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The Daily Free Press

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue III

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MO’BAMA More photos from the inauguration, Page 2.

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Tuesday, January 22, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

ROBO HOME

Smart appliances could change your home, page 5.

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NEW NOONAN

Men’s hockey seeks footing after tough weekend, page 8.

WEATHER Today: AM light snow/High 26 Tonight: Partly Cloudy/Low 7 Tomorrow: 18/5 Data Courtesy of weather.com

Hub bars violate food licenses, receive warnings BU students more cautious after 3 campus robberies By Amira Francis Daily Free Press Staff

After a hearing in front the Boston’s Licensing Board Tuesday, Mary Ann’s Bar and the Beacon Hill Pub were given warnings for violating their food licenses, but some students questioned the law requiring bars to sell food. Several bars in the Boston area have been given warnings for violating their food licenses. The suspicion began when Boston Police Department implemented police officers in Great Scott, O’Brien’s Pub, Mary Ann’s Bar and the Beacon Hill Pub, said Nicole Murati Ferrer, chair of Boston’s Licensing Board. Ferrer said bars in possession of a common victualler’s license, a license that allows an establishment to sell both food and liquor, must sell food. The food sold by each establishment varies according to what they presented to the board, Ferrer said. “It’s on a case-by-case basis,” she said. “I can’t tell you what would qualify as food in one place versus another. It also depends on what was originally presented to the board. If you originally presented to the board that you were only going to serve muffins, then muffins are enough.” After the bars’ hearing on Tuesday, the board found that Great Scott and O’Brien’s Pub do serve food, fulfilling their victualler’s license, but not at the time the police officers were in the establishments, Ferrer said. Mary Ann’s Bar and the Beacon Hill Pub admitted to not serving food at all, Ferrer said.

By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

you’re on the lease, you better make sure, number one, things don’t get out of control, and, number two, you don’t have students who are under the legal age of drinking,” Evans said. Chenlong Zuo, a School of Public Health second-year graduate student who lives in the GAP area, said he did not notice a difference in police presence this weekend, but thinks the initiative will be helpful in reducing partying and underage drinking. “It’s always good to know the news that they are increasing the police,” Zuo said. West Campus resident Danielle Cutts, a College of Arts and Sciences freshman, said she noticed the change this weekend. “Parties just ended sooner and everybody seems to be more on edge about partying, so there’s definitely a difference,” Cutts said.

Boston University students said they are more careful walking around West Campus and Brookline after three BU students were robbed in three different instances, one of which involved an armed suspect, on or near the Charles River Campus late Friday night and early Saturday morning. “Just knowing that there are more cops around may scare robbers into rethinking their decisions and make the area a safer place,” said Rivah Clemons, a College of Communication freshman. “I just avoid the area altogether because crime has been so frequent there the past few semesters.” Clemons said BUPD’s efforts to prevent more robberies are apparent. BU Police Chief Thomas Robbins said in an email sent to the BU community Saturday afternoon at least one individual robbed in each instance was a BU student. There were no injuries reported in any of the three incidents. “The BUPD and area police departments will be providing additional patrols to these areas over the holiday weekend to prevent and deter criminal activity,” Robbins said. “ … Although your chances of being the victim of a crime are small, your personal commitment to your own safety is crucial.” Robbins said while BU is in a relatively safe area, criminal activity is consistent with urban life. The first robbery occurred at 1065 Commonwealth Ave., next to the Shaw’s Supermarket at about 11 p.m. A BU student was walking alone in an alleyway when two males approached him. The first suspect was described as a white male in a North Face jacket standing between 5-foot-6 and 5-foot-8, of thin build with a possible righteyebrow piercing. The second suspect was described as an Asian male of muscular build. The suspects robbed the victim of his cellphone, Robbins said. At about 12:15 a.m. Saturday morning, three people, one of whom was a BU student, were stopped by whom they described as two white males on St. Paul Street in Brookline. The suspects presented a black handgun and took various items from the victims, including smartphones, Robbins said. The first suspect was described as 6-foot-2

Drinking, see page 2

Robberies, see page 4

HILLARY LARSON/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Boston-area bars have been given warnings by Boston’s Licensing Board for violating food licenses.

An anonymous source from Mary Ann’s Bar said he thought the snack machine in Mary Ann’s acted as the sale of food. “As far as I know, we have a snack machine and that satisfies the requirement for food service,” he said. Other bars given a warning by the licensing board declined to comment. Ferrer said the bars would not have to go

through the process of applying again in order to change their license. “All Beacon Hill and Mary Ann’s would have to do is file a petition to change the classification of their license from a common victualler to a general law premise license,” she said. “They wouldn’t have to go through the process of applying again, they just have to change the

Bars, see page 2

10 arrests in first weekend of increase BPD drinking patrols By Rachel Riley Daily Free Press Staff

Ten students from local schools including Boston University were arrested for alcohol-related offenses on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, with several others summonsed to court, Boston Police Department officials said. These charges are the result of BPD’s effort to increase weekend patrols in the lower part of Allston, including Gardner, Ashford and Pratt Streets, also known as the GAP, in order to reduce underage drinking. “We’re dedicating several officers on nights where students tend to party, and their sole job is going to be riding around making sure things aren’t out of control,” said BPD Superintendent William Evans. Evans said the offenses police are targeting include disorderly houses, underage drinking and disruptive behavior. In cases

of parties where underage drinking is present, students on the lease will be arrested. “Our goal is to stop the students from hosting these parties that get out of control, and we feel the quickest way to do that is to hold those responsible for hosting the parties,” he said. “Sometimes, we can take enforcement against the student visiting the home, but ultimately, the student hosting the party where minors are found should be held responsible.” Allston residents voiced concerns at a recent community meeting, which prompted the increase in patrols, Evans said. “A lot of the residents down there have put up with a lot of loud parties and vandalism and everything else,” he said. “This stepped-up effort will hopefully improve their living conditions.” Evans said students hosting out-of-control parties will face criminal action from the BPD. “If you’re going to host a party and

COM senior honored to cover presidential inauguration with BU students, faculty By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

College of Communication senior Deedee Sun said, while covering the presidential inauguration, she was struck by the energy of the American people and the historic significance of the moment. “You could really feel the enthusiasm of the crowd and it was just an amazing experience.” Sun is one of the students Boston University News Service sent to Washington, D.C. to cover the 57th presidential inauguration Monday, along with other associated events. Walter Montaño, BU’s Washington, D.C. program intern director, said Sun was one of 13 students covering the 72 hours surrounding Obama’s second inauguration. “They are out in the crowd and covering the parade — doing all of the reporting,” he said. “Anything political or historic we try to have a student cover.” Sun covered the Inaugural Parade and interviewed Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick for news outlets local to Boston, she said. She was on the

National Mall at the same time as Obama. Sun’s interview with Patrick was later aired on New England Cable News. “One of the things we asked was if after his term if he [Patrick] is going to work for the Obama administration because that is rumored and going all around,” Sun said. “Also, [we asked] if he is going to appoint someone for [Secretary of State nominee John] Kerry’s position.” Sun said she and her fellow student reporters contacted Patrick through his media team and benefitted from R.D. Sahl’s journalistic reporting experience. “It was really helpful to have a College of Communication professor who was established in the field there, even though I feel as if BU students are very proficient at what we do, it was helpful to have R.D.,” she said. “He knows D.C. like the back of his hand and was able to give great pointers.” Montaño said faculty members accompany

Inauguration, see page 2

BILLIE WEISS/BU NEWS SERVICE

Spectators gather on the World War II memorial in Washington, D.C. on the day of the Inauguration of President Barack Obama.

