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Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue XX

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Thursday, February 21, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

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Brownstone fire leaves $5 million in damages Mayor Menino puts

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

A 3-alarm fire destroys the fourth and fifth floor of a Back Bay brownstone Wednesday morning. By Michelle Jay and Zoe Roos Daily Free Press Staff

A three-alarm fire caused by an in-floor radiant heating unit broke out in a Back Bay brownstone near the Public Garden Wednesday morning. No one was injured, according to Boston authorities. The Boston Fire Department was called to 17 Commonwealth Ave., a condo building, at about 9 a.m. Steve MacDonald, spokesman for BFD, said the fire began on the fifth floor and

caused extensive damage. “[There is] Water damage on floors three through five,” he said. “The fourth and fifth floors are now gutted. And there is an estimated $5 million in damages.” Firehouse ladders 18, 17 and 24 reported to the scene, said Deputy Fire Chief Richard DiBenedetto. “It was because of the way the fire traveled,” he said of the need for such a great number of firefightes. “It was in the stairway and it got into the walls, so we needed

a lot of man power to open up all of the walls.” Stephen Storm, the site supervisor for the building under construction next door, said he smelled smoke and called the fire department. “Two of our workers smelled the smoke,” he said. “We were working out on the back deck and they smelt the smoke. Then we notified the Boston Fire Department.” MacDonald said the fire was put out within 35 minutes of the firefighters’ arrival on scene. No one was injured in the fire, but building resident John Walsh was in his condo on the third floor taking a shower when he first smelled the smoke. “I smelled the smoke, so I got out of the shower, dried off, put on sweats, went down to the panel and saw the 4th and 5th floor smoke detectors were on,” he said. “So I called the fire department. It seemed like they were here in seconds.” Walsh said he was thankful none of his neighbors were home and the fire department responded quickly. “They assessed the situation and went right in,” he said. “They seemed to have no thought for their own safety.” MacDonald said the building had a pleasant interior and it is unfortunate that it sustained so much damage. “There was a beautiful living room with a nice chandelier and there was just water pouring out of the ceiling,” he said.

Officials, researchers voice concern over possible NIH funding By Heather Hamacek Daily Free Press Contributor

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren joined with local hospitals and research universities at Boston Medical Center on Monday to highlight the dangers of possible research funding cuts to the National Institutes of Health next month. Menino said in a press release Monday he was astounded that Congress could consider cutting NIH funding. “The doctors who have joined us here today have made it their life’s work to improve people’s lives. I hope in the coming days we can say the same about Congress,” he said. CEO and President of Joslin Diabetes Center, John Brooks III, who was present at the press conference, said reducing

NIH’s funding would negatively impact not only current research projects, but the future as well. “Over time, the other part of the sequester is — there is a 2013 impact — but if we don’t get our financial help, or it continues to go over the next ten years, That would be devastating to enabling us to keep this type of faculty and keep the people we have here to support this type of research,” Brooks said. The Joslin Diabetes Center uses funds from NIH to support research toward identifying the underlying causes of the disease, and toward developing potential treatments and therapies for individuals struggling with diabetes, Brooks said. He said the center relies heavily on funding from NIH and reducing funding would evoke a major change.

“Something is going to have to give and that’s going to be reducing the scope or cutting back on the size of the experiments. That tends to undermine the viabilities of science, so they aren’t really good choices,” he said. In a report detailing the funding cuts released by Research America in 2012, NIH Director Francis Collins, said the cuts would restrict 2,300 grants from being given in the 2013 fiscal year. “The burden would hit particularly heavily upon first-time investigators who are seeking to get their programs up and going,” Collins said in the report. “And upon learning of something of this sort, what is already a considerable sense of anxiety in that cohort, who are our future, would only go up.”

Research, see page 2

$8.4 million towards affordable housing By Erica Shulman Daily Free Press Contributor

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and the Department of Neighborhood Development announced Monday that $8.4 million in resources and tax credit funding would be put toward three new affordable housing projects in the city. Menino said these projects will help create more housing and create about 300 new construction jobs in a press release on Monday. “It is critical that we use every resource available to build more rental housing for working families in our city,” he said. “Creating affordable rental housing not only provides housing for families, but it also aids Boston’s economic recovery.”  The new condo developments will be built in Jamaica Plain, Roxbury and Dorchester. They will provide 110 units of affordable rental housing for low-income families and households transitioning from homelessness, according to the press release. Lisa Pollack, director of media and public relations for the Department of Neighborhood Development, said Boston received the $8.4 million from the Commonwealth’s Department of Housing and Community Development. “These were projects that had been stalled because of the economy and financing issues,” she said. “The market for loans was very tight, so things like tax credits weren’t flowing. What this funding does, is it helps us bridge the gap between a stalled project and actually getting some shovels in the ground.” Pollack also said the developments might yield new space for entrepreneueship. “When you are able to open new small businesses, those generate jobs, those generate tax revenue, and those are in no small part the way that Mayor Menino looks at strengthening the communities,” she said. “Also he has always been really focused on helping the small businesses in the city and creating some space for new businesses to be born is exciting too.” In an effort to make the new buildings energy efficient, Pollack said the new hous-

Housing, see page 2

BRA approves plans for sprawling apartment complex near TD Garden By Michael Torruella Daily Free Press Contributor

