

Upson 46/31

ONTONAGON

(Continued from Page 1)

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Saxon 48/31

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Wed. 55/44 74/60 65/53 72/52 54/39 83/58 91/60 51/40

s pc s pc ra s s sh

Weather (Wx): cl/cloudy; fl/flurries; pc/partly cloudy; ra/rain; rs/rain & snow; s/sunny; sh/showers; sn/snow; t/thunderstorms; w/windy

WEATHER TRIVIA When was the first weather forecast issued in a newspaper?

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Answer: It was May 7, 1857 in the Washington Evening Star.

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OUTLOOK

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In the meantime, the airport board may be facing a $13,000 billing from project engineers Mead & Hunt of Lansing for extra work by the firm because of the concrete issue, Adams said. Airport manager Duane DuRay said Mead & Hunt initially requested $35,030, but that amount was dropped to $13,000 after negotiating with Adams. Prior to the counter-proposal, a tentative agreement drafted by Adams said Mead & Hunt approved leaving most of the concrete in the ground, “except a large piece of concrete near the new canopy support beams,” with Ruotsala Construction to provide a warranty bond for 10 years.

21º

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(Continued from Page 1)

Black, Victoria James and Lawrence Bauer. The council approved a sixmonth moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries in the village. Village manager Scott Frazer said the Ontonagon Village Planning Commission is working on zoning the village after the bridge was built and will need to determine where the zoning would apply to the issue. “We need to hold off any applications until something is in place. The village council is required to hold a public hearing on the moratorium,” said Frazer. “Once the zoning plan comes through we will be able to discuss the marijuana issue.” Frazer said L’Anse has been doing a lot of work on the issue. The issue of a demolition ordinance is being studied by attorney Kevin Mackey, Frazer said. “It is turning out to be a lengthy process and looking at other examples could turn out to be a

38º

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AIRPORT

(Continued from Page 1)

30º

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Wisconsin man admits to sending threatening e-mails to Gov. Walker MADISON, Wis. — A Wisconsin man has admitted to sending two e-mails threatening to kill Gov. Scott Walker and seven Republican senators, according to the Wisconsin Department of Justice, Division of Criminal Investigation. Wisconsin Attorney Gen. J.B. Van Hollen said that on Sunday evening, the DCI identified and located a subject suspected of sending the death threats. The man subsequently admitted to authoring and sending the two emails, according to Van Hollen. The text of the e-mails was released, but the man was not identified, pending presentation of the evidence to the district attorney for charges in the jurisdiction of the threat origination. The justice department notified the governor’s office and senate of the threats. Language from the threats included: “I want to make this perfectly clear. Because of your actions

today and in the past couple of weeks I and the group of people that are working with me have decided that we’ve had enough. We feel that you and your republican dictators have to die. “This is how it’s going to happen: I as well as many others know where you and your family live, it’s a matter of public records. We have all planned to assult you by arriving at your house and putting a nice little bullet in your head. However, this isn’t enough. We also have decided that this may not be enough to send the message. So we have built several bombs that we have placed in various locations around the areas in which

we know that you frequent. This includes, your house, your car, the state capitol, and well I won’t tell you all of them because that’s just no fun... “Please make your peace with God as soon as possible and say goodbye to your loved ones we will not wait any longer. Goodbye (expletive)!!!”

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Local briefs ‘Out of the Wild’ to primetime IRONWOOD — Ironwood resident Brad Strand, a star of the Discovery Channel’s “Out of the Wild” survival show, is getting bumped to prime time. “Out of the Wild,” which had been airing Thursdays at 9 p.m. CDT, has moved to 6 p.m. CDT Thursdays. “I’ve heard the ratings are good, so they wanted to move it to a more conducive time slot,” Strand said. “A lot of people have been asking me about it at work and on the street.” Strand said he’s glad there’s so much interest in the show, both locally and nationally. The show details Strand and eight other Americans’ attempts to navigate out of a treacherous Brad Strand wilderness in Venezuela, rife with perils such as predatory or venomous animals, flash floods and a lack of supplies like food and water. Though Strand lived the show, he said he’s enjoyed seeing how his long adventure was edited down into the short series. “It’s nice to see what happened instead of hearing about it,” explaining that camera crews were able to monitor all the participants even when they separated.

Submitted photo

Nick Keller of Richmond, Minn., stretches his legs and takes in the view during a recent 60-day ride for cancer as part of the Snowball Cancer Challenge 2011. Keller completed his 22,150-mile ride on Feb. 23.

Entertainer Paulsen dead at 80 DULUTH, Minn. — The man who was known to 1960s television audiences as Mr. Toot and Bozo the Clown died of cancer Friday in Duluth. Ray Paulsen starred on WDSM-TV in Duluth, which now broadcasts as KBJR-TV, channel 6. Paulsen was a sidekick to Jack McKenna’s Captain Q and then portrayed Bozo the Clown, followed by Mr. Toot, in daily, unscripted hour-long afternoon programming that included cartoons. He was also the weatherman at the NBC affiliate. Paulsen’s extensive broadcasting career started in the 1940s and ended on KUWS (Superior) radio, where he recorded his final segment in January. In his early career, he worked at the WJMS radio station in Ironwood. (See Obituary, page 8)

Keller rides to fight cancer By MARGARET LEVRA mlevra@yourdailyglobe.com

Nick Keller of Richmond, Minn., broke his own world record on Feb. 23 as he clocked 22,150 miles on his snowmobile in 60 days. Last year, Keller set the record while riding his snowmobile in the Hurley area. He then continued to ride until Feb. 23, 2010, ending a 60-consecutiveday journey with a world record of 19,506 miles. The focus of Keller’s sledding has been to raise awareness and funds for people with cancer as part of the Snowball Cancer Challenge, sponsored by the Keller Family Community Foundation, a nonprofit organization formed by Keller and his family. Keller clocked 552 miles in a single day, snowmobiled 41,656 miles in 120 days, and 43,150 miles in two snowmobiling seasons. He ended Snowball Cancer Challenge 2011 in his hometown of Richmond. He began his 60-day trek on Dec. 26, 2010, snowmobiling from Richmond to Ironwood. As Keller ended this year’s challenge on Feb. 23, Wade West,

snowmobile marketing manager for Yamaha Corp., who was present at the finish, said, “We are very proud to be working with Nick and the KFCF. Obviously, he needed a sled that wouldn’t let him down in his efforts, so the Vector GT was a perfect fit. What we didn’t expect was that he’d make two 60-day rides, two years in a row. “To have put on over 43,000 miles in 130 days of documented riding is simply amazing.” Ron Kern, owner of A & C Farm Services and Yamaha, also present at the finish said, “We knew he was up to the challenge. If anyone could do it, we knew Nick could do it. We are very proud of Nick and KFCF.” Keller attributes the long distance snowmobile ride as a response to a joking challenge from Kern two years ago. “I had to think about it awhile, but then thought, ‘Yeah, I can do it,’” Keller said with a smile. “And now, look at where we are.” Keller dedicated the last day of his challenge to a dear friend, Claudia, who died from cancer earlier that morning. Keller’s mother died 25 years

ago from breast cancer at the age of 56 and he has many other family members and friends who have been affected by cancer. Keller is a founding member of KFCF. He has been an avid snowmobiler for 38 years. He is a distance snowmobiler, averaging in the past over 200 miles a day and over 5,000 miles a season. He is active in his local snowmobile club and participates with the local and state snowmobile associations. Keller is also involved in various community organizations, volunteering his time, talents and financial support. Tax-deductible donations to the foundation are accepted yearround and Snowball Cancer Tshirts can be purchased through the KFCF website, snowballcancer.org. The site has information about how to donate or apply for a grant from the foundation, photos and Nick’s Blogs. Information is also available on Facebook or Twitter under Snowball Cancer or Keller Family Community Foundation. The foundation can also be contacted at KFCF, PO Box 164, Richmond MN 56368.

Sen. Kohl’s rep to hold meeting MONTREAL, Wis. — U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl’s regional representative, Marjorie Bunce, will be in Montreal on Tuesday, March 29, to meet with constituents from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Montreal City Hall. Bunce will meet constituents in the council chambers. No appointment is necessary. “If you are having a problem with a federal program or agency, or have an opinion on an issue before Congress, please let me know by meeting with my regional representative, Marjorie Bunce,” Kohl said in a news release. Bunce can also be contacted at Kohl’s regional office at 402 Graham Ave., Suite 206, in Eau Claire, 54701, or at 715-832-8424.

Good Samaritans turn over money IRONWOOD — A mother and daughter turned over $30 in cash they found on Ayer Street to the Ironwood Public Safety Department, according to a Friday complaint. Sundy Meyer, of Marenisco, told officers her daughter, Maggie, found the $20 and $10 bills on March 2 while walking to catechism at the Our Lady of Peace school. Meyer said she attempted to drop off the money at the public safety department office sooner, but the office was closed when she had tried to turn it over. The two bills were sealed in an envelope at the office and placed in a drawer, pending locating the rightful owner.

Ontonagon RAC to consider funding for Ottawa projects ROCKLAND — Funding for projects will be considered at the third meeting of the Ontonagon Resource Advisory Committee on Friday, April 8, beginning at 9:30 a.m. EDT at township offices in Rockland. Agenda items include consideration of projects on the Ottawa National Forest that enhance forest ecosystems, restore and

NOTICE

improve land health and water quality, and improve the maintenance of existing infrastructure. Project proposals were received from the public, RAC members, and U.S. Forest Service employees. The Ontonagon RAC will make recommendations on how to spend nearly $10,000 of Title II funds. The meeting is open to the public. The federal funding is made available to Ontonagon County

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through the Secure Rural Schools and Community Selfdetermination Act. The public is invited to view project proposals and provide comments prior to or during the April 8 meeting. Project proposals can be viewed at any Forest Service office or online. Written comments should be sent to Lisa Klaus, Ottawa National Forest, E6248 U.S. 2, Ironwood MI 49938, e-mailed to lklaus@fs.fed.us, or faxed to 906932-0122. All comments, including names and addresses when provided, are placed in the record and are available for public inspection and copying. For more information, contact Klaus at 906-932-1330, ext. 328, or e-mail lklaus@fs.fed.us.

LANSING — The Michigan Department of Transportation urges motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians to use extra caution now that daylight saving time has arrived. Motorists should be aware it is darker later in the morning. “Driving through school zones becomes more challenging for motorists during the first week of the time change,” said MDOT director Kirk T. Steudle. “Pedestrians and bicyclists should wear brighter, reflective clothing to be seen more easily, and those behind the wheel need to pay close attention and eliminate distractions while driving,” Steudle said. MDOT also reminds bicyclists to travel with the flow of traffic.

ST. JOSEPH, Mich. (AP) — Michigan U.S. Rep. Fred Upton said the U.S. House has authorized putting a statue of Presi-

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Monday Michigan Midday Daily 3: 5-0-1 Midday Daily 4: 8-5-2-5 Daily 3: 8-8-7 Daily 4: 4-6-1-6 Fantasy 5: 03-10-12-32-38 Keno: 01-05-07-08-09-12-26-28-46-49-51-53-55-5961-65-67-68-69-73-76-78 Wisconsin SuperCash: 02-04-09-14-34-37, Doubler: N Badger 5: 03-13-15-19-20 Daily Pick 3: 3-1-4 Daily Pick 4: 9-8-4-5

U.S. House approves Gerald Ford statue at Capitol

Corned Beef and Cabbage SORT AIN RE

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Daylight saving time in effect

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POLICE REPORTS City of Ironwood A 5:55 a.m. Saturday complaint was received by the Ironwood Public Safety Department about a possible break-in at the America’s Best Value Inn at 160 E. Cloverland Drive. The report was under investigation on Monday. ACCIDENTS City of Ironwood A parked vehicle sustained considerable damage in a 3:20 p.m. Friday accident on Lowell Street, near the Aurora Street intersection. Patrick Joergen, 28, of Loveland, Ohio, was attempting to turn into an alley when the back of the trailer of the semi rig struck a parked 1996 vehicle belonging to Kyle Anderson, of Wausau, Wis. The driver’s side of the car was damaged. The Mayflower LLC rig, from Trenton, Mo., was not damaged, according to the IPSD report. ——— Two vehicles were damaged in a Saturday afternoon accident on McLeod Avenue, at the Suffolk Street intersection. An IPSD report indicated a vehicle operated by Marie Gurske, 67, of Gile, Wis., sustained considerable damage in the accident and a vehicle operated by Richard Makinen, 42, of Osceola, Wis., had moderate damage. According to the accident report, Gurske and Makinen were both stopped at stop signs at the intersection, with Gurske headed west on McLeod and Makinen going south on Suffolk. A witness said both vehicles proceeded forward at the same time and a collision resulted. Officers later determined Makinen had the right-of-way. No injuries were reported and no citations were issued. Iron County, Wis. Julie A. Miles, 49, of Division Street, Hurley, was not injured when the vehicle she was driving rolled near the Island Lake Road-County CC intersection in Oma, according to a 7:40 a.m. Monday Iron County Sheriff’s Department report. The vehicle sustained minor damage, the report said. Ontonagon County On Sunday at 7 a.m., a 25-yearold Mass City resident was traveling east on U.S. 45, one-mile west of M26, when she lost control of her vehicle on icy roads. The vehicle crossed the roadway, entered the ditch, struck some trees and overturned. The unidentified woman was cited for operating while intoxicated, driving while her license was suspended and no proof of insurance. She was transported from the scene by Sonco North. Her vehicle was totaled and removed by wrecker.

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dent Gerald Ford in the Capitol rotunda. The St. Joseph Republican said all 14 other members of Michigan’s congressional delegation co-sponsored the resolution, which the House passed 396-0 on Monday. It now goes to the U.S. Senate. Ford represented western Michigan in the U.S. House before becoming vice president

under President Richard Nixon, then succeeding Nixon in 1974. Ford died in 2006. The statue would replace a statue of Michigan abolitionist Zachariah Chandler. Federal law lets each state display two statues in the Capitol at one time. Upton said a presentation ceremony for the new statue is planned May 3.

Wis. man sentenced for 12th OWI MANITOWOC, Wis. (AP) — A Manitowoc man has been sentenced to 12 years for his 12th drunken driving offense. The Herald Times Reporter says 49-year-old Daniel Frisch was sentenced last month to seven years of initial confinement, followed by five years of extended supervision. Conditions of Frisch’s extended supervision include paying $1,272 in fines and costs plus supervision fees, as well as submitting to random urine screens, no alcohol use and no visits to bars or taverns.

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Would you like to submit a letter to the editor? Call Diane Montz or Larry Holcombe at 906-932-2211 or by e-mail to news@yourdailyglobe.com

PINION

THE DAILY GLOBE 4 G TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011

DAILY GLOBE Lisa Ursini, Publisher Larry Holcombe, Managing Editor

In Their Opinion

Pulitzer effort shows why access, protections are vital Sunshine Week, which recently began, is designed to raise awareness of the importance of keeping government open and accessible to the people who own it: All of us. A key victory for open government in Wisconsin occurred last May when then-Gov. Jim Doyle signed into law a reporter’s shield bill protecting confidential sources and newsgathering materials. Wisconsin’s Whistleblower Protection Act provides journalists with an absolute privilege to withhold the identity of confidential sources and a qualified privilege to protect from disclosure of unpublished newsgathering information. While most people didn’t give this legislation a second thought, we need look no further than Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Raquel Rutledge to understand its importance. Rutledge won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for local reporting for uncovering widespread fraud in the state’s taxpayer-funded program that subsidizes child care for the working poor. Rutledge got a tip from a source who wished to remain anonymous, obviously for fear of retribution if his or her identity were revealed. Rutledge took the information, secured volumes of public records and then staked out residences of so-called child care providers to see if any kids showed up. Often they didn’t. Rutledge uncovered all kinds of fraud in the $350 million Wisconsin Shares program: Some parents participated in a three-way scam in which a phony employer wrote the parent a bogus check that the parent showed the caseworker as proof of employment. Another friend would pose as a day care provider, and when the parent received the government check everybody profited even though there was no job and no day care provided. In other cases child care providers offered free gas, rent, vacations, cash rebates and other incentives to encourage parents to enroll their children in day care rather than school. The crooks are still being rounded up, but the bottom line for taxpayers is tens of millions of dollars in fraudulent payments have been recovered. Without the help of a whistleblower and access to public records, the stories may never have been written and the crooks still would be operating. The other possibility is that court officials would have tried to force Rutledge to reveal her source, which would have forced the reporter to possibly go to jail to protect the civic-minded person who helped expose this monumental taxpayer rip-off to the light of day. Fortunately, most public officials have nothing to hide. But when they do or when — as in the case of the child care scandal — they aren’t even aware that crimes are being committed, it’s important for all citizens, not just journalists, to have the tools necessary to expose wrongdoing. The Leader-Telegram, Eau Claire, March 14

The Daily Globe welcomes letters from readers. Letters should deal with matters of current, public interest. We will publish as many as possible. However, we reserve the right to reject any letter and to edit those that are to be published. Please avoid name-calling or personal attacks. Letters should be no longer than 400 words. They must be signed by the author, and an address and phone number must be included for verification purposes. Letters may be mailed to: Letters to the Editor, Daily Globe, 118 E. McLeod Ave., Ironwood MI 49938. Or, they may be e-mailed to: news@yourdailyglobe.com, or faxed to 906-932-5358. Brief, thank-you letters will be considered for our Saturday “Bouquets” column.

