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Year xlii. Volume lxxxiii. Issue LIII

KEEP ON TRUCKIN’ City Hall launches mobile services to residents, page 3.

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Monday, December 10, 2012 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

MAKE IT NEW

Conor Oberst brings back oldies to Orpheum, page 5.

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WEATHER

M. hockey beats UMaine in last home game of 2012, page 8.

Today: Rain/High 58 Tonight: Rain/Low 41 Tomorrow: 42/28 Data Courtesy of weather.com

COM grad. student remembered for warmth, talent BU admin. halts GNH initiative, angers students

PHOTO COURTESY OF ANDY WEIGL

Chris Weigl, a College of Communication graduate student who died Thursday morning after colliding with an 18-wheeler truck, is remembered as an outstanding photojournalist, friend and son. By Chris Lisinski Daily Free Press Staff

College of Communication first-year graduate student Christopher Weigl had immense talent and would have made a fantastic journalist, said COM professor Mitchell Zuckoff, who taught Weigl in a graduate student seminar. “Chris was an excellent student and a terrific young man,” Zuckoff said. “He was smart,

thoughtful, creative and inquisitive.” Weigl, 23, died Thursday morning in a collision with an 18-wheeler truck while riding his bicycle at the corner of Commonwealth Avenue and St. Paul Street. He was studying photojournalism at Boston University and had aspirations of working for an international news organization.

“He had a passion for writing — he was an undergraduate English major — and photography,” said COM Dean Tom Fiedler in an email. “He believed that by combining those interests as a photojournalist he could positively affect the lives of many people, perhaps as a staffer for the Associated Press, Reuters or other international news agency as he loved to travel abroad.” Weigl’s father, Andy Weigl, remembers his son’s love for photography as something beyond an interest in visual aesthetics. “He’s had a passion for photography, which then got morphed into a bigger, people-oriented thing,” Andy Weigl said. “He didn’t start out wanting to take pictures of people, but he found out that people were interesting and his passion sharped.” Andy Weigl said his son always had a camera with him and his attention to detail made him see the world differently than other people. Fiedler said the entire BU community is grieving Weigl’s death. “The pain and heartbreak that this tragedy brings to his family and friends, as well as to the COM community, is incalculable,” he said. Weigl completed his undergraduate education at Skidmore College, according to his website. He graduated in May of 2011 cum laude with a degree in English. Andy Weigl said his son was always humble about his talents and remained reserved even when seeing exciting payoffs for his work. “He was very honest, would never brag

Obit, see page 4

Brown highest paid Mass. private college president, report suggests By Chris Lisinski Daily Free Press Staff

Boston University President Robert Brown was the highest-paid Massachusetts private college president in 2010, according to data from The Chronicle of Higher Education. In 2010, Brown received a total compensation of $1,141,330, about $70,000 more than Northeastern University President Joseph Aoun, the second highest-paid Massachusetts private college president, a data report released Sunday stated. The data shows compensation and base pay received in 2010 by 493 chief executives at 480 private, nonprofit colleges in the U.S, according to the report. Researchers compiled data from the Internal Revenue Service’s Form 990 from either colleges themselves or an online source. Brown’s base pay was listed as $734,349, which was also the highest among Massachusetts’s private college presidents. His base pay

increased 0.6 percent from 2009. Brown received the 24th highest total compensation nationally and the 16th highest base pay. The median compensation for private college presidents was $396,649, a 2.8-percent increase from 2009, according to the report. Brown, Aoun and Massachusetts Institute of Technology President Susan Hockfield were the third highest-paid Massachusetts presidents and the only three in the Commonwealth to receive total compensations more than $1 million. J. Robert Kerrey, president of The New School in New York, received the greatest compensation nationally totaling $3,047,703 with a base pay of $602,593. Kerrey was succeeded by David Van Zandt in 2011. From 2009 to 2010, Brown’s total compensation decreased 0.1 percent, according to the report. Brown did not receive any bonus pay, ac-

Employers view recent college graduates as unprepared, unskilled, study suggests By Rachel Riley Daily Free Press Staff

A recent study by the McKinsey Center for Government suggests many employers tend to not find young applicants who possess proper skills for jobs, which might contribute to high levels of unemployment among young people. The study, released Wednesday, observed different approaches to skill training in 25 countries, including the U.S. The report estimated 75 million young people are out of work globally while about 40 percent of surveyed employers feel applicants lack the necessary skills to fill entry-level positions. “We have to work at closing the gap between what employers need and what universities provide,” said Boston University School of Education professor Joseph Cronin. Only 43 percent of employers surveyed said they can find enough skilled entry-level workers, according to the report. The estimate of unemployed young people

potentially triples when considering underemployment as well as unemployment, the study stated. The study found 72 percent of educators believe new graduates “are ready to work” and fewer than half of youth and employers believe that they are ready. “Employers, education providers and youth live in a parallel universe,” the report stated. Cronin said when graduates struggle to find jobs after graduation or see their peers underemployed, they might come to believe they are less qualified. About 40 percent of educators surveyed said students most often dropped out because of the difficulty level of coursework, but less than 10 percent of students surveyed said this was the case, according to the study. Many students attributed dropping out to financial reasons. More than half of underemployed college

Youth, see page 4

cording to the report. He received $278,744 in nontaxable benefits in 2010, an increase of 2.2 percent from 2009. The report classified nontaxable benefits as any health and medical benefits, life insurance, housing provided by the employer, personal legal and financial services, dependent care, adoption assistance, tuition assistance or cafeteria plans. BU spokesman Colin Riley said Brown is fairly compensated for his work. “He’s [Brown has] done an outstanding job,” he said. “We’re really fortunate and benefitting from his leadership during his work as president of this university. The university continues to make great strides under his leadership.” Riley said it is important to note that the IRS changed its policy in 2010 to require universities to report nontaxable benefits such as hous-

President, see page 2

By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

Many Boston University students expressed frustration at BU administration for indefinitely shutting down Student Government’s genderneutral housing initiative. Administration officials told SG members that with a number of other pressing housing issues, gender-neutral housing is no longer a top priority and will not be implemented in 2012, said SG Advocacy Department Director Caitlin Seele at the last meeting of the semester Sunday night. After years of advocating for gender-neutral housing, SG announced in October that the initiative was passed and would be available as a housing option at an unspecified future date. Seele, a School of Management junior, said on Nov. 21, Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore called her to inform her the administration is putting a halt to the initiative. “He said it definitely wasn’t going to come this spring for sure because of a lot of reasons — for the revamp of the housing system,” she said. Administration officials decided that ensuring no freshmen live in Danielsen Hall and creating more on-campus housing for transfer students are the administration’s current points of focus, Seele said. SG received about 2,000 student responses in support of the initiative and about 700 student signatures, Seele said. “It’s important to note that we’ve really gone through the proper channels to get this done,” said Luke Rebecchi, SG associate director of social affairs and College of Arts and Sciences junior, during the meeting. “At the finish line for them to just stop the race, that’s just not okay.” Seele said the news was hard for SG to take as they had been working on the initiative over the summer and for the last year. “Communication has been a little hard, and I think that this just kind of took us by surprise,” she said. “He [Elmore] said he’d keep it in his list of things to keep on tabs with, but that by no means is a guarantee.” Elmore did not immediately respond to an email inquiry. BU spokesman Colin Riley said the initiative was under careful consideration by the administration. A number of students expressed disappoint-

Sg, see page 2

JOY TO THE WORLD

PHOTO BY MICHELLE KWOCK/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Conductor Keith Lockhart and the Boston Pops Orchestra perform at Boston Symphony Hall Friday afternoon.


