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The Daily Free Press

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue XXIV

STAY IN SCHOOL BPS considers new school zoning plans, page 3.

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Thursday, February 28, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

END HUNGER

MUSE staffer sits down with makers of hunger documentary, page 5.

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RE-LAX

WEATHER

Women’s lacrosse begins season with win, page 8.

Today: Showers/High 47 Tonight: Rain/snow/Low 34 Tomorrow: 41/32 Data Courtesy of weather.com

SMG adds 3 new deans to develop programs 3 Mass. candidates By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

To keep up with expanding business in digital technology, health sciences and sustainability, Boston University’ School of Management hired three new deans to oversee programs at the school and around the world. Kristen McCormack, the new assistant dean of sector initiatives, said the primary objective of the new deans is to customize students’ learning to provide more in-depth and applicable experience. “These fields cross every industry whether it’s the use of digital technology in any industry, the impact of climate change on any industry or the impact of healthcare accessibility,” McCormack said. “These are all forces happening across the world that affect the global economy, so our role is to make sure students gain the deep, practical experience and functional excellence.” SMG officials announced the new deans in two Feb. 21 press releases and one Feb. 20 press release. David Nersessian will become assistant dean of global programs and Deborah Marlino, will become associate dean for academic affairs and student programs. McCormack said she was the Faculty Director for Public and Nonprofit Management program prior to being promoted. She has been at BU for 12 years and started her new position two weeks ago. “Providing students with an opportunity to gain tools to solve global problems makes

prepare campaigns for Markey’s seat By Erica Shulman Daily Free Press Contributor

Private lenders offer few options other than graduated repayment, meaning the payments increase as the years pass, which decreases the monthly payment but effectively increases the total interest paid by the borrower, Chopra said. CFPB officials hope to recommend alternatives based on the public’s response to their request. “Unfortunately, while debt burdens for students have increased, wages for new college graduates have not,” Chopra said. “When adjusting for inflation, wages have actually slipped for new college grads according to some data.” CFPB officials are collecting the public’s opinions until April 8, at which point they hope to have enough information to make recommendations for policy changes, possibly on that very same day, Chopra said. “There have been — in other contexts in other consumer financial markets — different types of repayment options, such as temporary offers of interest-only payments or temporary

U.S. Rep. Ed Markey is favored to win the special Massachusetts senate election later this year, according to some recent polls, possibly opening his state congressional seat. In reaction to Markey’s senatorial candidacy, local politicians have announced bids to fill Markey’s current seat. Three local politicians have filed papers with the Federal Election Commission for candidacy in the race for Markey’s seat in the fifth congressional district of Massachusetts. Mass. Sen. William Brownsberger, a Democrat from Belmont, Mass. Sen. Katherine Clark, a Democrat from Melrose and Mass. Rep. Carl Sciortino from Medford are each hoping to make the jump from state to national politics by becoming a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. “It’s a great opportunity to carry the priorities I have been working on up to the national level,” Brownsberger said. Brownsberger represents the Second Suffolk and Middlesex district. He assumed office in January 2012 and was a member of the Mass. House of Representatives from 2007 to 2012, according to Brownsberger’s website. Brownsberger said he feels passionate about issues such as human rights, women’s rights, LGBTQ rights, climate change, education reform and fiscal responsibility. “I will be a candidate who refuses to accept special interest money in the campaign,” he said. “If you look at the quality of work I have been doing — the commitment to dealing in a very honest and independent way with each of the issues that we face.” Clark has been a member of the Massachusetts Senate since 2011. Prior to her senatorial stint, she served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 2008 to 2011. Clark is the Senate Chair of the Joint Committee on the Judiciary for the current legislative session. She was appointed to this position Jan. 31. Clark announced her run earlier in February in an email to her supporters. “I am running for Congress,” she said in the email.  “I want to put my experience to work for the people of the fifth congressional district. Throughout my career, I have stood up for the families of Massachusetts. I will

Loans, see page 2

Markey, see page 2

GRACE WILSON/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The School of Management appointed three new deans in the last week.

me really excited,” she said. “It’s about having a positive social impact, and most of the issues and the crises we are facing on a global scale like the decline of natural resources or fundamental models can be solved by business.” Nersessian said in an email his first day as assistant dean Wednesday was a wonderful experience because he can now give back to BU, his alma mater. “My goal is to spend a great deal of time

listening to my administrative and faculty colleagues and to students to help formulate SMG’s global strategy,” he said. “Our priorities will be anchored within the One BU concept and the globalization endeavors at the university level.” Nersessian said his responsibilities entail broadening efforts to expand global engagement opportunities for undergraduate and

SMG, see page 2

CFPB aims to gather public input on private loans By Katia Rar Daily Free Press Staff

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is looking to gather input on private student loans from borrowers and lenders, a policy Boston University faculty and students said will bring beneficial reform and lead to fewer student loan defaults. “The data are pretty clear that students are stuck with huge amounts of loans and then they default on it,” Sambuddha Ghosh, an economics professor. “Reform is a good start to helping graduates.” When unable to pay off student loans, the consumer has no choice but to default, Ghosh said. This is problematic for the borrower, who damages his or her credit history, and for the lender, who loses a substantial amount of money. CFPB officials announced a report outlining their plans, titled “Request for Information Regarding an Initiative to Promote Student Loan

Affordability,” to find options that would make private student loans more available and affordable to students Thursday. CFPB officials are attempting to make student loans more affordable by requesting information and suggestions from the public, said Rohit Chopra, the student loan ombudsman for CFPB in a Thursday news conference. “This effort complements existing productive discussions with student lenders and services, many of whom see repayment flexibility as a way to better serve their customers and get fully repaid,” Chopra said. “We hope to hear further input on how to promote affordable repayment options and stem the tide of student loan distress, delinquency, and default.” Of 2,857 total student loan complaints listed in CFPB’s report, 46 percent of students and graduates listed complaints against Sallie Mae. American Education Services, Citibank and Wells Fargo received 12 percent, 8 percent and 7 percent of the complaints respectively.

Online courses may lead to lower grades than traditional courses, study suggests By Hilary Ribons Daily Free Press Staff

As Boston University’s Council on Educational Technology and Learning Innovation looks to increase BU’s education technology options, students taking online courses are more likely to achieve lower grades, according to a new study. Members of the CETLI emailed faculty Tuesday regarding future educational innovations at BU, said Associate Provost for Undergraduate Affairs Elizabeth Loizeaux. The email stated BU officials will work to improve academic flexibility for BU students, create alternative classroom locations, connect the community and allow BU students studying abroad to participate in online courses. “We’re in a phase of trying to understand what the possibilities are for teaching with educational technology,” Loizeaux, CETLI co-chair, said. “It’s not just online — it’s the full range of educational technology.”

CETLI members aim to create a more flexible learning environment, Loizeaux said. Outside a traditional classroom environment, however, there are new educational challenges and concerns. Researchers at the Columbia University Community College Research Center examined 500,000 courses taken by 40,000 community and technical college students in Washington and found students enrolled in online courses received lower average grades than those enrolled in traditional classes, according to the study, published as a February CCRC working paper. Students who participated in online courses had a mean 2.77 grade point average on a 4.0 scale, whereas students enrolled in face-to-face courses enrolled averaged a 2.98, according to the study. David Whittier, education professor and director of BU’s Educational Media and Technology Program, said challenges often

Online, see page 2

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY KIERA BLESSING/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Online courses allow for more people to access education but may make a wider achievement gap, according to a new study.