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Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Student reporters accompanied by faculty on D.C. trip to cover inauguration

BILLIE WEISS/BU NEWS SERVICE

Police officers line Constitution Avenue leading toward the West Front of the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. on the day of the 57th Presidential Inauguration.

BILLIE WEISS/BU NEWS SERVICE

Sharletha Rayford of Memphis, Tennessee cheers alongside Constitution Avenue in Washington, D.C. as she listens to the swearing-in ceremony for President Barack Obama on the day of the 57th Presidential Inauguration. Inauguration: From Page 1

students while they are reporting to give guidance and advice. “We have two to three faculty members working to set up roadmaps for what stories we are going to cover, such as inaugural balls, interviews with Deval Patrick and various people here,” Montaño said. “Here we show students what political reporting is all about.” Sun had the opportunity to go to the Green Inaugural Ball, an event

thrown in Washington, D.C. by environmental communities and other similar organizations to celebrate the President and Vice President. Sun said she gained valuable experience because their pieces had quick turnarounds and because there was a lot expected of her as a reporter. She also had the opportunity to work with BU News Service, which is a multimedia content outlet. “Everyone is going to be a multimedia journalist whether you’re

studying print or broadcast or photo,” Sun said. “Everything is going to have to do multimedia content and that is what BU News Service really is.” Sun said the weekend exceeded her expectations and was a great opportunity for her as an aspiring journalist. “It’s the nation’s capital and the inauguration is a day in history,” Sun said. “You’re experiencing history in the making.”

SAR freshman: forcing bars to sell food is ‘silly’ Bars: From Page 1

classification if they choose not to serve food anymore.” Some students questioned the law that requires bars to sell food if they have this license. Anna Lee, a Boston University freshman in the Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, said the law requiring bars with a victualler’s license to sell food is ridiculous. “If you have a license, you have to serve food? That’s really silly. If

you have a driver’s license, does that mean you have to drive?” she said. Laura Cha, a College of Fine Arts sophomore, said she understood why the bars might want to sell just liquor instead of food. “A pub with food attracts a different crowd than one with only alcohol,” Cha said. “It turns into more of a restaurant than a bar, and maybe that’s not what they want. Also, food management isn’t necessarily a cheap thing.” Cha said she didn’t understand why the bars didn’t change their clas-

sification. “The law is a little flawed, but if you have to adhere to it, why not just change your license? It seems like an easy enough process to me,” she said. Other students said they would like to go to a bar that sells both food and liquor. “I didn’t know it was illegal for bars not to serve food when they have a food license,” said Brian Ferreri, a College of Engineering junior. “I would rather go to a bar that serves both food and liquor. A snack machine isn’t really serving food.”

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BILLIE WEISS/BU NEWS SERVICE Spectators cheer along Constitution Avenue in Washington, D.C. as they listen to the swearing-in ceremony for U.S. President Barack Obama on the day of the 57th Presidential Inauguration.

CAS freshman: Mood of party area noticeably different, tense “They [the police] have other issues that they need to be more concerned with,” Allen said. “Hence, the three robberies that happened the other night.” CAS senior Melina Vanos said increased police presence will not help prevent underage drinking and partying. “I think they’ve tried to do this in the past and it really hasn’t done much,” she said. “I think since everyone knows where to get alcohol, just having the police around isn’t really going to stop them.”

Drinking: From Page 1

Cutts said the increased patrols will only be partially effective. “It already seems like it’s helped a little bit, but there’s still going to be parties and there’s still going to be drinking,” she said. “There’s only so much that people can do.” Rachael Allen, a College of Communication sophomore, said the BPD’s initiative will not make an impact because students will grow to resent the police and their presence in the GAP area.

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Campus & City

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

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Parent’s money Forest Whitaker honored with MLK Fellowship Casinos compete for Massachusetts linked to lower Before an audience of about 400 gambling licenses GPA, study says people Monday, the Howard Gotlieb By Alexa Heupel Daily Free Press Contributor

By Taylor Burke Daily Free Press Staff

College students who receive financial support from their parents tend to have lower grade point averages but higher graduation rates, according to a recent study, which Boston University faculty said reflects a greater sense of responsibility resulting from financial independence. The study, conducted by Laura Hamilton a professor University of California, Merced, will appear in the February issue of the American Sociological Review, according to a Tuesday Merced press release. The GPA portion of the study surveyed about 12,000 undergraduates and found those who received some portion of aid from their parents had lower GPAs than those who did not. “Although the effect is not linear, and, ironically, the most harm comes from initial aid, increasing investments provide a gradual drag on student GPA,” the study stated. The study also found students with no parental aid have a 56.4 percent predicted probability of graduating, whereas students who receive $4,000 in parental aid have a 62 percent predicted probability of graduating. “I think that when people don’t do well in their courses, they start to wonder ‘maybe it’s not for me,’ if they’re paying for it for themselves,” said Jessica Griffin, School of Education manager of financial assistance. “But if someone else is paying for it, it’s not the same connection or investment, mentally and financially.” Griffin said financially independent students might have a more personal understanding regarding whether the college experience is right for them. “I have graduate students and almost all of my students are paying for their education themselves,” she said. “They push themselves very hard to make sure they’re doing well.” SED professor Joel Scott said he is not surprised by the results of the study. “This is something that they [students] are going to have to work on and accept, and for those that have too much parental support, it maybe takes them longer to understand that this is their journey,” Scott said. “Maybe their GPAs reflect that, versus the students that immediately ...

See Full Story Online

Archival Research Center at Boston University honored actor Forest Whitaker as a Martin Luther King Fellow Monday to recognize his humanitarian work. After being honored, Whitaker spoke to the audience in Metcalf Hall on King’s legacy and the importance of fighting for equality. “Without Dr. King’s fervor, dedication and passion our country would be in a different condition,” Whitaker said in his speech. “Without his efforts we would not be the same as we are today; without his seemingly lofty idea of justice through non-violence our nation may still be as divided today as it were when he was born.” Whitaker, an award-winning actor, director and producer who won an Academy Award for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in 2006’s “The Last King of Scotland,” said King’s dream is still relevant in today’s society. “This progress did not happen overnight or by accident,” Whitaker said. “It happened because of people like him who dared to turn an ideal into a reality, to persevere in turbulent times, propelling us into greater times.” Whitaker said he chooses roles in his career that highlight the social injustice in the world and increase social awareness.

By Zarah Kavarana Daily Free Press Staff

HEATHER GOLDIN/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF Forest Whitaker speaks as a part of the Martin Luther King Jr Leadership Lecture at Metcalf Ballroom Monday evening.