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Monday, December 10, 2012

Despite high pay, Brown strong leader, spokesman says CGSA to host meeting about President: From Page 1

ing in total compensation figures. As The Boston Globe reported on June 13, 2010, Brown’s residence in Brookline was the priciest among Boston private college presidents. However, the Globe reported that BU assessed the entire house in determining the rental cost, while many other Boston schools, such as Northeastern and Harvard University, as-

sessed rental costs based exclusively only the private residential portion of the house. Certain areas of presidential homes, particularly ground floors, are used for community activities. The Globe reported specialists said presidential homes would yield thousands of dollars more if universities assessed entire property values rather than portions. This distinction contributes to why Brown’s compen-

sation was the highest among Boston private colleges in 2008. New York University President John Sexton received a total compensation of $1,476,625, 11th nationally and a base pay of $1,242,806 in 2010. George Washington University President Steven Knapp received a total compensation of $1,165,813, 23rd nationally and a base pay of $725,231.

On December 15, THINK SUMMER—

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GNH plans Mon. at 8 p.m.

a video on the importance of genderneutral housing. Hunt, a College of Communication junior, said the production of the video was temporarily halted when SG received the phone call from Elmore, but it could be an important tool in getting the initiative back up and running. Hunt said administration and student leaders should realize the importance of gender-neutral housing. “Even if it’s only important for 20 people, we should care about that,” Hunt said. Swanson Ninan, public relations coordinator for the Center for Gender, Sexuality & Activism, said Center is dissatisfied with the administration’s decision. “The Center for Gender, Sexuality & Activism is disappointed to hear the news, but we are interested to hear more about the administration’s decision,” Ninan, a CAS sophomore, said. The CGSA will be hosting a public meeting Monday at 8 p.m. to discuss how to raise gender-neutral housing to the top of the administrator’s list of priorities, Ninan said. SG announced the administration’s decision as part of its agenda for the last meeting of the semester. The meeting focused on the genderneutral housing initiative, the passing of the gavel and the final speech of the fall 2012 president, COM junior Dexter McCoy. At the end of the meeting, the spring 2012 SG executive board was officially sworn into the office. SMG juniors Aditya Rudra, Lauren LaVelle and Justin Jones will serve as SG president, vice president and vice president of finance, respectively. Jasmine Miller, a CAS freshman, will serve as vice president of internal affairs. The winning slate, BetterBU, ran on a platform of stabilizing tuition, running vacation buses and increasing safety on campus. BetterBU ran unopposed and won about 1,300 per candidate. Steph Solis contributed to the reporting of this article.

SG: From Page 1

ment with the administration’s decision to strike down the gender-neutral housing initiative. CAS junior Alex Kara said he does not see any academic or pressing reason why gender-neutral housing should be rejected. “It seems like a lot of emphasis is placed on these arbitrary values,” he said, referring to values countering gender-neutral housing. “ … It seems kind of old-fashioned.” Hannah McKechnie, a junior in the College of Fine Arts, said BU officials should offer gender-neutral housing, considering the diversity of BU’s student population. “It doesn’t affect me, but I think there should be a place for everyone,” she said. “If there are people who want that, our school should offer it.” Madi Wachman, a first-year graduate student in the School of Social Work, said the university should consider the living preferences of all genders and identities within the campus. “I think this campus should be inclusive of all genders and all ways students identify,” she said. “I understand the difficulties that the administration faces, but I think they should support what the Student Government puts forth.” Considering its implementation at other universities, Wachman said, the administration’s decision to strike down the proposal seems unfair to the students at BU. “If there’s a model in place, it seems like BU should be able to look into that,” she said. To raise awareness and to encourage the administration to understand the importance of the initiative, Seele said SG might put together a number of responses from students explaining why they would want to apply for gender-neutral housing. “Gathering those stories, even if they’re just anonymous without a name or anything to them really sends a message that this has actually happened to people,” Seele said. Cherice Hunt, SG director of communication, said SG is in the process of creating and sending out

BOSTON SUMM UNIVERSITY TE Summer 1 May 21–June 28 Summer 2 July 1–August 9

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Campus & City Column

Never too old

Until 12:01 a.m. on Friday, Dec. 14, I will be in constant anticipation. When “The Hobbit” finally begins on the theater screen before me, my childhood will be rekindled. I first read “The Hobbit” in fourth grade, about 10 years ago. And ever since then, I’ve been obsessed with To l k i e n ’s world. I remember going to see “The Lord of the Rings” movKRISSEN ies in theaters after I KAWACHI fell in love with “The Hobbit.” I think it was December of 2002 that “The Two Towers” had been released. I remember seeing it with an old friend of mine, although she was never as crazed about it as I was. A year later, December of 2003, was the release of “The Return of the King.” It was a school day, and back then at 10 years old, the chances of me being allowed to see a movie at midnight were slim. But the day of the release, I begged my parents to take me (and I think a few friends) after school. I remember my dad waited in line that afternoon, by my request, so we’d get good seats in that showing — he was the first one there, camped out on one of those fold up chairs — poor Dad. My grandma picked us up from school and dropped us off at the theater. I was wearing, what I thought to be, the greatest costume of all time (months before, for Halloween, my mom had made me a dress just like Arwen’s in the movie). I proudly walked through that mall and into the theater wearing my costume. And I would do the same today, if only I still had the costume (my mom sold it at a garage sale and claims that it wouldn’t fit me — I’m unconvinced). Fast-forward nine years. This past summer, I attended the comic con in San Diego, hoping to catch a glimpse of the cast and crew of the upcoming Hobbit films. They held a panel in the biggest discussion hall to 6,500 screaming fans, and many had been camped out for over 24 hours. I sat there through a few hours of other panels, anxiously awaiting the time designated for “The Hobbit.” And when the lights went down and 14 minutes of never-before-seen footage began to project on the massive screen before me, I lost it. I became a 19-year-old sobbing child — me and one of my best friends who was sitting there next to me. I remember my mom laughing at me, saying I was ridiculous, before silently handing over a few tissues. To this day, I feel no shame. And I’m also 100 percent confident that, when I see the movie at midnight, I’ll start crying just the same. And luckily, that friend is coming to visit Boston to see the movie with me so we can share in that overly dramatic, nostalgic moment together. Krissen Kawachi is a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences and a weekly columnist for The Daily Free Press. She can be reached at kkawachi@bu.edu.

Monday, December 10, 2012

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City Hall to Go truck places services on menu By Nora Philbin Daily Free Press Staff

PHOTO BY NORA PHILBIN/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The new City Hall To Go truck stops in the North End at the Paul Revere Mall on its way to different Boston neighborhoods to showcase its services with the Mayor’s Enchanted Trolley Tour Sunday afternoon.

Voter registration, dog licenses and e-Library cards are among the few “menu” items Boston residents can order in the city’s first mobile city hall — a vehicle inspired by Boston’s food truck scene that will travel throughout the city offering government services. The truck, called City Hall to Go, allows pedestrians to make ticket payments, permit requests and renewals, certificate requests and property tax payments, according to the City Hall to Go menu on the City of Boston website. In addition to convenience, the van is designed to reach people who may not have access to the Internet or understand the process of dealing with City Hall, said Katharine Lusk, program director for City Hall to Go.