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Thursday, February 28, 2013

SED grad: Online good for busy students Global programs asst. dean Online: From Page 1

arise when courses change from in-person to online. “It’s true that no matter how good the technology is, when it’s between the communicators, something is lost,” he said. Whittier said when classes are offered online, communication becomes more structured and less flexible, offering fewer opportunities for dialogue. This has minimal effect in some courses, but for others that rely heavily on dialogue, it can become problematic. Whittier also said each student’s individual learning skills contribute to how well he or she may adapt to online learning, just as individual learning skills contribute to success in the classroom. Students learn as well online as they do in person, he said, though there are other factors that determine how successful they will be. “It’s not just high ability, a key factor is learner autonomy,” he said. “Autonomy is about be-

ing a good manager of your own learning … self-directed, selfmanaged, able to manage your time well, those features. There are differences among people in that regard. Some people are better at it than others.” Christina Richards, a first-year School of Education graduate student, said, logistically, online classes could be beneficial for BU students. “A lot of people would find them really helpful, especially graduate students who have to balance either full- or part-time jobs and find it difficult to physically attend class,” she said. Richards said while they would likely be helpful to other students, she has no personal interest in online classes. “I would not like online classes just because I am not self-motivated,” she said. “I need to be in a classroom in order to do my best.” Carrie Cramer, a College of Engineering freshman, said she had tried online courses in the

past and did not like them. “I’m more of a visual learner than just someone who learns by reading, and I think in a lot of online courses you’re reading a lot online,” she said. Beverly Chan, a College of Arts and Sciences junior, said online classes would help non-traditional students fit class into their schedules. “They are very useful for students that are either working full time or have a lot of other priorities other than academics,” she said. Despite the study’s findings, online courses and other educational technologies provide increased scheduling flexibility, accessibility and a lower cost, Whittier said. “A lot of the things that are happening are driven by economics and automation,” he said. “So a lot of the new online educational opportunities, especially the massive scale ones, do provide opportunities that are not available.”

seeks many collaborations

for the undergraduate program, and the assistant dean of the graduate program,” Marlino said. “I will be in charge of quality control for the student experience and the curriculum.” Marlino said she starts in August, but she looks forward to streamlining the educational experience for both undergraduates and graduate students. She said she plans to incorporate her experience at Simmons into improving the student experience at SMG. “I look forward to working with the faculty and administration and hopefully students to develop those plans forward,” Marlino said. “The direction SMG is taking the school is investing in a very bright future for growth.” Margaret Waterman contributed to the reporting of this article.

SMG: From Page 1

graduate students. He said he wants to make abroad offerings, graduate seminars and collaborations with other universities available to SMG students. “Fortunately for me, globalization is a priority for both SMG and the University, which creates tremendous opportunity for synergies within SMG — collaborations with other schools, university offices and the like,” Nersessian said.  Marlino, who is also the associate dean for faculty and curriculum at Simmons College and will work at both schools, said she is excited about the direction SMG is taking to invest in wider business education and opportunities for students. “I will be working with director of admissions, the assistant dean

Sciortino Jr., Brownsberger support Markey Markey: From Page 1

bring that leadership to Congress.“ Sciortino Jr. has been a member of the Mass. House of Representatives since 2005, representing the 34th Middlesex District. “I am running to continue the strong progressive leadership that the families of the fifth district have

always counted on,” Sciortino said in a statement. “I look forward to bringing my record of accomplishment to Washington to fight for our progressive values.” To run in the special election, Markey must defeat U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch in the upcoming primary. “I am proud to call Ed Markey

my Congressman, and I am dedicated to helping elect him as our next U.S. Senator,” Sciortino said. Brownsberger said he has full support for Markey and that he is doing everything he can to assure that he wins the senate seat. Both party primaries will occur April 30, and the general election will be held June 25.

CAS soph.: Students go to loans as last resort Loans: From Page 1

repayment schedules where interest rate reductions are offered,” said Chopra. “These and other types of options may or may not be applicable to this market, and that’s a key goal of what we want to learn in this information request.” Students in particular treat private loans with mistrust, though they are sometimes a last resort, said Kyle Spindelman, a College of Arts and Sciences sophomore. “I’m glad I don’t have to have

any [loans] from banks because the interest rates on those are ridiculous,” Spindelman said. Caitlin Coons, a School of Education sophomore, said she had to begin paying off one of her loans earlier than expected so she could finish school with as little debt as possible. “I wish there was a different system for it, but it’s just the way it is,” Coons said. “There isn’t much we can do other than pay.” Krutika Hosur, a College of Engineering junior, said she has not

had problems with private loans because her finances are organized, but she believes the system needs to be changed. “It definitely needs reform because the cost of college in general should be such a burden,” Hosur said. “They are a private institution and they have costs to cover, but if they’re going to offer an education and charge $60,000 for it, there should be a lot more benefits than what is offered by financial institutions currently.”

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Campus & City Column Girl, 20

Gloria in Excelsis Deo

The first time I held Jesus in my hands, he was in miniature form, hanging on a cross at the end of a strand of black rosary beads. Because I was a very young child at the time, I considered it strange that someone would wear a tiny, muscular, loin-clothed man as jewelry, but I later learned that these beads in particular were not to be worn SYDNEY around the neck, SHEA but instead used in prayer (a very long prayer which even all the Adderall in the world couldn’t help me finish). I liked this little man but at the same time felt pity for him, since he could not be detached from his cross and do more productive activities, such as date my Polly Pocket. Not too long after my first encounter with this Jesus, I attended my first lesson of Sunday school. The teacher was a young, attractive guy in his 20s, while I was only five years old — the only girl in the class of about 10 other kindergarteners. Each week I insisted upon wearing a green cotton turtleneck, black leather shoes as well as my favorite (and tellingly suggestive) plaid skirt. I loved Sunday school because I got to learn stories about the love, kindness and peace Jesus taught. The story about his resurrection, however, completely terrified me. When the teacher told our class of five-year-olds about Jesus’ death, burial and subsequent reappearance on Easter Sunday, I could never read about him in the same way. He became a kind of undead character, the sort that one would think about on Halloween. My teacher tried to explain that this was not the case, that Jesus did not come back bloodstained and physically deteriorated, but this image could not escape my mind. I can’t say if I’m still Catholic or not today, but my hesitation to choose is more out of a fear that something horrific will happen to me if I explicitly reject the existence of any member in the Holy Trinity — I’d probably be struck by a thunderbolt, automatically sent to Hell or even be forced to stand in a long line at the Warren Towers Starbucks. Also, Jesus’ transubstantiated body makes for a superb wafer — crispy, yet chewy — and the morals I learned as a child helped shape my character, at least before I became the cynical, sarcastic person I am today. Whenever I tried to envision what God was like when I was a child, I imagined the typical cumulus clouds that lead up to Heaven, which was a well-lit, ethereal area of the cosmos, but I had a bizarre perception of who God actually was. Get this: I thought God was a bust, similar to that of George Washington’s venerably portrayed head on the dollar bill, residing in a large space resembling a gymnasium, with people dwelling beneath this giant sculpture and carrying out whatever it was they did to make Heaven function. There was obviously a swing set as well.But having contemplated my eccentric first impression of God, I realize this concept is different for everyone, and I’m tolerant of everyone’s special image of it — whether it’s Zeus & co., Allah, YHWH or just a well-crafted block of marble. Sydney Shea is a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences and can be reached at slshea@bu.edu.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