It is essential for people to find fulfillment in their lives, he said. “A little advice: go out into the world and find what you are truly passionate about,” Whitaker said. “Find what that is and just follow it. Never mind that it may be crazy. Never mind that it may be farfetched. Never mind that there may be competition, just keep the dream alive inside yourselves.” Whitaker has been a Goodwill Ambassador for Peace and Reconciliation for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization since 2011, he said in his speech. Whitaker also furthered his humanitarian efforts in 2012 by founding the PeaceEarth Foundation, which focuses on his dream to achieve peace. Ryan Hendrickson, the Assistant

Director for Manuscripts at the Gotlieb Center, said the MLK Fellowship is awarded to individuals who promote activism and leadership. “The Director [of the Gotlieb Center] looks for somebody who has some kind of essential contribution to make some kind of effort to help other people or change other people’s lives,” he said. “This year we [chose] Forest Whitaker because of all the humanitarian work in Africa and other places in the world.” Since 2008, the Gotlieb Center has recognized Christine King Farris – MLK’s sister – Paul Rusesabagina and Georgia Rep. John Lewis as MLK Fellows. Hendrickson said Whitaker was a natural fit for the MLK Fellowship.

Whitaker, see page4

MBTA mTicket smart phone app brings in $1 million By Clinton Nguyen Daily Free Press Staff

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority’s mobile ticketing application, mTicket — which was released in November — surpassed $1 million in sales revenues Tuesday, officials said. “I’ll tell you, the app exceeded what we expected,” said Joshua Robin, MBTA director of innovation. “If anything it’s speeding up and it’s gathering more people who hear about it and try it out.” The app, released on Android and iOS platforms in early November, garnered more than 35,000 downloads and more than 100,000 tickets have been purchased, according to a statement released by the MBTA Wednesday. “The development and implementation of mobile ticketing for

our Commuter Rail customers represents not only an improvement in service and convenience, but also in the way we are collecting revenue,” said Dr. Beverly Scott, general manager of the MBTA in a statement. “We are still early in the effort but we feel we are saving thousands by not installing expensive vending machines, saving on ticket production and eliminating cash transactions – all while making riders’ commutes easier.” A Lowell rider at 5:40 a.m. on Tuesday pushed the mTicket sales over the $1 million mark. The rider was contacted and congratulated by T officials, Robin said. The app saw a predictable drop in ticket sales during the holiday week of Dec. 23 to Jan. 1. In 2013 ticket sales have increased by about 25 percent, with a large proportion

of revenues owing to monthly ticket purchases, according to statistics published by the MBTA. Marketing and advertising for the app has been light on account of low budgets, Robin said. He said the app relied mostly on word of mouth and media reports to increase circulation. “Advertising has consisted of ads on trains, in stations, and street teams,” he said. “We have also been giving out small advertising cards to riders who purchase on board.” Robin said he hopes the app will account for 25 percent of sales by the end of 2013. “About 76 percent of riders owned a smartphone or app-capable mobile device,” he said. “We notice there’s a market there to reach, and it’s a matter of using the right strategy to get out to those riders.”

See Full Story Online

After Massachusetts opened its doors to the gaming industry in 2011, 11 firms have applied to receive extended gaming licenses to expand into Massachusetts. The Massachusetts Gaming Commission has received applications from a number of entities interested in the opportunity, including MGM Springfield, Penn National Gaming, Inc., Plainridge Racecourse, Hard Rock MA, Wynn, LLC, Mohegan Sun, Sterling Suffolk Racecourse, Raynham Park, Mass Gaming Entertainment, LLC, PPE Casino Resorts and Crossroads Massachusetts, LLC. The Expanded Gaming Act sparked the need for an application process in November 2011. Elaine Driscoll, MGC director of communications, said the act was passed in an attempt to bring more jobs and increased revenue to the state. “With the arrival of expanded gaming, it is expected that there will be an additional 8-to-10 thousand construction jobs created by the builders of the gaming facilities, 8-to-10 thousand permanent jobs, and then $300-to-$500 million in increased revenue,” she said. The MGC has employed multiple teams that will conduct in-depth background investigations for all category one (resort casino) and category two (slots-parlor) gaming license applicants. The teams are made up of gaming experts who have experience in many types of investigations, Driscoll said. In the investigations, team members will uncover each company’s history in other jurisdictions, financial stability, recent litigation and compliance plan and history, Driscoll said. Before making any decisions, they will also analyze officers, board members, and key investors of the applicant, looking for employment history, criminal records, education, stockholdings and finances, she said. Driscoll said investigations would take six months to complete at most and that the process will not be easy for applicants. Along with the application, they each pay a non-refundable fee of $400,000. “I would say that ultimately it will be a very competitive process,” she

Casinos, see page4

Allston Pudding music blog offers more content to more readers By Jasper Craven Daily Free Press Staff

With a revamped website that went live Jan. 15, and an audience that has doubled over the past year, the Allston Pudding music blog has distinguished itself for more than its silly name. Allston Pudding was named Boston’s Best Music Blog the past two years at the Boston Music Awards. And its redesigned site might warrant a third award. New features include an upcoming shows page, a musical news section, video content and a “heating up” feature that offers music of the hottest underground bands. The founders are marketing the blog more heavily. And, perhaps most importantly, they are writing about more bands in more venues, and even considering branching out

to other cities. “The blog could one day even expand to other cities, but we have a lot of work to do at home first,” Daniel Schiffer, a co-founder said. Allston Pudding began in November 2010 when Schiffer, Perry Eaton and Jarrett Carr — three Boston University students — felt as if they had passed through the first half of college with no substantial accomplishments. “We were kind of having a midcollege crisis or slump,” Eaton said. “And we wanted to start something completely our own.” The founders decided to combine their skills and passions into a blog. Eaton had his own small music blog, Carr was a graphic design student and Schiffer was in the School of Management.

“It was the three powers combined that launched it,” Eaton said. Carr quickly hacked away a website on Tumblr, and Allston Pudding went live. “We ended up with something that was admittedly heinous,” Carr said about the first site, which has since gone through two full redesigns. Still, with a page to post content, the writing began. The blog publishes varying content, most frequently live music reviews. The blog also features opinion, interviews and show previews. Allston Pudding also releases local music in free mixtapes that are released monthly and hosts shows where local bands perform. Carousel, a poppy band of former

Allston Pudding, see page4

COURTESY OF ALLSTON PUDDING

Allston Pudding staff manager Ellie Moliter and co-founders Daniel Schiffer, Perry Eaton and Jarrett Carr accept an award at the Boston Music Awards in 2012.