“Many people don’t necessarily have Internet at home or at their workplace,” Lusk said. “The idea really is to give a face to the City of Boston. It’s a very visible way that we can provide more direct services.” Elderly community members and immigrants within the city are two demographics to which the program might be especially helpful, Lusk said. The program emerged as a part of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Mayor’s Challenge, and the mayor’s office decided that it was worth pursuing, Lusk said. The Mayor’s Challenge is a national competition in which cities submit an idea to address a prevalent social issue. “It seemed like a good way of en-

City Hall, see page 4

Mugar rents out puppy love for finals stress relief Mass. among states By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

After the large turnout for “Puppy Parties” at Boston University’s Marsh Plaza and the School of Management in previous semesters, a Mugar Memorial Library employee organized two days during the study break for students to reserve a time to play with therapy dogs at the library. Students have to reserve time with a dog by emailing Mugar for a 15-minute slot either on Thursday, Dec. 13 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. or Saturday, Dec. 15 from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Ann Marie Dryer Shafer, the evening circulation coordinator at Mugar, said she started working on this possibility in August. “It originally started as a trend for young adults and children who were having difficulty reading, she said. “Librarians would bring in dogs because kids weren’t stressed out about reading to a dog.” Shafer said she coordinated with the Dog Building Opportunities for Nurturing and Emotional Support group, which organizes therapy dog volunteers. “I picked days during the study period because I didn’t want to overlap when people were taking exams or when they were still in classes,” Shafer said. Students who signed up to play with a therapy dog will have 15 minutes with a single dog, she said.

Up to four people can pet one of the 16 volunteer dogs coming. Two dogs will be present every hour and alternate shifts. BONES has trained more than 800 teams of people and their therapy dogs to send to retirement homes, libraries and colleges since it was founded in 2002, said Jeanne Brouillette, BONES president. “You guys are in the middle of finals and looking for a diversion and you’re looking for a reason to get out of cubby holes to pet some dogs,” Brouillette said. “It’s creating a reason to take a deep breath.” There have been a number of studies about how dogs relieve stress, Brouillette said. “It’s the social contact with an animal giving you unconditional love that helps,” she said. “People who have a dog will have a chance to reconnect with that feeling they get at home.” Shafer said she implemented reservations because she needed to prepare for large crowds and limit stress for all parties involved. “The dogs need to be safe and the students need to be getting what they come for, but these are volunteers and we need to make sure they aren’t crushed by students asking to pet the dogs,” Shafer said. “I’m trying to make it more structured and having the waiting list gives us a good setup.” William Murphy, College of Arts and Sciences sophomore, she he would be interested in going to

Mugar to see the therapy dogs, even if he had to put his name on a waiting list. “I can see the tangible benefits to this and it’s pretty cool so I’m definitely thinking about it,” Murphy said. Shafer said she knew the dog therapy was going to be popular based on turnouts from previous years, but she did not expect that the spots would fill up so quickly after only putting a poster up Dec. 1. “By 6 p.m. [Dec. 3], judging by the number of emails I had in my inbox, the reservations were already full,” Shafer said. “Just on the off chance one of the dogs wasn’t able to come I only wanted to reserve for half of the time, so if you show up there are still half of the spots available.” Christine Lee, CAS freshman, said she would rather study in her room instead of losing time in line. “It’s not just 15 minutes for the dog — you have to stand in line as well,” Lee said. “There might be a lot of people who do it and the chances of getting time with a dog are slim.” Justine Velez, College of Communication junior, said crowds agitate her and it would be more stressful to go. “It’s the only reason why I wouldn’t go,” she said. “If I were to walk by and there was nobody standing there with no line, then I would go play with the dogs.”

hit hardest by ACA taxes, study suggests By Jasper Craven Daily Free Press Staff

A recent analysis of a new healthcare insurance tax contained in the Affordable Care Act will likely place a greater tax burden on residents of Massachusetts than those in many other states, one study suggests. The report, announced Wednesday by America’s Health Insurance Plans, places Massachusetts as the 10th most affected state by the new tax — shouldering about $4 billion of additional taxes on citizens over the next 10 years. “With full implementation of the ACA a year away, the focus needs to be on making coverage more affordable,” said AHIP President and CEO Karen Ignagni in a press release. “Taxing health insurance will have the opposite effect by making it more expensive.” Massachusetts was also listed as a state that will see large tax-hikes for families purchasing insurance. The report, conducted by the Oliver Wyman consulting firm for AHIP, estimated Massachusetts families could see an increase of $9,937 in health care taxes over the next 10 years on the individual market, and a $8,555 increase of taxes through small employers. The Affordable Care Act, more

Obamacare, see page 4

Older Bostonians reminisce about community from decades past By John Ambrosio Daily Free Press Staff

For Kevin Fennessy, the now defunct Raymond’s Department Store brings back memories of his father shopping downtown “in the Theater District’s grittiness.” Fennessy, who has lived in the Boston area all his life, said there is a variety of things he missed about Boston in the 1970s. “I miss the nightlife of the ‘70s with the Kenmore Square clubs like the Rat, Cambridge’s Inn, Square Men’s Bar [and] Jack’s,” he said. Fennessy is among a group of Bostonians who remember an older age of Boston, with fewer students and corporate stores. One Facebook page, called “Dirty Old Boston,” allows such residents to reminisce with vintage Boston photography, and more than 14,000 people have become fans since its inception on Sep. 22. The page includes photos that document people, local hangouts and other defining characteristics of Bos-

ton before the late 1980s. The concept has gained a following among both longtime residents and those relatively new to the city. Jim Botticelli, the page’s founder and administrator, said he started the page as a means of showing Boston the way he knew it. “I wanted to document where the city had been in the past,” Botticelli said. “There are a lot of young folks around here who weren’t around back then and have no clue, but they’re all on Facebook and like to look at the pictures.” Botticelli, a recently retired teacher who taught in the Boston area for 31 years, is no stranger to the city. After growing up in Lexington he moved to Boston to attend Northeastern University. Botticelli said that the number of changes he has seen in his time in Boston shocked him, and it is important to him that he remember these changes. “It’s a lot cleaner, it’s a lot brighter and it’s a lot more expensive,” he said. “It’s gone from a city of families to a

city of not families — a lot more students and condominiums.” Despite these changes, Botticelli said he is not upset that the city is different than it used to be. “I’m trying not to put a value judgment on it. Change is change,” Botticelli said. “Nobody’s getting hurt by this, except, maybe, for the many people who can no longer afford to live here because of these changes. Obviously it’s a negative change for them.” Fennessy also said he feels as though Boston has become less family-friendly over the years. “I miss the uniquely Boston shops before every city became an outlet for Macy’s and Banana Republic and the Gap,” he said. Paul French, a truck driver who has lived in Jamaica Plain his whole life, said the city has experienced improvements, but corporatization has visually altered Boston. “The landscape has changed incredibly,” French, who moderates the Facebook page “J.P. Loop,” which also accepts old photos of Jamaica

Plain and the Boston area, said. “I still love the city, but I feel that it went corporate. There’s an improvement as far as the accessibility of public transportation. As far as neighborhood stores though, it’s pretty much negative, and it’s all corporate.” French said the inclusiveness makes the Dirty Old Boston Facebook page especially intriguing. “A lot of people contribute things and I like the inclusiveness of the page,” he said. “It’s just fascinating.” The Dirty Old Boston page is open to contributions from anyone looking to share, Botticelli said. “The only thing we’re looking for is pictures from before the El went down,” he said, referencing the abbreviation for “elevated,” the former Orange Line branch of the T. This would be before 1987 or 1988, he said. The Dirty Old Boston page has been gathering photos from all over

Boston, see page 4


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Monday, December 10, 2012

City Hall truck initiative first in U.S. City Hall: From Page 3

gaging the community,” she said. During the weekend, residents who saw the van in different neighborhoods were very receptive, said Justin Holmes, director of constituent engagement. “It’s been phenomenally positive,” Holmes said. “We’ve got a lot of great press attention, and the folks that we’ve met out in the neighborhoods are very excited about the opportunity to deliver services to their neighborhoods directly, which is great. It’s a real part of the reason the mayor came up with the idea. Government should be accessible to the people that we serve.” The program will become a staple in Boston in the spring at block parties and street festivals while offering seasonal services during the year, according to a press release from Menino’s office. The schedule for the program’s transportation is still being planned, but will start likely in late March or early April, Lusk said. Officials are seeking input from residents as to where the van should stop on its route. Dave Masciuilli, a banker from Medford, said the program is a good idea in theory, but he is not sure if it is a necessity. “Parking is a big issue, but I usually just pay tickets online,” he said.