The Boston Redevelopment Authority unanimously approved plans Thursday to build a 38-story apartment tower next to TD Garden in the West End by 2014. The 503-unit Nashua Street Residences will include a two-story shopping arcade that will connect the apartment building with North Station and is expected to cost more than $200 million to build and develop, according to a press release from Feb. 14. “Thanks to private infrastructure investment and careful planning, the area is growing into an 18-hour neighborhood,” said Boston Mayor Thomas Menino in the statement. “The Nashua Street Residences are a key factor in that growth.” The tower will contain various units of one to three bedrooms on 32 residential floors on top of a six-story base that will contain a parking garage with 219 parking spaces available for the residents of the

apartment, according to the release. Scott Dale, senior vice president of AvalonBay Communities and a developer of the building, said the tower will allow the area surrounding TD Garden to flourish. “This [plan] is much needed residential housing for the area, and a portion of it will be affordable units that will transform a neighborhood,” he said. The building will contain 27 affordable units, and AvalonBay will designate more than $3.2 million for off-site affordable housing, according to the release. Dale said the project will commence later in 2013 and would be the only project for AvalonBay around TD Garden. Michael Ross, city councilor of Back Bay, said in the BRA meeting Thursday that family housing units will be built in addition to the single units. “If you listen to the residents of the West end, they will tell you that they are run-

BRA, see page 2

MAYA DEVEREAUX/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The Boston Redevelopment Authority approved a new housing and retail tower near TD Garden Thursday.


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Thursday, February 21, 2013

Designer: MBTA lot park after construction Mass. Gov. Patrick: Grand project will yield 1,700 jobs nade and the Greenway,” he said in a televised filming of the meeting Thursday. Wojciechowski said this plan would allow for unused MBTAowned lots to become integrated with the city’s growing park system. The development team includes AvalonBay Communities, CBT Architects, Exclusive Real Estate and Goulston and Storrs, according to the release. Delaware North Companies originally proposed and won approval for the apartment tower in 2005, but the economic downturn caused them to drop out of the development.

BRA: From Page 1

ning out of family-sized units,” he said. “There weren’t that many to begin in the first place. Credit to the proponent who heard loud and clear that we want to see more family-sized units.” Alfred Wojciechowski, partner at CBT Architects and a designer of the building, said at the BRA meeting they would make improvements to Nashua Street and Lomasney Way, which border the property. “An empty [Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority] lot will be developed to be an extension of the Charles River Espla-

Ross said in a statement that the new apartment complex would bring more affordable housing options to the area. “Avalon Bay’s building at Nashua Street will add about 30 units of on-site, affordable housing to the West End neighborhood, and countless new residential units — many of them family-sized,” he said in an emailed statement. Ross said the community advocated for the new building and it will be valuable for his district. “I’m happy to be able to see this beneficial and widely supported project be approved,” he said.

Sen. Warren committed to stopping NIH funding cuts port of Warren and Menino at the press conference. Malisa Schuyler, Director of Government Relations at Tufts, said it is important to focus on how institutions and programs will proceed if the cuts are made. “There is a strong belief that private funding will take the place of NIH funding,” she said. “But when looking in other areas such as the foundational science and research that is done in some of the major drug discoveries, that is

Research: From Page 1

Warren said Monday that she seeks to halt these cuts, as they endanger throughout Massachusetts. “I will fight to stop these significant cuts to NIH funding, which would put critical research programs here in Boston and across the Commonwealth at risk and hurt our economy,” she said in the press release. Tufts Medical Center officials said they were pleased by the sup-

something that is very much supported by NIH, and we are very worried about seeing that get reduced.” While Tufts Medical Center is still trying to gauge the magnitude of the cuts, Schuyler said it is important to look toward the future. “It’s going to need some real smart minds to get together and say, ‘Ok, now that we have to deal with these cuts. How are we going to do it in a smart way?’” she said.

Housing: From Page 1

ing developments will adhere to Leaders in Energy in Environmental Design Silver Standard and Energy Star Standards. “Obviously, it does cost more to build green. But in addition to it being the right thing to do, you do see savings and benefits that accrue over time in things like heating, cooling, water usage and hot water usage, “ Pollack said. This funding for Boston affordable housing comes from a state fund of $67 million that will be used to improve housing infrastructure across the Commonwealth, according to the HUD website. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick said in a press release Feb. 7 the project is set to create 1,700 new construction jobs as well as build or preserve 1,326 homes across greater Massachusetts.

“Government’s role is to help people help themselves, and sustainable affordable housing will build a better Commonwealth for generations to come,” he said in the release. Matthew Sheaff, director of communications for the Department of Housing and Community Development said Patrick has a goal of creating 10,000 new units per year of housing. “We know there is a high demand for housing across the Commonwealth,” Sheaff said. “I know local communities are excited, and we here at the state area are excited as well. We have a number of groundbreakings that start even next week, so we are looking forward to those.” Sheaff said some housing projects are already in development. The rest of the groundbreakings will be posted online so communities can stay up to date, he said.