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Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Brookline PD, BUPD, BPD investigating 3 robberies near campus Robberies: From Page 1

with a large nose, wearing a white, hooded sweatshirt and black jacket, and carrying the handgun. The second suspect was described as 5-foot11, of heavy build and wearing a black, hooded sweatshirt and a red scarf around his face. A BU Alert was sent to students about this incident early Saturday morning. At about 1 a.m. on Babcock Street, a female BU student was sitting alone on a set of steps and was

pushed to the ground by suspects she described as a black male and a black female. The suspects took a small sum of cash and her cellphone, before driving away in an old, black sedan. BUPD, Brookline Police Department and Boston Police Department are investigating the incidents. Robbins said in the letter students can help protect themselves by concealing their valuables, walking in groups and reporting any suspicious activity to BUPD immediately. BUPD’s phone number is located on

the back of every Terrier card. “Together we share the responsibility for maintaining a safe environment,” Robbins said. “Each one of us can improve our community’s welfare by reporting crime and unsafe conditions, and by helping others.” Georgia Hutchins, a College of General Studies freshman, said she lives in the area of the third robbery and finds it uncomfortable. “I live on West Campus and my window looks out on Babcock Street where one of the robberies happened,” Hutchins said. “I didn’t go

out that night so I was glad I stayed in, but that area in particular creeps me out.” Hutchins said not everyone at BU comes from a metropolitan area, so some might be unfamiliar with how cities can be more dangerous than rural areas. “Police should patrol that area more, especially on the weekends, but their resources are limited because there are so many dark places in Allston and Brighton,” Hutchins said. “It’s not part of the campus so I feel like it’s more up to the students

making wise decisions when going out.” Sebastian Siembieda, a School of Management sophomore said he still feels unsafe walking home, especially because he lives off campus. “The walk home from where many BU students live — Allston, Brookline and Fenway — isn’t exactly brief,” Siembieda said. “It’s appalling that [Boston University Shuttle] service doesn’t even go to South [Campus] or 1019 [Commonwealth Ave.] on a regular basis, let alone off campus.”

Casino applicants must pay non-refundable $400,000 fee to MGC Casinos From Page 3

said. “Right now, however, we’re in a phase when we’re determining their own suitability.” Kelley Tucky, vice president for community and public affairs for MGM Resorts International, said she remains confident despite the intense level of difficulty and competition. “We have been really inspired and energized by the local partners and supporters,” she said in a phone interview. “We’ve had hundreds of volunteers who have visited our com-

munity office and they have offered to write letters, to put up yard signs, and to simply be our ambassadors, so we feel very confident about the opportunity there.” Tucky said the community is attracted to the 300,000 jobs MGM Resorts has promised to the community. “In a city where economic development is a number one priority, jobs fit that bill,” she said. Phase two of the application process is expected to be released in summer 2013, and will deal with the

applicant’s site-specific plans. MGM has already decided its location would be in Springfield, Tucky said. “The city has significant cultural and business amenities already in place, such as Union Station, MassMutual Center, and Symphony Hall,” she said. “And the proposal we’ve put together supplements those existing cultural and business jewels — if you will — that are already in Springfield.” Philip Hebert, president of the

Palmer town council said he has “mixed feelings” about the potential of a large gaming facility moving into town. He has no qualms about the increased jobs and revenue Mohegan Sun would bring if it were chosen, but he has great concerns about increased traffic and crime brought on by a greater population. Despite his own opinions, the decision is one the entire Palmer community will make, he said. “It’ll have to be a community agreement along with input from the

council in concern for the citizens,” Hebert said. “It’s going to be put to referendum vote, and it could either go on from there or just be done with it. The ultimate vote comes right down to the people. We can’t override their vote, nor should we.” Town decisions will have to be made after the end of 2013, when slots-parlor licenses will be awarded, and on Feb. 26, 2014, when the first resort casino licenses will be awarded, according to a Jan. 11 MGC press release.

Introduction for Forest Whitaker given by CFA senior Hampton Fluker Whitaker From Page 3

“Forest Whitaker is one of those rare individuals who embodies [MLK’s] dream and is a courageous leader in his own right, which is why we recognize him on this important day,” said Hampton Fluker, a College of Fine Arts senior who introduced Whitaker at the fourth MLK Leadership Lecture Monday. Fluker said Whitaker embodies King’s selflessness while staying

alive in the world. “I think selflessness and being truly aware is what makes a great artist, I also believe it is what makes great people,” Fluker said. “This trait was in MLK and honestly I feel it is in Forest Whitaker.” Students who attended said they found his speech inspirational, especially as Monday was U.S. President Barack Obama’s second inauguration.

“It was inspirational of him to tie everything back together and show how relevant everything still is today through his whole connection to dreaming,” said Mary Lynne Detoni-Hill, a College of Communication junior. Detoni-Hill said while Whitaker is one of her favorite actors, she was unaware of his humanitarian role. College of Arts and Sciences sophomore Sidhanta Mehra said

Whitaker’s position in the industry as well as in the world as an actor just gives him a better platform to make people aware of what is going on. “He made us think about what there is to do in society for students, especially my age, who can definitely work with other students and the resources the university provides to make that tiny, little difference he was talking about,” Mehra said.

Casi Kadangs, a School of Public Health graduate student, said she was fascinated by Whitaker’s speech. “I liked how he shared stories about his life and the challenges he had to go through, and how he’s worked hard to never let his dream die,” she said. “I just felt very inspired by all the work he’s done around the world and in the country.”

Allston Pudding targets local hip-hop scene next

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Allston Pudding: From Page 3

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Berklee School of Music students, was written up in Allston Pudding in the band’s infancy. They have since moved to Brooklyn, N.Y., produced two EPs and have begun to tour nationally. “It was great being covered by them early on,” said band member Kevin Friedman in an email. “They were one of the first blogs to check us out. Allston Pudding really introduced us to the underground Boston music scene we know today.” The underground Allston music scene, a mix of grungy garage punk and psychedelic rock, has been the

main subject of Allston Pudding content. But Schiffer said the blog is consciously trying to branch out of this one scene. “There is a ton of music in Boston that we want to start covering going forward,” he said. “There’s a great hip-hop scene we haven’t tapped into. That’s our next frontier.” The blog started out with three founders contributing work, but has grown to about 30 writers and photographers who produce all the content. No one is paid, unless you count the free tickets given to cover shows. The founders, who are not paid, said they started the blog to see free music shows, and that it is still payment

enough. “As much as I’d love it to be, the blog is nothing that’s going to pay the rent, at least not yet,” Eaton said. “It just may always be a labor of love, which is something I’d be perfectly fine with.” Going forward, Eaton said the blog will not break its allegiance to local music. “Our priority and our allegiance is to Massachusetts music,” he said. “But, I think going forward we see it as a benefit to these local artists to put them on the same platform and mention them in the same breath as the buzzed-about, nationally touring bands.”

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Household appliances get “smart” Stephanie Post