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BPS strive for more school choice, equity Lawmakers push

legislation for aid in heating crisis

By Heather Hamacek Daily Free Press Contributor

The Boston Public School Committee met Wednesday to hear public comment on a school assignment plan that would increase and diversify the number of Boston schools to which parents have the choice to send their children. These plans would constitute the biggest change in the public school system since 1988. “Our journey toward equity and excellence is never ending,” said Carol Johnson, BPS superintendent. The plan, called Home-Based A, was passed by the External Advisory Committee Monday. It would use a complex algorithm to give families an average of eight to 10 schools to which they could apply, based on the quality of the school and its proximity to their home, according to the Home-Based A Proposal. Johnson said the current system of assignment is not connected to equality or predictability, but the modern model allows for both fairness and choice. The current system divides Boston into three zones, with families only allowed to choose schools within their respective zone, according to a press release from the EAC Monday. Johnson said the new model would provide better information and clearer guidance to families

By Zoe Roos Daily Free Press Staff

KENSHIN OKUBO/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF The School Committee of the City of Boston held a meeting Wednesday night to weigh different grant proposals and public concerns.

about the schools their children will be attending. Michael O’Neill, chairman of the BPS Committee, said as the quality of schools increases, the assignment system will adjust. “As quality improves, they will get less choices, but they will be higher quality [schools] and closer to home,” O’Neill said. He said the system is both an incentive to the district and a reward to the parents. Laura Perille, an EAC member, presented the reasons for change to the committee. “The system we have today with three large zones and transportation across the city is not working well for families … we [should] develop a student assignment model

that would deliver more equitable results to students and families,” Perille said. She said the criteria for school assignments would be based on equitable access to quality, proximity and predictability. “We looked in particular at students with the lowest access to quality … to ensure if a student is on a bus, the student is on a bus to a higher quality school” Perille said. Mary Tamer, representative for the BPS Committee in the EAC, said the EAC has met 55 times since March 2012 at 31 different sites and engaged with more than 5,100 community members about the proposed changes to the zoning laws.

Schools, see page 4

Public research access good for colleges, prof. says By Alice Bazerghi Daily Free Press Contributor

In order to expand public access to the results of federally funded research, the White House issued a memorandum Friday instructing federal agencies to develop plans to make taxpayer-funded research available to the public. Boston University Associate Dean for Research and Outreach James Jackson said the memorandum, which came in response to a We The People petition on the White House website, is fairly balanced. “This directive strikes a nice compromise,” Jackson said. “It allows the publishers to publish the journals, but after a 12-month wait because publishing these journals costs money, and the publishers charge subscription fees to cover these costs. Thus, the public’s access and the publisher’s business model are preserved.” Michael Stebbins, White House

assistant director of biotechnology, ordered in a statement on the White House website Friday federal agencies with more than $100 million in research expenditures to make the results of federally funded research publicly available and free of charge within 12 months of the original publication. Assistant to the President for Science and Technology John Holdren posted on the petition website the same day U.S. President Barack Obama’s administration agreed citizens deserve easy access to the research for which their tax dollars have paid. “Scientific research supported by the federal government spurs scientific breakthroughs and economic advances when research results are made available to innovators,” Holdren said in the memorandum. “Policies that mobilize these intellectual assets for re-use through broader

access can accelerate these breakthroughs and advances.” In addition, the memorandum requires that agencies improve upon the management and sharing of scientific data produced by federal funding. “Access to pre-existing data sets can accelerate growth by allowing companies to focus resources and efforts on understanding and fully exploiting discoveries instead of repeating basic, pre-competitive work already documented elsewhere,” he said. Jackson said the new policy will be beneficial for colleges and college-based research. “I see no adverse effect on research at colleges,” Jackson said. “… Everybody wins when access to science and an appreciation of scientific discovery are more accessible.” The petition, created in May, had about 65,700 U.S. citizen signatures

Research, see page 4

Several New England lawmakers re-introduced legislation Tuesday to increase funding for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, a system that helps thousands of families in Massachusetts each year. U.S. Rep. Ed Markey is one of four house democrats trying to increase the annual funding before the sequester slashes aid to such services. “Working families in Massachusetts and around the country will have education, healthcare and other essential services cut because of sequestration,” Markey said in a statement Tuesday. “During such a harsh winter, no family should also worry about heating their home and keeping their kids and other family members safe from the weather.” Markey released a report earlier this month indicating that funding to LIHEAP could be cut by as much as $6.7 million in 2013 year due to the sequester. These cuts would total about $1.6 billion in cuts to the program since 2010. Kathy Tobin, energy services director for Action of Boston Community Development, said an estimated 50,000 households have already used all of their heating aid. “We are estimating almost everyone will use up all of their aid before the winter is over,” she said. “We receive hundreds of calls and we have no funds to give and we are only at the end of February. Winter can last at least until May.” Federal funding for heating assistance has slowed significantly this year, Tobin said. “We received $21 million last year in additional funding,” she said. “We are urging the state to supply more because this winter has been significantly colder than last year. Tobin said the pending sequester is to blame for the federal government’s lag in providing funding. “We are still waiting on possible federal funds,” she said. “We could possibly get $8 million more but we really don’t know. Everything is on hold.”

Heat, see page 4

Boston-based ticket, charity website to launch nationally By Kristen Gloss Daily Free Press Staff

Tickets for Charity, a Bostonbased fundraising company, will be expanding its concert and sports ticket sales nationally and to Canada by the end of March for the start of the upcoming Major League Baseball season. “There’s a tremendous amount of need in the world right now, and it’s imperative that corporations or organizations focus on social impact,” said Charles Veysey, vice president of partnership development for TFC. “We feel as if we’ve created a model that celebrates charitable giving and enabled consumers to support the charities they care about while seeing their favorite artists or favorite sports team.” The company works with more than 75 different performing artists, dozens of professional sports teams

in all four major leagues and theaters and corporations to provide an opportunity for people to enjoy their favorite groups while also contributing to charities of their choice. TFC is partnered with more than 100 charities, according to the TFC website. “The charities out there looking for money can no longer rely on looking for direct donations or dinners,” Veysey said. “We help solve the really important problems in the world right now.” The Boston Red Sox Foundation partnered with TFC in 2006 and has received about $1 million in donations of charity. This money has gone to its cornerstone programs, such as the Red Sox Scholars Foundation and youth baseball programs, said Gena Borson, director of special events and development for the Boston Red Sox Foundation. “In our partnership with [TFC],

we harness the passion of our fans with the Red Sox tickets and raise money that way,” Borson said. Veysey said the company has attempted to align itself with charities representing a diversity of causes. Jennifer Iselin, director of special projects at the Natural Resources Defense Council, said the NRDC has received more than $500,000 from TFC since it began working with the company in 2007. TFC’s contributions to NRDC began after singer-songwriter James Taylor designated the environmental group to be the charity to receive the money raised from his tour, Iselin said. “I like TFC because it continues to grow and reach new audiences with the messages of different charities,” she said. “It gives donors a choice of where they would like their

See Full Story Online

PHOTO COURTESY OF TICKETS FOR CHARITY

Tickets for Charity, lead by CEO Jay Whitehead, is an online ticket marketplace where part of the proceeds from sales go to charity.