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The Daily Press Crossword Want to be a DailyFree Free Press blogger? Interested

52. Hyperbolic sine in multimedia or social media? Join the digital 53. Pertaining to a clan 54. Entrances 58. Sole team. ACROSS 59. Southeast Asian By Mirroreyes Internet Services Corporation

1. Abraham’s original name (Bible) 6. Main stalk of a plant 10. Tilt 14. American Revolutionary leader Thomas _____ 15. River in St. Petersburg Russia 16. Smell or fragrance 17. Acclaim 18. By mouth 19. Sugar or ice 20. Bone framework 22. Coral islands 24. Sludge or slime 25. Oscillates 26. People who drive at high speeds 29. German for “Missus” 30. Lubricates 31. Fractured 37. Plait 39. Flee hastily 40. Covered in “fur” 41. Creates an unusual rhythm 44. Former gossip columnist ____ Barrett 45. Religious sisters 46. Stroked gently 48. Tennessee literary publication “_______ Review”

country 61. Site of Abraham’s first altar 62. Edges 63. 50s brother singing group 64. Sporting venue 65. Affirmatives 66. Not difficult 67. Break into pieces

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DOWN 1. Mimicks 2. Spine 3. Anger 4. Painkiller 5. Interplanetary rock 6. Derisive gesture 7. Marine bird 8. Extra Vehicular Activity 9. Pertaining to a small Asian country 10. Used to make chocolate 11. “Grownup” 12. Aristocratic 13. Long lock of hair 21. Throw 23. Fact 25. Dirt 26. Steals 27. Breezy 28. Tribe 29. Apartments (Brit-

CORRECTION n a Feb. 20 article titled “Rising numbers in Greek Organizations: specialty groups serve as an outlet for BU students,” the author made an error. The following sentence “This drive to make a difference is what inspired Volpe to create her own organization, which is how Omega Phi Alpha started, she said” wrongly attributes Volpe as the sole creator of BU’s chapter of OPhiA. While the article states early-on that Volpe is one of the co-founders, this sentence wrongly suggests she created it herself.

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Sudoku 2

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3 ish) 32. Flying vehicle 33. Helps make humus 34. Violent disturbance 35. Sea eagle 36. Unit regarded as a pair 38. Italian for “Madam” or “Lady” 42. Latin for “Girls” 43. Expectorate

47. Bowel cleansings 48. Tale 49. Tennessee _____ Ford 50. Fred Flintstone’s wife 51. Chasm 52. Spunky 54. Leaves or departs 55. Region 56. Units of Japanese

currency 57. Ruled Iran 60. Doctors’ group

Solution is on Page 4

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Difficulty: Medium

Solution is on Page 4


CCampus & City olumn girl, 20

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Alcohol linked to cancer deaths, study suggests Council considers

online education’s role in BU classes

Hills of Vantage Throned

If all goes accordingly, my future will sit atop a wooden staircase and be encased by oak panels, rare books and a view of the State House. This isn’t a vain desire spawned from some materialistic, preadolescent “Better Homes and Gardens” fantasy, either — it’s instead a rather specified and well- SYDNEY coordinated plan SHEA I’ve had for about 10 years. A decade ago, I went with my mother to look at some real estate on Beacon Hill (looking at property during the housing boom was a hobby of hers). Since I lived in a small — okay, piss-ant — town, spending time in Boston was something I’d do as frequently as possible, even if it just meant looking at boring property with my parents. So up the brick-laden Hill I walked on that October day to the open house my mom wanted to tour — with my mind probably set on the Newbury Street visit that would come after — and we entered a building at the summit with the word “SEARS” and a date inscribed above the door. We first looked at a modest, vacant apartment with a fireplace and, as advertised in “Johnny Tremain,” a Birth and Death room, complete with a nightmarish baby head above the threshold (one thinks of the Museum of Fine Art’s Fenway entrance). I patiently waited for my mom to evaluate the wood floors and assess the one-and-a-half baths, and I thought about what a waste of space it was for adults to populate a perfectly good ballet studio with intrusive furniture and electronics. I followed through the back and climbed up a dusty staircase. To my surprise, however, I walked into my ideal future home. I entered a room that doubled as a library and a ballroom (functionality), which would have been surrounded by intricately carved oak, but was — ever so rudely — interrupted by the most beautiful view of the State House’s backyard in the entire Hub.The carved embellishments ran along the bookshelves and created a woody cosmos all over the ceiling, and I pictured myself someday dancing on my pointe shoes with a versi-colored collection of books as my audience, and not to mention whoever happened to be mowing the lawn at the State House that morning. “Eff my life, this means I’ll probably actually have to wear clothes around the house now.” Still, I had to live there. When it was time to go, I gave my future home one final glance that has never left my mind. To this day whenever I’m jogging up Mount Vernon Street (by jogging I mean trying not to collapse and bargaining with God due to my smoking habits), I try to look for the same building, but it’s lost in the slew of other Brahmin brownstones. But the innocent portrait of my 10-year-old dream house complete with a ballet studio is, in reality, probably inhabited by some middle-aged, Botoxed Real Housewife of Beacon Hill whose life revolves around The Bar Method and an impossibly precise coffee order at Starbucks. That’s okay, though. She can keep it warm for me while I brainstorm up some color schemes. Sydney Shea is a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences, and a columnist for the Daily Free Press. She can be reached at slshea@bu.edu.