“Most of the information is online, so that’s the only issue. But it’s a good P.R. vehicle.” Jian Zhang, a 38-year-old computer worker from Allston, said she was interested in how the truck will run. “This is a great start,” she said. “I want to find out more about it and where available locations are.” Photographer Jeremy Fraga, a 25-year-old resident of Boston, said City Hall to Go might help ease the time constraints of certain city offices. “Those offices are never open when you want them to be,” he said. Though the process will be more convenient for residents, it will not change the way City Hall functions, Lusk said. “For city departments, it will be business as usual,” she said. “Many of the transactions that are coming through on the truck will be processed back here at City Hall whether they are input online or there is a form filled out.” Since this is the first program of its kind in the U.S., many officials hope that it can be an example for other cities in the U.S., Lusk said. “We absolutely do hope that other cities will follow our lead,” she said. “In a way, there is no road map, so we can learn a lot from this process, and we learn as we go. Then we can share that information with other cities.”

Dirty Old Boston Facebook page open for submissions, creator says Boston: From Page 3

the city, and many of Boston’s longtime residents such as French, Fennessy and Store 54’s Wayne Valdez have been eager to contribute. Valdez said the page is a great opportunity for people to share. “People want to share their photos, and no one prints anything anymore,” Valdez said. Valdez acknowledged the effect

that economic changes in recent years have had on those who can no longer afford to live in the city. “Things always change and grow, but I know from looking at these pictures that people can’t afford to live here like they used to,” Valdez said. “The rooming houses were all being abolished so homelessness shot up. I don’t always see it in the pictures, but that’s one of the things I get about them.”

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Weigl described as ‘bright light’ by advisor Obit: From Page 1

about himself in any way, shape or form,” he said. “He was understated. We knew when something big was going on if we get a note or a call to say something. [He was] very droll and modest even with us.” Zuckoff said Weigl was an inquisitive mind who constantly asked important questions. “He didn’t have a big ego,” Zuckoff said. “It was not about calling attention to himself. It was really about his curiosity and expressing himself. I’m going to miss everything about him. He was a terrific student and a terrific young man.” Chris’s mother, Bonnie Weigl, said he had a way of making everyone around him feel accepted. “They knew he would accept them for whoever they were, whatever they believed, whether it was something he agreed with or not,” she said. “As a result he had a wide variety of friends with a wide variety of interests and beliefs and sexual preferences.”

Peter Southwick, Weigl’s photojournalism professor and academic advisor at BU since September, said Weigl was a gifted photographer with a passion for telling stories through his work. “He was just a real bright light and he was somebody everybody wanted to be around,” Southwick said. “He had a very high level of visual talent, creativity and skill, and the combination of those things were going to give him a very bright future. It’s a terrible tragedy to see someone who had so much promise have their life ended.” Weigl was a warm person who easily got along with everyone he met, Southwick said. “He was a very pleasant guy, which is vital in our profession,” he said. “It’s not a side light, you need to have the skill, the ability to connect with people on an intimate level so then you can tell their stories.” His brother, Dustin Weigl, a senior at Middlebury College, remembered a lighter side of Chris. He recalled a

time the two had gone to dinner with their older cousin. “We hadn’t had zucchini before, there was zucchini at dinner and [Chris] was refusing to eat it — texture, probably,” Dustin said. “He refused to eat it and our older cousin offered to pay him $5, and that’s what made him eat it. He wouldn’t eat it for anything other than a monetary value.” About 70 members of the BU community gathered in COM Thursday night to offer support and remembrance. The Center for Gender, Sexuality & Activism also organized a candlelight vigil Thursday night in Marsh Plaza with about 65 people. Visitation will be held from 3 to 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 15 at the Chesmore Funeral Home in Holliston. On Dec. 16, a memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. at the First Congregational Church in Holliston. Amy Gorel, Steph Solis and Margaret Waterman contributed to the reporting of this article.

Congressional Budget Office: ACA could burden consumers Obamacare: From Page 3

commonly known as Obamacare, will also raise taxes in the Medicare and Medicaid market, according to the report. Enrollees in Medicare nationwide are expected to pay $3,604 over 10 years, and Medicaid recipients are expected to pay $1,523 more over 10 years. The Affordable Care Act has long been compared to the insurance overhaul undertaken under former Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney in 2006. The law established ambitious goals for health care reform, including subsidizing healthcare for the very poor

and expanding coverage to the uninsured. Pieces of legislation in both chambers of Congress aim to repeal these fees placed on insurance providers that translate into taxes. Both these bills, called H.R. 1370 and S. 1880 respectively, are still stalled in committees. The Joint Committee on Taxation, a nonpartisan congressional committee, argued that if the fees are repealed, insurance plans would be less expensive. “We estimate that repealing the health industry fee would reduce the premium price of plans offered by

covered entities by 2.0 to 2.5 percent,” wrote Thomas Barthold in a letter from the commission to Congress in 2011. The Congressional Budget Office has also voiced concern over the new costs with which the ACA would burden consumers. The ACA, which has won support from a few Democratic Massachusetts politicians, allows people under the age of 26 to stay on their parents’ health care plan, mandates free preventive care and offers coverage to those with preexisting conditions, according to the federal government website Healthcare.gov.

COM senior: Post-grad. prospects high due to internship Youth: From Page 1

graduates in the U.S. do not believe their postsecondary education improved their chances in the job market, according to the study. Cronin said the global recession that began in 2008 has contributed to unemployment among graduates. “People are now disillusioned with higher education because it was supposed to be the ticket to making an additional million over the course of thirty or forty years,” he said. “It still is, but we’re in a dip. The chances are we’ll come out of it in the next two years, but that’s too long for people who are 23, 24 years of age who want to get a job, want to get a vehicle, want to move out of their family’s house right away.”

The need for software developers gram next semester, so I’m hopefully and other experts since the technol- going to get a job through one of my ogy explosion, coupled with students internships,” she said. “Had I not choosing in-demand majors less done that, I think that would have deffrequently, might play a role in the initely change prospect just because disparity between employers and ap- it’s hard to go out there and get jobs.” plicants, Cronin said. Kuriyan said BU prepares stu“There’s a mismatch between was dents well for seeking employment students would like to do with their after graduation. lives — the millennium generation “Even in trying to find an intern— and what the employers want,” he ship, employers have been very willsaid. ing because I go to BU,” she said. The report calls for better com- “We are at an advantage opposed to munication between employers and other people.” professors as well as more effective Katherine Duncan, a Sargent Colskill-training systems. lege of Health and Rehabilitation College of Communication senior Sciences senior, said job prospects Ali Kuriyan said she believes her depend on the area of work. prospects for getting a job after college are high. “I’m doing the Los Angeles pro- SEE FULL STORY ONLINE


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Muse Editor - Marisa Benjamin