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65,700 signatures on petition BPS rep: EAC reached 5,100 people since March Research: From Page 3

as of Wednesday evening. “We believe in the power of the Internet to foster innovation, research and education,” the petition stated. “Expanding access would speed the research process and increase the return on our investment in scientific research.” Several BU students said they support progress being made to expand public access to research funded by their tax dollars. Tate Gieselmann, a College of Arts and Sciences sophomore, said he approved of the progress the petition has made. “It shows people where their money is put to use and informs them of the future of science and medicine,” he said. “It seems like a good step towards making the government more transparent.” Rami Barghout, a College of

Engineering junior, said it is fair for taxpayers to see how their money is being used. He also said taxpayers should be allowed to question the type of research being done with their money. ���It depends on how much they are being taxed and so on, but yes, they should have the right to disagree,” Barghout said. Charlie Crocker, a CAS junior, said citizens have the right to be aware of what research is being done. “Anyone should be able to see the research being done,” Crocker said. “If the ultimate goal of society is to thrive and excel, we should be more willingly working together to find answers and ideas. The information gathered should be available to the public because no one ever knows who can do great things with certain information.” Margaret Waterman contributed to the reporting of this article.

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Schools: From Page 3

Some community members said the updated zoning plan is a step in the right direction, but obstacles remain. Kim Janey, senior project director of Massachusetts Advocates for Children, said equitable access to quality schools is important. “The challenge however, is the unequal distribution of quality schools,” she said. Others said the new assignment system does not focus on racial or socio-economic equity of students. “It is disappointing that the

EAC recommendation saddles its proposed new model with the yoke of past inequities that the Boston School Committee has imposed through an outdated algorithm laden with bias and preferential treatment for geographically advantaged families,” said Peggy Wiesenberg, former board member of the Citywide Parents Council. Fran Smith, an active community member, said she dealt with these geographic problems when she was in school. “I began this journey when I was 15 years old, when a black girl asked me why my people were

taught to hate,” Smith said. Smith said she has not seen the leadership of Boston take a bold move on institutional racism, but said the city has come a long way since she was young. “At least we have a school committee that is racially diverse and can answer, ‘will this change with school assignment help black, brown and low-income students of all races?’” Smith said. The School Committee members will continue to review — and could vote on — the Home-Based A assignment plan at their next meeting on March 7.

ABCD energy dir.: Sequester may be causing funding lag Energy: From Page 1

Matthew Sheaff, director of communications for the Department of Housing and Community Development, said Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick has been pushing the federal government to front funding before the sequester. “Governor Patrick has been a leader in calling on the federal government to fully fund — upfront — LIHEAP because as we know, the heating season, especially here in the Northeast, does not follow the fiscal cycles of Washington, D.C.,” he said. “Our maximum benefit level is based off the amount allocated by Congress.” Joe Diamond, executive director of the Massachusetts Association for Community Activism, said a dramatic increase in the cost of heating has created more problems this winter.

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“The price of heating oil has gone up remarkably,” he said. “And we see that, per home, it’s about 300 gallons (per tank) so it’s a couple thousand dollars that each home spends on heating and so most people receiving aid have used it already. Most went through it before January.” Diamond said a significant decrease in federal and state funding has made the LIHEAP budget even smaller. “Heating aid is a federal program, but since its low right now, we’re asking the state to supplement,” he said. “Last year they gave $126 million, this year $141 [million]. Before that we’d been getting about $200 million. We’re still in winter and it doesn’t show any signs of abating.” The situation for applicants unable to get funds is poor, Diamond said.

“People would have to be very conservative in how they heat their home, and if people get desperate enough they might turn to dangerous methods like turning their stoves on or using face heaters,” he said. “People sometimes go without heat for the whole winter and that’s no good either.” Diamond said when budgets are tight, some have to choose between buying food, medicine or heating. The proposed legislation to increase funding will not go into effect until 2014 if it is passed, which will still leave a funding problem for the rest of this winter, Tobin said. “Nobody knows what is going to happen in terms of this year’s funding,” she said. “What is happening now with the sequester will effect the next several years. Things look very bleak.”

5

Muse Editor - Meg DeMouth

Music Editor - Lucien Flores

Film/TV Editor - Michela Smith

Lifestyle Editor - Justin Soto

Food Editor - Brooke Jackson-Glidden

Q&A: A Place at the Table and hunger in the USA Josh Stadtner MUSE Staff MUSE Staffer Josh Stadtner sat down with director Lori Silverbush and her husband, celebrity chef Tom Colicchio, to discuss their new food documentary, A Place at the Table, which comes to theatres tomorrow.

I know Jeff Bridges and T-Bone Burnett (who wrote music for the film) helped out with this film and have been active in this issue for a while. Did they come as a twofor-one deal?

Here’s an excerpt from the interview with the two about the film, which illuminates the seldom talked-about issue of hunger in the U.S. The documentary, produced by the company that produced Food, Inc. in 2008, makes the case that obesity, hunger and the governmental subsidization of large agribusiness are all interconnected.

Lori: (chuckles) No they are two exceedingly independent individuals and they don’t always march in step as it turns out. But T-Bone had worked with our partners, Participant Media, on a film called Waiting for Superman. He helped with a series of concerts to benefit education. The creative exec., Diane Weyermann, asked T-Bone if he would be interested in throwing a beneficial concert or something and he said, “I want to do more than that. When the time comes I want to do your soundtrack.”

JS: Why did you choose to make a documentary about hunger in the United States? Lori: We knew there was an issue with hunger in this country … It really became personal for me when I was mentoring a kid who it turns out was going hungry and it was messing with her life in a big way … I helped get her into a private school that specialized in helping kids with learning disabilities. Then I got a call from the principal that she was foraging in the trash for food. She was hungry because this school wasn’t mandated to serve breakfast or lunch, so she wasn’t getting the one meal a day that she was getting back in her public school. Every part of her life was suffering and that was shocking and upsetting. So at first you think, well, we’ve got to feed this kid. So we did, we fed her. And she has siblings so we fed them too, but at a certain point you can feed as many people as you can, but they’re still going to be hungry the next day, and at a certain point you have to say, “Wait a minute, what’s going on?” We need to look at the underlying issue here because, in a country that has so much food, how can so many people be going hungry? Once we started looking into the issue we discovered that it impacted about 50 million people. We discovered that there’s hunger in every single country, and we felt a responsibility to show who exactly is going hungry and maybe bust some of the stereotypes. So we did. We reached out to people and gathered a number of stories. So here’s a scenario: You get an Ayn Rand supporter who says, “People go hungry because they’re not working hard enough and the country needs to be fiscally conservative here and not allow further subsidization for food in schools.” How do you respond to that? Tom: You hope that both sides of the aisle can see this film and decide that this is a priority. That it’s a priority of government