By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

GRAPHIC BY MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

A recent study found a link between alcohol consumption with cancer and death rates. By Trisha Thadani Daily Free Press Contributor

Consumption of alcohol, even small amounts by non-binge drinkers, might be linked to higher rates of death from cancer, according to a new study by Boston University researchers. BU School of Medicine professor Timothy Naimi examined recent U.S. data on alcohol consumption and cancer mortality and found a correlation between the two, according to a Friday BUSM press release. Alcohol consumption is connected to about 20,000 yearly cancer deaths, and accounts for 3.5 percent of all cancer-related deaths in the U.S., according to the study. Although the risk of cancer becomes higher as alcohol consumption increases, researchers discovered 30 percent of all alcoholattributed cancer deaths are associated with consuming one-and-a-half drinks or fewer per day. Tibor Palfai, a BU professor of

psychology, said college students in particular ignore health warnings because they believe the associated risks will not affect them. “Part of the reason that health warnings often have little influence on drinking behavior is that they are about distal probabilistic outcomes,” Palfai said. “... they [the risks] are things that may have a low probability of occurring.” He said Naimi’s study and other similar studies might counteract heavy-drinking stereotypes college students believe they must fulfill. “Although it is unlikely that a single research study will lead to broad reductions in drinking, it is still a piece of a broader approach to help students become aware of how heavy drinking may put them at risk for harm,” Palfai said. Breast cancer is currently the most common type of cancer related to alcohol consumption, according to the study. The study also found alcoholrelated cancers of the mouth, throat

and esophagus are responsible for a total of 6,000 deaths each year in men. However, despite the study’s findings, a number of BU students said they do not believe their peers will heed the warnings against drinking’s harmful effects. Lindsey Garber, a College of Communication senior, said she thinks students will continue to drink heavily despite these warnings. “[Students] probably don’t think about possible future diseases at younger ages,” she said. “Right now at this stage in our lives, it’s more about having fun with our friends.” Naimi said the correlation between alcohol consumption and cancer is important for people to understand. “If people are drinking heavily in college, they are unlikely to be influenced by this article,” Naimi said. “But this research is important for the general population to know the link of cancer.”

Comments affect perception of research, study says By Katia Rar Daily Free Press Contributor

More frequent negative comments posted to scholarly research articles online might influence readers’ perceptions of the research itself, according to a recent study. The study, outlined Feb. 14 at the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, found, overall, polite comments caused supporters and skeptics to be split fairly evenly, while rude and negative comments caused readers to adopt a critical view on the academic arguments. “Humans are so influenced by our peers and what other people say,” said Catherine CaldwellHarris, a Boston University professor of psychology. “So especially if we’re not certain or if we’re looking for a reason to go in a different direction and other people start voicing criticisms, we get swept up with them.” Readers were presented a scientific article discussing the risks of nanotechnology, and after reading respectful comments, 43 percent of readers found the risks to be low and 46 percent found them to be high. With the addition of negative feedback, 32 percent found the risks to be low and 52 percent found the risks to be high.

Caldwell-Harris said she found her students expressing reluctance at posting in particularly negative sections of comments. Students told her after they posted their findings, negative feedback increased exponentially. “First of all, you get people who don’t read the articles and they just read the headlines and they sound off on whatever they think the article is probably about,” said Connor Wood, a third-year Graduate School of Arts and Sciences doctoral candidate. “And if you’ve got an article that’s really gone viral and you’re getting comments from all over the place, you’ll get some people who will just be insulting.” Wood said he is researching the relationship between religion and science. He writes for the website ScienceOnReligion.org and the blog Patheos.com, which centers on conversation about religion. He said he often gets hostile comments and believes there is no better topic to incite rude remarks. “I got one person who called me a ‘closeted atheist’ because he or she thought that my article was actually saying negative things about religion,” he said. “They were insulting me directly.” Aliza Stein, a research assis-

tant at the Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders, said feedback submission would be better off if it were completely confidential with the comments only visible to the author of the article. “You would get a more honest response, because people wouldn’t be impacted by their peers a lot,” Stein, a College of Arts and Sciences junior, said. CAS senior Belva Dibert said even with negative feedback, she does not believe non-experts should be withheld from commenting on the blogs. “It’s important that non-experts get into the debate because they often have different motivations than, say, the researchers,” she said. “A non-expert may consider the application of the study in his or her life beyond just the theoretical boundaries.” Allison Borges, a CAS senior majoring in psychology and neuroscience, said she is neither worried about, nor opposed to receiving negative feedback. “While the results of the study are a little disheartening in that readers were biased by other comments, I still think comments are valuable,” she said. “This study makes me excited about my future career and the challenge of making my research matter to myself as well as others.”