A

Music Editor - Sydney Moyer

Film/TV Editor - Melissa Papalcure

Lifestyle Editor - Gina Curreri

Food Editor - Katie Doyle

Conor Oberst Rocks the Orpheum Chelsea Feinstein MUSE Staff

t a Conor Oberst show, it’s always a gamble as to which of the singer-songwriter’s personas is going to show up. Sometimes drunk, occasionally confrontational, sometimes manic, other times mellow, the New York-via-Omaha musician’s shows are always a surprise. The Oberst who played at the Orpheum Theatre Thursday night was joking, humble and seemed genuinely happy to be there, even teasing that he wanted to move to Boston, despite the sports rivalry with his home in New York. He seemed, in general, like a guy you’d get a beer with after the show. Accompanied by only one other musician, Oberst went through a wide range of his broad catalog, playing everything from Bright Eyes classics to tunes off of his brilliant self-titled solo album to songs from his efforts with the Mystic Valley Band. He even threw in a few new tracks. Oberst opened the set with “The Big Picture” off of fan favorite Bright Eyes album Lifted or the Story is in the Soil Keep Your Ear to the Ground. One of his most haunting compositions, the song set the perfect tone for the show, and it was clear this was going to just be about lyrics and guitar. No light shows, no jumping around the stage — just music. Between the sweet lilting melody of “First Day of My Life” and Mystic Valley Band tune “White Shoes,” Oberst joked about how he writes “infatuation songs” more than “love songs,” and how sometimes it’s hard to tell the difference. “White Shoes” is one of Oberst’s prettiest songs, with the refrain “Lover anything you want to do” and the comparison of the girl in question to King David’s star and the cres-

cent moon. But the show wasn’t without Oberst’s unique sense of humor. Before “Lenders in the Temple” he joked about how he wished the location of the concert hadn’t been moved (the show was originally set to be at the Tremont Temple), because the song is blasphemous and he would have liked to play it in a church. And in the introduction to “Cape Canaveral” he joked (was it a joke?) about how the world was going to end soon and how we should all get on the next bus out of here (via an alien pickup outside of Mexico City). The set featured two new songs that Oberst has been testing in live shows since the summer — “Kick,” about the KenCHELSEA FEINSTEIN / DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF nedys, and “You Are Your Musician Conor Oberst brought old and new tracks alive at the Orpheum Theatre on Thursday. Moms,” about a young boy growing up. The first just be spectators but could join in and sing To finish the night, Oberst played a showcased his signature lyrical poetry and along. three-song encore of “An Attempt to Tip cultural awareness, while the second was Oberst ran through two tracks off the last The Scales,” “Lua” and “Waste of Paint,” beautifully direct, almost like a lullaby. Bright Eyes album “The People’s Key” — the last two of which inspired word-for“At the Bottom of Everything,” Oberst’s “Ladder Song,” on which he played piano, word sing-a-longs from the audience. anthem off of what is arguably Bright Eyes’ and “Shell Games,” which he introduced by The show was short and sweet — a runmost consistently great album, was a high telling the audience to imagine him sitting down of classics by one of the premiere point halfway through the set. It was during on a tall stool on “MTV Unplugged.” songwriters of Oberst’s generation. And as this song that the audience really got into He then closed out the regular set with always, he left his audience anxious to see the show, realizing that they didn’t have to the beautiful “Laura Laurent” and “Breezy.” what he would do next.

Perceptive Rainbows

B

lack Moth Super Rainbow performed at the Paradise Rock Club last Monday to a mellow, jovial packed house. The band’s mastermind, Thomas Fec, wore a heavy jacket and a hat, though I cannot imagine it was chilly on the stage with all the lights, however blue they were. He was concealed behind the case of his vocoder synthesizer. When I got a chance to talk to him Thursday, he mentioned how much he did not like performing. The band definitely was

Melissa Papalcure MUSE Staff not “performing” in the sense that they were animated or doing acrobatics for the audience — they just played their music as the people they are, almost indifferently to the audience. The large projection of images behind the band moved slightly and peculiarly, setting a mood of contrast to the electronic and distant tones of the music. They juxtaposed natural, willowy scenes of nature with pulsing, refracted and repetitiously dreamy music. When a forest and a road unfolded

Photo Courtesy Jon Shedler

Black Moth Super Rainbow brought their traditional electronic sound to Paradise.

behind them, it was as if they were floating off into the scene, and the lights brought us along with them. I did not realize at first that the images were actually moving, that the leaves were blowing in the breeze. Soon the woods were replaced by smoke stacks, and later a graveyard. A mysterious blonde figure sat in the graveyard, peering onto the stage behind the band, as if listening along with us. Then the figure stood up and left the frame. Regardless of Fec’s claims of not having an ulterior message behind his work, the gap between the dissociative and technological forms of their music and the natural scenes they chose to accompany it cannot go unnoticed. He wants his audience to interpret the music as a complete individual, just as he performs it. I can’t help but wonder whether he believes we are floating away from nature, or if synthesized, technological melodies are somehow bringing us closer to the primal threads within it. The great thing about this breed of electronic music is that there are so many layers of understanding. There is the initially physical feeling that the beats and sounds evoke, but you have to strain a bit to understand Fec’s lyrics. At least live, I found it easier to slip only into the more base tones and sway along, rather than attempt to distinguish the meanings of the songs. In their new album, Cobra Juicy, the

most appealing track to me is “Windshield Smasher,” which the band played as one of their encore songs. It has been stuck in my head for days (“It goes on and on and on and on”). I prefer the recorded version to the one I heard live, which I felt lacked some of the violent and powerful energy within the song, since the band’s stage presence is so acute and motionless. The video opens with a decidedly “hip” and modern couple in their car, screaming at one another about the GPS. Fec’s lyrics “Show me the way you make my dreamin’ okay. You love my hair because it grows every day,” drift in to the pulsing, intense rhythms, as scary hoodlums come to beat up the couple’s car. The hoodlums are wearing masks of the BMSR orange logo, presumably designed by Fec. The huge teeth grin hauntingly at the couple as they forcibly brush their teeth, feed them birthday cake and shave off their hair. How this video is not critical of American culture, I cannot fathom. By not explaining their actions and choices, BMSR absolutely leaves the perception of their music up for complete interpretation. Their mellow and expressionless performance live also seems to address the truth of the human mind — we are vast thinkers and feelers even when we are silent, but time will go on and on in complete indifference to us.


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onday, december

10, 2012

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 42nd year F Volume 84 F Issue 53

Steph Solis, Editor-in-Chief Sydney L. Shea, Managing Editor Lauren Dezenski, Online Editor Emily Overholt, Campus Editor

Amelia Pak-Harvey, City Editor

Kevin Dillon, Sports Editor

Meaghan Kilroy, Opinion Page Editor

Divya Shankar, Features Editor

Abigail Lin, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

Gender-neutral housing on hold For years, Student Government has advocated for gender-neutral housing options at Boston University. Just when it seemed as though BU would implement the initiative at some point in the near future, as SG announced in October, the administration announced it would halt the housing plan indefinitely, bringing BU back to square one. Why did BU put gender-neutral housing on hold? The administration decided it has a number of other housing priorities to attend to, including preventing freshmen from being placed in Danielsen Hall and providing more housing options for transfer students, SG members announced at its final meeting Sunday. While it may be important for all freshmen to have the traditional dorming experience and for transfer students to have more housing options available, neither trumps the importance of making sure every student feels safe and secure in his, her or their living space. One might not look to Danielsen as providing the typical freshman experience — the dorm is located a few blocks off-campus and is mostly comprised of private bathrooms and suites — but most students do not come to BU looking for a traditional campus. In fact, many BU students look to the university’s academic programs, diversity and integration with the city as reasons to matriculate. For a number of students, BU appears to be a safe place for people of various backgrounds, philosophies, sexual orientations and genders. Yet while students appear to push one step forward, from gender-neutral housing to discussing genderneutral bathrooms, the administration seems intent on taking the university two steps backward. It is time that BU housing enters the 21st

century and accept that its students are not only ready for gender-neutral housing, but adamant about its implementation. By stalling the initiative, the administration ignores the needs of the transgender population on campus. NASPA, the Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education, state in a 2010 study that transgender-inclusive policies such as gender-neutral housing, can foster other transgender-positive policies. These policies would not only facilitate more secure living situations for people within the LGBT community, but it would make BU a more open-minded campus. And that seems to be what students want. SG received about 2,000 student responses in support of the initiative and about 700 signatures. After collecting student responses, personal accounts, statistical information and other details to push the initiative, SG lobbied for the best interests of students and convinced the administration to approve the measure. To back off now is a slight to not only the students who would apply for gender-neutral housing, but also to the members of SG who worked tirelessly to ensure that the initiative would pass. Gender-neutral housing is available at 92 American colleges and universities, according to the Transgender Law & Policy Institute. Within Boston, institutions such as Emerson University, Harvard University and Tufts University have adopted gender-inclusive housing options. If Boston University is to live up to its reputation as diverse and open-minded institution, it will have to join the ranks of others who have ensured that students of all sexual orientations and genders have sufficient housing options.