Barbie Izquierdo and kids in A Place at the Table.

to take care of people less fortunate, regardless of how they got there. Because children have no choice in the matter, right? It’s not like they’re going out and not working hard enough, they just want to go to school and learn. You hope that public officials realize that this has become a health crisis, and that it’s something we can fix. If it becomes a priority, then you fund it — it’s as simple as that. It’s a similar situation to when Dole and McGovern got together and created the modern food safety net. You hope it happens again because we’re right back where we were in the 60’s. Lori: If you’re worried about husbandry of governmental revenue, revenue is going down a leaky drain because of this issue. And if you’re only interested in your own pocket book then it makes a lot of sense to fix it. Right now we are spending multiples of what it would cost to fix this problem on lost productivity. There are huge healthcare costs and educational outcomes. We’re putting kids through an expensive public school system — that the taxpayer is paying for — and if kids can’t learn, it’s wasted money. How can they become members of a self-sufficient workforce if they are not nourished enough to learn in school and be healthy? Would you say that having a sugar tax or a ban on soft drinks over 16 ounces is a waste of initiative? Lori: I don’t know if I would say that. Far more important than tweaks to food policy here and there is fixing a broken system. The truth of the matter is that our system is broken. We have double the calories for everyone in this country to eat well, yet we have 50 million Americans who are not getting enough food.

Don’t miss this week’s second interview! Visit

PHOTO COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES

Tom: I think the better way to deal with overconsumption of sugar is to stop subsidizing corn. If the price goes up, then the 16-ounce soda isn’t going to be cheap anymore. There are a lot of different ways to look at it.

Tom: You know, Jeff Bridges really puts it right in the film. He says this issue is about what kind of democracy you want to live in. Do you think people will be depressed about a movie concerning hunger? Lori: Did you leave feeling depressed or did you feel like we can do this? This issue is fixable and it’s doable.

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6T

hursday,

February 28, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

To whom it may concern

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 24

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan, Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Editor

Kaylee Hill, Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

Don’t mess with my beer, bro

Consumers in three U.S. states are suing Anheuser-Busch InBev (ABI), the brewery responsible for our beloved Budweiser, for allegedly overstating the alcohol content in Budweiser, according to Bloomberg Tuesday. Apparently, the brewery routinely adds extra water to its finished products. Bloomberg reported that lawyers are saying the company uses accurate alcohol-measuring technology to dilute its beers just before bottling. The beer is reportedly between 3 and 8 percent weaker than what it says on the label. Josh Boxer, the lead lawyer in the case, says his claim is based on information obtained from former employees at the company’s 13 U.S. breweries, according to the Associated Press. But Peter Kraemer, the company’s vice president of brewing and supply, has said that the allegations are completely false. So how did the accusers determine that there was, in fact, less alcohol? No one knows. Perhaps, as loyal customers, they’ve just built up tolerance. But if the news is true, it’s upsetting. First, because we now have to drink more Budweiser to get a buzz (and binge drinking is bad), which means we have to buy more Budweiser, which

means that Anheuser-Busch would make more money, at least in the short run. While Boxer has claimed that the brewery started diluting beers as a cost-saving measure, if anything, it’s going to hurt the label in the long run, because once we’ve realized we’re being cheated into buying more less effective beer, we’re going to stop buying it in favor of the better stuff out there, like Natty Light. (Just kidding. But the Associated Press did report that the company’s fourth quarter profits are down 4.9 percent.) But what’s more bothersome for the individuals claiming damages is the false advertising. People should be able to rely on the information that food and drink companies put on their labels. We have less of a problem with lowered alcohol content than with the fact that ABI purportedly hasn’t been telling us this. Hopefully they don’t make dilution a trend, seeing as it owns 39 percent of the American beer market, according to Bloomberg. Either way, the accusers are claiming damages of $5 million, which is a ridiculous sum to ask of a company whose products have usually afforded a person a pretty good time.

Guest Perspective: Re-electing a Pope

Today Catholics wonder, “Who will lead Christ’s Church?” Cardinals assemble in Rome to elect Benedict XVI’s successor.  Pilgrims gather in St. Peter’s Square to await word of a new pope. The faithful offer prayers for Mother Church in this strange time. Although this appears procedural, the interregnum offers the world a period of both excitement and anxiety. This strange time must precede the laud roars from Vatican City. Tomorrow, we have no pope.   We call this period the interregnum. All administration in the Vatican ceases. All major decisions await the new Holy Father.  From a management perspective, this makes little sense. To better understand this approach, we consider sede vacante in the Roman Catholic tradition. Sede vacante describes the specific period within the interregnum when, literally, the chair is vacant. In the Catholic Church, every bishop takes possession of a physical chair, the cathedra, as a symbol of leadership in the particular Church they serve. The Cathedral of the Holy Cross keeps the cathedra of His Eminence, Seán Patrick Cardinal O’Malley, the Archbishop of Boston. The Pope, the Bishop of Rome, possesses the Chair of St. Peter, the first pope. In the Bible, Jesus said, “You are Peter, and on this rock I will build my Church … And I will give unto you the keys of the kingdom of heaven” (Mt. 16:18-19). From these words Jesus Christ empowers Peter and his successors to lead His Church on earth. He commissions them to teach the faith and administer the sacraments for the salvation of souls. This is the premier cathedra in the Christian world because it preserves the faith through the Vicar of Christ, the Pope. We Catholics celebrate a feast day to commemorate the Chair of Peter. Christian Prayer says the feast exists “as a sign of unity of the Church founded upon [Peter, the] apostle.” Catholics’ deep connection to the papal office stems in Christ’s institution of His Church

in this way because Christ maintains His authority through apostolic succession, the Pope serves the world as the steward of the faith. He takes a new name so as to abandon his identity and become the Servant of the Servants of God. The Pope remains Christ’s leader in the world.     The papal vacancy befuddles the faithful because Catholics practice a great devotion to the Successor of Peter. We devote time and energy to prayerfully consider Benedict’s resignation. We question what the world and Church needs in its universal pastor. The media continues to profile Cardinals, odd-makers offer wagers with high rewards and private circles debate the fastly approaching conclave. The Cardinals meet daily and listen to each other speak about the Church. These conversations allow the Cardinal electors to learn more about each other and concerns of the universal Church. Formal campaigning does not exist in the process. These meetings coupled with personal prayer prepare the Cardinals for their primary duty: electing the Supreme Pontiff. Tomorrow begins a new chapter in the life of the Roman Catholic Church. Despite the heightened media coverage, outrageous predictions and cries of reform, Mother Church shows us prudence and patience. Rather than assemble the electors and urge them toward a successor, she slowly gathers the Cardinals to Rome and calls upon the faithful to join them in prayer for this sede vacante. In a world set on efficiency, the Church assumes a radically different position. She sets aside pressing issues and allows the Holy Spirit to direct her elections and meet the current needs of her faithful. The empty chair prompts the Church to examine herself and reaffirm her commitment to service of the world in Christ’s name. Tim McGuirk CGS ‘13 COM ‘15 mcguirkt@bu.edu