Amidst national dialogue on the changing face of higher education and the role of online learning at colleges and universities, a special Boston University council announced it is necessary for BU to be at the forefront of educational developments. The Boston University Council on Education Technology and Learning Innovation, formed by BU President Robert Brown in October, advocated integrating new technologies at BU in an email sent to the community, a mission BU students said will benefit working students. “It [online classes] would be more convenient but would depend on the subject to the classes and what is offered,” said Mariah Yamamoto, a College of Communication sophomore. “For an English class they have you read a book and and write a paper on it. It doesn’t necessarily merit a long discussion. You can benefit from that and also still do work and understand the subjects well on your own.” Debate on massive open online courses, or MOOCs, has been consistent in national media in recent months as educators attempt to determine the role these free, online courses will play and how to accredit them. On Feb. 7, the American Council on Education endorsed five such courses for accreditation. Associate Provost for Undergraduate Affiars Elizabeth Loizeaux, one of the council’s co-chairs, said while BU already has online classes for some of its programs, wider use of online courses would enhance BU’s reputation by increasing its efficiency and flexibility. “What we have found so far is that educational technology really does offer exciting possibilities for improving the quality of education,” she said in an email. “Which of those possibilities will become reality, and how, will emerge as faculty, staff and students at BU talk together more about what they want and what excites them.” She said online classes would allow more students to participate in internship and study abroad programs, as a student potentially could stay on-track for graduation while abroad by taking online classes. “If they are really good courses, they would enable you to have an extremely valuable educational experience — study abroad — you couldn’t otherwise have,” she said in an email. “That is an example of the kind of flexibility we’re thinking about.” In its email, the council also recommended BU become a leader in harnessing new educational technologies, consider the value of a residential college experience and collaborate with other universities and colleges. The council established a blog for community members to offer insight and feedback on the possible developments, according to the email. Loizeaux said she hopes for some of the programs to be up and running by the fall 2014 semester. “Like course development of all kinds — which is happening all the time, every semester, as your faculty revise courses and develop new ones — this is an ongoing project,” she said. “We will be calling for proposals for a few new projects this spring.”

See full story online


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Thursday, February 21, 2013

S T U D E N T ’ S G U I D E TO Graduate students see fewer fin. aid Undergrads. encouraged to enroll opportunities than undergraduates in different school for grad studies By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

While a variety of both merit-based and need-based financial aid options exist for undergraduate students, Boston University’s graduate student financial aid is entirely meritbased, which is a means of attracting the best students, BU officials said. “What the graduate programs are looking to do is attract the best applicants and the best students,” said Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Director of Admissions and Financial Aid Janette Countryman. “Boston University is a very well-known research institution, and they are trying to help with the research aspect.” Graduate and professional students must rely more heavily on student loans than undergraduates, as grants are only offered to undergraduates, said Heather Jarvis, a student loan expert who spoke about student debt relief at the School of Law Nov. 14. “We’re trying to promote access to higher education to people, whether or not they can pay for it out of their own pocket exclusively,” Jarvis said in an interview. “Undergraduate education is the first and most important postsecondary education that’s available.” Jarvis said the government focuses on providing aid for undergraduate students because not all undergraduates go to graduate school. Master’s program students are occasionally granted scholarships depending on their field, Countryman said. “At the master’s level, it varies,” she said. “Some students, depending on the program, may take out loans, and some may get a small scholarship to help pay, but it varies by the program.” Countryman said some students attend graduate school only part-time and work on the side to help pay for their education. However, some are unable to do so with certain majors. “If it’s a one-year master’s program, you’re not going to be allowed to do that [work fulltime], and take two classes per semester,” she said. Doctoral candidates, however, are offered five years of funding and sometimes an additional stipend for living expenses, Countryman said. Certain students are required to work for BU while they earn their degree. “They may have to do some teaching, they may have to do some research,” she said. “As long as they’re making progress in their program.” Students should consider the cost of graduate school and the availability of aid as part of their decision-making process. The career path students wish to pursue following the collection of their master’s degree should also

have influence, Jarvis said. “Some degrees pay off more than others from a monetary perspective,” she said. “Many degrees can be extremely rewarding intellectually, but not end up getting you a high-paying job.” Jarvis said there are loan forgiveness programs available to students. “People should definitely be thinking about all the ways they can help mitigate the cost of graduate education, including those kinds of loan forgiveness programs,” she said. Elizabeth Kinney, a first-year GRS student, said her expenses for her undergraduate education were different than her graduate school expenses. “It’s like comparing apples and oranges,” she said. “It’s different because grad students can take out more federal loans than they can take out as an undergrad. Also, your eligibility for financial aid doesn’t depend on your parents income or financial income [in grad school].” She said the amount of money she received played a role in her decision to enroll in BU for graduate school. Kinney said she works odd jobs and freelances outside of school to help pay for her education. She also receives a research assistantship stipend. “I don’t know if I would be at BU if I hadn’t gotten some sort of funding,” she said. “Grad school is expensive, so I’ll take any money I can get.” Kiva Kuan Liu, a College of Communication first-year graduate student originally from China, said she receives no aid, but came to BU for the opportunities it would afford her. “My parents always wanted me to choose the highest education available I can achieve,” she said. “My parents think if I come here, I’ll find a better job here and stay here [in America]. Liu said the cost of tuition and the expense of living is a large burden for her family, and she knows only one graduate student at BU who received a scholarship. “Only one of us got a scholarship and the rest of us have to take on the entire burden, including living, tuition and everything,” she said. “It’s the largest amount of expense my family has ever had.” Henry Han, a School of Management junior, said he will likely pursue a Master’s in business administration after graduation. The cost of graduate school is an important factor, as he already must pay back his undergraduate loans. “That’s what I’m worried about right now, just returning all the loans to BU,” Han said. “I’ll find different, alternative ways to fulfill my career if I cannot afford it [grad school].”