MOOCs growing in popularity Georgetown University joined the list of elite universities offering massive open online courses, according to an article in The Washington Post Sunday. In comparison to regular college courses and traditional online courses, MOOCs are courses that do not earn students credit, do not require a fee and are available to people outside the host school. Georgetown will partner with edX, a Web platform that offers MOOCs, according to the Post. In addition to Georgetown, more than 200 universities have expressed interest in working with edX since Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced their collaboration with the company in May, according to a statement on edX’s website. MOOCs are nothing new. The idea traces as far back as the 1960s. However, researchers attribute the hype to elite universities’ recent commitment to the movement. At Boston University, we have seen a similar. On Oct. 12, students and staff received an email from President Robert Brown about the formation of a council,

the Council on Educational Technology and Learning Innovation, to explore advancements in digital learning, MOOCs being one of the tools up for consideration. On one hand, BU would benefit from adopting MOOCs because of its role in bringing formal education to geographic areas where those opportunities are limited or non-existent. However, the university should not kid itself. It seems unlikely that many students will be motivated enough to enroll in such courses. It sounds like a nice idea — expanding skills for a summer or two — but when summer rolls around and we find ourselves working or making travel plans with our friends, are we really going to commit ourselves to these courses? Probably not. It should also be noted that while MOOCs are a great community service, they cannot replace traditional brick-andmortar classrooms. They provide little interaction with the instructors, if any. For people who have the opportunities to attend a traditional college, MOOCs should be considered a supplement to traditional education and a supplement only.

I

Status update ANNE WHITING

left Facebook this weekend in the name of Finals Week self-improvement. And I was overjoyedy to learn that the same day I dyeactivated, The New York Times’ Roger Cohen (my future employer) posted an op-ed about over-sharing on social media, to which The New Yorker’s Richard Brody (and I rather like him, too) wrote a commentary in response a few hours later. So though Facebook critiques are nothing new — I know you’ve heard all about virtual self-aggrandizement and the problem (is it?) of over-sharing and the potential superficiality, if not falsity, of online friendships — if Cohen and Brody are writing about something so ever relevant, so can I. Only they get more than 800 words. Not fair! Anyway. Cohen’s piece complained about today’s “unctuous ooze of status updates” and our general tendency to over-share, calling them “the two great scourges of the modern world” (the first world, that is — so many problems). The culprit for these woes, he said, is a society-wide anxiety that our personal statuses in our various community sects might be falling or “— the horror, the horror! — disintegrating.” And you know, it’s funny: when I turned off my account on Thursday morning, for a second it felt like I’d fallen off the edge of a very flat world and ceased to exist, like I’d just poof! disappeared mid-sentence at the table and left my poor friend Kubs talking to himself and his coffee. Naturally, I had a few fits of withdrawal. I accidentally visited the site a number of times, because typing “fa … ” into the URL box on Firefox is most often the first thing I do whenever I open my computer. (Similarly, the little blue app is the first button my thumb hits after I turn off the alarm on my phone in the morning. Instagram is the second. I’m an enlightened and modern human being, obviously.) “Come back, Jack,” said Kubs. So I did. I set aside “Paradise Lost” and reactivated. I signed onto Messenger. And then, suddenly, I freaked out and re-deactivated. I had failed. I had broken my covenant. Kubs later said that was a very Annie Hall thing to do, and I felt cool, singular. But more than anything I was surprised that a day’s worth of abstinence had actually quelled my desire to be part of things for the weekend. I wondered if something was wrong. Cohen argues that we overshare to stay relevant. And I almost wonder if my thus-far-brief leave of absence from Facebook isn’t actually a test of my own staying power. Not just to others, but to myself, too. Like, am I still alive sans social media presence? Am I less present in the world without an online presence? If there’s not a picture of my Saturday night meal on my wall, did I really eat it? Are Kubs and I still friends without daily spamming of each others’ walls? Are my thoughts still important if they don’t have 14 “likes” attached to them? Did I really have such an awesome time in Prague and Vienna if I don’t have any pictures to prove it? And does my boyfriend really love me if all I get are Facebook messages and no roses? Etc.

I’m guessing my communication and public relations internship supervisors, for whom I have tweeted my heart out and managed internationally visited social media pages, would say no. Why? Because these days, sharing legitimizes things. Privacy is so pre-Timeline. Life is less fun when you have to keep it to yourself. I want people to know where my friends and I went last night, how funny my Christmas lights look un-hung and lit up on the floor and what a great time I’m having on my travels over Christmas break. Sorry you guys. I can’t help that my life is really, really international and awesome. #jk Cohen didn’t write about the positives of oversharing, about the interconnectedness afforded by status updates, and likes, and comments. That’s where Brody comes in, reminding us that social media is actually a positive thing because such interconnectedness is “a fundamental human condition and value.” Facebook does foster friendships and communities. Everyone likes “Happy Birthday!” posts and filtered photos of artisan lattés with foam poured into the shape of a heart. For this reason, I want to share. I want interconnectedness. I want people to know how cute my cousins are in their Christmas sweaters, I want to re-post The Paris Review’s latest poem because I found it moving and I think everyone should watch the video I just watched of Britain’s Got Talent’s Charlotte and Jonathan singing their hearts out. (Watch it — it’ll bring tears to your eyes). Admittedly, I like newsfeeds, because for the most part, I like knowing what people have to say. All of it — the great, the boring, and the ugly. Facebook is social studies. And I am a social being. Yes, there rest those questions of whether or not the touch screen has replaced real human touch, “as cars replaced buggies and assembly lines replaced craftsmen” (Kubs’ insight). It’s possible that Facebook only supplies a mere pretense of the familiar and an un-genuine one at that. But I don’t have room on the page to go deeper into this. I’ll ponder later with Kubs over iMessage. And I’ll try to stay away from Facebook just a little while longer. I’ll be back soon, to keep in touch with Kubs over break and write a few notes of Christmas love to my surrogate family in Germany. But for the time being, I need to stop wasting minutes wondering if I should push the “share” button, and spend the holiday break on other things, like grad school applications or my reading list (without telling you what’s on it, though I promise it’s a really good one, you’d approve) or lunch with my Uncle Bob, all without updating my status. Anne Whiting is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences and a weekly columnist for The Daily Free Press. She can be reached at aew@bu.edu.