EXITMENT

DAVID FONTANA

In the words of Usher Raymond IV, “these are my confessions.” Yes dear readers, I do in fact, have a confession to make: In an earlier column I told you that I could sympathize with the forgotten middles names because I was a middle child. Well, unfortunately, I am not technically speaking, exactly, how do you say, born in the spot that would denote being a middle child. [Gasp.] I know, I know, “liar, liar pants on fire.” But before you go sharpen your pitchforks and burn me at the stake, I’ve got something else to say — yes folks, it gets worse — not only am I not a middle child, but I am in fact, dare I say it — whatever you are thinking just make it about a 260 times worse — yes, that’s right, I am indeed, most indubitably, in the very nature of fact, a twin. And oh, the shame! (he was ashamed!) Thought of changing my name! (what’s in a name!) And I got downhearted! (how did you feel?) Every time my twin and I ... David, not in front of the kids. Oh, sorry. Seriously, how dare I let you read something by a twin! I should have named my column “It’s a trap!” It’s like I have only half of a soul or something. It’s almost worse than being a ginger. But it’s not as bad as you monozygotes think. So listen up singletons! It’s time we debunked some of those pesky myths about twinhood: Myth: Twins share ESP. False. Twins prefer to use ESP separately. They just share everything else. Myth: There is a good twin and bad twin in every pair. True. Twins are in fact the root of all good and evil in the world. See Genesis 226:733. Myth: You can’t always tell twins apart. False. Every twin has a small mark on the bottom of their left heel that denotes whether they are the good twin or the bad twin. Myth: Twins must be educated separately in school or they will, in fact, take over the world. True. Just because I lied, it doesn’t make me the bad twin, okay! I only missed the middle-child boat by 3 minutes, though she won’t ever let me forget it. Yes, my twin is a girl named Alice Marie Fontana (clearly we’re identical twins). And, although we may share a last name, we’ve got almost nothing else in common. Whenever I describe her to someone, all I say is that

we’re polar opposites. And if you’re thinking she and I are mirror images of each other, then they must be some funky fun-house mirrors we’re looking in. Besides our freckles, we don’t even look alike, let alone dress alike. The last time we wore matching outfits was when we were still in cribs and diapers — let me tell you, our onesies were pretty fly. With a funhouse comes a circus, and like in any circus, being a twin has been quite the artful balancing act. We’re kind of like Artemis and Apollo (yeah, that’s right, I just elevated us to Greek Gods status. What’re you going to do about it, punk?). She’s got brown hair, and I’ve got blond. She’s the athlete in the family (the hunter if you will), while I played in the band (the drums aren’t exactly a lyre, but who’s counting anyways). Even when we were newborns, she stayed up all night long while I had my adventures during the day — you can be sure that our parents were overjoyed with this last one. So maybe we didn’t live on Mount Olympus, or even get a TV show like Tia and Tamara, but hey, being a regular fraternal twin is still pretty awesome. The truth is, there’s something special about being a twin. Growing up, we knew all of the same people, all of the same songs, TV shows, places, jokes. That’s not to say our tastes weren’t different, because believe me, they were (we couldn’t both get the “impeccable taste” gene ... that one went to me). Still, although we may not even have the same nose, more than being my polar opposite, she really is just my other half, the yin to my yang, the South Pole to my North. I definitely wouldn’t have made it this far in life without her, and even though we go to school in different states, she’s still the most important support system for me all those 1,086 miles away. As of this past Tuesday, Feb. 26, we’ve put in a solid 22 years together (not including all of that extra womb time) — 22 years of laughter, car rides, fighting, friendship. 22 years of singing “go shawty, it’s your birthday.” 22 years of (hashtag) twinning. I’m not always a twin, but when I am, I prefer to be her twin. So here’s to 22 years Alice! Happy belated birthday. I love you lil’A. David Fontana is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences and a weekly columnist for the Daily Free Press. He can be reached at fontad5@bu.edu.

This week, the FreeP discovered the notorious 9-year-old rapper Lil’ Poopy. That being such a great name, we wondered what rap names all the schools of BU would adopt...

• • • • • • • • •

COM : Lil’ H@$#tag SHA: Bell Boiz 2 Men CGS : Lil’ Brainz CFA : Das Artizt SMG: Biz Khalifa ENG: Notorious E.N.G. BU Athletics: Lil’ Talent Dean Elmore : Lil’ Hurr The FreeP : Run D.F.P.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

7

Terriers erase first-half deficit to get first win of season in overtime Lacrosse: From Page 8

46 seconds remaining in the half to cut UMass’ lead down to 4-3. After halftime, the Terriers came out hot, as Boarman and junior attack Elizabeth Morse scored to give BU its first lead of the game, 5-4, with 23:15 remaining in the game. Robertshaw said the team’s improved offense in the second half resulted from figuring out

UMass’s defense, as well as finishing plays. “UMass played a really aggressive zone style of defense against us, and it took us a little while to adapt and find the openings that we were looking for,” Robershaw said. “In the second half, we finished on more of our shot opportunities and got more of the looks that we were hoping to get.” Rush scored again for UMass

to tie the game up at 5-5, but senior attack Danielle Etrasco scored two unanswered goals for the Terriers to put them up by two with 10 minutes remaining in the game. However, UMass scored two more goals to force overtime. In overtime, senior midfielder Kristen Mogavero and junior midfiedler Sydney Godett scored to give BU a 9-7 lead. UMass added another goal with under a minute remaining to play, but the Terriers

held on for the hard-fought win. Church led the Terriers with three points (one goal, two assists) in the game, while Boarman and Etrasco each finished the game with two goals. Junior goalkeeper Christina Sheridan finished the game with six saves and collected three ground balls. BU outshot UMass in the game, 22-17, but the Minutewomen had a 13-8 advantage in draw controls.

While Robertshaw said it was not a perfect game for the Terriers, she was thrilled at the effort BU put forth against a very skilled team. “There’s a lot of things we need to work on obviously,“ Robertshaw said. “But for the first game, for them to go out and play a solid game and finish it in the weather that we played in today, I’m really proud of them.”

Women focused on smart play Attention to Etrasco brings out best in others Women’s hockey: From Page 8

Huskies, including four over the past weekend. Her performance against Connecticut earned her a fifth Hockey East Rookie of the Week nod. Durocher praised his star rookie, and said he expects her to be an integral part of BU’s playoff run. “She’s obviously a kid who has shown that she can score at this level, and on certain nights score in bunches,” Durocher said. “She creates a tough matchup for a lot of people because she’s a strong kid, she has a great shot and she really goes to the net hard. “She can score goals from 45 feet out with a wrist shot. She can get plenty of goals right down in the blue paint, right at the crease, and that makes her a multifaceted kid, not just somebody who’s scoring with a shot or at the net.” Connecticut is a young team, as its top five scorers are either freshmen or sophomores. Sophomore Kayla Campero leads the Huskies with 18 points on nine goals and nine assists, including two goals and an assist over the weekend. Freshman Michela Cava, who had a goal and assist on Saturday, is right behind Campero with 17 points on 10 goals and seven assists. Durocher said rather than focusing on the areas in which Con-

necticut excels, his team needs to focus on its strengths. “We’ll concentrate on what we do,” Durocher said. “I feel like we have good depth throughout our team, and any one of those four lines can do a good job out there. Our goal is to make sure we’re picking people up, making sure we’re not forechecking with reckless abandon and getting two and three people caught deep. “It’s the little things like that that add up. If we can take care of business on some of those technical things then I’d like to think we’ve got enough talent to put pressure on them, and hope we get ourselves a win.” In 2012, the Terriers won their second Hockey East championship in double overtime against Providence College, 2-1. In order to come away with the trophy for the second straight year, Durocher said a quick start is key. “This is a game of hockey that’s usually a race to three, or maybe a race to four goals, and if you get one early in the game, it gives you momentum,” Durocher said. “It gives you a little extra jump in your step. It gives you a push. “Hopefully we can do a good job of quick starts. And if one of the games or some of the games it doesn’t happen, we’ve just got to buckle down and keep wearing people down and go get the win.”