Joint panel adds new bait to carp fight At a time of federal dithering on blocking advance of Asian carp into Lake Michigan, a U.S.-Canadian agency has just added its important voice to spur “rapid response” efforts to make the Great Lakes a no-swim zone for this invasive threat. The International Joint Commission last week issued its 15th Biennial Report with 32 recommendations for action at the federal, state, provincial and local levels of government. Emphasis of the report was on need for the two nations to approve a revised Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement “that addresses threats to water quality to prevent or reduce their impact on human and ecological health” — the big threat being expanding growth of algae and other aquatic plants. What particularly interested me in the report was its section on aquatic invasive species, which touched on the block-the-carp issue being pushed on Capitol Hill by U.S. Rep. Dave Camp, R-Midland, and Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow, and in Lansing by attorney general Bill Schuette. He, as former attorney general Mike Cox before him, is working with other states on legal battles to require closing of locks leading to Lake Michigan. The joint commission said: “With the Asian carp threatening to invade the Great Lakes, the report recommends using a revised agreement as a vehicle for the development and deployment of binational protocols for rapid response before invasive species enter the lakes.” Action in Washington on Asian carp has been far from rapid. Describing another threat in its March 10 story on the joint commission report, the Associated Press said: “A resurgence of soupy, blue-green algae blooms in the Great Lakes

George Weeks

is an ominous sign of suffering water quality that poses health risks for people who depend on lakes for drinking water, food and recreation.” The joint commission said: “Beach closings, harmful algal growth, contaminated groundwater and alien invasive species are examples of threats that are of greatest concern in the nearshore zone where most people live and get their drinking water and which provide vital habitat for fish and wildlife populations.” (The full report and a summary version can be accessed at ijc.org.) “Human health must be highlighted as a priority concern of both countries in a revised Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement,” Lana Pollack, U.S co-chairwoman of the commission, said regarding current negotiations by the two nations on updating the agreement. “Adding explicit provisions to protect human health based on sound science is one of the most important things we can do.” In a more pointed comment reported by the A.P., she said programs that monitored and controlled phosphorus have disappeared in the past 15 years, and “progress has leveled off and is actually sliding backward. We need to get our governments to recognize that all is not well.” Such blunt talk is typical Pollack-speak

for the former Democratic state senator from Ann Arbor who ran the Michigan Environmental Council before her leadership role in the joint commission. Two other Michiganians in the Windsorbased Great Lakes Regional Office of the joint commission are John Nevin, longtime communications specialist who was speechwriter for ex-Gov. John Engler, and Dave Dempsey, former environmental adviser to ex-Gov. Jim Blanchard and then policy specialist under the Pollack-led MEC who recently joined joint commission in a similar role. Dempsey is author of numerous books relating to Great Lakes and other environmental issues.

Broder and Michigan It’s doubtful that any national political columnist wrote as much about Michigan governors as Dave Broder of the Washington Post, who died last week at age 81. That’s not just because he spent portions of summers on Beaver Island at a family cabin built by his wife’s grandfather a century ago. It’s that during his long career, he paid particularly close attention to the states in the federal system and governors as forces in presidential and other politics. Former Republican State Chairman Rusty Hills, former aide to Engler and other politicians (and now with AG Schuette) had been interviewed about a dozen times and found him “always a classy gentleman.” George Weeks, a member of the Michigan Journalism Hall of Fame, for 22 years was the political columnist for The Detroit News and previously with UPI as Lansing Bureau Chief and foreign editor in Washington. His weekly Michigan Politics column is syndicated by Superior Features.

today in history By The Associated Press

Today is Tuesday, March 15, the 74th day of 2011. There are 291 days left in the year.

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT

IN

HISTORY

On March 15, 44 B.C., Roman dictator Julius Caesar was assassinated by a group of nobles that included Brutus and Cassius.

ON

THIS

DATE

In 1493, Christopher Columbus returned to Spain, concluding his first voyage to the Western Hemisphere. In 1767, the seventh president of the United States, Andrew Jackson, was born in Waxhaw, S.C. In 1820, Maine became the 23rd state. In 1913, President Woodrow Wilson met with reporters for what’s been described as the first presidential press conference. In 1919, members of the American Expeditionary Force from World War I convened in Paris for a threeday meeting to found the American Legion. In 1944, during World War II, Allied bombers again raided German-held Monte Cassino. In 1956, the musical play “My Fair Lady,” based on Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion,” opened on Broadway. In 1964, actress Elizabeth Taylor married actor Richard Burton in Montreal; it was her fifth marriage, his second. In 1970, Expo ’70, promoting “Progress and Harmony for Mankind,” opened in Osaka, Japan. In 1975, Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis died near Paris at age 69. Ten years ago: Federal authorities confirmed that remains found on a Texas ranch were those of missing atheist leader Madalyn Murray O’Hair and two of her relatives. (David Waters, the key suspect in

the slayings, was sentenced to 20 years in prison after pleading guilty in federal court to extortion conspiracy.) Chechens hijacked a Russian plane after it left Turkey and forced it to land in Saudi Arabia. (Saudi special forces stormed the plane the following day; a flight attendant, a passenger and a hijacker were killed.) Actress Ann Sothern died in Ketchum, Idaho, at age 92. Five years ago: Saddam Hussein, testifying for the first time in his trial, called on Iraqis to stop killing each other and instead fight U.S. troops; the judge reprimanded him for making a rambling, political speech and ordered the TV cameras switched off. A gunman opened fire inside a Denny’s restaurant in Pismo Beach, Calif., leaving two dead and two injured before taking his own life.

Jeff King won his fourth Iditarod, finishing several hours ahead of runner-up Doug Swingley. One year ago: Michael Barrett, an insurance executive who’d shot surreptitious hotel videos of ESPN reporter Erin Andrews, was sentenced in federal court in Los Angeles to 2 1/2 years in prison. The United States demanded that Israel call off a contentious building project in east Jerusalem.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Musician DJ Fontana is 80. Former astronaut Alan L. Bean is 79. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 78. Actor Judd Hirsch is 76. Rock musician Phil Lesh is 71. Singer Mike Love (The Beach Boys) is 70. Rock singer-musician Sly Stone is 68. Rock singer-musician Howard Scott (War; Lowrider Band) is 65. Rock singer Ry Cooder is 64. Actor Craig Wasson is 57. Rock

singer Dee Snider (Twisted Sister) is 56. Actress Park Overall is 54. Movie director Renny Harlin is 52. Model Fabio is 50. Singer Terence Trent D’Arby (AKA Sananda Maitreya) is 49. Rock singer Bret Michaels (Poison) is 48. Rhythm-and-blues singer Rockwell is 47. Rock singer Mark McGrath (Sugar Ray) is 43. Actress Kim Raver is 42. Rock musician Mark Hoppus is 39. Actress Eva Longoria is 36. Rapper-musician will.i.am (Black Eyed Peas) is 36. Rock DJ Joseph Hahn (Linkin Park) is 34. Rapper Young Buck is 30. Actor Sean Biggerstaff is 28. Rock musician Ethan Mentzer is 28. Actress Caitlin Wachs is 22.

THOUGHT

FOR

TODAY

“You can’t copy anybody and end with anything. If you copy, it means you’re working without any real feeling.” — Billie Holiday, American singer (1915-1959).

M AY WE H ELP ?

DAILY GLOBE DOONESBURY

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COMMUNITY

THE DAILY GLOBE TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011 G 5

Raising preemie called emotional roller coaster By MICHAEL ASTOR Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — My wife Ivandy wasn’t due to deliver our son for another three months when her water broke. We rushed to the hospital where doctors said our baby’s world was drying up around him. Nicholas was born weighing just 2 pounds, 2 ounces. His face was the size of an old-fashioned silver dollar and his life seemed to hang from a passel of tubes and wires connected to beeping and sputtering machines. In the days ahead, I learned to read monitors and hang on nervously as Nicholas’ oxygen levels dipped and rose along with my heart. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit became our second home. As parents of preemies, we were plunged into a community of experts and caregivers that we hardly knew existed before. And we had to learn to cope not just with our son’s needs, but also with our sorrow, emotions and anxieties. Before Nicholas’ birth, I’d seen pictures of tiny intubated children in incubators and assumed their mothers had health problems or issues like drug abuse. But I learned that about half the women who have pre-term babies don’t fall into any known risk category, as was the case with my wife, Ivandy.

MORE, SMALLER BABIES SURVIVE About 12.9 million premature babies are born around the world each year. As medical advances allow more children to stay alive, that number is growing. In the United States, the number of pre-term infants has increased by 36 percent over the last 25 years. Only recently have doctors started looking beyond survival and focusing on improving outcomes for premature children outside the NICU. Children born prematurely may have learning disabilities, attention deficits, cerebral palsy, vision and hearing problems, respiratory illnesses and other conditions. Doctors are also finding that the trauma of premature birth can be devastating to parents, who may suffer from depression and anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder — the same condition that can afflict troops returning from war. “Prematurity is not just a medical crisis, it’s a family crisis. There are confusing, conflicting emotions,” explains Mara Tesler Stein, a clinical psychologist and co-author of “Parenting Your Premature Baby and Child.” Stein compares parents’ experience of grieving after the birth of a premature child to that of losing a loved one — an especially confusing emotion when you are in fact gaining a loved one. Our first family portrait shows my wife in a hospital bed and me leaning over, smiling and holding a Polaroid of Nicholas alone inside a plastic box, swallowed by his diaper, sensors trailing from his tiny fingers and feet, an

In Loving Memory of DONELLE LAABS Husband, Father and Grandfather who passed away on March 15, 2009. Our lives go on without you But nothing is the same, We have to hide our heartaches When someone speaks your name. Sad are the hearts that love you Silent the tears that fall, Living our lives without you Is the hardest part of all. You did so many things for us Your heart was kind and true, And when we needed someone We could always count on you. The special years will not return When we were all together, But with the love within our hearts You will walk with us forever. Sadly missed by his wife, Sharon and family

across the Range Lenten services IRONWOOD — The Ironwood Presbyterian Church will hold Lenten services on Wednesdays through March and ending on April 13 at 6:30 p.m. The church is located on Aurora Street in Ironwood.

oxygen tube taped to his nose. My wife and I didn’t know whether to be happy or sad. Should we send out birth announcements? What if the baby doesn’t make it? When I spoke to my father prior to Nicholas’ birth, he was already offering condolences. We attended one last baby preparedness class after Nicholas was born but it felt awkward explaining to the expecting parents our baby was already born but not yet home. It also felt like time better spent in the hospital with Nicholas.

New Beginnings fundraiser

TWINS BORN TOO SOON Most parents agree the hardest part of having a premature child is leaving the baby alone in the NICU. “I felt like I was abandoning them,” explains Melissa Orlando, a Colorado art teacher who gave birth to premature twins. “Goodness, they didn’t know if I was going to come back. I did a lot of talking with them explaining I was going home to sleep.” The next hardest thing is the uncertainty: No one could give us a definitive prognosis for our baby because every premature child is different. Orlando’s twins quickly become over-stimulated, hiccuping and turning white if they were handled too much — a common condition among preemies. Nicholas, by contrast, never suffered from Associated Press this, nor did he need a respirator, feeding Melissa Orlando holds her twin daughters Fiona and Mallory on April tube, or require brain surgery as did several 26, 2010, at her home in Parker, Colo. Orlando, 26, an art teacher, of the other children who shared the same gave birth to the premature twins last year. NICU. Nicholas’ issues would only become apparent later. “Many clinicians may be reluctant to glibly inform or When Nicholas left the NICU I wasn’t suffering so saturate or over-saturate a parent’s mind and agenda much from post-traumatic stress syndrome as an excess with all sorts of potential concerns that sound overof pride that our child had appeared to have done so well. whelming and potentially very negative and frightful,” I had almost forgotten the morning when I arrived at Carter explains. the NICU to find a report taped to his incubator stating In retrospect, we were lucky to have doctors who that he had stopped breathing during the night. A doctor remained unfailingly optimistic — even if they weren’t said we’d have to wait and see if there was any neurolog- always entirely honest about all the obstacles that might ical damage. lie ahead.

PREDICTING OUTCOMES IS DIFFICULT Dr. Brian Carter, director of the Neonatal Follow-up Program at the Monroe Carell, Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, says predicting outcomes for premature children is difficult because treatments are constantly evolving and often doctors only learn 10 years down the road “what were the rewards of our interventions and the disabilities.”

Calendar / 6 Days MARCH 15-20 Events are listed in the 8 Days calendar up to one week before they occur, space permitting. E-mail calendar listings to news@yourdailyglobe.com.

TUESDAY, MARCH 15 Bariatric Support Group, Aspirus Grand View Hospital Room 205. 906-932-5330, ext. 6046. Weight Watchers, Knights of Columbus, Ironwood; 6:30 a.m. weigh-in, 7 a.m. meeting; 5 p.m. weigh-in, 5:30 p.m. meeting. TOPS, 8:30 a.m. weigh-in, 9 a.m. meeting, Hurley Senior Center. Iron/Gogebic County Integrated Family Services, 9 a.m., Iron County Courthouse, Hurley. Wisconsin Veterans Employment Services Representative, 911:30 a.m., veterans service office, Hurley. 715-392-7808.

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DAY CARE CENTER “Nurturing Children in a Christian Environment.”

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Ironwood Theatre Presents

Superior Wind Symphony

The

Gogebic County Veterans Service Officer, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Ironwood Memorial Building. 906-6671110. Tiny Tot Story Hour, 10 a.m., Wakefield Public Library; stories, craft, snack for area children and caregivers. 906-229-5236 or dengel@uproc.lib.mi.us. St. Patrick’s Party, 11 a.m., Hurley Senior Center. RSVP 715-5612108. Gogebic-Ontonagon Community Action Agency food commodity distribution for seniors, 1-3 p.m., 100 Mill St., Bessemer. 906-6670283. Work Bee, 1 p.m., Hurley VFW, Post Home; 6 p.m. meeting. 906663-4553. Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, Salem Lutheran Church, Ironwood. area74.org. Gogebic Range Men’s Club Attitude Adjustment, 5 p.m., dinner 6 p.m., American Legion Club Rooms, Bessemer. Cancer Support Group, 5-6 p.m., Aspirus Grand View Conference Room B. Call 906-932-2443 to register. American Legion Auxiliary Unit 27, 6 p.m., American Legion, Bessemer. Survivors of Suicide, 6 p.m., Zion Lutheran Church, Ironwood. 906-932-4504 or 906-932-5718. North Country Trail, 6 p.m., Regal Country Inn, Wakefield, 906229-5122. American Legion Ladies Auxiliary Unit 27, 6 p.m., Legion hall, Bessemer. Hurley VFW Post 1580, 6 p.m., VFW post home. Range Art Association, 6:30 p.m., home of Pat DiLuna, Hurley. 715-561-2039. Lighthouse Freedom Clinic, 6:30 p.m., Lighthouse Family Church, 777 E. Ayer St., Ironwood; $18 for 8 weeks. 906-932-4848. Bessemer Veterans of Foreign

Over the past decade, doctors have made many advances in techniques to improve the quality of care in the NICU to lessen trauma and improve outcomes — including skin-to-skin contact, also called “kangaroo care”; encouraging breast milk over formula, and involving parents more in baby care. Almost from the outset, Ivandy was able to keep (See PREEMIES — Page 6)

Wars, 7 p.m., VFW hall, Bessemer. Al-Anon, 6:30 p.m., Salem Lutheran Church, Ironwood. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 p.m., Church of Transfiguration, Ironwood. area74.org. Government Iron County Highway Committee, 4 p.m., highway office, Hurley.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16 Christian Men of the Northland, 6:30 a.m., Uptown Café, Ironwood. Gogebic-Ontonagon Community Action Agency food commodity distribution, 9-10 a.m., Pioneer Park Apartments, Ironwood. 906932-4200. Hurley Education Foundation, noon luncheon meeting, conference room, Hurley K-12 School. 715-8932206. Alcoholics Anonymous, open meeting, noon, Salem Lutheran Church, Ironwood. area74.org. Iron County Veterans Service Officer, 1-3 p.m., Mercer Town Hall. 715-561-2190. Adult education class, 3:30 6:30 p.m., Hurley K-12 School. 715682-4591, ext. 3188. Ironwood Area Business and Professional Women, 5 p.m., social hour, 6 p.m., speaker, dinner will follow, Elk and Hound, Ironwood. RSVP 906-932-4430, 906-3643812. Hurley American Legion Birthday Party, 5:30 p.m., happy hour, 6 p.m., dinner, Liberty Bell Chalet, Hurley, $15. RSVP 715-561-3098. Immaculate Conception Women’s Guild Meeting, 6 p.m., church hall, Wakefield. History Lecture, with Larry Peterson, 6 p.m. Wilder Fine Arts, 540 W. Cloverland Dr., Ironwood. 906-932-3186. Superior Group Snowshoe Night, 6:30 p.m., Michigan State Tourism Information Center U.S. 2, west end of Ironwood. American Legion Post 58, Hurley, 7 p.m. at the post. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 p.m., Sharon Lutheran Church, Bessemer. area74.org.

Wednesday, March 30 at 7:30pm General Admission: $10 Adults ~ $5 Youth This program made possible by Michigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairs and Ironwood - Hurley Rotary

906-932-0618

www.ironwoodtheatre.net

As Good As Ribs Get!

Sandwiches & Wraps Galore www.tacconellis.com

932-2101

Government Iron County Recycling Committee, 5 p.m., Iron County Courthouse, Hurley.

THURSDAY, MARCH 17 Diabetes Support Group, Aspirus Grand View Hospital. 906932-2443. Aging Unit of Iron County Board, 9:30 a.m., Hurley Senior Center. Gogebic-Ontonagon Community Action Agency food commodity distribution, seniors, mothers, infants, children, 9:45-10 a.m., Lake Gogebic Senior Center, Bergland; 10:20-10:35 a.m., Porcupine Mountain Senior Center, White Pine; 1111:45 a.m., Holy Family Catholic Church parking lot, Ontonagon; 1:15-1:45 p.m., Resource Center, Mass City; 2:15-2:45 p.m., Stannard Township Ballpark, Bruce Crossing; 2:30-2:45 p.m. CST, Watersmeet Town Hall parking lot, Watersmeet. 906-884-2106. Gogebic County Veterans Service Officer, 10:30-11:30 a.m., Wakefield City Hall; 1-2 p.m., Watersmeet Township; 2:45-3:15 p.m., Marenisco Township. 906-6671110. Mended Hearts and Diabetes Support Group, 2 p.m., Grand View Hospital conference area, Ironwood. For those recovering from heart surgery or diagnosed with diabetes. 906-932-2443. Bessemer Area Historical Society, 2 p.m., 403 Sophie Street, Bessemer. Magical Fun in the Kids Room, 4-6 p.m., Ironwood Carnegie Library. Crafts and books. Business After 5, 5 p.m., Iron Nugget, Hurley, $2 members, $3 non-members. Childbirth and Healthy Parenting Class, 5:30-8 p.m., Aspirus Grand View Hospital. Call 906-9322443 to register. DOVE Bingo, 6 p.m. play; 5 p.m. card sales, Ironwood Memorial Building. Alcoholics Anonymous, 6:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, Hurley. area74.org. Gogebic County Council of Veteran Affairs, 6:30 p.m., Bessemer VFW. Spaghetti or Cabbage Roll, 4-7 p.m., American Legion Post 27, Bessemer; with Irish theme desserts; $7. iHeart Youth Ministries, 7 p.m., teens to mid-20s; worship, service, question/answer peer counsel, Lighthouse Family Church, Ironwood. 906-932-4848.