I

Features Staff

f walls could talk, what would they say? What about appliances? With the rapidly developing technological field, this concept may soon become a reality. Although household appliances may not be able to talk now, they will be able to connect to smartphones, tablets and the main databases of the companies that created them. At the three-day Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas beginning Jan. 8, manufacturers such as Whirlpool and LG introduced new household appliances capable of connecting to their owners’ smartphones and tablets. These new appliances will use Wi-Fi networks and alert consumers to change filters and schedule maintenance. Others will allow owners to send emails, play music and use Bluetooth technology. The conference debuted other emerging technologies, such as touch-screen washing machines with “smart diagnosis,” touchscreen refrigerators that hope to revolutionize food management and app-controlled robotic vacuums. While these technologies serve widely different purposes, they do have a common goal, aside from convenience they will eventually cut back energy consumption and costs for consumers. What is a ‘smart appliance’? A smart appliance uses sensory technology to adjust itself according to electricity prices and available energy, according to SmartPlanet, a website that explains technology and business. For example, a thermostat may automatically lower its temperature during a month that heating prices are high, saving the consumer money and preserving energy. These appliances are generally hooked up to Smart Grids. According to Smartgrid.gov, a Smart Grid is a digital technological device that allows for communication between the utility or appliance and its customers. Similar to the Internet, Smart Grids will have controls, computers, automation and the coordination of new technologies and equipment. However, unlike earlier technologies, these electrical grids will respond digitally to electrical demands. These Smart Grids will be the main databases for many upcoming smart appliances and will help control energy intake based on abundance and cost. Ultimately this will reduce monthly bills and conserve energy. Cutting back on energy consumption While these new contraptions do hold some “cool” factor, the companies behind them are focused on reducing overall energy usage. Massachusetts is ranked 16th for total residential energy usage in the entire nation, putting it within the top 30th percentile of residential energy users, according to the sustainable energy website eredux.com. The United States Energy Information Administration calculated that 30.6 percent of Massachusetts’ total energy consumption is within the household, which happens to be the second largest consumer, only falling 2.2 percent short of the number one consumer, transportation. These different developers plan to reduce these numbers on a national scale through new smart technology inventions.

connected with their belongings and family while they may be away.” The creation of “smart” security systems, as described on the ADT website, allows consumers to check the safety their households before they arrive home. With these systems, homeowners can arm or disarm alarm systems via remote control. In addition, households with an abundance of smart appliances — also referred to as “smart houses” in a National Multiple Sclerosis Society article — can increase the independence of those living with decreased mobility.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY KIERA BLESSING / DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

A recent conference displayed the future of technology, branching out from smartphones and laptops to refrigerators, vaccums and washers and dryers.

How can ‘smart appliances’ help reduce our energy intake? The new smart appliances debuted at the Consumer Electronics Show will predictably decrease energy intake in the average household. These appliances will allow consumers to control household settings in accordance with their daily lives, even while away from home. Some appliances, such as the Nest thermostat, will learn the consumer’s schedule from the adjustments he or she makes to it, according to Phys.org, a technology and research news service. It will also sense the consumer’s presence and consequently adjust the temperature when he or she is home. This particular thermostat can also detect when no one is home and adjust itself using its ‘Auto-Away’ program. Appliance programs such as this can lower heating bills and conserve energy while keeping your home at its desired temperature. In addition to altering one’s household heating, some smart appliances at the conference will allow the consumer to turn off lights through his or her smart phone or tablet. This allows owners to digitally turn lights off that were accidently left on, resulting in decreased electricity use and costs. Pricing Although these technological advances may be convenient, new products can also be costly. “If smart technology does follow the plans of phones and tablets then people will spend more money as they become corralled into a tighter marketplace with fewer options,”

said Mark Correia, a Boston University professor of instructional technology, in a phone interview. “Many of the smart appliances currently being developed are expensive and serve little purpose.” Correia used “the Hue,” an app-controlled LED light bulb developed by Philips, as an example. “It costs $299 for three light bulbs, and while this looks very cool, it is expensive considering it basically either dims the bulb or changes the color,” Correia said. Jeffery Fox, a School of Education junior, said it is important to remember that onceexpensive appliances are now small expenses for the average American. “Eventually, this technology will be affordable for everyone, just based on how most technology costs change,” Fox said. “DVD players were hundreds of dollars 15 years ago, and now they’re often less than $20. More research will be done, the technology will become more efficient and cost effective and most people will be able to afford it.” Other uses for “smart appliances” While the ability to turn on a dishwasher from another room will not reduce an electric bill, it might make day-to-day activities more convenient. Drew Salad, an SED sophomore, said these new systems not only make life more convenient and affordable, but can also make life safer. “Now people can control heat, light and check on the status of their house from afar on their own,” Salad said. “It’s very helpful for people who are interested in staying

BU Sustainability Program Through the Sustainability@BU program, there have been several ways that BU has attempted to cut back on its carbon footprint. With regards to energy usage, BU has changed the lights that are used, and has even come up with ‘Computer Energy Settings Recommendations’ to help cutback on energy use with regards to computers. College of Communications junior Alex Wagner, said he believes this program is making a difference at BU. “BU has definitely done quite a bit with regards to sustainability,” Wagner said. “Everyone seems to be dedicated to finding alternates to energy usage and using less energy. BU is definitely heading in the right direction.” In the past six years, BU has gone from using 1.60 Million MMBtus to approximately 1.45 Million MMBtus with just a few simple changes around campus, according to the statistics provided on the BU Sustainability website. Some of these small changes include Mugar Library lighting retrofits, the ‘Turn Off the Lights’ movement and Computer Energy Saving recommendations. Although BU has not gotten too involved with the “smart appliance” movement just yet, they too are showing genuine concern for energy usage, and are trying their hardest to cut back on the university’s intake. The future of smart appliances Hopefully within a few years, smart appliances will become readily available to the average consumer. With this new technology, consumers will be alerted when energy usage is at its highest during the day and will automatically cut back its own consumption, allowing the user to know that he or she is using that appliance in the most energy-efficient, inexpensive way possible. Smart appliances may seem like an expensive, futuristic toy now, but BU technology education professor Katya Vigil said they will change in the future. “As this new technology hits the market, prices will come down, and the technology will become commonplace,” Vigil said. However, Correia said he is more skeptical. He said smart appliances are too restrictive and that people should are capable of creating their own smart technology without investing in major companies. Although the topic of smart appliances can be controversial, with the fast pace of technological developments, soon it will be normal for our lights to turn on when we arrive at home, or for our homes to be set at our favorite temperature the minute we step inside.

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January 22, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 3

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan Online Editor Jasper Craven, City Editor Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Page Editor

Kaylee Hill Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

Obama highlights progressive agenda in inaugural speech

To a crowd of excited supporters, U.S. President Barack Obama rang in his second term with a speech that heartily embraced a progressive agenda based firmly on promoting equality and opportunity in our nation’s ethos — two concepts entirely fitting for the national holiday that served as a backdrop for the event, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. “All men are created equal,” he reminded us in King-ly fashion before delving with the usual eloquence and élan into his plan to promote social and economic betterment over the course of the next four years. Obama’s second inaugural address outlined a plan for the continued promotion of gay rights, racial and immigrant assimilation, gun and violence control, better education and an addressing of climate change. With no re-election on the horizon this time (and no fear of critique or obsession with image — culprits of American political corruption), the President seemed able to endorse and push the more left-leaning agenda to which he aspires. The next four years, ostensibly, will be dedicated to promoting and pushing into action a much more controversial legislation than what we’ve seen during the last term. (In years past, Obama has been criticized for failing to incite the change he called for during the last election.) “We, the people, still believe that our obligations as Americans are not just to ourselves, but to all posterity,” Obama said

before addressing the need to focus more national attention on the issue of climate change, and effectively summing up what the New York Times called Obama’s version of modern liberalism. In recalling for equality in the U.S., he is effectively endeavoring to reestablish national unity. Inequality is what hinders America from achieving whatever greatness of which it’s capable. Deeming equality the American people’s “lasting birthright,” Obama called for Americans to embrace his cause with “solemn duty and awesome joy.” “With common effort and common purpose, with passion and dedication, let us answer the call of history, and carry into an uncertain future that precious light of freedom,” he said. And if his address wasn’t enough to make clear his progressive agenda, Obama’s choice of inaugural administrators was a pointed display of his attempt to embrace and promote social equality. His inaugural poet was Richard Blanco, who read his poem “One Today,” and who was the first immigrant, first Latino, the first openly gay person and the youngest to be the U.S. inaugural poet. Additionally, Sonia Sotomayor — the Supreme Court’s first Hispanic justice — became the first Hispanic to administer the oath of office. We anticipate watching Obama’s plans unfold over the course of his next term in office. And we congratulate his staunch and passionate defense of social progress.