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Monday, December 10, 2012

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Terriers hold on to lead Maguire closes first half of season strong despite 5-minute penalty Maguire: From Page 8

Men’s hockey: From Page 8

glove-side high,” Hohmann said. “I just shot it up there and he made a really good save.” Halfway through the third period, BU had a scary moment when freshman defenseman Matt Grzelcyk took a puck off of his left ankle. He fell to the ice and got up slowly, in apparent pain. Freshman forward Wes Myron and senior defenseman Sean Escobedo helped him off the ice.  Fortunately for the Terriers, Grzelcyk returned to the ice after a few minutes of rest. Parker said the injury was just a bruise. All six BU defensemen, Grzelcyk included, became penaltykillers in the waning minutes of the game. At the 14:28 mark of the third period, senior forward Ben Rosen received a five-minute major penalty for boarding when he knocked down Maine captain Mark Nemec. The Black Bears recorded

three shots on that five-minute power play, but Maguire hung onto the rebounds and kept Maine off the scoreboard as capably in the last five minutes, just as he had in the 55 before. While Maguire was strong in net, the Terriers’ defense was just as stout. BU blocked 21 shots in the game, including five blocks from Escobedo. Hohmann was second on the team with three blocks. With the win, BU enters the winter break with twice as many wins as losses, and with its season series against Boston College, the University of New Hampshire and the University of North Dakota complete. According to USCHO.com, the Terriers have faced the toughest schedule in the nation so far. “We’re a team that’s going north, as we say,” Parker said. “We’re going in the right direction.”

his collegiate debut, said Maguire has come a long way since then. “He’s fallen into who he is now,” Parker said. “The UNH game to kick off the season for him really put him back on his heels a little bit to start with. “But now he’s recovered from that pretty nicely and when he went out and played as well as he did against North Dakota even though he lost that game, he played very, very well and came up with some big saves,” Parker added. “I think that was enough to get him settled down.” Saturday’s win over Maine (2–11–2, 1–7–2 Hockey East) may have been Maguire’s most impressive performance yet. He gave up a few big rebounds in the slot, but it never came back to bite him, and he kept Maine silent while BU had trouble controlling the pace of the game for the final 50 minutes. Parker is a believer that strong goaltending is a key to a successful penalty kill, and at the end of the

third period Maguire gave the Terriers just that. Senior forward Ben Rosen got a five-minute major penalty for boarding with 5:32 left to play, and BU successfully killed it thanks in part to Maguire, who stopped all three shots he faced. “[Maine] frustrated us a lot tonight and I think Sean Maguire came up huge,” said junior defenseman Garrett Noonan, who scored the only goal of the game 7:13 into the first period. Maine coach Tim Whitehead, who has run the Black Bears since the 2001–02 season and has seen the likes of Sean Fields, John Curry and Kieran Millan in BU’s net, was also impressed with Maguire. “He was great,” Whitehead said. “Certainly any time a freshman can come in and pitch a shutout and face some of the quality shots he did [it’s good]. I thought he played really well. I was very impressed.” Maguire is going to have to wait at least three more weeks before he plays again, as will the rest of the Terriers. But when BU returns to

action on Dec. 29 — the beginning of a 12-day span in which it will play Denver, RIT and Harvard — Maguire and fellow freshman Matt O’Connor may be splitting time in net. It would be a return to the plan Parker had before the season started, a plan to have the goalies platoon. O’Connor (.931 save percentage, 2.22 goals-against average) got off to a hot start, so that did not actually happen. O’Connor started 10 of BU’s 15 contests, and the longest stretch during which the netminders went every other game was four. Headed into the second half, Parker may have exactly what he hoped for at the beginning of October: a tight fight to be the number one goalie. “It’s nice to have two really good-looking goalies out there,” Parker said. “They’re both very confident, they’re both pushing each other and they’re both rooting for each other. “I’m sure they’re both feeling pretty good about their first half,” Parker added.

Sperry’s great performance leads BU to scoreless draw Women’s hockey: From Page 8

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Junior goaltender Kerrin Sperry stopped 38 shots in BU’s scoreless tie with Minnesota-Duluth.

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challenges in the first period when junior goaltender Kerrin Sperry stopped a shot from the crease and senior forward Isabel Menard blocked a shot on a picked up rebound. “They end up with a couple of unbelievable chances,” Durocher said of Duluth. “One goal could have meant a whole bunch tonight early in the game because it might have lead to a second or third one.” Sperry went on to stop 38 shots in the game, which ties the regularseason record she set against Boston College earlier this season. She also earned her second shutout of the year. “We needed Kerrin to make every one of the 38 saves she made tonight,” Durocher said. “She was spot-on strong.” Although the Terriers gave up 38 shots to their 19, Durocher said he did not think that BU struggled defensively. “It didn’t quite feel like 38 shots, but that’s what the total said at the end,” Durocher said. “We had to sneak out of there with a couple of one-point games.” As for the Terriers offense,

the team struggled to get shots on Black. BU, which was led by Poulin with five shots in the game, only mustered up 19 shots on goal. The Terriers also struggled at the faceoff dot, as none of its centers had a faceoff percentage above 50 percent. Poulin led the Terriers in that category as well, winning 9-of-19 draws in the game. The only Terrier to win more faceoffs than she lost was Lefort, who won the only draw she took. While Duluth has struggled at times this season, Durocher said he still expects the Bulldogs to be one of the top teams by the end of the season. “Duluth is a team that’s going to be reckoned with before it’s all said and done,” Durocher said. “Between them and Minnesota and Wisconsin they got all the national titles. They’ve been off to a little bit of a slow start for them, but I could see them getting a bit of a confidence boost in the second half. “You probably like these two ties then more than you do now,” Durocher added.

Women’s basketball to take on Harvard at Case Gymnasium Women’s basketball: From Page 8

going to take it one possession at a time and just try to keep them to their weaknesses.” The Terriers, meanwhile, will be looking to stay ahead in the turnover margin. They are currently averaging 15 takeaways per game for a plus-3 turnover margin. They will also need to remain solid in their stout perimeter defense and help out their forwards down low if they are going to contain the high-powered Crimson offense. One of the Terriers to look out for will be Agboola. Agboola is currently on a three-game doubledouble streak dating back to Dec. 1 when she dominated the St. John’s defense on BU’s way to a blowout victory.

Agboola has been able to consistently have her way in the paint, which has forced the opposing defense to focus on her, thus opening up the Terriers’ shooters who have been able to knock down open jump shots. In Saturday night’s contest, Agboola recorded 12 points on 5-of-9 shooting and pulled down 11 boards. Along with Agboola, Moran will also play a major role if the Terriers are to come out victorious. Leading the team in assists at over six per game, Moran will have to continue to be sharp with her decision-making and crisp with her passes against a team that averages nine steals per game. This is BU’s third-to-last nonconference game before America East play starts Jan. 2.


Quotable

We’re a team that’s going north, as we say. -BU coach Jack Parker on his team at the midway point in the season.

Page 8

Sports

Outfoxed

The Daily Free Press

The BU women’s basketball team took down Marist College in overtime Saturday, winning its third consecutive matchup. P.8.