Government Bessemer Housing Commis-

IRONWOOD — New Beginnings Pregnancy Support Services will hold a fundraising dinner at Maplewood Steakhouse on Sunday, April 3, from 2 to 6 p.m. The cost of the broasted chicken dinner is $8 per meal or $5 for a smaller, child’s portion. Proceeds help New Beginnings serve parents and families, with free pregnancy tests, peer counseling, healthy pregnancy and parenting classes and other services. For tickets or more information, contact New Beginnings at 906-932-0414. The agency is located at 126 W. Aurora St. in downtown Ironwood.

Dolphin jumps onto boat deck MARCO ISLAND, Fla. (AP) — A dolphin weighing between 600 and 700 pounds jumped onto the deck of a boat, injuring a woman in South Florida. Isles of Capri Fire spokesman Keith Perry said a charter boat captain called 911 Sunday afternoon after the dolphin jumped on the boat and landed on one of his passengers. The woman suffered a sprained ankle. Her name was not available. Officials from the Isles of Capri Fire Department, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Collier County Sheriff’s Office used an immobilizing board and a rope to push the dolphin back into the water.

sion Board Meeting, 8:30 a.m., Executive Director’s Office, 709 W. Iron St., Bessemer. Iron County Fair Board, 6:30 p.m., Saxon Community Center, Saxon, Wis.

FRIDAY, MARCH 18 Mercer Food Pantry, noon-1 p.m., Railroad Street, Mercer, Wis. Emergencies: 715-476-7655. Alcoholics Anonymous/AlAnon, noon, Salem Lutheran Church, Ironwood. area74.org. Fish Fry, 3:30-8 p.m., Bessemer VFW; eat in or carry-out. 906-6670812. Narcotics Anonymous, 5-6 p.m., Ironwood Fellowship, Lahti’s Chevrolet building. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 p.m., Our Lady of Peace Church, Ironwood. area74.org.

SATURDAY, MARCH 19 Treasure Room, 9 a.m.-noon, at Iron County Food Pantry, 72 Michigan Ave., Montreal, Wis. 715-5614450. Third Saturday Food Distribution, 10 a.m.-noon, Trinity Lutheran Church, $20, all welcome, bring boxes. Alcoholics Anonymous, 11 a.m., Salem Lutheran Church, Ironwood. area74.org. Alcoholics Anonymous Women’s Group, 5 p.m., Salem Lutheran, Ironwood. area74.org. Dinner Dance, 6 p.m., Wakefield VFW; rib eye steak dinner. RSVP 224-3071. Gogebic County Federal Credit Union, 59th Annual Meeting, 6 p.m., Bessemer Veterans of Foreign Wars Hall. Government Iron County Democratic Party Meeting, 9 a.m., Iron County Courthouse.

SUNDAY, MARCH 20 Friends of the Miners Memorial Heritage Park, weekly snowshoeing, 2 p.m., meet at the Ironwood Schools bus garage on Ayer Street. St. Urho’s Day Dance, 2 p.m., Little Finland, Kimball, Dorothy and the Boys. Refreshments. 906-9321608. Finnish Folk Dance Lessons, 3:05 p.m., All Saints Lutheran Church, Putnam Boulevard, Wakefield; free; coffee and pulla. 906-3647148. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 p.m., Sharon Lutheran Church, Bessemer. area74.org. ——— Read portions of the Daily Globe online at yourdailyglobe.com.


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COMMUNITY

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011

PREEMIES

‘Fathers can have a harder time attaching to their child ... if they can’t fix the situation, they really don’t quite know what to do with it..’

and try other t h i n g s , ” Maroney said. When it came time to take Nicholas home, the doctor told us to treat him like any other child. We later discovered he had suffered a —D IANNE M ARONEY brain injury during the incident when he’d stopped breathing. It had affected his motor coordination, requiring him to use a walker. It turns out such surprises are not uncommon for parents of preemies. And yet it’s not as bad as it seems. If I had a magic wand and could make everything all better I wouldn’t hesitate for second, but at the same time I wouldn’t want to lose the stronger person I’ve become — a warrior, self-educated physical therapist and passionate advocate for allowing Nicholas to lead as normal life as possible. Then there’s also the incomparable joy that has come from knowing and loving Nicholas.

(Continued from Page 5) Nicholas tucked between her breasts for most of the day. When I watched him with Ivandy or held him in my arms, I felt OK. But when I was away, worries crept in. Would he walk? Talk? Go to school like other kids? The fears would snowball until I would sometimes cry and even scream. I spent almost all my spare time at the NICU, coming in after work and warbling to Nicholas offkey for a few hours each evening. The nurses often let me stay long after visiting hours had ended, but it was hard to wake up for work the next day. “I think fathers can have a harder time attaching to their child, especially if the child’s really sick. Men tend to be fixers and if they can’t fix the situation they really don’t quite know what to do with it,” explains Dianne Maroney, a NICU nurse and co-author of “Your Premature Baby and Child.” Maroney, whose daughter was born premature, says parents should seek outside help and not rely exclusively on doctors to help overcome the obstacles facing their children. “You have to learn to follow your gut instinct — my daughter is almost 17 and according to statistics she should be a very different child than she is and she’s really, really quite normal, and I believe that’s because I was willing to step outside the box

THE DAILY GLOBE

Prince William, Kate Middleton represent future LONDON (AP) — Powerful husband? No problem. Money? Got that too. Clothes, good looks? Ditto. What does the woman who has it all do after her honeymoon? That’s a tough one. Kate Middleton’s fame is undeniable. She is already one of the world’s most talked-about women, and that will only increase when she marries Prince William next month. But her royal role remains completely undefined, and much rests on her slender shoulders. If her marriage to Prince William is a joyous union that produces heirs, not tears and recrimination, the young couple could put the somewhat shaky British monarchy on solid footing for generations to come. But if it collapses into a replay of Prince Charles’ I-hate-you-Ihate-you-more donnybrook with Lady Di, the impact on the House of Windsor would be

grave. Journalism professor and newspaper columnist Roy Greenslade said William and Middleton must rebuild public trust that has been eroded by heir-to-the-throne Prince Charles — because of his failed marriage and perceived eccentricities — and by scandal-bound Prince Andrew. The British public still reveres the queen, he said, but has doubts about her four children, including Princess Anne, who is divorced, and the nondescript Prince Edward. “The glue that holds the monarchy together is the queen, but there is a great deal more skepticism and even cynicism about the next generation,” he said. “You have a dysfunctional family, so it really falls on William and Kate to actually be an upright couple that can engage with the public and be glamorous at the same time. It’s

fine with the queen on the throne, and Charles won’t reign for long, so it really does fall to the next generation to rescue them.” Restoring the frayed bond between crown and subjects is vital, Greenslade said, because the monarchy will suffer a substantial blow when the queen dies, and also faces the very real threat that Australians will decide to sever ties to the British monarch in the next decade, likely giving republicans in Britain a boost. That’s a lot of pressure for a young woman who already faces the formidable task of marrying into a rather imposing family. “Her prime objective is to become a wife, and a good wife,” said Dickie Arbiter, a former royal spokesman who expects Middleton to give up her nightclubbing ways once she becomes a princess on April 29.

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ENTERTAINMENT

THE DAILY GLOBE

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011 G 7

Neil Diamond, Alice Cooper inducted into Rock Hall NEW YORK (AP) — New Orleans piano maestro Dr. John wore a bright purple suit for his induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Monday, leading a class with Neil Diamond, Alice Cooper and Tom Waits. Singer Darlene Love, whose voice cut through Phil Spector’s “Wall of Sound,” called her induction into the Hall her best 70th birthday present. Pianist Leon Russell also was to be inducted at a black-tie dinner at The Waldorf-Astoria hotel in Manhattan. A tape of the ceremony is to air March 20 on Fuse. Dr. John said he felt “like I’m blessed to be singing, to be breathing.” He was inducted by singer John Legend, who recalled meeting him at a benefit for Hurricane Katrina relief. Legend said the new Hall of Fame member has been a leading global ambassador for New Orleans and its special musical gumbo. “He has never stopped flying the flag of funk,” Legend said. “Tonight, he is definitely in the right place at the right time.” That was a reference to one of Dr. John’s bestknown songs, “Right Place, Wrong Time,” with Allen Toussaint and the Meters. Love fought back tears in her acceptance speech, saying she had faith that the gift God gave her would sustain her for the rest of her life. She was inducted with a comic ramble by Bette

lenging recordings in recent years with producer Rick Rubin. He said before the ceremony that he had flown in from a concert tour in Australia for his induction and was flying back when it was done. Alice Cooper is the stage name for singer Vincent Furnier and his band, known for 1970s era hard rock songs “Eighteen,” “No More Mr. Nice Guy” and “Schools Out.” Their concerts were steeped in horror movie theatrics, and singer Rob Zombie was to salute them Monday. Songwriter Waits is well-versed in blues, poetry and ballads, with songs rough and romantic. Several of his Hall of Fame predecessors have recorded his work, including Bruce Springsteen (“Jersey Girl”), the Ramones (“I Don’t Want to Grow Up”), Rod Stewart (“Downtown Train”) and Johnny Cash (“Down There By the Train”). Another Californiabased songwriter, Neil Young, was to pay tribute to Waits on Monday. Russell’s long hair and beard gave him a distinctive look, but it’s the piano player’s songs — particularly “Delta Lady” and “A Song for You” — that made him memorable. His career has recently been revived through a collaboration with Elton John, who was to induct him. Elektra Records founder Jac Holzman and Specialty Records founder Art Rupe were to be inducted in the non-performer category.

Associated Press

Neil Diamond, left, and Alice Cooper were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at a party Monday evening in New York City. Midler, who said she was a goner when she first heard Love’s voice on a transistor radio. “Listening to her songs, you had to dance, you had to move, you had to keep looking for that rebel boy,” Midler said. Love lent her powerful voice to several of Spector’s hits, in acts such as the Crystals and Bob B. Soxx and the Blue Jeans. Her “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)” is a holiday standard: She

sang on U2’s cover and performs it every December on David Letterman’s show. The Brooklyn-born Diamond wrote pop-rock hits for himself (“Solitary Man”) and others (The Monkees’ “I’m a Believer”). Presidential daughter Caroline Kennedy was the inspiration for “Sweet Caroline,” now a Boston Red Sox anthem. Diamond settled into a comfortable career as a middle-of-theroad concert favorite, although he made some chal-

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TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011

OBITUARIES

THE DAILY GLOBE

In tribute Raymond Chris Paulsen

Joseph L. ‘Buddy’ Finco

Betty L. Gutt

DULUTH, Minn. — Raymond Chris Paulsen, born in Superior, Wis., on Sept. 23, 1930, died March 11, 2011, at Solvay Hospice House in Duluth. Despite battling cancer since 1984, Ray loved life and accepted all that it brought. He loved God, his family and country. Ray enjoyed people, and was very outgoing in public, but preferred a quiet life at home. Survivors include: daughter Julie (Jim) Krznarich, Ironwood, Mich.; son Roland (Angela) Paulsen, Wisconsin Rapids, Wis.; grandchildren Jesse Paulsen, Madison, Wis., Catina Stoflet, Wisconsin Rapids, Joseph CasaDeCalvo, Minneapolis, and great-granddaughter Carmen Stoflet, Wisconsin Rapids. Ray was preceded in death by his father, Chris, his mother, Esther, his first wife (and mother of his children), Julia, and second wife, Carmen. He graduated from Superior Central High and attended Superior State College. After graduating from the American Institute of the Air, Minneapolis, Ray worked as a radio announcer at WSBR in Superior, WJMS in Ironwood and WDSM in Superior. Ray became a pioneer of Twin Ports television as an announcer and weatherman at WDSM/KBJR Channel 6, but is best known for his characters on local children’s shows, including Sparx, Bozo the Clown, and Mr. Toot. He left broadcasting in 1977 to be the Executive Director of the Superior Chamber of Commerce. He then became the first general manager of Mariner Mall in 1980, retiring from that position after nine years. After retirement, Ray worked parttime at Bingham Hardware. Ray served in the U.S. Army, and was honorably discharged. He was active in stock car racing from the inception of the TriState Racing Association. Ray and Carmen became licensed private pilots in 1981, and loved flying, especially to Carmen’s home state of Montana. He was a member of Pilgrim Lutheran Church, the Danish Brotherhood in America, Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, and the Superior Optimist Club. Visitation began at 5 p.m. Monday, March 14, 2011, at the Downs-LeSage Funeral Home, 1304 Hammond Avenue, Superior. Visitation will resume at 10 a.m., today, Tuesday, March 15, 2011, at Pilgrim Lutheran Church and continue until the 11 a.m. funeral service, with the Rev. Doctor Mark Hillmer officiating and the Rev. Ronald Becklund as homilis. Pallbearers for the service will be Toby Marcovich, Jim Christianson, Joseph CasaDeCalvo, Roger Lundquist, Bill Maki, Bill Ellison, Cedric Johnson and Mike Upthegrove. Memorials may be given to Pilgrim Lutheran Church, 820 Belknap Street, Superior WI 54880, or to Duluth Clinic Education and Research, 400 E. 3rd Street, Duluth MN 55805, to be earmarked for cancer research. To leave an online condolence or to sign the guestbook, please visit downs-lesage.com.

SEBRING, Fla. — Joseph L. “Buddy” Finco, 84, of Ironwood, Mich., died Sunday, March 6, 2011, in Sebring, surrounded by his loving family, following a brief illness. He was born Aug. 10, 1926, in Ironwood, son of the late Joseph and Elizabeth (Erickson) Finco, and graduated from Luther L. Wright High School in 1944. He then served two years in the U.S. Navy in the North Atlantic during World War II. Following his honorable discharge, Buddy returned to Ironwood and was employed with A.P. Laabs Housemoving. He then worked in the Geneva mine for 15 years, retiring from White Pine Copper Co. in April, 1985. He was a member of Our Lady of Peace Catholic Church in Ironwood, where he sang in the Men’s Choir and Resurrection Choir. He Joseph L. also belonged to Ironwood Knights of Columbus Council No. 1396 and Ironwood American “Buddy” Finco 1926-2011 Legion Post 5. Buddy was a 51-year camper at Lake Gogebic, and enjoyed hunting and fishing. He especially enjoyed spending winters in Sebring. On May 8, 1948, he was married to Barbara L. “Barb” Kuiawa at the Immaculate ConcepVeteran tion Catholic Church in Wakefield, Mich. She survives. Also surviving are a son, Joseph P. (Toni), Mukilteo, Wash.; three daughters, Roberta (William) Hovey, Olathe, Kan., Lynda (Joe) Fairfield, Sebring, and Susan (Donald) Bull, Valparaiso, Ind.; five grandchildren, one grand-daughter-in-law, two step-grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and six step-great-grandchildren; three brothers, Robert (Joyce), Castor, La., and Gerald (Geri) and Bernard (Helen), both of Ironwood; brother-and-sisters-in-law, Leo and Joan Kuiawa and Grace Kuiawa, all of Kalkaska, Mich., Sophie Kuiawa, Green Bay, Wis., and Mary Finco, Cudahy, Wis.; an aunt, Gert Newberg, Ironwood; and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by a grandson, Kevin Fairfield; a brother, James; and a sister, Lois Gayan. In accordance with Buddy’s wishes, cremation has taken place. Visitation will be Friday, July 8, from 10 to 11 a.m., in the St. Joseph Family Room at Our Lady of Peace Church, followed by a Memorial Mass celebrated at 11 a.m., with the Rev. Darryl J. Pepin, celebrant. Full military honors will be accorded by the Ironwood American Legion Post 5 Honor Guard. In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred to the Bud and Donna Somers Hospice House, 1110 Hammock Rd., Sebring, Fla. 33870. Online condolences may be given to Buddy’s family at mckevittpatrickfuneralhome.com. Local arrangements are with McKevitt-Patrick Funeral Home and Cremation Services of Ironwood.

IRONWOOD, Mich. — Betty L. Gutt, 82, of Ironwood, died Monday, March 14, 2011, in Ironwood. Arrangements are pending with McKevitt-Patrick Funeral Home and Cremation Services of Ironwood.

Charles J. Boutan KENOSHA, Wis. — Charles J. Boutan, 70, of Pleasant Prairie, passed away Friday, March 11, 2011, at Kenosha Hospital. He was born on March 14, 1940, to the late Jerome A. and Sabina (Gulan) Boutan in Bessemer, Mich. He was educated in the schools of Hurley and graduated from Hurley high school. He also attended Gogebic Community College in Ironwood, Mich. Charles entered the U.S. Army and was in the 32nd Infantry Division during the Berlin Crisis and was honorably discharged in 1962. On Aug. 5, 1961, he married Mary Grandelis in Hurley. Charles worked at AMC as a quality control engineer and retired after 30 years in 1990. Charles was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Hurley. Charles J. Charles enjoyed fishing with his dog and Boutan fishing buddy, Toby, hunting, going to his cot- 1940-2011 tage in Hurley, where he and his wife spent their summers, and loved spending time with his family. Charles is survived by his loving wife, Mary, Pleasant Prairie; his loving children, Sharie Veteran (Norman) Giles, Wheatland, Charles M. (Cynthia) Boutan, Toledo, Ohio, and Gerald Boutan, Pleasant Prairie; his loving grandchildren Christopher, Justin, Billy and Jeremy; his loving great-grandson, Kaden; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. His sisters, Carol Peterson and Audrey Koski, preceded him in death. A Celebration of Life for Charles will be held on Tuesday, March 15, at 11 a.m. at the Bruch Funeral Home in Kenosha. Full military honors will follow. Visitation will be held on Tuesday from 10 a.m. until the time of service. Memorials would be appreciated to the Kenosha Achievement Center.

Kenneth McGeshick BRUCE CROSSING, Mich. — Kenneth McGeshick, 35, of Bruce Crossing, died on Sunday, March 13, 2011, in Bruce Crossing. He was born on May 28, 1975, in White Pine, son of John and Judy (Pete) McGeshick. Ken worked in the tribal maintenance department at Lac Vieux Desert and enjoyed poker, fishing, golf and all outdoor activities. He is survived by his parents, John and Judy McGeshick, Sr., Watersmeet; three sons, Reign, Storm and Avery; two daughters, Jade and Destiny; significant other, Susie Maki, Bruce Crossing, and her daughters, Mabel and Gracie; two brothers, John C. McGeshick, Jr. and Christopher McGeshick; two sisters, Roxanne Bain McGeshick and Anna Fors; and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. He was preceded in death by two sons, Cain and Kenneth; and a sister, Joy Marie. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, March 16, 2011, at Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Watersmeet, with Father George Maki officiating. Interment will be in the Watersmeet Township Cemetery. Visitation will be held today, Tuesday, March 15, 2011, after 6 p.m. at the Wandersee Funeral Home in Bruce Crossing. Tribal Feast will be held on Wednesday following the service at the Lac Vieux Desert Spiritual Center.