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By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

Although certain Boston University graduate programs draw in a number of students from BU undergraduate programs, students who continue their graduate education at the same institution may be at a disadvantage, BU officials said. “A very small fraction of BU undergraduates apply, one reason being most faculty advise undergraduates interested in pursuing a research degree to go elsewhere,” said Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Associate Dean Jeffrey Hughes. “Undergraduates applying to a BU graduate school are at a disadvantage because we think they should be learning elsewhere.” Hughes said the reason he encourages his students to apply to different research institutions because graduate students should learn from new professors rather than repeat portions of their undergraduate work. “It is better to be exposed to new faculty and new ideas because you have already majored in the field at this institution,” Hughes said. “You already learned from the faculty here and you are far better off going to learn from faculty at another leading research university and getting exposed to their ideas.” In recent years, between seven and 10 students in each School of Law class year earned undergraduate degrees from BU, said LAW Assistant Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid Alissa Leonard. “Each year, one of our top undergraduate feeder schools in the entering class is BU,” she said in an email. “Students choose a law school based on a variety of factors.” For the Class of 2015, 210 students matriculated to LAW, according to its website. Leonard said LAW is an excellent school with a national reputation, so some BU undergraduates naturally choose to remain and enroll. “Students have many reasons for choosing BU Law, regardless of whether their undergraduate degrees are from BU,” said LAW Dean Maureen O’Rourke in an email. “But certainly that we are a research university is quite helpful to us in recruitment.” O’Rourke said BU undergraduate colleges are among the top 10 feeder schools for the BU School of Law. Charles White, a School of Education associate professor, said he has not had a graduate student with a BU undergraduate degree in any of his classes. He said BU undergraduates applying to SED graduate programs strive to get li-

censed in a new field to become more marketable. “Probably most stay because they become acquainted with the faculty that teaches in the program,” White said. “They learn it’s a good program and they’re familiar with the campus and how things work.” Pattaya Hongsmatip, a College of Engineering first-year graduate student, said she had interesting, captivating professors as an ENG undergraduate, and these professors were a factor in her decision to stay at BU in pursuit of a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering. “From my standpoint, with what I talk about with other grad students, the graduate school professors have a completely different teaching style than undergraduate professors,” Hongsmatip said. Jillian Tocci, a College of Communication junior, said she sees both benefits and drawbacks to enrolling in a COM graduate program with similar professors. “It is a concern — if you are attending the same school, you re-learn a lot of the same ideas,” Tocci said. “But I also had professors get their undergraduate and graduate degrees from here, and they are outstanding.” Although she is an undergraduate, Tocci said she does not feel like she would have an advantage over students applying from other schools. “I honestly don’t think I have a leg up, because it’s a competitive grad program, and I like to think everyone gets the same chance,” she said. “I do hope recommendations from professors in the programs would help me, though.” Tess Guttadaura, a second-year graduate student at the Tufts University Boston School of Occupational Therapy, said Tufts undergraduates are encouraged to apply to Tufts graduate programs. “Tufts has an option where [if] you go to undergrad then grad there, you get 50 percent off tuition,” Guttadaura said. “It’s good to have people around [that are] comfortable with Tufts already, and who can show new students what it is all about.” She said attending the same university for graduate work can ensure students are familiar with the campus and processes. “It’s beneficial just in terms of figuring out how to register for classes — I was already familiar with the Tufts system,” she said. “It’s a lot easier … Anyone that is going to the same school again, they obviously have to love it enough to go again. It’s good for morale at the university when you just have people with that extra edge of passion.”

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Thursday, February 21, 2013

G R A D U AT E S C H O O L

The most recent U.S. News and World Report ranks various graduate schools in the nation.

SOURCE U.S NEWS AND WORLD. GRAPHIC BY KENSHIN OKUBO/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

DISCOVER. INNOVATE. ACHIEVE. At Worcester Polytechnic Institute, graduate students work in teams with faculty who challenge them to conduct research that matters in the real world. We invite you to discover WPI—a premier university for graduate studies in science, engineering, and business. grad.wpi.edu/+discover

JANUARY 24 - MARCH 30 EXHIBITION System: ECOnomies

FEBRUARY 23 Inflatable Beehive: Urban Hex//Honeybees & EVENT 12 - 5 pm

Community in the Urban Landscape

24 - 28

ECOnversation EXHIBIT Sunday 2 - 9pm; Monday - Thursday 11 - 9pm Green Faith. A collaborative project with BU students and artist Diana Gilon bu.edu/cfa/sustainability

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hursday,

February 21, 2013

Opinion

EXITMENT

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

YONO

43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 20

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan, Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Editor