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Crime communication In the case of campus crime, notifying students quickly is crucial, and the BU Alert system may be falling short. After robberies around campus seemed to peak last September and October, Boston University students were victim to three more robberies this weekend, one of which was armed. The first robbery occurred at 12:15 am on Saturday. The BU Alert system notified the student body of the event at 1:05 am. According to the alert, three victims, one of whom was a BU student, were robbed at gunpoint near St. Paul Street and Freeman Street in Brookline. The Daily Free Press reported Saturday that, as aforementioned, there were in fact three separate robberies that took place that night, despite only one alert warning students of one robbery. The first occurred near Shaw’s at about 11 p.m. Friday. Two male suspects robbed a BU student of his cellphone. The second was the armed robbery. The third instance involved a female BU student at 1 a.m. sitting alone on her steps on Babcock Street. She was pushed to the ground and robbed of cash and her cellphone. The Boston University, Brookline, and Boston Police Departments are investigating the incidents. In the meantime, however, BU stu-

dents are beginning to complain about the lack of crime alert communication by the BUPD Alert System. BU Alert text messages were sent late if at all, meaning that students were unaware of the breach in their safety and the safety of their classmates until after the fact. It is true that defeating crime entirely on an urban campus is impossible. Risk of robbery — especially at night — is part of going to school in the city, and it’s important to remain generally aware of this. But students should be made aware as soon as possible when there has been dangerous activity in their area so that they can take the necessary precautions to prevent being robbed themselves. Delay in reporting instances puts other students at risk. Communicating issues of safety is the most important thing. Additionally, it is the most effective way of making students feel safe. If BU Alerts won’t do that important job, there needs to be a better system of letting students know that their urban campus is, in fact, dangerous. Perhaps the increased weekend patrols of campus-area parties by the BUPD will aid in reducing the amount of robberies. Continue to watch your safety: walk with friends, and walk in more populated areas whenever possible.

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Tuesday, January 22, 2013

7

Track begins Terriers penalty trouble leads to losses against NU, UMass Track: From Page 8

ko Brady (8.77 seconds), freshman Sophie Jacsurak (8.92), and senior Julia Mirochnick (9.15) placed first, second and third, respectively. Another event the Terriers dominated was the men’s 3000m. Senior Robert Gibson posted the top time in America East so far this season, winning the race with a time of 8:19.49. Sophomore Aaron Somoroff placed third, finishing in 8:26.75. He was followed by fourth-place finisher freshman Kevin Thomas, who had a time of 8:27.85 in his collegiate track debut. Lehane had particular praise for Somoroff’s performance, which he said was a personal best. “That was a gigantic improvement,” Lehane said. “Last year he struggled through an up-and-down year due to injuries and things like that, and worked hard all summer, and got hurt again — couldn’t run cross country. But to see him do that today, that’s pretty cool.” The Terriers also fared well in the men’s high jump, with junior Connor Sullivan (1.97m) and Arsenault (1.92m) claiming the top two spots. Other individual victories included Page in the 60m dash (6.95 seconds) and freshman Reuben Horace, who excelled in his collegiate debut with an America East season-best of 18.33m in the weight throw. “[Horace is] doing really well,” Johnson said. “He’s a strong competitor, and he was ranked very high coming in nationally in high school. He wants to be better, and he’s working very hard.” Johnson said the solid performance by her team will help it moving forward, starting with the Terrier Invitational this weekend. “It does well for [the team’s] confidence,” Johnson said. “We’ve been training since the summer, so coming off the whole summer, the whole fall, and now seeing the fruits of your labor, it looks good for them, and they feel good about it. They’re showing that all that hard work is paying off.”

Men’s hockey: From Page 8

The Terriers’ lead did not last the period though, as UMassLowell forward Joseph Pendenza finished off a crisp cross-ice pass from sophomore Scott Wilson. The Wilmington native scored his eighth goal of the year with the effort.  After finishing the first period without a penalty, the Terriers found themselves in the sin bin quite a bit in the second period. In a span of less than five minutes, BU took four penalties, including a tripping from sophomore defenseman Alexx Privitera and a high sticking from senior defenseman Sean Escobedo that led to a 5-on3 Lowell advantage.  “[We took] real stupid penalties,” Parker said. “[We] took ourselves out of the game over and over again. It’s amazing we were in that game because of what we did with penalties.”

The River Hawks took the lead on that power play when defenseman Chad Ruhwedel blasted a slap shot over freshman goalie Matt O’Connor’s shoulder for his fifth goal of the season. Wilson made the pass at the blue line to set up Ruhwedel for his second assist of the game. Instead of coming out and tying the game up to start the third period, the Terriers fell further behind the River Hawks fewer than two minutes into the frame. UMass junior Derek Arnold forced a turnover at BU’s blue line and wasted no time firing a wrist shot over O’Connor’s right shoulder for his third goal of the season.  Lowell added another goal while shorthanded later in the period. Forward Adam Chapie skated past freshman defenseman Matt Grzelcyk on a two-on-one and beat O’Connor over his shoulder again with a wrist shot. The

goal, which was Chapie’s third of the season, was unassisted.  BU’s power play came right back and answered Chapie’s goal though, as sophomore forward Evan Rodrigues fired a low shot past Carr for his third goal and fifth point of the weekend. Privitera set up the goal with a long pass through the slot.  Not long after, the Terriers pulled themselves within one, thanks to a nice give-and-go play between sophomore forward Cason Hohmann and senior captain Wade Megan. Megan chipped the puck into the offensive zone for Hohmann, who feathered a touch pass back to Megan on the doorstep for the easy goal. It was Megan’s teamhigh 12th goal on the season and Hohmann’s team-leading 16th assist.  “Yeah it was perfect, he’s an unbelievable passer,” Megan said of Hohmann’s pass. “I just went

to the net and it was right on my stick and I just poked it in.” BU seemed like it was on the verge of a comeback until some bad penalties appeared to put those chances to rest. At 14:13 in the third, junior assistant captain Garrett Noonan was called for spearing Carr, which earned him a five-minute major penalty and a game-disqualification. Even with the penalties, it looked like BU had a chance to tie the game back at four. With fewer than two minutes to play, Grzelcyk rang a wrist shot off the crossbar with Carr down and out of the play. It was the fourth post the Terriers hit that night. “When things are going wrong, things are going wrong,” Parker said. “That kind of doubles up, too. We can whine about the pipes if we want to, if we didn’t give the game away with the penalties. But we beat ourselves tonight.”