For reprints or lamination services, contact The Daily Globe at 932-2211

‘Battle: LA’ tops box office NEW YORK (AP) — The alien invasion sci-fi blockbuster “Battle: Los Angeles” conquered the box office with a $35.6 million debut. Other new releases performed poorly. The gothic fairy tale adaptation “Red Riding Hood” took in $14 million, while Disney’s 3-D animated “Mars Needs Moms!” managed just $6.9 million. The top 12 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Sunday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Monday by Hollywood.com are: 1. “Battle: Los Angeles,” Sony/Columbia, $35,573,187, 3,417 locations, $10,411 average, $35,573,187, one week. 2. “Rango,” Paramount, $22,602,847, 3,923 locations, $5,762 average, $68,206,101, two weeks. 3. “Red Riding Hood,” Warner Bros., $14,005,335, 3,030 locations, $4,622 average, $14,005,335, one week. 4. “The Adjustment Bureau,” Universal, $11,597,335, 2,847 locations, $4,074 average, $38,589,595, two weeks. 5. “Mars Needs Moms!” Disney, $6,914,488, 3,117 locations, $2,218 average, $6,914,488, one week. 6. “Beastly,” CBS Films, $5,021,232, 1,959 locations, $2,563 average, $16,911,633, two weeks. 7. “Hall Pass,” Warner Bros., $5,011,020, 2,555 locations, $1,961 average, $34,842,289, three weeks. 8. “Just Go With It,” Sony, $4,019,266, 2,398 locations, $1,676 average, $94,000,847, five weeks. 9. “Gnomeo and Juliet,” Disney, $3,617,255, 2,585 locations, $1,399 average, $89,102,365, five weeks. 10. “The King’s Speech,” Weinstein Co., $3,573,112, 1,768 locations, $2,021 average, $129,010,235, 16 weeks. 11. “Unknown,” Warner Bros.,

$3,366,339, 2,303 locations, $1,462 average, $58,410,845, four weeks. 12. “I Am Number Four,” Disney, $2,260,314, 2,005 locations, $1,127 average, $50,455,723, four weeks.

Betty Irene Crawford WAUSAU, Wis. — Betty Irene Crawford, 77, Mosinee, died Tuesday, March 1, 2011, at Colonial Manor Nursing Home, Wausau. She was born Aug. 16, 1933, in Mosinee, the daughter of the late Joseph and Ida (Rindfleisch) Kessler. She married Howard Morrill on July 7, 1951. He preceded her in death on April 12, 1981. On Nov. 6, 1982, she married Robert Crawford in Mercer. She worked for Simpson’s in Mercer and Lietz’s in Mosinee, where she was very social. Betty was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary in Mercer and Mosinee, where she was very active. She loved her flowers, birds, gardening, snowmobiling and especially her great-grandchildren. Survivors include a daughter, Linda (David) Dahm; two grandchildren, Michelle (Dave) Barrett, and Scott Dahm; and two great-grandchildren, Grayson and Carter Barrett, all of Mosinee; a stepdaughter, Rosalie (Jim) Haigh, Lake Tomahawk, and their children, Roger Ullmark and Nicole Ullmark, both of Genoa, Ill.; one brother, Donald (Marie) Kessler, Mercer; four sisters, Adeline (Tom) Vick, Wausau, Anna Meyer, Springstead, Margaret Vanish, Mosinee, and Darlene (Vernon) Cartwright, Mosinee. She was preceded in death by two sisters, Dorothy Tryba and Hilda Belohlavek. Services will be at 11 a.m. Friday, March 18, 2011, at Beste Funeral Home, Mosinee. The Rev. Donald Przybylski will officiate. Burial will be in Mosinee Cemetery at a later date. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. Friday until the time of the service at the funeral home.

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Do you have sports news? Call Jason Juno at 906-932-2211, ext. 123 or e-mail to sports@yourdailyglobe.com

SPORTS Watersmeet’s Burke named to Class D All-State first team By JASON JUNO sports@yourdailyglobe.com

WATERSMEET — Watersmeet senior Marissa Burke can add another line to her already impressive resume. All-State player. Burke was named to The Associated Press’ Class D AllState team, which was released today. Also from the U.P., Chassell senior Mara Ryynanen made the team, while Crystal Falls Forest Park freshman Lexi Gussert was named special mention. Burke played for the Lady Nimrods since she was in eighth grade and became a starter halfway through that season. Burke was an All-U.P. Second Team selection as a sophomore and a First Team selection as a junior. She surpassed 1,000 career points during her senior season, led Watersmeet to its first 20-0 regular season since 1989 and received the Edward Helakoski Award as the Porcupine Moun-

tain Conference’s Most Valuable Senior. She helped Watersmeet to four consecutive PMC titles. Burke averaged about 13.2 points per game, 4 assists, 2.9 steals and shot about 29 percent from behind the arc. She finished her career with 1,092 points, including 88 points scored as an eighth grader. She was a standout defensive player this year for the Lady Nimrods, which finished the year at 22-1. “I couldn’t have asked for a better ballplayer,” veteran Watersmeet coach Kathleen McGrath said earlier this year. “She should be very proud of what she’s done for Watersmeet girls basketball.” Burke’s not just a standout basketball player. McGrath said she is the valedictorian of her class and a role model for other girls in the school. McGrath said Burke plans to play basketball at Finlandia University in Hancock.

THE DAILY GLOBE TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011 G 9

Knights slay Devils Norway advances in 58-47 MHSAA Class C regional victory over Ironwood By JASON JUNO sports@yourdailyglobe.com

ESCANABA — Norway frustrated Ironwood offensively and ended the Red Devils’ special season with a 59-47 victory in Monday’s Class C regional semifinal at Escanaba Senior High School. The Devils (18-6) kept pace with the Knights through a fast-paced first quarter as Norway led 22-18 going into the second. Norway (9-14), which has peaked at the right time after a season full of injuries, never trailed and outscored the Devils 16-15 in a sluggish middle two quarters before pulling away in the fourth. Ironwood couldn’t get into a rhythm offensively, struggled to get clean shots off at times and only made two of its six 3-pointers after the first quarter. “They played excellent defense,” Ironwood coach Pete Lewinski said of the Knights. “Mid Pen Conference, those teams beat each other up every night. They knew (Tyler) Gottschalk and (Adam) Mackey were our top two scorers and they made us work for every shot we got.” Gottschalk still managed a game-high 21 points and Mackey had 13. They combined for four 3pointers. They had combined for eight of Ironwood’s 10 3-pointers in Friday’s 53-38 district final win over Calumet. “We were worried about 10 (Mackey) and 12 (Gottschalk). Both of them are really good shooters,” Norway coach and White Pine native Ben Leiker said. “(Mackey) is more of a set shooter that wants to shoot the 3 more than anything else. We worked on his tendencies in practice. (Gottschalk) is a jump shooter and a slasher, so he was a tough cover for us.” The Knights jumped out to a 13-6 lead. The Devils answered with two quick 3s from Gottschalk and John Colassaco to pull within 1312, but Norway struck quickly again and led 20-12 as Jon Reath (6-7) scored twice inside and Tanner Kelly hit a 3. Gottschalk’s jumper capped a 6-2 Ironwood run to end the first quarter. Norway led 22-18 after one. The pace slowed considerably in the second quarter as neither team scored until Norway’s Jalen Bal hit a jumper 2:28 into the quarter. Mike Gotham scored underneath later in the quarter to pull Ironwood with four points, 26-22. But the Knights scored the final five points of the half as Bal hit a 3-pointer and Traves Guldswog made two free throws for a 31-22 halftime lead. The Devils made two runs in the second half, but Norway had an answer both times. Henry Moon drilled a 3 to start the half and Gottschalk made a jumper to pull within 31-27. (See DEVILS — Page 10)

Jason Juno/Daily Globe

Tyler Gottschalk of Ironwood slips around Norway defender Jon Reath in the second half Monday in a Class C regional semi-final at Escanaba.

Vikings scores 95 in victory over Panthers in Class D regional By JOHN VRANCIC Escanaba Daily Press

Jason Juno/Daily Globe

Watersmeet’s Marissa Burke goes up for a layup in the Nimrod’s 5046 loss to Crystal Falls Forst Park in Watersmeet on March 4. Burke was named to the Class D All-State first team on Monday evening.

Class D All-State CLASS D ALL-STATE FIRST TEAM Janae Langs, Climax-Scotts, 5-4, So. Jasmine Hines, Central Lake, 6-3, Sr. Emily Veenstra, Ellsworth, 6-2, Jr. Sarah Theut, Marine City Cardinal Mooney, 5-9, Jr. Morgan Warfield, Camden-Frontier, 5-9, Sr. Heather Lantis, Hillsdale Academy, 5-9, Sr. Christina Branch, Kentwood West Michigan Lutheran, 6-1, Sr. Marisa Burke, Watersmeet, 5-9, Sr. Mara Ryynanen, Chassell, 5-11, Sr. Lauren Robak, Waterford Our Lady, 5-10, Sr. Special mention Karli Jacob, Gaylord St. Mary, 5-9, Jr. Kelsie Blamer, Mio, 5-8, Sr. Natalie Markell, Morrice, 5-7, Jr. Lexi Gussert, Crystal Falls Forest Park, 6-0, Fr. Honorable mention

Jenna Green, St. Joseph Michigan Lutheran, 5-8, Jr. Elizabeth McKee, Leland, 6-0, Jr. Alyssa Bryan, Mason County Eastern, 5-6, Sr. Maggie Farrell, Muskegon Catholic, 5-9, Sr. Erica Hansen, Mount Pleasant Sacred Heart, 5-9, So. Breagh Beaton, Marine City Cardinal Mooney, 6-0, Sr. Nicole Schneider, Portland St. Patrick, 5-7, Sr. Mikayla Terry, Lansing Christian, 5-10, Fr. Jamie Davis, Hillsdale Will Carleton Academy, N/A, Sr. Jaime Madalinski, Bark River-Harris, 5-10, Jr. PLAYER OF THE YEAR Jasmine Hines, Central Lake COACH OF THE YEAR Todd Eriksen, Manistee Catholic Al Becker, Central Lakes

EwenTrout Creek’s Nick Hearns puts up a shot during a game against Baraga as part of the Class D Regional tournament held in Negaunee on Monday. Mining Journal/ Danielle Pemble

NEGAUNEE — The tournament trail came to a dead end for the Ewen-Trout Creek boys Monday night as they dropped a 95-75 basketball decision to the hot-shooting Baraga Vikings in a Class D regional opener. Baraga (16-8), which sank 36-of-57 field goals, returns to the Negaunee High School gym for Wednesday’s title game against defending champ Superior Central (221). Tip-off is set for 7 p.m. EDT. The top-ranked Cougars advanced with a 74-62 conquest of North Central. “They (Baraga) did everything right and were very quick on the floor,” said E-TC coach Brad Besonen. “They broke us down and got layups. They also hurt us on the offensive boards. Their seniors played with a sense of urgency. They were in every passing lane.” E-TC (18-6), starting a junior, three sophomores and a freshman, led 34-33 midway through the second quarter. Junior forward Jordan LaPlant, however, soon picked up his third foul. And much to the Panthers’ dismay, Baraga finished the period with a 16-6 run for a 49-40 halftime cushion. “They took Jordan right out of the game with his foul touble,” said Besonen. “He’s our

floor leader. It was tough having Jordan out of the lineup.” Baraga started the third quarter with a 6-0 run, gaining a 55-40 advantage on John Bower’s putback 80 seconds into the period. The Vikings, continuing to run the floor with authority, extended their advantage to 76-51 after the third quarter and 89-55 on a layup by senior guard Brent VanAlstine with 5:44 left to play. “He (VanAlstine) is a shifty kid,” said Baraga coach Jon Young. “His change of direction is what gives opposing players trouble. He also does an excellent job changing speed in transition.” VanAlstine finished with 31 points in Baraga’s three-guard offense. Alden Connor added 19 points and nine rebounds. Justin Hartzog hit 16 points and Zack Sauvola had 10 in a reserve role. “He (VanAlstine) was on fire tonight,” said Besonen. “We didn’t have an answer for him. Although, I thought we took three charges from him in the first half, which was a game-changer. We also didn’t hustle back on defense to take things away.” LaPlant scored 19 points and sophomore Dillon Gordon hit 16, all in the first half for the Panthers who beat Baraga by 18 points in their lone regular-season meeting. “We kept pressure on him (See PANTHERS — Page 10)


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SPORTS

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011

DEVILS: Five seniors graduating

Daily Globe Scoreboard

(Continued from Page 9)

local schedule WIAA girls basketball playoffs All games at 7 p.m. central unless otherwise noted Division 4 Sectional semifinals March 17: Hurley vs. Boyceville at Spooner March 17: Eau Claire Regis vs. OwenWithee at Chippewa Falls March 19: Final at Eau Claire Memorial, 2

basketball MHSAA BOYS BASKETBALL Class C Regional Semifinal Detroit Consortium 86, Madison Heights Bishop Foley 55 Flint Beecher 55, Laingsburg 48 Hanover-Horton 49, Albion 45 Hillsdale 63, Addison 44 Ithaca 59, Grand Rapids Covenant Christian 41 Lincoln-Alcona 72, Harbor Springs 61 McBain 63, Elk Rapids 47 Melvindale Academy for Business And Tech 68, Detroit Allen 33 Monroe St. Mary Catholic Central 47, Manchester 36 Muskegon Western Michigan Christian 56, Clare 55 Negaunee 68, Rudyard 54 New Haven 65, Saginaw Nouvel 54 Norway 59, Ironwood 47 Saginaw Buena Vista 94, Harbor Beach 51 Schoolcraft 86, Fennville 62 White Pigeon 62, Bridgman 48 Class D Regional Semifinal Adrian Lenawee Christian 66, Hillsdale Academy 54 Allen Park Inter-City Baptist 56, Ann Arbor Central Academy 45 Auburn Hills Oakland Christian 54, Sterling Heights Parkway Christian 37 Baraga 95, Ewen-Trout Creek 75 Burton Genesee Christian 58, Carsonville-Port Sanilac 54 Cedarville 87, Pellston 50 Detroit Westside Christian 50, Bloomfield Hills Roeper 32 Eben Junction Superior Central 74, Powers North Central 62 Fulton-Middleton 57, Big Rapids Crossroads Charter Academy 45 Leland 45, Bellaire 42 Manistee Catholic Central 61, McBain Northern Michigan Christian 54 Muskegon Catholic Central 74, Lansing Christian 60 Posen 61, Rogers City 49 Saginaw Michigan Lutheran Seminary 55, Akron-Fairgrove 43 St. Joseph Michigan Lutheran 72, Climax-Scotts 62 Wyoming Tri-unity Christian 75, Kalamazoo Phoenix 60

Men’s NCAA Tournament All Times EDT FIRST ROUND At UD Arena Dayton, Ohio Tuesday, March 15 No. 16 Seed Southeast: UNC Asheville (19-13) vs. Arkansas-Little Rock (19-16), 6:30 p.m. No. 12 Seed East: UAB (22-9) vs. Clemson (21-11), 9 p.m. Wednesday, March 16 No. 16 Seed East: Texas-San Antonio (19-13) vs. Alabama State (17-17), 6:30 p.m. No. 11 Seed Southwest: Southern Cal (19-14) vs. Virginia Commonwealth (2311), 9 p.m. EAST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 17 At St. Pete Times Forum Tampa, Fla. West Virginia (20-11) vs. UAB-Clemson winner, 12:25 p.m. Kentucky (25-8) vs. Princeton (25-6), 30 minutes following Friday, March 18 At Time Warner Cable Arena Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina (26-7) vs. Long Island University (27-5), 7:15 p.m. Washington (23-10) vs. Georgia (2111), 30 minutes following At Quicken Loans Arena Cleveland George Mason (26-6) vs. Villanova (2111), 2:10 p.m. Ohio State (32-2) vs. UTSA-Alabama State winner), 30 minutes following Xavier (24-7) vs. Marquette (20-14), 7:27 p.m. Syracuse (26-7) vs. Indiana State (2013), 30 minutes following SOUTHEAST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 17 At The Verizon Center Washington

Butler (23-9) vs. Old Dominion (27-6), 12:40 p.m. Pittsburgh (27-5) vs. UNC AshevilleArkansas-Little Rock winner, 30 minutes following At St. Pete Times Forum Tampa, Fla. Florida (26-7) vs. UC Santa Barbara (18-13), 6:50 p.m. UCLA (22-10) vs. Michigan State (1914), 30 minutes following At The Pepsi Center Denver BYU (30-4) vs. Wofford (21-12), 7:15 p.m. St. John’s (21-11) vs. Gonzaga (24-9), 30 minutes following At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. Wisconsin (23-8) vs. Belmont (30-4), 7:27 p.m. Kansas State (22-10) vs. Utah State (30-3), 30 minutes following SOUTHWEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 17 At The Pepsi Center Denver Louisville (25-9) vs. Morehead State (24-9), 1:40 p.m. Vanderbilt (23-10) vs. Richmond (27-7), 30 minutes following Friday, March 18 At The United Center Chicago Notre Dame (26-6) vs. Akron (23-12), 1:40, p.m. Texas A&M (24-8) vs. Florida State (2110), 30 minutes following Purdue (25-7) vs. St. Peter’s (20-13), 7:20 p.m. Georgetown (21-10) vs. Southern CalVirginia Commonwealth winner At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Kansas (32-2) vs. Boston University (21-13), 6:50 p.m. UNLV (24-8) vs. Illinois (19-13), 30 minutes following WEST REGIONAL Second Round Thursday, March 17 At The McKale Center Tucson, Ariz. Temple (25-7) vs. Penn State (19-14), 2:10 p.m. San Diego State (32-2) vs. Northern Colorado (21-10), 30 minutes following At The Verizon Center Washington Connecticut (26-9) vs. Bucknell (25-8), 7:20 p.m. Cincinnati (25-8) vs. Missouri (23-10), 30 minutes following Friday, March 18 At The BOK Center Tulsa, Okla. Texas (27-7) vs. Oakland, Mich. (25-9), 12:15 p.m. Arizona (27-7) vs. Memphis (25-9), 30 minutes following At Time Warner Cable Arena Charlotte, N.C. Michigan (20-13) vs. Tennessee (1914), 12:40 p.m. Duke (30-4) vs. Hampton (24-8), 30 minutes following

Little League registration The Ironwood, Bessemer and Wakefield Little Leagues will be holding open registration on March 1517 from 6 p.m. - 7 p.m. at the following locations: Ironwood: Manny’s Restaurant. For more information contact Scott Wilson at 906-932-2139 or Sam Fontecchio at 906-932-4999. Bessemer: A.D. Johnston High School. For more information contact Dave Zielinski at 906-663-4961 or Jim Reed at 906-663-6064. Wakefield: Wakefield School. For more information contact Jim Tarro at 906-364-3636 or Pat Libertoski at 906-224-1113. Baseball is available for boys ages 5-15 and softball for girls 5-16. The cost is $20 for those in tee-ball (five and six year-olds) and $35 for all other leagues. The maximum registration fee is $50 for a single family. A completed application form signed by a parent or guardian and a birth certificate is required for registration. Parents or guardians who cannot attend the scheduled registration session should call the telephone number listed before the March 17 deadline or the participant may not be able to be placed on a team. The Hurley Area Little League will be holding registration on March 15-17 from 5 p.m. - 7p.m.in the Hurley K-12 School commons. Baseball is available for boys ages 4-12 and softball for girls 7-12. The cost is $15 for those in tee-ball (four to six yearolds) and $25 for all other leagues. The maximum registration fee is $50 for a single family. For more information call Vikki Hissa at 715-5613747.