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

Monday, December 10, 2012

BU escapes last-place Black Bears with 1–0 win at home Noonan’s 1st-period goal leads BU past Maine

Maguire earns another shutout at Agganis

By Annie Maroon Daily Free Press Staff

By Tim Healey Daily Free Press Staff

The victory could not have been narrower, but the No. 7 Boston University men’s hockey team defended a one-goal lead for about 53 minutes on Saturday against the University of Maine, winning 1–0 in its last home game of 2012. Freshman goalie Sean Maguire had 28 saves in the shutout, his second straight at Agganis Arena. The Terriers (10–5, 8–4 Hockey East) had just 21 shots to the 28 taken by the Black Bears (2–10–2, 1–6–2 Hockey East), Hockey East’s last-place team. BU coach Jack Parker opened his postgame press conference with an understatement: “Well, that wasn’t easy.” At first, it seemed it might be. BU opened the game with three and a half minutes of puck possession in Maine’s defensive zone. The Black Bears could not clear the puck or even catch up with BU’s quick passes, and their first line had to remain on the ice for about three times the length of a normal shift. Junior defenseman Garrett Noonan then opened the scoring at 7:13 of the first. On BU’s second power play of the night, he took a cross-ice pass from sophomore forward Danny O’Regan and ripped a slap shot past goaltender Martin Ouellette for his third goal of the year. “I was really concerned, because the way the game started, it looked like it was BU playing the Belmont Bantams,” Parker said. “We had complete control of the puck. … Then they got their legs and started playing a little better by the end of the first, and then they came out pretty hard after that.”

more forward Cason Hohmann cut in on the Maine net and was hooked by Maine forward Steven Swavely. He drew a penalty shot, the first of the season for BU. “I was really fortunate to get a penalty shot,” Hohmann said. “I didn’t think it was much of a penalty at all.” Hohmann veered slightly to the left as he came in on goal, then snapped off a wrister that Ouellette gloved without much trouble. “I was kind of thinking about going five-hole, but then he gave me the whole

With the University of Maine on the power play at the end of the second period Saturday night, Black Bear forward Kyle Beattie managed to get a last-second shot on net from just outside the crease. Boston University (10–5, 8–4 Hockey East) freshman goaltender Sean Maguire closed his pads as the buzzer went off, and turned his head to look in the goal. No puck. Then he opened his pads. Puck. It was Maguire’s 21st save on a night he recorded a perfect 28 en route to No. 7 BU’s 1–0 win over visiting Maine, his second straight shut out. The first came in the only other home game of his young college career, a 4–0 victory over St. Lawrence University on Nov. 24. “I was really happy for Sean Maguire,” said BU coach Jack Parker. “Back-to-back shutouts in front of the home crowd and he was really poised in net.” The consecutive whitewashes are part of a longer stretch in which Maguire has not allowed a goal in more than 130 minutes, dating back to the third period against the University of Vermont on Nov. 16. In his last four games Maguire has put up a .956 save percentage and a 1.26 goals-against average. In other words, one outlier — an embarrassing Oct. 20 loss to the University of New Hampshire in which he allowed four goals in half the game — is the only thing from preventing Maguire (.930 save percentage, 2.00 goals-against average in five games) from having a very impressive first semester. Parker, who attributed the UNH blowout somewhat to the goalie’s nerves while making

Men’s hockey, see page 7

Maguire, see page 7

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Junior defenseman Garrett Noonan scored the Boston University men’s hockey team’s only goal in its 1–0 victory over the University of Maine. Late in the first, sophomore forward Evan Rodrigues became the latest in a long string of Terriers to be called for embellishment. Maine defenseman Brice O’Connor hooked Rodrigues as he skated into the Maine zone, but the official ruled Rodrigues exaggerated his fall. The call was the sixth embellishment or diving call against BU since Nov. 3. After BU’s dominant start, the balance began to shift. Maine picked up its pace and finished the period even with the Terriers in shots, 9–9. Then they outshot BU 11–8 in the second. At the 15:08 mark in the second, sopho-

Women’s hockey ties twice in Terriers earn overtime victory in games at Minnesota-Duluth road contest against Red Foxes By Meredith Perri Daily Free Press Staff

In a weekend that saw the No. 7 Boston University women’s hockey team’s captain reach the 100-point mark quicker than any other Terrier, and the team’s starting goaltender stop 38 shots in a single game, the Terriers extended their undefeated streak to six with two ties against the University of Minnesota-Duluth. “It was two really good hockey games,” said BU coach Brian Durocher. “There was a lot of good energy, they played hard and I was certainly impressed with Duluth.” After traveling out to AMSOIL Arena Friday, the Terriers (11–3–3, 6–2–1 Hockey East) started off the weekend series with a 2–2 tie Saturday afternoon. Senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk gave BU an early lead about halfway through the first period when Kohanchuk and junior cocaptain Marie-Philip Poulin skated down the ice on a 2-on-1. Poulin slid Kohanchuk the puck from the right side, allowing Kohanchuk to slide the puck by Bulldog netminder Kayla Black. From that point on, neither team scored until the third period, when Duluth (7–8–3) defenseman Brigette Lacquette tallied her sixth goal of the season to tie the game. The Bulldogs took the lead 13 minutes later on a goal by forward Zoe Hickel.

That lead would not last long, however, as senior defenseman Kathryn Miller scored her first goal of the season just over a minute and a half later to tie the game. Senior cocaptain Jill Cardella connected with fellow co-captain Poulin, who then sent the puck over to Miller. With the assist, Poulin tallied her 100th career point as a Terrier. While Poulin is not the first Terrier to reach the 100 mark, she is the fastest to reach the plateau as she did so in just 58 games. “It’s great for her, and it’s another accomplishment that she has in her great hockey résumé,” Durocher said. “I’m sure she deflects some of the credit to Jenelle and to [freshman forward] Sarah Lefort and her teammates here, but we all know she’s an outstanding player that helped to get a tie there in the first game of the series.” Little did the Terriers know that Saturday’s 2–2 tie would involve all of the scoring for the weekend, as BU and the Bulldogs competed to a 0–0 tie Sunday. “We probably stole a point [Sunday],” Durocher said. “I like the fact that our team competed really hard [on Sunday] and defended hard.” The Terriers faced some of their biggest

Women’s hockey, see page 7

The Bottom Line

Monday, Dec. 10

W. Basketball vs. Harvard, 7 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec. 11 Men’s Basketball @ Harvard, 7 p.m.

By Matthew Fils-Aime Daily Free Press Staff

Riding a three-game win streak into Poughkeepsie, N.Y., Saturday, the Boston University women’s basketball team (7–3) endured a hard-fought battle that ended in a 62–56 overtime victory over Marist College. Leading all scorers was senior guard Mo Moran, who scored 14 points on 4-of11 shooting and also added six assists and five rebounds. The Terriers had four players in double figures Saturday night, as junior forward Rashidat Agboola, senior guard Chantell Alford and junior guard Danielle Callahan each played well offensively. As time expired at the end of the second half, Alford got a shot off that would have served as the go-ahead score for the Terriers, but she missed and the game moved into overtime. Held to just nine points in regulation, Alford, the Terriers’ leading scorer, made a critical layup in the overtime’s opening minutes and was fouled to give BU a 54–51 lead. With its next possession, Alford connected on a mid-range jumper to extend the Terrier lead to 56–51. They would not let up, as they sank foul shots late in the game to solidify the victory.

Wednesday, Dec. 12

No Games Scheduled Vince Young tweeted at Larry Fitzgerald offering help to a Cardinals team that has had poor quarterback play ...

Thursday, Dec. 13

Looking ahead to Monday night, the Terriers will host a surging Harvard University team in Case Gymnasium. Also riding a four-game winning streak, the Crimson (7–2) have been gelling offensively of late and are averaging just fewer than 70 points per contest. On the strength of a strong back court, the Crimson currently have three players averaging 10 or more points per game. Their leading scorer, guard Christine Clarke, is averaging 17.6 points per game and three assists. “Every single year they’re a very good offensive team,” said BU coach Kelly Greenberg. “They always have very solid players who are well-skilled and can really shoot it.” As a team, the Crimson are currently shooting 46 percent from the floor and 44 percent from beyond the arc. In their season opener, they hit nine 3-pointers in an 80–62 victory at the College of the Holy Cross. Defensively, the Crimson are giving up just under 63 points per game, holding opponents to 40 percent shooting and forcing nine steals per game. “We’re going to play our man-to-man like we have been,” Greenberg said. “We’re

No Games Scheduled ... Young, who called last year’s Eagles team the “Dream Team,” is looking for a place to play ...

Women’s basketball, see page 7

Friday, Dec. 14

No Games Scheduled ... Considering he threw nine interceptions in three games last year, any team is likely a Dream Team to him.


12-10DFP