Kaylee Hill, Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

From Bachelor’s Degree to file clerk

It’s been said that you can work your way up in a corporation, or any workplace for that matter: Start low, work hard, get noticed, and then get promoted. That’s the general process. So at first it seemed fair (albeit slightly dismaying) when The New York Times reported Tuesday that the college degree has become the new high school diploma for getting even the lowest-level job these days. Typically, young graduates should expect to get the lower jobs, since most of the time, they’re less experienced and less professional than their superiors. But for a lowpaying job like a file clerk, a Bachelor’s Degree is an expensive credential, and it leaves us asking how much we would ultimately pay for an education that barely wins us the minimum wage. Not much, we’d hope (that is, we’d expect an expensive degree from a private institution like Boston University to afford us some more leeway in our initial career and salary options) — but then again, the cost of college is always rising, and with it student debts, which will be hard to pay off with a $10-an-hour salary. Is this fair? On the one hand, yes. As employers receive more and more applicants for even the lower-paying jobs, they have to be selective. Those college graduates willing to work for a low wage are, at least at first glance, more desirable candidates. They are purportedly educated and driven, and thus ostensibly deserve the job. “College graduates are just more career-

oriented,” said Adam Slipakoff, a managing partner at the law firm featured by the Times. “Going to college means they are making a real commitment to their futures. They’re not just looking for a paycheck.” On the other hand, does awarding lowpaying jobs to college graduates take job opportunities away from those unemployed individuals without a college degree? With education expenses so high, not everyone can afford them. Where, if the low-paying positions require degrees, will such individuals work? Moreover, how will they get the chance to work their way up in their career field, if all the menial jobs and networking abilities have been landed by those who can either afford college or afford to live on just a little bit of cash during the first few years off campus? If a high school diploma is now good for little to nothing, chances are the social and economic gaps already existent in the country will only widen. The problem, of course, arises from the fact that more and more qualified applicants are applying for fewer and fewer jobs. Only the best applicant will get any position. This may encourage more individuals to get that college degree — which can only be a good thing, both for the student and for the country’s general intellectual status. Perhaps universities will respond by offering more cost-accommodating programs. And after that, it’s just a matter of the country finding more jobs with which to accommodate more talents.

To the Editor: Space Program Initiatives As a member of the Boston University chapters of the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics and Students for the Exploration and Development of Space, it was with great joy that I read the Tuesday, February 19th Editorial, “Asteroid hit should be taken as warning.” While Friday’s meteorite actually hit about 1500 kilometers from Moscow, and not in Moscow itself as stated by the editorial, I otherwise cannot agree more with the piece. The meteorite fall and the unrelated close approach to Earth of Asteroid 2012 DA14 are only the latest in a string of events in recent months that have brought space exploration to a prominent place in national and international discussions. Last spring saw the space shuttles Discovery and Enterprise arrive at their new homes in Washington, D.C. and New York City to enthusiastic celebrations. A few weeks later, SpaceX’s Dragon capsule became the first spacecraft built and operated by a private company to dock to the International Space Station — delivering food and other supplies — a feat that was repeated in October. On June 6, the planet Venus passed directly between the Earth and the Sun for the last time until 2117. The summer months brought both sad reflection with the deaths of astronauts Alan Poindexter, Sally Ride and Neil Armstrong, and exultation with the successful landing of the Curiosity rover on the surface of Mars.  In the months since its successful landing, Curiosity has made observations confirming that the Red Planet was once much wetter than it is today, in line with the discoveries

of the previous Phoenix, Spirit, Opportunity, and Sojourner rovers. While it occurred far short of the actual boundary of space contrary to some news accounts, the stratospheric skydive performed in the fall by a private team contributed much useful data that may enable future space travelers to survive emergency scenarios in near-space conditions and at supersonic speeds, and set a new record for the most simultaneous YouTube views of a video livestream. Last week’s State of the Union address saw NASA engineer Bobak Ferdowsi of the Curiosity mission team as a special guest of the First Lady. And since his launch to the station in December, International Space Station astronaut Chris Hadfield has been cultivating an incredible Internet presence, performing live from space with Ed Robertson of the Bare Naked Ladies and becoming the first to communicate through Tumblr and Reddit from orbit.    All of these events have brought space travel to the public’s attention, and now the meteorite strike has driven home the necessity of the world’s space programs. My fondest hope is that the intersection of these trends will lead to real and lasting progress in space exploration. For too long, visions of apocalypse — zombie, Mayan and otherwise — have dominated our cultural ideas of humanity’s future. It’s time to realize that it is within our power to avert disaster, create a positive future, and reach for the stars. Zoe Strassfield CAS 2015 zpstrass@bu.edu