Hurley playoff tickets on sale Tickets for the Hurley vs. Boyceville girls WIAA sectional semi-final will be available in the Hurley K-12 school’s principal’s office today through Thursday at noon. The game will be played in Spooner and the cost is four dollars. New York 34 31 .523 13 Philadelphia 34 32 .515 131⁄2 Indiana 28 38 .424 191⁄2 Charlotte 28 38 .424 191⁄2 Milwaukee 26 39 .400 21 Detroit 23 44 .343 25 New Jersey 22 43 .338 25 Toronto 18 48 .273 291⁄2 Washington 16 49 .246 31 Cleveland 12 53 .185 35 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB x-San Antonio 54 13 .806 — Dallas 47 19 .712 61⁄2 d-L.A. Lakers 47 20 .701 7 1 d-Oklahoma City43 23 .652 10 ⁄2 Denver 40 27 .597 14 New Orleans 39 30 .565 16 Portland 37 29 .561 161⁄2 1 Memphis 37 31 .544 17 ⁄2 Phoenix 33 32 .508 20 Utah 34 33 .507 20 Houston 34 34 .500 201⁄2 Golden State 30 36 .455 231⁄2 L.A. Clippers 26 42 .382 281⁄2 Minnesota 17 51 .250 371⁄2 Sacramento 15 49 .234 371⁄2 d-division leader x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division Monday’s Games New Jersey 88, Boston 79 Oklahoma City 116, Washington 89 Memphis 105, L.A. Clippers 82 Denver 114, New Orleans 103 Miami 110, San Antonio 80 Houston 95, Phoenix 93 Utah 112, Philadelphia 107, OT Golden State at Sacramento Orlando at L.A. Lakers Tuesday’s Games New York at Indiana, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 7 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. Dallas at Portland, 10 p.m.

NCAA Women’s Div. II Tournament All Times EDT First Round Friday, March 11 Midwest Region At Houghton, Mich. Wisconsin-Parkside 73, Missouri S&T 55 Quincy 85, Kentucky Wesleyan 72 Michigan Tech 72, Lewis 56 Drury 67, Grand Valley State 60 Second Round Saturday, March 12 At Houghton, Mich. Wisconsin-Parkside 73, Quincy 62 Michigan Tech 70, Drury 51 Midwest Final Monday, March 14 At Houghton, Mich. Michigan Tech 69, Wisconsin-Parkside 57 At St. Joseph, Mo. Quarterfinals Tuesday, March 22 East champion vs. Clayton State, 1 p.m. Shaw vs. Metro State, 3:30 p.m. Michigan Tech vs. Arkansas Tech, 7 p.m. Cal Poly-Pomona vs. Northwest Missouri State, 9:30 p.m. Semifinals Wednesday, March 23 West-South Central winner vs. Midwest-South winner, 7 p.m. Central-Atlantic winner vs. East-Southeast winner, 9 p.m. Friday, March 25 Championship Semifinal winners, 8 p.m.

hockey NHL All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE GP W LOT Pts GF d-Philadelphia68 42 19 7 91 219 d-Washington70 40 20 10 90 189 d-Boston 68 38 21 9 85 205 Pittsburgh 70 40 22 8 88 201 Tampa Bay 70 39 22 9 87 210 Montreal 69 38 24 7 83 184 Buffalo 69 34 27 8 76 203 N.Y. Rangers 70 36 30 4 76 198 Carolina 69 31 28 10 72 196 Atlanta 69 29 28 12 70 194 Toronto 70 30 30 10 70 184 New Jersey 68 32 32 4 68 146 Florida 69 28 32 9 65 173 N.Y. Islanders70 27 32 11 65 194 Ottawa 69 25 35 9 59 157 WESTERN CONFERENCE GP W LOT Pts GF d-Vancouver 70 45 16 9 99 229 d-Detroit 69 41 20 8 90 227 d-San Jose 70 39 23 8 86 197 Chicago 70 38 24 8 84 232

NBA All Times EDT EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct x-Boston 47 18 .723 y-Chicago 47 18 .723 x-Miami 46 21 .687 Orlando 42 25 .627 Atlanta 38 28 .576

GB — — 2 6 1 9 ⁄2

GA 182 171 164 171 211 172 201 171 209 223 218 174 191 221 215 GA 165 199 183 196

Los Angeles 69 39 25 5 83 192 168 Phoenix 70 36 23 11 83 202 200 Dallas 69 37 24 8 82 193 193 Calgary 71 36 26 9 81 214 203 Nashville 69 35 24 10 80 177 161 Anaheim 69 37 27 5 79 195 202 Minnesota 69 35 27 7 77 176 184 Columbus 68 32 27 9 73 188 206 St. Louis 69 31 29 9 71 193 207 Colorado 68 26 34 8 60 191 239 Edmonton 70 23 38 9 55 172 231 Monday’s Games Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 2 Chicago 6, San Jose 3 Minnesota at Vancouver Tuesday’s Games Atlanta at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Boston at Columbus, 7 p.m. Washington at Montreal, 7 p.m. Carolina at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 7:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Nashville, 8 p.m. San Jose at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Phoenix at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.

baseball MLB spring training Monday’s Games St. Louis 1, Atlanta 1, tie, 10 innings Minnesota 9, Florida 0 Philadelphia 7, Houston 6 Detroit 4, Washington 2 Baltimore 8, Pittsburgh 2 Seattle 5, Chicago Cubs 3 San Diego 7, Chicago White Sox 6 Milwaukee 12, San Francisco 8 Cleveland 9, Oakland 8 Texas 5, L.A. Dodgers 4 Colorado 3, Cincinnati 2 Boston 2, N.Y. Yankees 1 Tuesday’s Games Houston vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Boston vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia vs. Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Florida vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m. Colorado vs. Chicago Cubs (ss) at Mesa, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (ss) vs. Oakland (ss) at Phoenix, 4:05 p.m. Oakland (ss) vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels vs. San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Texas vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 4:05 p.m. Washington vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 7:10 p.m. San Francisco vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 9:40 p.m.

Cain returns to mound, but Brewers top Giants 12-8 SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Matt Cain has put a premium on his durability during his majorleague pitching career, and he isn’t about to stop now. The right-hander had started San Francisco’s spring opener on Feb. 27, but missed two starts due to inflammation in his right elbow. He insisted he was fine all along, but the Giants wanted to be careful. They allowed him to throw a bit on the side, but nothing in games. The true test came on Monday, when Cain started against the Milwaukee Brewers. He threw three scoreless innings, giving up three hits and striking out one batter. Those who followed Cain to the mound, namely veteran

right-hander Jeff Suppan, weren’t nearly as fortunate. The Brewers rallied for six runs — five earned — off Suppan and went on to post a 12-8 victory in front of 11,686 at Scottsdale Stadium.

Brewers 12, Giants 8 Milwaukee B.Boggs cf Counsell ss 1 E.Farris 2b Braun lf L.Schafer lf B.Katin pr-lf Fielder 1b Almonte 1b Kotsay dh T.Green ph-dh Kottaras c Mi.Rivera c L.Cruz 2b-ss Dickerson rf Reed rf Z.Wheeler 3b

San Francisco ab r h bi ab r h bi 5 1 2 1 Torres dh 3 1 1 0 4 0 1 0 Schierholtz ph-dh 1 0 1 2 2 0 2 3 1 4 1 4 1 5 1 3 4

1 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0

1 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 3 0 1 2

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 3 0

Eldred ph-dh 1 F.Sanchez 2b 2 Burriss pr-2b 2 A.Huff 1b 3 Ishikawa 1b 1 Posey c 2 B.Crawford 2 Tejada ss 3 T.Neal lf 2 Burrell lf 3 J.Williams c 2 C.Ross rf 3 T.Evans rf 2 P.Sandoval 3b 3

0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

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THE DAILY GLOBE

Gillaspie 3b 2 0 0 0 Rowand cf 3 0 1 0 G.Brown pr-cf 1 1 0 0 Totals 42 12 16 10 Totals 41 8 14 8 Milwaukee 000 361 200 —12 San Francisco 003 022 100 — 8 E—Almonte (1), M.Rogers (1), A.Huff (2). DP—Milwaukee 2, San Francisco 1. LOB—Milwaukee 8, San Francisco 9. 2B—E.Farris (3), L.Cruz 2 (2), F.Sanchez (1), A.Huff (2), Posey (4), C.Ross (3). 3B—Torres (2). HR—B.Boggs (2), Reed (1), A.Huff (2), P.Sandoval (3). SB—G.Brown (4). IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Ra.Wolf W,1-0 4 7 3 3 0 0 Braddock 1 1 2 2 1 0 M.Rogers 1 3 2 2 0 1 McClendon 1 2 1 0 0 1 Stetter 1 0 0 0 1 1 James 1 1 0 0 0 2 San Francisco M.Cain 3 3 0 0 0 1 Suppan L,1-1 BS,1-21 4 6 5 2 0 M.Yourkin 1 4 3 3 0 0 Br.Wilson 1 1 1 1 1 0 R.Ramirez 1 3 2 2 0 0 S.Edlefsen 1 0 0 0 0 1 Kroon 1 1 0 0 1 0 A—11,686 (12,000).

Norway scored the next five points to take a 36-27 lead. After Norway went up 38-28 on two Reath free throws, Gotham scored underneath and Mackey hit a corner 3 near the buzzer to pull the Devils within 38-33 going into the fourth. The Devils couldn’t find an open look early in the final quarter. When Ironwood had a chance to make it a one-possession game, Ironwood had an empty possession and a charge. Reath, who had 13 points, hit a basket and later a free throw to make the margin eight, 41-33, which was fairly typical on Monday. “We just couldn’t get over the hump, the old cliché,” Lewinski said. “Give Norway credit, they withstood our runs tonight.” Gottschalk hit a free throw to pull within seven and Ironwood received a technical foul on John Colassacco three seconds later. Bal made three of four free throws to put Norway ahead 4434. Ironwood fouled the Knights from there and they made most of their free throws to maintain the lead. The Devils won last week’s district with defense and Norway eliminated Ironwood with defense. “The team we have here is not a super talented team,” Leiker said. “So we have to really play hard on defense, we have to maintain position and hustle as much as we can. That’s what we did. I think we frustrated them a little in that second half. They weren’t getting the shots that they wanted.” Not one bounce seemed to go Ironwood’s way. A half in, half

out free throw by Gottschalk came out. Loose balls always seemed to careen to Norway. “The ball didn’t bounce our way, but sometimes you’ve got to make them bounce your way,” Lewinski said. “It was a struggle tonight. The kids never quit though, which I was happy with.” Leiker said Norway has to win those battles and it did Monday. “We can’t afford to give up possessions because we’re not a high-powered offense,” he said. “We don’t have a great scorer to go to, we can’t rely on jump shooting. In order for us to win games, we have to win the hustle points, we’re going to have to get all the loose balls and rebound as hard as we can.” After the buzzer sounded, a three-quarters court heave by Ironwood’s Bryant Rowe went in, which got a loud cheer from the big Ironwood following. “The fans were outstanding,” Lewinski said of this season. “I told the seniors I thought they brought a little enthusiasm back into the gym this year.” Ironwood loses seniors Moon, Colassaco, Gottschalk, Hewitt and Gotham. Lewinski said Gotham played good defense on Reath once he started guarding him after Reath had a solid first quarter. Lewinski said there is nothing for the Devils to hang their heads about. “(Gottschalk) had an outstanding career, very fine player, very fine athlete,” Lewinski said. “Mike Gotham, unsung hero, did a lot for this team, assist leader, rebound leader, very good defensive player. His inside presence is going to be missed. Henry Moon, a very good point guard.

Johnny Colassaco, four-year starter, stepped up in various spots of the game. I thought Josiah had an outstanding tournament with his quickness and he gave us tremendous minutes coming off the bench. Five seniors, plus Adam Mackey, just a great job this year.” The tournament experience should help Mackey, who collided with Bal in the closing minutes as Mackey was trying to foul. Both left the court with bloody faces, Mackey had a cut above his eye, Lewinski said. “He’s no longer a freshman, he’s a veteran player. He’s an experienced player,” Lewinski said of Mackey. “He’s emerging as a leader for next year and his junior and senior years.” Bal led Norway with 20 points. Lewinski considers the point guard, who can score, pass and settle the team down, to be an All-U.P. candidate. Norway plays Negaunee (185) on Wednesday for the regional title. Negaunee beat Rudyard (17-6) 68-54 on Monday. Injuries and a tough schedule doomed the Knights to a sub-.500 record, but they came on at the right time. “I think the record is deceiving, but you know what, we lost a lot of close games, we had some issues with health and injuries, we play a lot of good teams also,” Leiker said. “That prepared us for today, for this tournament. Hopefully we can keep it going.” Norway — Jalen Bal 20, Tanner Kelly 6, Anthony Bal 1, Jon Reath 13, Dan Hill 9, Traves Guldswog 10. FTs: 2333. Fouls: 16. Fouled out: Reath. 3-pointers: Jalen Bal 1, Kelly 1. Ironwood — Henry Moon 5, John Colassaco 3, Adam Mackey 13, Tyler Gottschalk 21, Mike Gotham 5. FTs: 918. Fouls: 25. Fouled out: Moon, Hewitt, Colassaco, Mackey. 3-pointers: Mackey 2, Gottschalk 2, Colassaco 1, Moon 1. Norway 22 31 38 59 Ironwood 18 22 33 47

Leonard’s parents speak after Fennville loss VICKSBURG, Mich. (AP) — Wes Leonard’s parents sobbed as they broke their silence for the first time since their son died earlier this month after making a game-winning shot for Fennville High School. Gary and Jocelyn Leonard spoke with The Associated Press on Monday night after Schoolcraft (23-0) beat Fennville 86-62 in a Michigan Class C basketball regional playoff game. They both wore black T-shirts adorned by buttons with their son’s picture in basketball and football uniforms. “You won’t get over it, but you’ve got to get through it,” Jocelyn Leonard told the AP after she and her husband visited Fennville’s locker room. “We couldn’t get through it without everybody helping us.” The 16-year-old Leonard had cardiac arrest March 3 because of his enlarged heart. “He’s what every parent would wish for,” Gary Leonard said. “Losing him so sudden is just so hard. I don’t even know how to describe it.” Every night since his death, members of the team have spent the night at the Leonard’s house. “They don’t want us to be alone,” Jocelyn Leonard said. “Their families have loaned them to us. They sleep on the floor because I can’t let anyone in his room.” The family plans to create a cause in Wes Leonard’s name to encourage others to avoid similar deaths with screenings. “We’re going to do something about prevention,”

Jocelyn Leonard said. The Leonards said their 13-year-old son, Mitchell, got a clean bill of health from a cardiologist on Monday. More than 3,500 people — including about 70 members of the media, including a crew filing a documentary — were shoulder to shoulder and hip to hip at Vicksburg High School to witness Fennville’s first loss after 23 victories, including three in the playoffs without its star player. Fennville’s players wore black T-shirts over their jerseys during the national anthem and when they were on the bench with “Never Forgotten,” on the front and “Leonard 35” on the back. Fennville Area Fire Chief Lowell Winne watched from the baseline, near Fennville’s bench, and raved about a young man he got to know as his middle school football coach. “Its a huge loss for our community because Wes made everybody around him better,” Winne said. “When Wes walked in a room, it lifted everybody up because they wanted to be like him and he usually made them smile.” After the Leonards first interview since their son’s death, they made a point of thanking, among others, the Fennville school district, the community, basketball coach Ryan Klingler and his wife, Becky, athletic director Tony Petkus, board of education vice president Loren Barnes and superintendent Dirk Weeldreyer. “They protected us and let us have our grieving time,” Jocelyn Leonard said.

PANTHERS (Continued from Page 9) (Gordon) consistently all night,” said Young. “He’s a good shooter, but I think we wore him down. Containing him in the second half was a key. “In the regular-season game, they got out and ran so well on us, and we didn’t do a real good job defending that. Lately, we’ve been playing the full game and it’s making a difference. The bottom line is our guys just wanted it tonight.” Turnovers were nearly even with 15 for E-TC and 14 for Baraga. Despite the setback, Besonen says the Panthers had a good season. “We’re very pleased with the season,” he added. “We’ve really improved. Only, it stinks to have

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a game like this in the end when you know you’ve improved. We also have to give Baraga some credit. They���re playing well right now. They beat one of the better teams (Chassell) to get out of their district.” In Monday’s nightcap, senior forward Dylan Johnson hit 23 points for Superior Central. Junior forward Bryce Bilski

paced the Jets (16-7) with 18. Baraga — Connor 19, Ross-Geroux 4, Turunen 8, Chaudier 4, Hartzog 16, VanAlstine 31, Sauvola 10, Bower 3. FT: 18-26; F: 16; Fouled out: None; 3-point field goals: Hartzog 2, VanAlstine 2, Sauvola. Ewen-Trout Creek — Borseth 8, LaPlant 19, Maki 3, Taylor 9, Gordon 16, Besonen 3, Kauss 9, Hearns 4, Schaad 2, Brown 2. FT: 15-21; F: 18; Fouled out: None; Technical foul: coach Besonen; 3-point field goals: Gordon 4, Borseth 2, LaPlant, Taylor, Maki, Besonen. Baraga 19 49 76 95 Ewen-Trout Creek 18 40 51 75

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NATIONWORLD

THE DAILY GLOBE

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011 G 11

Japan plant spews radiation in crisis escalation SOMA, Japan (AP) — Radiation spewed Tuesday from a crippled nuclear power plant in tsunami-ravaged northeastern Japan in a dramatic escalation of the 4-day-old catastrophe, forcing the government to tell people nearby to stay indoors to avoid exposure. In a nationally televised statement, Prime Minister Naoto Kan said radiation has spread from four reactors of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in Fukushima province that was one of the hardest-hit in Friday’s 9.0magnitude earthquake and the ensuing tsunami. “The level seems very high, and there is still a very high risk of more radiation coming out,” Kan said. This is the worst nuclear crisis Japan has faced since the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. Kan warned there are dangers of more leaks and told people living within 19 miles (30 kilometers) of the Fukushima Dai-ichi complex to stay indoors to avoid radiation sickness. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said a fourth reactor at the complex was on fire and more radiation had been released. He said the reactor, even though it was unoperational, was believed to be the source of the elevated radiation release because of

the hydrogen release that triggered the fire. “Now we are talking about levels that can damage human health. These are readings taken near the area where we believe the releases are happening. Far away, the levels should be lower,” he said. “Please do not go outside. Please stay indoors. Please close windows and make your homes airtight. Don’t turn on ventilators. Please hang on your laundry indoors,” he said. “These are figures that potentially affect health, there is no mistake about that,” he said. He said a reactor whose containment building caught fire Monday has not contributed greatly to the increased radiation. The radiation level around one of the reactors stood at 400,000 microsiverts per hour, four times higher than the safe level. Officials said 50 workers are still there trying to put water into the reactors to cool them. They say 800 other nonessential staff were evacuated. The death toll from last week’s earthquake and tsunami jumped Tuesday as police confirmed the number killed had topped 2,400, though that grim news was overshadowed by a deepening nuclear crisis. Officials have said previously that at least 10,000 people may have died in Miyagi province alone.