Noonan lets frustration show with bad penalties in losing effort Noonan: From Page 8

Friday vs. Northeastern, after BU scored three in a row only to see the Huskies reclaim a 6–5 lead, Noonan capped off the game with a five-minute slashing penalty with four seconds left. The defenseman followed that up with an embellishment minor — a penalty that Parker abhors — before his spear Saturday. “There’s no place for it,” said UMass-Lowell coach Norm Bazin of the spear. “And I don’t know

why you would take a penalty like that in that juncture of the game.” Although Parker said Noonan has been “terrific” leadershipwise since being appointed assistant captain at the end of the fall semester, Noonan has admitted to being frustrated with his own performance. Noonan made a big splash in his sophomore campaign by netting 16 goals, tying him for second on the team, but this year the tallies have not come nearly as easily. Last year’s familiar sight

of Noonan flying down the wing to bang home a rebound or crossslot pass has been much less common this time around, taking away a big part of the offensive defenseman’s game. Noonan and the Terriers will likely straighten themselves out, particularly with a relatively weak second-half schedule. Noonan has already matched his assist total from last year (11), and with 14 games remaining in BU’s regular season, the Norfolk native has time to make up ground.

That number will be 13 at most for Noonan, though, who will have to sit out as a result of his game-disqualification when his team visits Providence College Friday. As if anticipating Saturday, a somber Noonan sung a familiar song after Friday’s loss. “We will be better,” Noonan said. “This team trusts each other and we are going to bounce back and everyone in that room believes.”

Alford’s impressive shooting leads to BU defeat of UNH W. Basketball: From Page 8

er with a game-high 22 points. She shot 8-of-15 from the floor and buried six treys while also grabbing 13 boards. “There were some breakdowns that we had that gave [Reed] wideopen threes,” Greenberg said. “Really only one of her six threes were contested, and she’s the type of player that if she’s open, she’s going to knock it down.”

Alford led the Terriers in scoring with 13 points. She also added four assists and five rebounds to her stat sheet, and was named America East player of the week for the fifth time this season after averaging 17 points and five rebounds per game. Alford shot 50 percent from long range, hitting eight of her 16 3-point attempts on the week. Against UNH, Alford was able to hit three shots from deep, putting her at 220 career threes made, the

most in program history. Also producing offensively was Agboola, who came close to yet another double-double with 11 points and eight rebounds. Senior captain Mo Moran also scored in double figures, adding 11 points and five assists. Callahan connected on three treys to finish with 10 points. The Terriers’ current 13-game win streak is reminiscent of last season when they were able to open conference play with a 13-

game win streak. Their longest streak is 19 games, set by the 2008-09 squad. Looking ahead, the Terriers will face one of their toughest tests of the season when they host Albany in Case Gym at 7 p.m. Wednesday. The Great Danes are coming into this matchup a perfect 5–0 in conference play. The game will determine the sole owner of the top spot in America East.

Dom Morris, Malik Thomas lead team effort in BU’s win over UNH Men’s basketball: From Page 8

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Dom Morris scored 18 points in BU’s victory over UNH Saturday afternoon.

under control and held on for the 69–59 victory. The win was largely due to BU’s ability to share the ball and score with players other than stars such as Irving, Watson Jr. and Robinson. Morris, who is emerging as one of the team’s top players this season, played a fantastic game, scoring 18 points and grabbing

four rebounds. “Outside those first three games, [Morris has] taken a big step,” said BU coach Joe Jones. “He did a great job.” Morris said he was happy with his big offensive performance. “I just came in with a clear head [and] played hard knowing we needed a road win,” Morris said. “I just left it all out there on the court. I felt that I had to step up and be a bigger offensive

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threat.” Thomas also played a significant role in the Terriers’ victory. He played a well-rounded game, recording 11 points, four rebounds, three steals and an assist. “Malik Thomas played well, with a lot of energy,” Jones said. “That really helped us, got us going. We felt that Malik needs to be the x-factor for us, and we … talked about the kind of things he could do to have a bigger impact

on the game.” Jones said he was pleased with the victory, which ended a threegame road losing streak. “It was a great bounce-back game for us,” Jones said. “We obviously got drilled earlier this week and I was really interested to see how we’d respond to that. We did a very good job of that, coming on the road and getting our first [conference] win [on the road].”

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Quotable

We can whine about the pipes if we want to, if we didn’t give the game away with the penalties. But we beat ourselves tonight.

-BU coach Jack Parker on the men’s hockey teams effort over the weekend.

Page 8

Terriers succeed in season opener By Sarah Kirkpatrick Daily Free Press Staff

With several strong performances, including those of graduate students Katie Matthews and Zachary Ray, the Boston University track and field team had an impressive showing to begin its season Thursday at a multi-team meet at the BU Track and Tennis Center. Matthews, who was named an All-American in the 5000m in 2011, competed in the 3000m for the Terriers and won the race with a time of 9:14.71. Her time is the top time in the nation so far this season, nearly four seconds ahead of Cornell’s Rachel Soma, who ran a 9:18.17 earlier this season. During the race, Matthews said she was focused on trying to run as fast as possible. “I ran a 9:07 a couple weeks ago [at an intrasquad meet], so I wanted to run faster than that. But there was really nobody around me, so that made it more difficult,” Matthews said. “I was thinking that I wasn’t running fast enough, because I was supposed to be at a little bit of a quicker pace.” Distance coach and assistant director of track and field, Bruce Lehane, said he was plenty impressed by Matthews. “Katie ran very well. Of course, the only person disappointed in that is probably Katie,” Lehane said with a laugh. Lehane said while Thursday evening’s performance was solid, she needed to continue improving. “She’s clearly a national-class runner,” Lehane said. “So that’s the challenge. You’ve got to walk this fine line. You don’t want to use up her best energies too early, because the competition’s going to get way harder down the road. So she needs to be ready for that.” Lehane didn’t doubt Matthews’s ability to stay focused, though. “You really don’t need to motivate her at all,” Lehane said. Ray, a transfer student from the University of Maryland, also had a big day for BU in his first competition in a Terrier uniform. He placed first in the 60m hurdles with a time of 8.09 seconds, and won the long jump with a mark of 7.16m. Additionally, he combined with juniors Stephen Vitale and Brian Leonard and senior RJ Page to win the men’s 4x400m relay (3:20.09). Track and field Director Robyne Johnson had nothing but good things to say about Ray following his strong showing. “He has improved on some things,” Johnson said. “He is a real, true competitor, and he’s very talented, so I expect to see some very good performances from him this year.” Ray was not the only Terrier hurdler to have a good day. Vitale placed second in the event, with a time of 8.52 seconds, while senior Samuel Arsenault finished fourth with a time of 8.83 seconds. On the women’s side, senior Nik-

Track, see page 7

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The BU track and field team started off its season with multiple impressive performances in its first meet. P.8.