Depth: From Page 8

a 2-0 deficit, the Terriers were on the offensive, deep in the UMass zone. Junior attack Becca Church had the ball on the right side of the net and found Boarman, who fired the ball low past the goalkeeper for her first goal of the season and the third of her career. Boarman had a huge day feeding off the attention on Etrasco. She finished with a total of six shots, two goals and an assist. Coming off of a free position attempt 13:15 into the match, freshman midfielder Ally Adams controlled the ball for the Terriers and sent in a pass to freshman midfielder Sofia Robins, who was streaking towards the net and fired a shot past the goalkeeper for her first score of her collegiate career. “This was Sofia Robins’ first game, and for her to score that goal after getting saved the shot before, that was a big play,” Robertshaw said. Adams, who assisted on the

play, spent the majority of the game around the net creating shot opportunities for her teammates and finished the day with two assists. At that point in the match, Etrasco, had not gotten a single shot opportunity. Upon receipt of the ball, she was regularly faced with multiple defenders and was forced to pass it away. This swarming defense on Etrasco freed up Robins for multiple shot opportunities. She finished the game with five shots on goal, compared to Etrasco’s two. “We knew that if they were going to play a zone against us that we would have to put Danielle in the middle,” Robertshaw said. “It was going to take away some of her scoring looks, but it was for the good of the team and everyone stepped up well around her.” Church was also a key player in the victory, and will likely have to continue to step up if the Terriers want to have a chance at the postseason. She finished with two assists and an unassisted goal with 46 seconds left to play in the first half that

brought the Terriers within one goal of the Minutewomen, 4-3. “We did a good job with other people showing that they wanted to put the ball in the back of the net,” Robertshaw said. “They really trusted themselves.” With a final score of 9-8 after two overtime periods, the Terriers saw goals from seven different players, with two players scoring two goals. Etrasco, who was blanketed for the majority of the game, still found a way to come up with big plays for the Terriers. Her two goals came within two minutes of each other in the second half. The first served as the go-ahead goal for the Terriers on an unassisted gem, and the second came off of a feed from Boarman that put BU up by two goals with fewer than nine minutes to play. But with the attention Etrasco will demand from opposing defenses, the Terriers will have to rely on supporting players to get frequent, timely goals. If Wednesday’s performance is any indication, this shouldn’t be a problem.

Brenton leads talented SBU squad Men’s basketball: From Page 8

freshman guard Maurice Watson Jr. Irving recorded 17 points and joined the 1,000-point plateau as a member of the Terriers and Watson dropped 19 of his own, to go along with six assists, in BU’s 68-59 victory over the University of Maryland-Baltimore County Saturday. Meanwhile, forward Tommy Brenton paces the Seawolves in the frontcourt. He tallied 13 points and snared 20 rebounds in Stony Brook’s win that guaranteed it at least a share of the regular-season championship. Brenton, forward Jameel Warney (12.1 ppg), guard Anthony Jackson (11.1 ppg) and guard Dave Coley (11.0 ppg) round out the rest of the talented Stony Brook squad. “They have a lot of talent,” Jones said. “They’re a very talented group. They work hard. They expect to win every time they step on the floor. They defend at a high level. The kid Brenton is a unique talent because he’s a skilled kid at the three and at the four. He’s a really tough kid. He’s their best team defender.” Although Brenton is well known around the league for his defensive prowess, an underrated

aspect of his game is his ability to make an impact on the offensive end as well, especially with his passing. Brenton ranks third in the America East with an average of 4.7 assists per game. BU’s Watson ranks first in the category with an average of 5.4. “The thing with him is that we have to match his physicality and intensity,” Jones said of Brenton. “He gets guys involved. He’s an intangible guy. You can’t allow him to make multiple-effort plays. “If he gets an offensive rebound, if he gets to a loose ball, you can’t let that happen down the floor multiple times. You need to make those effort plays against him.” Jones knows that his players are well aware of their goal of closing out the regular season — and the farewell tour of the America East — on a high note. “They want go out on top,” Jones said. “We’ve put together a nice run. We have to focus on the things that we need to do to win the game. We can’t focus on it being a big game. We’re going to be in great shape. I can’t speak for them. I hope that they continue to do things that we’ve been doing.”

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Quotable

We’ve just got to buckle down and keep wearing people down and go get the win.

-BU coach Brian Durocher on the upcoming Hockey East quarterfinals matchup

Page 8

Sports

Always

The Daily Free Press

room for

‘Mo

Senior midfielder Krisen Mogavero was one of many offensive contributors to BU’s 9-8 victory over UMass-Amherst. P.8.

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

Thursday, February 28, 2013

BU keeping it Terriers defeat UMass-Amherst in season opener simple in game Women’s lacrosse BU opens season with rival SBU gets scoring from with win despite supporting cast Boston University men’s bas- rusty beginning By Rene Reyes Daily Free Press Staff

ketball coach Joe Jones had an up-close and personal view of the meeting between BU (17-11, 11-4 America East) and Stony Brook University that took place at Agganis Arena March 12, 2011. He was sitting behind the Terrier bench during the America East championship game, a matchup the Terriers won in nail-biting fashion, 56-54, to clinch the program’s first conference title since 2002 and seventh appearance in the NCAA Tournament. Jones remembers the March afternoon quite fondly, especially the performance by Terrier legend John Holland, who piled up 27 points — including 14 in a row during a decisive stretch late in the second half — and sent the Agganis crowd into euphoria after the buzzer sounded. “Both teams played hard that day,” Jones said. “John Holland was outstanding. What a great atmosphere. Those were things that I remembered from that afternoon.” Nearly two years later, Jones leads his squad — inherited from former BU coach Patrick Chambers, who was at the helm when BU defeated Stony Brook in the championship tilt — into a contest with the Seawolves (21-6, 12-2 America East) at Agganis Arena Thursday night. BU currently sits in second place behind Stony Brook in the conference standings, as the Seawolves clinched a share of the America East regular-season crown with a 69-53 win over the University of Maine Saturday. Thursday’s contest pits the two hottest clubs in the conference, with the Terriers riding a seasonhigh six-game winning streak while the Seawolves have not lost in four games. Both teams are firing on all cylinders as BU prepares for its final America East game. In this highly touted game against Stony Brook, Jones said his team is approaching it like any other game and sticking to the formula that has been working during the winning streak. “We don’t want to do anything different,” Jones said. “In big games, you can focus on the magnitude of the game. We want to continue to do what we’ve been doing. We’ve been ascending. “We want to continue defending and rebounding at a high level. We want to make a lot of plays — effort plays. The team that usually wins is the one that makes those plays.” Leading the Terriers as of late is the dynamic backcourt duo of junior guard D.J. Irving and