Evacuated residents are checked for radiation exposure in Koriyama, Fukushima, in northern Japan, today following Friday’s massive earthquake and the ensuing tsunami. Associated Press

Fears of a slowdown in Michigan groups protest governor’s budget Japan push stocks lower NEW YORK (AP) — Concerns over the economic impact of the massive earthquake and tsunami in Japan, the world’s thirdlargest economy, led to a broad sell-off in the stock market on Monday. Nine out of the 10 sectors that make up the Standard and Poor’s 500 index lost ground. Utilities companies fell 1.4 percent, the most of any group, as explosions at Japanese nuclear reactors in the wake of the disaster dimmed prospects for the nuclear energy industry. The S&P index, the basis for most U.S. mutual funds, fell 7.89 points, or 0.6 percent, to 1,296.39. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 51.24, or 0.4 percent, to 11,993.16. The Nasdaq composite dipped 14.64, or 0.5 percent, to 2,700.97. “Everything is linked now,” said David Katz, senior portfolio strategist at Weiser Capital Management. “There is no such thing as a catastrophe happening in any major country and it not affecting the global economy.” Japan’s central bank pumped a record $184 billion into money market accounts to encourage bank lending. Financial analysts said the move could put pressure on Japan to raise interest rates, particularly since the country is saddled with massive debt that, at 200 percent of gross domestic product, is the biggest among developed nations. “The fiscal position is deterio-

MOUNT CLEMENS, Mich. (AP) — State workers, small business owners and retirees were among those who gathered in cities across Michigan on Monday to protest cuts in Republican Gov. Rick Snyder’s proposed budget — a prelude to demonstrations later this week that include rallies at the state Capitol. Corrections officer Adam Douglas, who spoke to a group of about 25 people in a Mount Clemens church, said he’s concerned about cuts to prisons and fears privatization. Douglas said he doesn’t understand why politicians are portraying public workers as “pariahs” both in Michigan and elsewhere. “The only thing people in Lansing are worried about is the profit margin,” said Douglas, who has worked at the Mound Correctional Facility in Detroit for 14 years. “There is a democratic system in place — it isn’t all about money.”

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overall budget proposal, while containing some “difficult cuts,” is necessary. “Those are tough calls,” he said. “But I’m making those decisions on the basis of what’s good for all of us in the long run so we can all win together.” Dennis McComb, a retired firefighter from Selfridge Air National Guard Base, said he’s worried about his pension taking a hit and doesn’t like to see the erosion of a benefit earned during earlier labor struggles. “As far as the pension goes, it’s something our forefathers fought for,” he said. He’s also angry that Snyder wasn’t more forthcoming about his plans last year when the wealthy businessman ran for governor. “He never did say too much when he was running — other than he was the ’nerd,’” McComb said.

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Monday’s events included stops in Mount Clemens, Monroe, Lansing, Grand Rapids, Ann Arbor, Kalamazoo and Saginaw. The AARP and the Michigan League for Human Services plan a Capitol rally on Tuesday. Douglas said he plans to join other union workers at a rally scheduled for Wednesday in Lansing. Snyder has said repeatedly that his budget plan represents “shared sacrifice” and puts Michigan on the path to a better future because it helps to solve the fiscal woes of the state, which is facing an estimated $1.4 billion shortfall. His $45.9 billion proposal includes spending cuts for schools and would eliminate many personal tax breaks while slashing business taxes. Among the proposals: ending exemptions from the state income tax for most pension income. The governor reiterated Monday that his

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rating in Japan,” said Channing Smith, managing director of equity strategies at Capital Advisors Inc. “If we get higher interest rates, that is a major threat to ... the global recovery.” Japan’s benchmark Nikkei 225 index fell 633.94 points, or 6.2 percent, to close at 9,620.49

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Gov. Scott Walker is proposing spending $1.1 billion on building projects in Wisconsin over the next two years, nearly 30 percent less than what was spent in the current two-year budget. Walker said in a statement that his proposal released Monday “aggressively uses the funds available to us to maintain state buildings, plan for growth, and most importantly create jobs.” Projects included for funding include $76 million for the new Badger Performance Center on the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus to house a variety of programs, $44 million for an education building at University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and $5 million for creation of a new joint museum for the state Historical Society and Department of Veterans Affairs in Madison. The Badger Performance Center includes a new 132,000-square foot facility to house sports medicine, academic services and strength and conditioning while sharing space with the College of Engineering. It includes remodeling space in the McClain Center, construction of a new tunnel connecting the center to Camp Randall as well as renovations at

improvements at the stadium. Of the $1.1 billion requested, about 67 percent is for new construction or major renovation with the rest spent on maintenance and upkeep, said Peter Maternowski, deputy administrator for the state’s Division of State Facilities. All but about $200 million of the $1.1 billion for the building projects comes from bonds, with the rest coming from cash, grants and federal money, Maternowski said. Other major projects include $38.5 million for expansion of the west campus and $67 million for the Institute for Medical Research both at UWMadison, $8 million to help pay for expansion of the Marquette Dental School and $17 million to renovate Carlson Hall at the University of WisconsinWhitewater. The Building Commission, controlled by Republican state lawmakers and chaired by Walker, will meet on Wednesday to approve the recommendation and forward it to the Legislature’s budgetwriting committee. That panel will consider it as part of the state’s two-year budget which will likely be voted on by the Legislature in June.

Chicago, carriers reach O’Hare deal CHICAGO (AP) — The city of Chicago and two major airlines announced a nearly $1.2 billion deal Monday to go ahead with parts of a long-planned expansion for O’Hare International Airport, one of the world’s busiest air traffic hubs. That means construction of a new runway can begin, even though questions remain about the timing and pace of future expansion. It also allows Mayor Richard Daley to leave office this spring after 22 years with renewed momentum on one of his biggest priorities. “This is a wonderful day for

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Both sides were at an impasse as recently as last month, when Daley and airline executives went to Washington to meet with Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. LaHood, a former Illinois congressman, eventually offered an extra $155 million, in addition to earlier funding, to close the deal. American and United agreed to back about $300 million in bonds with airline revenues. The city will also use about $365 million in passenger fees. “We decided on the runway that we felt was most important,” LaHood said Monday at O’Hare. The deal, though, delays decisions about a new western terminal and other elements of the project opposed by American and United airlines.

GOP conservatives balk at stopgap spending bill WASHINGTON (AP) — Conservative Republicans on Capitol Hill began Monday to come out against a measure to keep the government running for three more weeks while the White House and Republican lawmakers seek a longer-term agreement on spending cuts. Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, who chairs the Republican Study Committee, which makes up a sizable majority of House Republicans, said the measure should include a ban on federal funding for Planned Parenthood and that Congress needs to do better than cutting spending a few billion dollars at a time. Jordan’s opposition reflects widespread unhappiness among conservatives with the mustpass legislation. The measure is needed to prevent a partial government shutdown when a stopgap funding bill expires Friday at midnight. The House is set to vote Tuesday on a measure cutting $6 billion as the price for keeping the government open until April 8. Democrats and Republicans remain deadlocked over legislation funding day-to-day agency operations “With the federal government facing record deficits and a mammoth debt hanging over our economy and our future, we must do more than cut spending in bite-sized pieces,” Jordan said in a statement. In the Senate, a tea party favorite, Sen. Marco Rubio, RFla., also announced his opposition to the upcoming measure, saying that “Washington politicians of both parties (are) scrambling to put together two- and three-week plans to keep funding the government, while not fundamentally changing the behavior that has gotten us into this mess to begin with.”

Wednesday’s

Grilled Salmon with Mango Salsa served with Rice & Asparagus

Liberty Bell Chalet

Restaurant: Mon.-Thurs. 11-2; 7 Days a Week at 4 p.m. Italian Market: Mon.-Sat. 10-7; Closed Sunday


HEALTHTODAY

THE DAILY GLOBE 12 G TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011

Aging boomers may fuel surge in Alzheimer’s

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — As baby boomers fuel a historic surge in the olderthan-65 demographic, state health officials fear that as many as one in three could develop Alzheimer’s. The incurable brain disease causing dementia afflicts more than 100,000 people in Wisconsin, including about 12,500 in Green Bay and the surrounding area. John Taylor, a businessman and father in Oconto County, first exhibited symptoms in the late 1990s, when he was barely 60 years old. His wife, Gail Taylor-LaPlant, recalls that it took two years to find a doctor who was able and willing to offer an official diagnosis. The couple ended up selling their house and relocating to Green Bay in search of better care.

Associated Press

Gail Taylor-LaPlant sits on Feb. 28 among the photos and memories of her late husband John, who died after battling Alzheimer’s Disease. Taylor, a businessman and father in Oconto County, first exhibited symptoms in the late 1990s, when he was barely 60 years old. Finding an adequate support group became a challenge, so Taylor-LaPlant started her own.

MINOR CONFUSION AT START

Associated Press

Creamy soup makes the most of fresh, spring asparagus. The seasonal vegetable is a nutritional powerhouse, low in calories and packed with vitamins and folate.

Yogurt adds low-fat, creamy texture to soup By JIM ROMANOFF For The Associated Press

Global markets and hightech shipping methods have put asparagus on our tables virtually year-round, yet most of us still associate it with spring. Asparagus is a nutritional powerhouse. It is low in calories (about 5 calories per stalk) and is packed with vitamins A, C and E, and folate. Green, purple and white varieties of asparagus are common, though green is the least expensive and most readily available. Green asparagus has a fresh, woodsy flavor, while purple varieties tend to have a more fruity flavor. White asparagus is milder in flavor and should always be peeled before cooking. When shopping for asparagus, look for firm stalks with tight tips. Fresh asparagus should snap when bent. Though best eaten the day pur-

chased, asparagus can be refrigerated, wrapped in a damp cloth inside a plastic bag, for three days. Though not essential, peeling tough-skinned stalks with a vegetable peeler will help ensure that the tips and otherwise thicker stalks cook at the same rate. Rinse all asparagus thoroughly before cooking to remove any lingering sand. For this simple asparagus and potato soup, all the vegetables are roasted at high heat, caramelizing their natural sugars and enhancing the flavors. They then are pureed until smooth and combined with thick, nonfat Greek-style yogurt, which gives the soup a creamy quality that belies its low-fat nutritional profile. To top off the soup, shreds of sweet and salty prosciutto ham are crisped in a skillet to create a garnish that has all the appeal of crumbled bacon, without all the grease.

Roasted Asparagus and Potato Soup Servings: 4 6 cloves garlic 11⁄4 pounds asparagus, bottoms trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces (about 3 cups) 2 cups peeled and diced Yukon Gold potatoes 1 medium sweet onion, cut into 6 wedges 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste 1 ⁄2 teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste 2 ounces prosciutto, chopped 3 cups chicken broth, divided 6 ounces nonfat plain Greek-style yogurt 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon

Heat the oven to 425 F. Place the garlic on a square of foil and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon water. Fold the foil into a packet. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine the asparagus, potatoes, onion, oil, 1⁄2 1 teaspoon salt and ⁄2 teaspoon of black pepper. Toss to coat. Spread the vegetables over 2 large, rimmed baking sheets. Place the packet of garlic in one corner of one of the sheets. Roast, stirring occasionally, until the asparagus pieces are soft and the potatoes are tender, 35 to 45 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small skillet over medium, crisp the prosciutto, about 5 minutes per side. When the vegetables are roasted, empty the garlic onto the baking sheet with the other vegetables and cool for 5 minutes. Transfer half of the vegetables into a blender. Add 11⁄2 cups of the broth, then blend until smooth. Transfer to a large pot. Repeat using the remaining vegetables and remaining 11⁄2 cups of broth. Warm the soup over medium heat. Whisk the yogurt, lemon juice and tarragon into the soup. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Crumble the prosciutto and use to top each serving.

Audit knocks prisons over prescription drugs DETROIT (AP) — State auditors say Michigan could have saved millions of dollars by choosing lowercost alternatives to a mental-health drug widely prescribed in prisons. The audit released Friday says psychotropic drugs added up to more than $8 million from January through July last year — 41 percent of all pharmaceuticals. Seroquel is the most prescribed antipsychotic drug. Auditors say the Corrections Department could have saved $350,000 a month by switching half of those prescriptions to a drug called Risperdal.

senior citizens and people with disabilities. Located at 2900 Curry Lane on the city’s northeast side, N.E.W. Curative serves about 2,000 people a year — many suffering from Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia — with therapy, social activities, employment placement and other programs. The agency gets government aid, so clients are asked only to offer $20-a-day donations, if possible. Officials say there are no similar agencies assisting the elderly in the Green Bay area, although N.E.W. Curative branched out in Door County recently and is working to help Kewaunee County to launch its own such service. Diana Brown, vice president of program services, said unless new funding becomes available, she doubts such facilities will be able to keep pace with the expected increase in demand for services. “They will grow, but not to the tune that they should be growing,” she said. Green Bay also is home to the Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Wisconsin, which

Alzheimer’s typically begins with minor signs of confusion or forgetfulness. In advanced stages, it can lead to almost total loss of cognitive understanding and a need for constant assistance with the most basic of daily human functions. Even finding an adequate support group became a challenge, so Taylor-LaPlant started her own. Alzheimer’s disease carries a stigma that makes many sufferers reluctant to seek help, she said. “People aren’t reaching out,” she said. “They’re staying in their homes. They don’t know where to go.” John Taylor died in 2008 after an agonizing battle with Alzheimer’s, during which his wife never left his side.

N.E.W. CURATIVE HELPS One of the few places where the couple found help was N.E.W. Curative Rehabilitation Inc., a nonprofit Green Bay agency that offers adult day care and other services for

Many teens suffer from eating disorders; few seek treatment CHICAGO (AP) — More than half a million U.S. teens have had an eating disorder but few have sought treatment for the problem, government research shows. The study is billed as the largest and most comprehensive analysis of eating disorders. It involved nationally representative data on more than 10,000 teens aged 13 to 18. Binge-eating disorder was the most common, affecting more than 1.5 percent of kids studied. Just under 1 percent had experienced bulimia, and 0.3 percent had had anorexia. Overall, 3 percent had a lifetime prevalence of one of the disorders. Another 3 percent of kids questioned had troubling symptoms but not full-fledged eating disorders. The study was released online recently in Archives of General

Psychiatry. The rates are slightly higher than in other studies. And the study is based on kids and parents interviewed over two years ending in 2004. But co-author and researcher Kathleen Merikangas of the National Institute of Mental Health says similar rates likely exist today. More than half the affected teens had depression, anxiety or some other mental disorder. Sizeable numbers also reported suicide thoughts or attempts. Merikangas said the results underscore the seriousness of eating disorders. ——— Online: NIH: health.nih.gov/topic/EatingDisorders Journal: archpsyc.amaassn.org/

healthy options Caregiver’s support IRONWOOD — A Caregiver’s Support Group meets at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 23, in Conference Room B at Aspirus Grand View Hospital. Kris Nevala, certified dementia practitioner from the Golden Living Center at Court Manor in Ashland, Wis., will be the guest presenter. The group welcomes caregivers and family members of people who have Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia. The group addresses how caregivers can better care for themselves, how to relieve stress related to caregiving, how to deal with difficult behaviors and situations with the family member, and how to address these issues in your home. Coffee and light refreshments will be served. To register or for more information, call 906-932-2443 or visit aspirusgrandview.org.

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serves most of the northern region of the state. Housed in the same building as N.E.W. Curative, the association has a staff of 16 people who work in case management, support services and education. Kim Kinner, the association’s executive director, hopes increased public awareness about Alzheimer’s will lead to more government research on the cause, treatments and, perhaps someday, a cure. While the government spends $6 billion a year for cancer research and $3 billion for AIDS research, just $450 million is spent on Alzheimer’s, Kinner said. As baby boomers come to realize just how much Alzheimer’s could threaten their retirement years, Kinner said, she hopes they will become activists in advancing the cause of conquering the disease. For now, her agency is reaching out to nursing homes, schools, hospitals and just about anywhere else in an effort to raise public awareness. “We can’t do it all alone,” she said. “You start to wonder if it’s going to be enough.”


HELOBE DAILY GLOBE THE DAILYTG

TUESDAY MARCH 15,,2011 PG15, 1 2011 G 13 TUESDAY MARCH

CLASSIFIED

Classified Deadlines: Ad Copy to Globe By: 2 pm Monday appears Tuesday 2 pm Tuesday appears Wednesday 2 pm Wednesday appears Thursday 2 pm Thursday appears Friday 1pm Friday appears Saturday and/or Monday

The Daily Globe • The Range Shopper • www.yourdailyglobe.com • Lost & Found • Help Wanted • Pets

• Giveaways • Articles For Sale • Apartments & Duplexes

118 E. McLeod Ave., Ironwood MI 49938

Phone: 906-932-2211 Fax: 906-932-5358

Personals

Notices

Help Wanted

Pets

ADOPT: Loving family hope to adopt newborn. Love, security, laughter & hugs. Expenses paid. Jenn & Ed @ 1-877-999-1525

PHOTOS ARE available for pickup from Graduation Greetings, Special Deliveries, Pet Contest, Baby’s 1st Christmas, Good News Corners and In Memoriams. Please stop by the Classified Department or call (906)932-2211.