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Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Men’s hockey struggles, drops pair of games Noonan going through rough patch

BU falters in comeback attempt

By Tim Healey Daily Free Press Staff

By Kevin Dillon Daily Free Press Staff

On Jan. 10, in the midst of a rough stretch in which the No. 11 Boston University men’s hockey team is still mired, junior assistant captain Garrett Noonan walked into the small coaches’ room for a post-practice, one-on-one meeting with BU coach Jack Parker. Noonan looked nervous. “He had nothing to be nervous about,” Parker said immediately after the meeting, which came one day after BU (12–9, 9–6 Hockey East) blew a three-goal lead to Harvard University before losing in overtime. “He has a lot of equity in his account. All that good playing from last year and all that great defense from first semester. “But he’s certainly struggling a little bit,” Parker added. Two weekends later, the Terriers are still stuck in a slump, most recently losing back-to-back games to Northeastern University Friday and then-No. 15/18 University of Massachusetts-Lowell the next day. Parker said after Saturday’s 4–3 loss to the River Hawks (13– 7–1, 7–6–1 Hockey East) Noonan has been playing better of late, but it was in part his misguided actions late in the game — a fiveminute major spearing penalty

TAYLOR HARTZ/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Junior assistant captain Garrett Noonan contributed to BU’s penalty trouble in its losses to Northeastern and UMass-Lowell. and game-disqualification — that killed the Terriers’ comeback attempt. The then-No. 9 Terriers had scored twice in the third to draw within one goal. But after Noonan was ejected 14:13 into the period, BU spent most of that time on the penalty kill. “I haven’t seen that from him in a while,” Parker said of Noonan letting his emotions get the best of him. “Saw some of that last year once in a while. We’ll figure that out.” However, Parker didn’t offer

any answers as to how, exactly, the team will “figure that out,” and Noonan loosing his cool is not necessarily anything new. Against Denver on Dec. 29 — BU’s first game after its break, and the first game in this slide — Noonan repeatedly crosschecked a Pioneer late in the game before tag teaming him with junior defenseman Patrick MacGregor. Noonan got away without a penalty, but his frustration boiling over was evident with him playing the body and not the puck.

Noonan, see page 7

The then-No. 9 Boston University men’s hockey team came close to a comeback again, scoring two goals in the third period after falling behind 4–1 to the University of MassachusettsLowell. However, just like the night before against Northeastern University, the comeback fell short and the Terriers lost, 4–3. “Too little, too late,” said BU coach Jack Parker. “But competitiveness was back in a lot of guys, which is nice.” BU (12–9, 9–6 Hockey East) got the scoring started with a nice play by a newly formed third line. Senior forward Ben Rosen made an impact on the score sheet after being moved up a line by kicking a loose puck up to his stick and sending a backhanded shot on Lowell (13–7–1, 7–6–1 Hockey East) goaltender Doug Carr. Carr fumbled the rebound and freshman forward Matt Lane was there to knock in the puck for the game’s first goal.  The goal was only the second of Lane’s career. The last time he put the puck in the back of the net was at the University of North Dakota on Nov. 3. 

Men’s hockey, see page 7

Terriers extend winning streak BU defeats New Hampshire in to 13 with win over Wildcats important America East contest By Matthew Fils-Aime Daily Free Press Staff

Riding a 12-game win streak into its matchup against the University of New Hampshire, the Boston University women’s basketball team found itself in unfamiliar territory — facing a halftime deficit for the first time in conference play — but battled back in the second half to escape with a 55–53 victory. Junior forward Rashidat Agboola connected on a layup to open the game and give the Terriers a 2–0 lead, but they quickly went cold, missing 10 consecutive shots before junior forward Whitney Turner put in a layup. The Terriers struggled shooting in the first half, and they trailed 23–19 while taking a 25.9 shooting percentage into the locker room at halftime. “We were missing a lot of shots,” said BU coach Kelly Greenberg. “We were getting the shots we wanted, [but] we just missed a lot of them.” Scoring has not been an issue for the Terriers this season, as they currently sit second in America East with 63.2 points per game, trailing only the University at Albany.

In the locker room, Greenberg was faced with an anomalous task — rallying her players for a second-half comeback. “I talked to them a ton about being sharper,” Greenberg said. “Every game we’ve been taking care of business, and all of the little things that we’ve been working on in practice we’ve been doing very sharply. And defensively, more than offensively, we weren’t so sharp.” The Wildcats shot 45 percent from the floor in the first half while also shooting 40 percent from beyond the arc. The Terriers came out stronger in the second half, tying the score at 30–30 7:38 into the final frame. BU jumped out to a 54–38 lead 16:39 into the second half, but a 3-pointer by guard Cari Reed ignited a 15–0 UNH run to come within one point, 54–53, with four seconds remaining. Reed fouled junior guard Danielle Callahan with two seconds left. Callahan made the first shot and missed the second, but senior guard Chantell Alford secured the offensive rebound to preserve the BU victory, 55–53. Reed was UNH’s leading scor-

W. Basketball see page 7

By Chris Dela Rosa Daily Free Press Staff

DURHAM, N.H. – On Saturday afternoon, the Boston University men’s basketball team was able to rebound from a painful loss and beat the University of New Hampshire, 69–59. After losing 75–48 to Stony Brook University last Tuesday, BU (9–10, 3–3 America East) was up against a less daunting opponent in the Wildcats (4–13, 0–5 America East). Going into the meeting, the Wildcats were in the midst of a seven-game losing streak. At first, things did not seem to be going in BU’s favor, as New Hampshire won the tip and immediately got the ball to one of its best players, forward Patrick Konan. Konan tried a layup and was denied, but he got his own rebound and scored. Junior forward Dom Morris, who has finally begun to produce consistently in the paint, was able to tie up the game with a layup of his own. After Morris’ layup, UNH and BU exchanged shots for the first 15 minutes. The Terriers were ahead the entire time, their lead fluctuating between two and five points.

At 14:49 in the half, the Wildcats only trailed 23–21, but BU’s sharpshooters made sure their lead did not disappear. First, sophomore forward Malik Thomas hit a jump shot, which he immediately followed up with a block on New Hampshire forward Ferg Myrick. Thomas’ block led to a fast break by the Terriers, and junior guard DJ Irving found junior forward Travis Robinson open for a 3-point attempt, which he sank. Within a matter of minutes, the Terriers were able to turn the twopoint lead into a seven-point lead. They headed to the locker room at halftime ahead 31–24. BU began the second half right where it left off. In the first eight minutes, the Terriers were able to extend their lead to 16 points. After a 3-pointer by Irving, New Hampshire called a timeout in an attempt to regroup. They then cut a 16-point deficit into a seven-point deficit in five minutes. Unfortunately for the Wildcats, freshman guard Maurice Watson Jr. hit a 3-pointer 14:04 into the final frame, and from that point on, BU kept the Wildcats

Men’s basketball, see page 7

The Bottom Line Tuesday, Jan. 22 No Events Scheduled Tom Brady completed just 29 of his 54 pass attempts in the AFC championship...

Wednesday, Jan. 23 W. Basketball vs. Albany, 7 p.m. M. Basketball @ Albany, 7 p.m.

Thursday, Jan. 24

No Events Scheduled ...Apparently he mistakenly thought his wide reciever was Manti Te’o’s girlfriend.

Friday, Jan. 25

W. Track Terrier Invitational @ TTC, 2 p.m. W. Hockey @ Vermont, 2 p.m. M. Hockey @ Providence, 7 p.

Saturday, Jan. 26 M. Basketball vs. UMBC, 1 p.m. W. Basketball @ UMBC, 2 p.m. M. Hockey vs. Providence, 7 p.m.


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