Men’s basketball, see page 7

By Conor Ryan Daily Free Press Staff

It was a dreary day at Nickerson Field, with torrential rain and strong winds forcing students to run for shelter. Despite the terrible conditions, the Boston University women’s lacrosse team braved the elements and defeated the No. 12/14 University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 9-8, in overtime to win its first season opener since 2010. “I was really impressed with how the team fought through really tough conditions,” said BU coach Liz Robertshaw. “It was not nice out there, with the rain and the wind, so it was a tough way to play your opening game. But in conditions like that, we didn’t have time to let nerves and jitters get to us.” The game started off in favor of the Minutewomen (3-2), as senior Cori Murray and junior Sam Rush both scored within the first five minutes of the game to give UMass an early 2-0 lead. Robertshaw said the Minutewomen’s quick start to the game was the culmination of both UMass having four regular season games already under its belt, as well as BU facing its first opponent of the year. “[The Minutewomen] are a lot more comfortable in their system,” Robertshaw said. “They’re more comfortable in their attack-

M. Basketball v. Stony Brook, 7 p.m.

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Terrier senior midfielder Kristen Mogavero scored one goal and registered two shots in BU’s 9-8 overtime win in its first game of the season.

ing schemes, and we had to get used to playing somebody else.” BU (1-0) answered back with a goal from sophomore attack Jenna Boarman at the 7:10 mark, but UMass regained its two-goal lead with a score from junior Kate Ferris just minutes later. Freshman midfielder Sofia Robins scored her first collegiate

goal with 16:45 remaining in the first half, cutting the deficit back down to one. After more than ten minutes with no goals, UMass senior Lauren Terracciano scored to give the Minutewomen a two-goal lead once again. However, BU junior attack Becca Church scored with

Lacrosse, see page 7

In its first game of the season, the Boston University women’s lacrosse team showed its scoring depth potential in a victory over the No. 12/14 University of MassachusettsAmherst. The game served as an early proving ground for BU (1-0), given the stifling defense against senior attack Danielle Etrasco. Etrasco — last season’s leading scorer and a recent selection for the U.S. national team — was guarded heavily by UMass (3-2) defenders for the majority of the match. Additionally, an injury to sophomore attack Mallory Collins removes another scoring threat for the Terriers. Collins was named last year’s America East Rookie of the Year, finishing the season with 55 points on 46 goals and nine assists, second best on the BU squad. Despite the lack of scoring opportunities for its top players, several other Terriers stepped up in support. Sophomore attack Jenna Boarman consistently found herself in positions to score. She saw limited time her freshman year, but will be called on to take up some of the scoring duties this season. “Jenna stepped up and took some great chances,” said BU coach Liz Robertshaw. At 7:10 into the match and facing

Depth, see page 7

Terriers facing familiar foe in quarters Softball to travel to Wildcat Inv. By Sarah Kirkpatrick Daily Free Press Staff

Fresh off of clinching the top seed in Hockey East, the No. 4 Boston University women’s hockey team will face the University of Connecticut in a quarterfinal matchup of the Hockey East Tournament at Walter Brown Arena Saturday afternoon. The Terriers (23-5-3, 18-21 Hockey East) are coming off a weekend series against Connecticut (3-28-3, 1-19-1 Hockey East), during which BU was able to complete its season sweep of the last-place Huskies and earn the regular season Hockey East championship. However, the title did not come easily. Early in Saturday’s game, BU faced a 5-1 deficit on its home ice. But thanks to six unanswered goals, including a fourgoal surge in the second period, BU ultimately walked away with a 7-5 victory. “We missed a couple of assignments in the first part of that game, and we’ve got to make sure that doesn’t happen,” said BU coach Brian Durocher. “You’re

The Bottom Line

Thursday, Feb. 28

By Matt Fils-Aime Daily Free Press Staff

Friday, March 1

M. Hockey v. Vermont, 7:30 p.m. Softball @ Wildcat Invite, 3 p.m. Track IC4A/ECAC Championships @ TTC, All Day

not coming back from three or four-goal deficits too often.” Sunday’s game in Storrs, Conn., required no miraculous comeback, as a power-play goal by senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk at the 17:00 mark of the first period allowed the Terriers to break a 1-1 tie and take a lead that would be untouched by the Huskies over the remaining 43 minutes. BU went on to win 4-2. The two victories extended BU’s winning streak to five games, which Durocher believes gives his team a strong mindset going into the Hockey East Tournament. “It gives you a real positive confidence,” Durocher said. “It lets you know that you’re able to finish the job ... We’ve put together five games here where, more than anything else, it gives the kids a good running start confidence-wise going into the playoffs.” Freshman forward Sarah Lefort leads the team in goals, netting 19 this season. She has goals in all three games against the

Women’s hockey, see page 7

Saturday, March 2

M. Hockey v. Vermont, 7 p.m. Softball @ Wildcat Invite, 2 p.m. W. Hockey v. Connecticut, 3 p.m. Track IC4A/ECAC @ TTC, All Day

By Christopher Dela Rosa Daily Free Press Staff

After a rough start to the season at the Citrus Classic in Florida, the Boston University softball team plans to bounce back in Tucson, Ariz., at the Wildcat Invitational at the University of Arizona. The Terriers (1-4), who made an NCAA tournament appearance last season, dropped four of their five games last week to begin 2013. “We’re excited to get back on the field again,” said BU coach Kathryn Gleason. “We learned a lot about ourselves last weekend. We’ve spent the last two days of practice focusing on what we didn’t do last weekend.” Not only was BU’s first victory an exciting extra-inning game, but it was also Gleason’s first victory as BU head coach, following the departure of Shawn Rychcik. Unfortunately, BU could not keep the magic going during the rest of the weekend. That same day, it lost to the University of Wisconsin 11-3 in a game that lasted only five innings because of the eight-run mercy rule. The rest of the weekend was more of the same, as BU dropped another two games against the Badgers (10-

Sunday, March 3 Softball @ Wildcat Invite, 11 a.m. Track IC4A/ECAC Championships @ TTC, All Day

1) and one more to Georgia Southern University (7-7). By the end of the weekend, the Terriers were outscored 36-7 at the ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex. There is no doubt the women will be looking for a much better result this time around, when they face even tougher opponents. This weekend’s matchups include Portland State University, the University of Arizona and the University of California-Riverside. The most notable team is Arizona (10-5), which is ranked 17th in the nation. The Wildcats pack a lineup filled with strong hitters. Their two best hitters are sophomores Hallie Wilson and Chelsea Goodacre. Goodacre leads the team with four home runs, 11 RBIs and a .556 slugging percentage in 15 games. Meanwhile, Wilson leads the team with a .409 batting average, 18 hits and a .509 on-base percentage. “Arizona has had some injuries to some key people, but they are still Arizona and in the Pac-12,” Gleason said. “They’re going to be a tough opponent, but we feel like we’re ready for them.”

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Monday, March 4

No Events Scheduled 41-year-old Manny Ramirez recently signed with a team in Taiwan in the “Might As Well Retire” league.


February 28th Daily Free Press