BOOKKEEPING POSITION AVAILABLE: Local firm seeking bookkeeper for a full-time position with benefits. Qualified applicants should have a bookkeeping, accounting, and computer background with knowledge of Accounts Receivable/Payable and General Ledger. Experience with QuickBooks and Peachtree preferable. Send resume to Box 02335, Daily Globe, 118 E. McLeod Ave., Ironwood, MI 49938.

HOPE’S ADOPTIVE PETS

PLEASE CHECK Your ad on the first run day. The Daily Globe will not be responsible for mistakes after the first day. The Daily Globe will not be responsible for lost photos placed in advertising.

Help Wanted

Read about our broken justice system and on-going travesty of justice in the Don Miller case. www.freedonmiller.com www.freemyfather.com

Firewood Seeking Hourly Managers and crew Ironwood & surrounding area. Benefits & Competitive Wages! Apply online www.jointeamheartland.com

FIREWOOD FOR sale: 8’ in length Also cedar posts for sale. Call (715)493-2137 for pricing. FOR SALE: Firewood wood pellets. $210.00 a ton. Call (715)893-2495

Employment

ON THE ROAD TO A BRIGHTER FUTURE www.midwesta.com Midwest Truck Driving School Classes start every 4 weeks (906)789-6311 1-800-377-5567 Tuition Reimbursement Financing Available Major Credit Cards Accepted

Situation Wanted ANY REPAIRS!! Inside-Outside Great Rates! Carpentry, Roofs, Remodeling, Painting, Trim, ETC. Licensed & Insured (906)932-6028 HANDYMAN FOR hire. I do most types of work. (906)932-0643 HANDYMAN: Looking for work, indoors or outdoors, day or night. (906)663-2080 (906)364-2120 ask for Jim.

Warm a special someone’s heart with a classified Good News Corner ad. Stop in today. The Daily Globe, 118 E. McLeod Ave., Ironwood • 906-932-2211

PART-TIME BARTENDER wanted at the Aurora Club. Stop in for an application. WANTED OCCASIONAL part-time maintenance person. Must have some of your own tools. Send resume to Box 02334, Daily Globe, 118 E. McLeod Ave., Ironwood, MI 49938. MAINTENANCE or handy man needed for local business. Must be able to do a variety of different jobs. Send resume to Box 02333, Daily Globe, 118 E. McLeod Ave., Ironwood, MI 49938.

• Houses for Sale/Rent • Autos & SUVS • Trucks

Easy Street, Industrial Park (906)932-1511 OPEN: 7 days a week 2:00pm-5:00pm

CATS:

HELP WANTED: Golf Course Maintenance. Please send resume to: P.O. Box 581, Ironwood, MI 49938

Business Opportunities NOTICE: The Daily Globe, while exercising reasonable care in accepting ads, warns those answering to investigate the proposition offered and to be careful of any ad requiring money to be sent for information or long distance phone calls that may request money for information.

Pets YORKIES AKC Registered. 1st three shots, dewormed, tails docked, dew claws, ears standing. Two girls & two boys. Parents on site. Call (906)285-0269 Need cash? Team up with classified and make a little profit selling the items you no longer need.

Tia: Senior spayed female Siamese shorthair. Rosa: 2 year old spayed female black longhair. Libby: 2 year old spayed female orange/white shorthair. Frosty: 10 year old spayed female Gray DSH. Sully: 3 year old neutered male orange tabby/white DSH. Fluffy: 5 year old spayed female gray torti DLH. Sawyer: 9 month old neutered male orange Tabby DSH. Hugo: 9 month old neutered male orange and white Tabby DSH. Shuester:8 month old neutered male black and white DSH. Calvin:3 year old neutered male orange tabby longhair. Suki: 2 year old spayed female tabby point Siamese. www.myhopeanimalshelter.org

Email: classifieds@yourdailyglobe.com

Give Away-Pets

Articles for Sale

GIVE AWAY Ads run free for three days. 15-20 word limit. The ads must be mailed or dropped off at The Daily Globe, 118 E. McLeod Ave., Ironwood, MI 49938.

FRONT LOAD washer $350.00, Grandfather clock $500.00. Call (906)364-4801

Appliances

The Daily Globe now has American Flag Kits on Sale!

Mattson’s TV & Appliance

Since 1962

“Box Store Prices, Small Town Service”

3’x5’ with pole and bracket. Only $15.00 Stop by at 118 E. McLeod Ave. Ironwood, MI 906-932-2211

Apartments & Duplexes

HOPE’S ADOPTIVE PETS Easy Street, Industrial Park (906)932-1511 OPEN: 7 days a week 2:00pm-5:00pm Dogs: Mondo: 1 year old, neutered male, Lab mix with brindle coat. Blitz: Neutered male tri-color Beagle Daisy: 1 year old, female Yellow Lab mix. Lexi: 4 year old female, Shepherd mix. Pal: 5 year old male Chow Husky mix. Sargeant: 1 year old male, Husky mix. Skeeter: Male Plott Hound www.myhopeanimalshelter.org

122 E. Aurora St. Ironwood, MI

906-932-0510 Wanted to Buy SAM’S SALVAGE, INC. 932-4340 Scrap Iron, Brass & Copper Aluminum & Aluminum Cans Junk Autos & Trucks

Articles for Sale BOWFLEX EXTREME II, $600.00; 1959 Platte camper, $500.00; Saddle, $150.00. (906)364-5058

BESSEMER 1 bedroom, quiet and clean. Lots of light. Washer and dryer on site. $425.00 monthly includes heat and water. Call (906)663-0297 BESSEMER downtown, main level hardwood floors in this 1 bedroom. Lots of windows, washer, dryer on-site. $425 monthly. Heat and water included. (906)663-6871 BIG POWDERHORN VILLAGE: 1 bedroom apartment, Fully furnished, $450.00 per month, ALL utilities included. NO pets. Available March 15. Call Tony at Gheller Lodging, (906)364-6901. EFFICIENCY, 1, 2, and 3 bedroom apartments, garages, duplexes, and homes. The Real Estate Store (906)932-5406 FURNISHED 1 bedroom, upstairs, Ironwood. Suitable for 1 adult or couple. Smoke free. No pets. Security deposit and references required. (715)561-4241

Snow Ridge Lumber, Inc. located in the Hurley Industrial Park, is now accepting applications for an experienced Head Sawyer.

Auto Repair

Massage

Check Engine Light On? Have your car checked today!

Kinnunen’s Garage General Auto & Truck Repair

ABS Service • Air Bags Computer Scanning

906-364-9332

John Jennings, Proprietor E4717 Airport Road Leviticus 19:36 Ironwood, MI 49938

Carpet Cleaning

Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork Swedish, Deep Tissue, Myofascial Release, Pregnancy, Thai, CranioSacral, Healing Touch, Reiki At The Higher Level Suites Ironwood, MI

(715)561-2880 or (906)932-2423 Larry I. Sands, BS, NCTMB, RMT, HTP Nationally Certified Massage Therapist

Applications may be picked up from 8:00am-4:00pm

Full Service Painting

Snow Ridge Lumber, Inc. 1200 Odanah Road • Hurley, WI 54534

(715)561-2880

Snowplowing

SAVE $$$ SAVE $$$

HOST Carpet Dry Cleaning

(715)561-2880

Deep Cleans, NO soapy residue! Leaves carpet dry, ready for use Safe for all carpets, even orientals!

Excavating CLOVERLAND MOTORS & EXCAVATING BUILDING DEMOLITION

We do Bulldozing • Driveways • Foundations • Basements • Garage Slabs & Garages • Land Clearing • Road Building • Water Lines • Sewer Systems • Ponds • Dump Truck Hauling & Demolition • Snow Plowing-Removal FREE Estimates

Villa Home Health is now accepting applications for Full and Part time Registered Nurses. Villa, a name you have come to know and respect is expanding services. Villa offers a competitive wage and fringe benefit package. Flexible working hours with Full time, Part Time and on call positions available. Successful candidates should have a minimum of 2 years home care experience.

Apartments & Duplexes GILE: 2 bedroom apartment, security deposit, no pets. Property well maintained. (715)561-3616 or (715)561-2514 Hurley: Free 1st months rent! 1 bedroom apartment $300.00 plus utilities. Water, Sewer included. No Pets, Security Deposit required. (651)324-0349 IRONWOOD 2 bedroom lower duplex. $375.00 with water and sewer. Also Hurley 1 bedroom upper $425.00 with utilities. (800)975-5209

IRONWOOD AHONEN APARTMENTS

Studio, 1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments available. Ranging from $330.00 to $630.00 per month. Some utilities are included.

Call (906)285-1740 IRONWOOD MSHDA approved Upper 2 bedroom. Newly decorated. Close to schools and McDonalds. $365.00. Call (715)4760045 Ironwood township 2 bedroom, garage, close to park. $440.00 monthly include garabage. Call (906)663-0297 POWDERHORN SUBDIVISION, Country setting, 2 bedroom, field stone fireplace, south deck, year lease. $475.00 monthly includes garbage. (906)663-0297 WAKEFIELD: Spacious 1 bedroom apartment, garage parking and storage. Smoke-free, no pets $450.00. Utilities included. Available April. (906)364-4752

Houses for Rent HOUSES, APARTMENTS, and Business Spaces for rent. Call for details. The Real Estate Store. (906)932-5406 Ironwood Northside- 2 bedroom, stove, refrigerator. References and security deposit. NO pets. $300.00 monthly plus utilities. (906)932-4672

Condos for Rent Nice Powderhorn Chalet Condo-2 Bed/2 Bath Furnished, Utilities--even Basic/Expanded Cable Included! $600.00/mo. 612-990-6309

Houses for Sale Ironwood Township 3 bedroom, garage, large yard, hardwood floors, new kitchen. $480.00 monthly plus $2000.00 down. Call (906)663-0297 THREE BEDROOM houses for sale or rent. Call (906)224-9581

Houses for Rent

Ramsay, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, new windows, doors, vinyl siding, insulation, furnace, hot water heater, carpeting, counter top, dishwasher and updated electric. Pellet stove. No land contract or rental inquires please. Call (906)285-2446 $39,900.00

2 Country Homes for rent. $625.00 plus utilities. Security deposit. Call (906)932-1411

First

BESSEMER 3 bedroom, 2 bath, recently remodeled, hard wood floors, new kitchen. Available April. $495.00 monthly. Call (906)932-4959 or (906)364-4309 BESSEMER, 2 bedroom small farm house located on US2 just out of town. $400 monthly plus utilities. Security required. Furnished or unfurnished. (906)364-7268 IRONWOOD 3 bedroom house with garage, double lot for rent or sale. Will finance. (715)561-5511

In buying In selling and In the hearts of its users...

That’s Classified The Daily Globe 118 E.McLeod Ave. Ironwood, MI 906-932-2211 globeclass@chartermi.net

NOW HIRING Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park is currently accepting applications for summer employment. Vacancies range from general maintenance/janitorial duties to positions that involve a great deal of public contact/office work, including seasonal naturalist. Work locations include the Union Bay and Presque Isle campgrounds, Park Headquarters, Visitor Center and Lake Gogebic State Park. Starting wage for all positions is $7.65 per hour. Applications can be obtained at the park headquarters building Monday-Friday 8:00am-4:30pm EST, on line at Michigan.gov/dnr or at Michigan Works! Applications must be submitted before close of business April 6, 2011. For additional information you may call 1-906-885-5275. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Submit your resume or letter of interest to:

Hometown Service Directory

CLOVERLAND MOTORS

and receive a one month listing in the

Sanding & Salting

Advertise your business in the

Joe Simonich Executive Director Villa Home Care Services 300 Villa Drive Hurley, WI 54534 joes@avantihs.com

Here’s My Card Section

at NO CHARGE!

Septic Systems Topsoil, Sand & Gravel

We offer the following benefits to our full-time employees: Medical/Dental Insurance, Paid Vacations/Holiday, Profit Sharing & Life/Disability Insurance.

Painting

Interiors & Exterior Licensed Contractor

• Legals • Good News Corner • and MORE!!

$60.00 Limited Time Offer!

118 E. McLeod Avenue 906-932-2211 globeclass@chartermi.net

Painting

(906)932-1202 (906)932-7282

ed Specializ Property Management

RESERVED

For ALL your PAINTING needs!

Especially for you! Call Today! The Daily Globe at 906-932-2211

Worry less when you paint with us. (Supplies are included in our pricing)

We don’t cut corners we PAINT them!!

(906)285-4400

• Snow Plowing & Removal • Banks Pushed Back • Driveways Widened

Jacquart Fabric Products is looking for the following:

WE HAUL SNOW!

Sewing Machine Operators

*Commercial & Residential*

(906)932-1202

Experience preferred, but will train. Previous Applicants Please Re-apply

*Reasonable Rates*

Taxes

HURLEY TAX SERVICE www.hurleytax.com

Full benefits for full time employees.

STARTING AT $75 •Pay for your taxes when you get your refund •Over 5500 Returns since 1993 • Pickup & Delivery

Apply in person at: Jacquart Fabric Products Building 1 1238 Wall Street • Ironwood, MI or email a cover letter and resume to hr@jacquarts.com

715-561-9969

Equal Opportunity Employer

Need new staff? Post your job opening in our print and online Classifieds to reach thousands of potential candidates. You’re bound to find a perfect match for the job!

Place your Help Wanted ad for one week and receive one week at NO CHARGE!

Invest as Little as $18.95!

Find out more by calling 906-932-2211 ext. 131 today!

Daily Globe www.yourdailyglobe.com


G

THE, D G15, LOBE TUESDAY MAILY ARCH 2011

TUESDAY MARCH 15, 2011THE PG D 2 AILY GLOBE

Lake Front Property

Real Estate

Borseth Insurance & Real Estate Ewen, MI Phone (906)988-2329 Toll free (877)768-9846 Lake Gogebic Hotline (906)575-3495

www.borsethproperties.com

1.94 ACRES at 12059 East Shore Road Lake Gogebic. Wooded lot, winding drive, underground electric. 150 feet of pebble beach, $185,000.00. (734)439-3036

Boats, Watercrafts, Motor

Snowmobiles

Highway US-2 • Ironwood

1995 POLARIS XCR 600. Runs great! Studded carbides, triple cylinders, padded knees on tunnel. Extra windshield, stock heads, new belt included. $1,500.00 Call (715)862-0082

Looking for a cute, cuddly, adorable friend to play with? Or just a simple companion to come home to? Check out our pet section!!

1994 LINCOLN Continental Executive Series, 160,000 miles. Run’s Great!! New tires, needs a fuel filter. Can be seen at 1006 Harrison $1,400.00. Call (267)297-6860 1995 CHEVY Silverado extended cab, 4X4, new interior, 9 inches of lift, crate motor, Posi gears, duel exhaust. $3,495.00 or best offer. Call (906)285-1375

Campers & RVs

1979 Chevy Marcque Motorhome 80,000 miles, everything works and is in good condition. $3995.00. Call (906)285-2446

upnorthproperty.com

BUYING JUNK cars or trucks. Ramme’s Auto Salvage. Highway US2 Bessemer. (906)663-6080

2000 POLARIS XCSP 600 Edge. Excellent condition. New 144X2” long track, skis and slides. Set up with removable ice fishing box. $2,000.00 best offer. Call (715)893-2485 or (715)862-0359

1998 ARCTIC Cat ZL500 Studded track, plastic skis, extra belt, good condition and runs great! Great all around sled. Cover included. $1,099.00 or best offer. (715)776-0236 2002 Ski-doo legend 500 L/C Electric start, reverse. $1800.00 or best offer. Call (906)842-3104 or (906)364-2697

Wildwood Manor Apartments is now accepting applications for our spacious, newly remodeled 1 bedroom apartments. Wildwood Manor is an elderly community for ages 62 or older or disabled of any age. rent is based on 30% of your income and barrier free waiting list is also available. Please call (906)932-6355 or stop by to see all that Wildwood Manor has to offer. TDD# 1-800-649-3777

2002 Ford Focus Station Wagon. Loaded. NEW PRICE $3,450.00. 1977 Chrysler Newport. 50K Miles. Immaculate interior. Book $4,000.00 buy $1,500.00 or best offer. (906)285-0004.

Trailers

1988 HONDA Gold Wing Interstate. All options. 47,000 miles. Excellent. $4,700.00. Call (715)561-4570 or (715)360-0036

906-932-5406 Wanted to Buy

Autos/SUVs

STAR CRAFT 15’ boat with 40hp motor and trailer. Great condition! Blowout $1,000.00. Call (906)285-0004

Motorcycles & ATVs

Sales • Rentals Management • Appraisals

Snowmobiles

2003 Silverado 4X4 LS regular cab, long box, bed liner, new brakes, tires, front end work. 144,000 highway miles. Pampered tow package. Reese hitch. WOW! $7990.00 or best offer. Call (906)364-0966 or (906)932-2012

2009 CARGO Mate Eliminator enclosed trailer, 32ft v-nose, 8.5ft wide, 3-7000# Torsion axles, with spare tire and weight distribution hitch. $14,500.00 (906)884-4632 Ontonagon

Trucks, Heavy Equipment 1985 GMC Sierra Classic 4x4 short box. New 350. Runs excellent. Needs body work. Several $1,000’s invested. Best offer. (906)932-0100

2006 Pontiac G6 GT Coupe 29,000 miles, Excellent condition, custom wheels, along with set of factory wheels and tires. Lots of extras. $13,000.00 Call (906)364-1535 2008 HONDA Civic Hybrid. 40,000 miles, 48 MPG, excellent. Two additional new snow tires. $14,900.00 (715)561-4570 or (715)360-0036 IRONWOOD 2005 CHEVY Suburban 1500LS 4 wheel drive, 105,000 miles, sun roof, On-STAR, CD, loaded. Very clean, new tires, white & gray. $12,900.00 Mike (847)280-7712

2004 Toyota Tundra 4x4, V-8 4.6. New tires, no rust. 141,000 miles. $10,500.00. (906)229-3038

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March 15, 2011 LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Public Hearing I Ironwood City Commission Notice is hereby given that a Public Hearing will be held by the Ironwood City Commission on Monday, March 28, 2011 beginning at 5:20 P.M., City Commission Chambers, 213 S. Marquette Street, Ironwood, Michigan. The purpose of the hearing is to hear comment on submitting a grant application to the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Trust Fund for the purpose of developing the Downtown Depot Park. Interested persons will have the opportunity to be heard at the time and place in this notice. No hearsay or individual surveys will be accepted as testimony; only written or oral presentation will be acknowledged. Written comments can be submitted to the Ironwood City Commission, 213 S. Marquette Street, Ironwood, Michigan 49938, prior to the scheduled Public Hearing.

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118 E. McLeod Avenue, Ironwood, MI 49938 classifieds@yourdailyglobe.com 906-932-2211 Prepayment required. Offer is subject to change without notice. Additonal words .25 each. Realtors, Landlords welcome. Limit one property per ad. Other restrictions may apply.

Legals March 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011 April 5, 2011 LEGAL NOTICE STATE OF MICHIGAN IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF GOGEBIC CASE No. G09-247-CK MARQUETTE GENERAL HOSPITAL, INC, Plaintiff, -VSEDWARD J. JENKINS, Defendant. RANDOLPH B. OSSTYN (P26052) Attorney for Plaintiff NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that by virtue of a writ of execution issued out of and under the seal of the Circuit Court of the County of Gogebic, State of Michigan dated May 5, 2010, in favor of Marquette General Hospital, Inc, Plaintiff, against the personal property and real estate of Edward J. Jenkins, Defendant, in Gogebic County, to me directed and delivered, I did on the 18th day of August, 2010, levy upon and take all right, title and interest of Edward J. Jenkins in and to the following described lands located in the City of Ironwood, County of Gogebic and state of Michigan described as: Lots 3 and 4, Block 10 Curry 3rd Addition located in the City of Ironwood, County of Gogebic and State of Michigan. All which I shall expose for sale at public sale, to the highest bidder, at the front door of the Gogebic County Courthouse, in Bessemer, Michigan, That being the place of holding the Circuit Court within the County, on the 15th day of April, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. (cst). Successful bidder must pay by cash or certified check Deputy Ross Solberg Gogebic County, Michigan PREPARED BY: Randolph B. Osstyn (P26052) Attorney at Law 4149 West Washington Street Marquette, MI 49855 Telephone: (906)228-3650

Explore the world of values found in classified every day.

BRIDGE:A double finesse for double the fun Tuesday, March 15, 2011 By Phillip Alder A proverb from Honduras goes: “Grief shared is half grief; joy shared is double joy.” At the bridge table, if you misplay a contract and go down, your partner will probably not want to share your grief. But if you make a contract with good play, your happiness will be shared with your partner. This week, we are studying various finesses. In today’s deal, how would you try to make three no-trump after West leads the spade five and East covers dummy’s jack with his queen? That was another exciting auction to three no-trump! You have eight top tricks: one spade, two hearts, four diamonds and one club. You must get a second club trick. How would you do that? You should plan to take two club finesses. Win the third spade trick (in case West started with a five-card suit) and play a club to dummy’s nine. East takes the king and leads his last spade. The defenders then exit with a heart or a diamond. You win in your hand and take a second club finesse for your contract. What is the chance that the second finesse will win? It is around 76 percent. You fail only when East has both missing honors. Phillip Alder is teaching during the American

Contract Bridge League’s Sectional at Sea from July 19 to 26 aboard Cunard’s Queen Elizabeth. The cruise starts and ends in Southampton, England, and goes to the Norwegian fjords and the North Cape. Details are at www.phillipalderbridge.com. Copyright 2011, United Feature Syndicate

Atelvia joins ranks of osteoporosis treatments By Peter H. Gott, M.D. DEAR DR. GOTT: I recently saw a television ad for Atelvia, a new osteoporosis treatment. Since I’ve never heard of it before, can you tell me anything about this product? DEAR READER: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Atelvia (risedronate sodium) for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. It is essentially a delayedrelease form of Actonel. It is available in pill form that should not be crushed or chewed and is to be taken once a week with at least a half cup of plain water immediately following breakfast. A person may stand or sit but should not lie down for 30 minutes following ingestion. If antacids or calcium supplements are taken routinely, they should be consumed at a different time of day than the Atelvia. Common side effects include upset stomach, muscle, back and joint pain, diarrhea and flu-like symptoms. If you have medical conditions other than osteoporosis, a kidney disorder or difficulty swallowing pills, speak with your physician before using Atelvia. There are numerous other medications on the market that treat osteoporosis. Some of the side effects can be dramatic. While they don’t occur for everyone, they have been documented and should be reviewed with a personal physician before usage begins. For example, bisphosphonates (the drug category of Fosamax, Actonel, Atelvia, Boniva and others) can cause severe muscle, joint and bone pain, upset stomach, inflammation and erosion of the esophagus, and osteonecrosis (bone-cell death). Furthermore, they have been reported to weaken the femur

and result in nontraumatic fractures of the bone and can cause atrial fibrillation, an abnormal rhythm of the heart. I am not implying that preventive care is the complete answer or opposing physician-prescribed medication for postmenopausal osteoporosis. But until you make a decision on a drug, try limiting your caffeine intake to about three cups of coffee or other caffeinecontaining products per day; discontinue smoking; and add soy, calcium with vitamin D supplements, potassium, vitamin K, and fresh fruits and vegetables to your daily diet, as they should give your bones a boost. If you are physically able, add regular exercise to your daily routine to prevent further bone loss. If you are on corticosteroids, a diuretic (water pill), thyroid medication or take antacids containing aluminum, be sure to speak with your physician regarding any possible connection with it or them and your osteoporosis. Readers who would like additional information can order my Health Report “Osteoporosis” by sending a selfaddressed stamped No. 10 envelope

and a $2 check or money order made payable to Newsletter and mailed to Newsletter, P.O. Box 167, Wickliffe, OH 44092-0167. Be sure to mention the title or print an order form off my website’s direct link at www.AskDrGottMD.com/order_form.pdf. DEAR DR. GOTT: I just read your article about Kangen water. Honestly, I don’t think you did enough research because if you did, you would not have said what you did. Japan is the healthiest country in the world. Besides, the way the East and West do things is very different. They are more interested in prevention. Doctors here are more interested in surgery and drugs. Your body cries for water. You’re not sick. You’re thirsty. Kangen water has no comparison. It’s that good. DEAR READER: I didn’t bash ionized water. I simply suggested some ionizers could be purchased for less money than the one Kangen markets. I did recommend people with questions have their water tested by a reputable firm to determine whether it is potable. I also went on to say if the reader felt ionized water worked, to stay the course. In any event, I respect your opinion and thank you for taking the time to write. Write to: Dr. Gott c/o United Media, 200 Madison Ave., 4th fl., New York, NY 10016. Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired physician and the author of several books, including “Live Longer, Live Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Cookbook,” which are available at most bookstores or online. His website is www.AskDrGottMD.com. Copyright 2011, United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

Cute Kids Across the Range! We know you have cute kids, now it is time to prove it! Send in your favorite photo & we will show them off on

Friday, April 22! Fill out the form below & return to:

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4 7 1 5 9 5 6 Difficulty Level

9 1 1 4 6 2 6

7 3

8 7 9 8 6

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3/14

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14

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THE DAILY GLOBE

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011 G 15

Women’s NCAA tournament field announced UConn, Tennessee, Baylor and Stanford No. 1 seeds the rationale was for not taking Syracuse.” Unlike the men’s bracket that expanded to 68 teams this year,

Second Round

Elite Eight

Elite Eight

Sweet 16

more center Brittney Griner, will face No. 16 Prairie View in their opener on Sunday in the Dallas region.

Second Round

9QOGP¶U&KXKUKQP+ $CUMGVDCNN%JCORKQPUJKR

1 UConn (32-1) 16 Hartford (17-15)

12:05 p.m.

8 Kansas St. (21-10) 9 Purdue (20-11)

30 min. following

4:20 p.m.

30 min. following

4:15 p.m.

5 Georgetown (22-10)

11:10 a.m.

3 DePaul (27-6) 14 Navy (20-11)

30 min. following

Durham • Sat.

7 Iowa St. (22-10) 10 Marist (30-2)

11:15 a.m.

2 Duke (29-3) 15 UT Martin (21-10)

30 min. following

Knoxville • Sat.

1 Tennessee (31-2) 16 Stetson (20-12)

11:05 a.m.

5 Ga. Tech (23-10) 11:20 a.m. 12 Bowling Green (28-4)

30 min. following

Final Four

P hi l adel p hia

Stanford (29-2) UC Davis (24-8)

1 16

Texas Tech (22-10) 8 St. John’s (21-10) 9 UNC (25-8)

5

Fresno St. (25-7)

12

Kentucky (24-8)

4 13

Hampton (26-6)

Spokane 4:10 p.m.

Championship Game

30 min. following

Iowa (22-8)

6

Gonzaga (28-4)

11

UCLA (27-4)

3

Montana (18-14)

14

Indianapolis

8 Marquette (23-8) 9 Texas (19-13)

4 Ohio St. (22-9) 13 UCF (22-10)

April 5

Indianapolis

NATIONAL CHAMPION

12:10 p.m.

30 min. following

Indianapolis

April 3

30 min. following

30 min. following

5:10 p.m.

5:20 p.m.

30 min. following

30 min. following

2

Baylor (31-2)

1

Prairie View (21-11) 16 8 West Virginia (23-9) 9 Houston (26-5)

Green Bay (32-1) UALR (23-7)

5 12

Michigan St. (26-5) 4 UNI (27-5)

13

30 min. following

Georgia (21-10)

6

All times EDT 5:15 p.m.

12:15 p.m.

4:05 p.m.

30 min. following

30 min. following

5:05 p.m.

Middle Tenn. (23-7) 11 Florida St. (23-7)

3

Stanford (25-7)

14

Rutgers (19-12)

7

Louisiana Tech (24-7) 10 Texas A&M (27-5) 2 McNeese St. (26-6) 15

Shreveport • Sun.

2 Notre Dame (26-7) 15 Utah (18-16)

Xavier (28-2)

S. Dakota St. (19-13) 15

Auburn • Sun.

7 Arizona St. (20-10) 10 Temple (23-8)

10

Dallas

6 Oklahoma (21-11) 30 min. following 11 James Madison (26-7)

14 Gardner-Webb (23-10)

7

Vanderbilt (20-11)

April 3

D ayton

3 Miami (Fla.) (27-4)

Louisville (20-12)

Witchita • Sun.

6 Penn St. (24-9) 11 Dayton (21-11)

Final Four

30 min. following

First Round

Waco • Sun.

12:20 p.m.

Columbus • Sat.

12 Princeton (24-4) 4 Maryland (23-7) 13 St. Francis (22-11)

Salt Lake City • Sat. Charlottesville • Sun.

Sweet 16

was in Indianapolis, Baylor won the championship as a No. 2 seed. The Lady Bears, led by sopho-

Albuquerque • Sat. Spokane-Gonzaga • Sat. Cincinnati • Sun.

State College • Sat. College Park • Sun.

Storrs • Sun.

First Round

the women decided to stick with 64. Indianapolis will host the Final Four on April 3 and 5. The last time the Final Four

Stanford • Sat.

UConn’s not.” The most emotional matchup Connecticut’s path to a third of the tourney, however, likely straight national championship will be in the Dallas region could include a renewal of the between No. 6 Georgia and No. most heated rivalry in women’s 11 Middle Tennessee State, which is still dealing with the college basketball. For Geno Auriemma to match stabbing death of teammate Tina Tennessee coach Pat Summitt Stewart on March 2. “The tragedy was most with an eighth national champiunspeakable and our full comonship he might have to go mittee and shared our thoughts through her Lady Vols, who earned the top seed in the Day- and condolences,” selection comton region. The Huskies earned mittee chairwoman Marilyn the No. 1 overall seed in the McNeil said. “However, what we want to assure everyone is they NCAA women’s basketball tourwere considered like everyone in nament Monday night. the field. We looked at their body If both come through their of work and what regions, UConn and UWGB a No. 5 they had done on Tennessee could the floor over the meet again in the seed in NCAA entire season. They national semifinals tournament were selected as at Indianapolis. GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) one of the 33 best Auriemma’s — After losing only once at-large teams in Huskies didn’t have this season, Wisconsin- the country.” to face Tennessee Green Bay has earned a First up for during its record 90- No. 5 seed in the NCAA UConn is Hartford, game winning streak women’s basketball tourna- which won the that was ended by ment. America East title, Stanford on Dec. 30. The Phoenix begin play and is coached by The two pre-eminent Sunday afternoon with a former Huskies teams in the sport game against 12th-seeded star Jen Rizzotti. broke off their annu- Arkansas-Little Rock in The two teams al matchup in 2007 Wichita, Kan. have played each Green Bay (32-1) other over the last in a testy split. Baylor and Stan- earned an automatic bid to six years but didn’t the tournament by claiming ford were the other meet this season. the Horizon League chamtwo No. 1 seeds. It pionship Sunday with a 74- Hartford is winless in 11 meetings was the second 63 victory over Butler. straight No. 1 seed Marquette (23-8) made against UConn. The Huskies will for the Cardinal, who the field as a No. 8 seed, fell to UConn in the and will face ninth-seeded be trying for their title game last sea- Texas in Knoxville, Tenn. third consecutive title, matching on Saturday. son. their run from “I think if it’s a four-horse race, there are some 2002-04 and Tennessee’s from dark horses,” Stanford coach 1996-98. UConn is one of a record Tara VanDerveer said. “I don’t nine Big East teams in the field. think there is a clear-cut The Big East got 11 men’s teams favorite. Last year they (UConn) in their field announced Sunday. Auriemma said he’s happy were a clear-cut favorite.” “We’re not a clear-cut favorite. they got nine bids but was surTennessee’s not a clear-cut prised Syracuse didn’t get in. “I was hoping that we’d get favorite; Baylor’s not; and 10,” he said. “I don’t know what By DOUG FEINBERG AP Basketball Writer

AP

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16

G

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011

COMICSFEATURES

DEFLOCKED

FOR BETTER OR WORSE

MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM

FRANK & ERNEST

BORN LOSER

GET FUZZY

ALLEY OOP

BEETLE BAILEY

THE DAILY GLOBE

ZITS

Your Horoscope Your Birthday Tuesday, March 15, 2011

BERNICE BEDE OSOL

Making money isn’t likely to be one of your problems in the next year, but if you handle your finances impractically, you could take a hit. Strive to use your head, not your emotions, when solving an issue. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Your financial aspects look better than usual, so don’t let anyone advise against doing what you think is best. Losses would only come from being too careless or too extravagant. ARIES (March 21-April 19) — It isn’t likely that anybody is going to get away with doing something they shouldn’t while in your charge. You’ll be on to them the moment they attempt anything funny. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Because you won’t allow your imagination to run rampant, your intuitive perceptions will come through loud and clear, leaving you with no doubt as to handle matters. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — You’ll easily keep pace with your high-roller friends when and if you choose to. Fortunately, you’ll be able to discern when to get involved in and what is too much for you. CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Because objectives that are important to you are likely to be woven into the interests of others as well, there will be a great deal of harmony when and if you want to get involved. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — No one will know better than you that fanciful thinking could cause you to draw unrealistic conclusions. You’ll make sure your conclusions will be based on pure logic and clear thinking. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Because you’ll be particularly careful when conducting business with someone about whom you know little, you aren’t likely to get yourself into something regrettable. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — This could be one of your better days for negotiating some kind of necessary business arrangement. Make things happen without waiting on life to make it so. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Do whatever needs doing without waiting on others. There won’t be anybody better than you to do a job you want handled a certain way. You’ll like what you do on your own. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — There will be lots of justification for your lucky feeling. Although she is likely to have her limitations, Dame Fortune should do quite well for you at this time. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Double check your guest list to make sure you have invited everyone desired. There is someone you know who will be an outstanding contributor to your gettogether. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Follow what your logic and reasoning abilities tell you to do, and don’t allow anyone to persuade you to act from emotions. Let your head have the last say.

Love long gone from old marriage Dear Annie: My husband and I are in our mid-60s, married 42 years. Our marriage hasn’t been great, but it’s also not horrible. About 15 years ago, my husband developed erectile dysfunction and stopped wanting sex. I urged him to talk to his doctor, which he did. The doctor gave him some pills, but he refused to try them. I have tried other remedies on my own, but nothing has helped. I admit I am not beautiful, and I also am overweight. Still, I’ve always been this way. My husband never cuddles up to me in bed like he used to. He never puts his arms around me, kisses me or shows any affection whatsoever. And he refuses to discuss it. I feel like I’m living with my brother. Our anniversaries come and go with no celebration of any kind. Every little thing he does seems to irritate me, and I can barely speak to him. Of course, when I do, he doesn’t listen. Sometimes he actually walks away while I’m talking. I don’t know what to do anymore. Can you help? — Tired of It All Dear Tired: A low testosterone count could be responsible not only for a lack of interest in sex, but for depression, as well. This is fairly common and might be the source of your husband’s unwillingness to work on the problem. Ask him to go back to his doctor and get tested. It could make a world of difference to him, and it would help your marriage, as well. Dear Annie: Ever since my husband and I moved to a resort area, we have enjoyed many family gatherings at our house. These were invited guests at times that suited our schedules. Lately, however, the family seems to expect our house to be a spontaneous crash pad because we have “the most accommodating space.” The truth is, almost every visit has become a financial burden

SPEED BUMP

Annie’s Mailbox and a physically taxing occasion, especially when they linger for days, sometimes weeks. Our utility bills skyrocket, the food costs are insurmountable, and this doesn’t include the unrelenting domestic chores with little or no help. During their stay, our house looks ransacked, with carpet stains, damaged furniture and tons of laundry. These are all grown, financially secure, professional adults. My husband I have tried tactfully refusing them, suggesting other places, and designating meals and tasks, all of which were basically ineffective. Telling them we have other plans is not a deterrent. Our home has turned into a hotel and storage facility. We love them, but we are at our wits’ end. Any thoughts? — Ocean City, Md. Dear Ocean City: You are going to have to be more firm and consistent. Say, “Sorry, you cannot stay here.” Don’t let them in the door. Don’t give them keys. When they complain, tell them point blank that you love them, but people leave the house a mess, no one contributes a thing, it strains your finances and you’ve had enough. You will invite them when you are ready to have company. Period. They may be upset, but they will only stop taking advantage of you when you insist on it. Dear Annie: This is in response to “Thrown for a Loop,” the wife whose husband was meeting a former co-worker for lunch. She requested a separation since he refused to stop these meetings. Although he should not

HERMAN

THE GRIZZWELLS

be keeping these meetings a secret, she should not assume her husband is having an affair. I am a single woman with many married male friends. There are no affairs. I treasure these friendships and appreciate the wives who are not suspicious of us. However, if a wife is uncomfortable with her husband meeting me for lunch, she should join us. I would welcome her company and hopefully make an additional friend. — Monrovia, Calif. Dear Monrovia: We heard from a great many women, and most of them were furious. We agree that including the wife is a great idea. Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please e-mail your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777 W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045.

Crossword


DG 031511