DAVID FONTANA

Immortality. Sounds pretty nice right? All the coolest people throughout history have had it: Nicholas Flamel, the Greek Gods, Mario and Luigi. I mean you get an eternity of time to do whatever you want (basket weaving, duh), you get to watch other people come up with the most incredible inventions ever (let me just say: Sham “Wow!”), and then you get the prestigious luxury of growing old and turning gray until you can’t even move and then watching everyone who you know and love die in the fiery inferno of a nuclear winter (or an alien attack, I haven’t decided yet) and, if you’re lucky, you become a grasshopper. One out of 10 immortals becomes a grasshopper. What happens to the rest, you ask? Well they just die. Or maybe it’s that they “stop existing.” But either way, I think we can agree: Immortality’s the best! However, I guess there may also be a few downsides to this whole “living for eternity” thing. But then what’s with the obsession? Probably, it comes down to two cups of “fear of death” and one heaping tablespoon of “hope,” all baked in the oven at 350 degrees. There’s a whole world of literature out there on the subject, everything from classic stories like “Gilgamesh” (I think it might take the cake on “classic”), to movies like “Cloud Atlas“ (didn’t anyone else even see that . . .), and songs like “Forever Young.” It wasn’t so long ago that we had Jay-Z whispering in our ears, “Forever young, I wanna be, forever young.” But when this Renaissance man was asked, “Do you really want to live forever?” he deferred to some old-school Outkast logic: “Forever ever, Forever ever.” But “forever never seems so long, until you’ve grown.” So, in a strange kind of acceptance of our mortality, a generation of youths has turned to a different standard for living, a higher moral value, a “so fresh, so clean” mentality, a new low for humanity — a YOLO, that is. Yes, it’s the phrase that has been sweeping the nation (I hope not the world) since back in November of 2011 when popularized by Canada’s finest rapper, Drake, in his song “The Motto.” Luckily for me, at the time of its release, I was living on the streets of northern Africa where they were blasting Shakira instead. Let me tell you, I will take “She Wolf” over “The Motto” any day of the year. And that’s saying something (“hoowwwoooo”). However, even since the beginning, the philosophical gem of a saying “You Only Live Once” has received loads of criticism. As the youth of our nation run around dropping “YOLOs” to unashamedly apologize for what we can only claim to be attempts at suicide by lighter fluid, alcohol, cotton candy, our parents and elders have grown in fear of what harm we’ll do next. But to all those cynics out there

(a.k.a. haters), let me remind you, as Wikipedia so eloquently reminded me, that YOLO is really just the same as Carpe Diem. Yep. That’s right folks. We have successfully taken a phrase that has been around since a majority of people were actually speaking Latin (i.e. it’s very old), a phrase uttered by John Keats and Robin Williams alike, and whittled it down to an ugly, little acronym. YOLO! [said in the most offensively stereotypical-bimbo-ignoramus voice] Alas, poor Yoric. Yet, just when we thought things couldn’t get worse, they did. How could we forget about Ke$ha! And her catchy hit “Die Young” at that. At least before we were focusing on living, even if only once, but we’ve now been asked to literally die, in our youth, at our prime, speak now or forever hold your peace. Wonderful. That lovely little lady with a dollar sign in her name has now made an anthem for people across the world to “make the most of the night like we’re going to die young.” Yet in this battle against Canadians and dollar signs people have tried their best to come up with some catchy phrase to overwhelm the zombie-like-ignorance virus that is deep inside us all. They’ve used things like “YODO — you only die once.” It may be morbid, but perhaps it has just the right amount of realistic sense to knock out YOLO’s aggravating, albeit humorous, overtones — because nothing makes me laugh more than millions of people dying. And then of course there’s “you oughta look out.” Now, while I doubt that anyone could parody ideals like YOLO or The Space Olympics better than Lonely Island in their series of (what some may call jokes but are surely) public service announcements (I know I’ll be staying away from saunas, crawling with piranhas), I thought I’d give it a shot. I offer to you, citizens of the greater Boston area, my antidote to YOLO, my crème-de-lastop-with-this-nonsense: YONO. And no, it’s not short for Yoko Ono. It simply means, “You only niggle once.” All right, so maybe that doesn’t work so well. But perhaps you can use YONO to mean “You only No,” as in “No worries” or “No, thank you” or even “No, I don’t want to hear what you or I or anyone ‘only’ does once.” I don’t “only do anything. I fight, I laugh, I make mistakes, freak out, fall asleep, eat, live and yes, I even die. So they next time someone even starts to utter those four little letters “YOLO,” just remember to be polite, right before you get up in their face and yell at the top of your lungs “YO...NO!” David Fontana is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences, and a weekly columnist for the Daily Free Press. He can be reached at fontad5@bu.edu.

The Feminine Mystique, largely said to be a manifesto of second wave feminism, turned 50 this year. So we here at the Ol’ Free Press wondered what the schools of BU would title their own manifestos, if they had them...

• • • • • • • •

COM : #Hashtag SHA: Who, What, When, Where and Wine. CGS : Wait, what’s a manifesto? CFA : “Untitled”: A Series of Postmodern and Solipsistic Vignettes Chronicling the Decline of the Verisimilitude of MBTA Sign Art. SMG: The Official Handbook of the 1 Percent. BU Athletics: On Scoring. Dean Elmore : My Life in Bowties. The FreeP : Emergency Bourbon.


Thursday, February 21, 2013

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Impressive offense leads men’s basketball to 5th consecutive win Men’s basketball: From Page 8

the BU crowd into the game with a block on Albany guard D.J. Evans 3:58 into the half. Even with Albany keeping the game close, Watson Jr. continued feeding Irving and Papale as the guard play for BU took over the second half and helped maintain a 58–51 lead 12:04 into the final frame. The Terriers led for the remainder of the half. A dunk from freshman forward Nathan Dieudonne, followed by a 3-pointer from junior forward Travis Robinson, put the dagger

in the heart of Albany and chalked up the win for the streaking Terriers. With the 79–69 win, BU has won five consecutive games and seven of its last eight. “I said this before, last time we played BU, but they are going to win the Patriot League right away from the get-go next year,” said Albany coach Will Brown after the game. In typical Terrier fashion, BU had four players in double digits. Watson Jr. registered a double-double with 11 points and 10 assists while Morris, having finished the game with 16 points and nine rebounds, came one board

shy of a double-double. Papale and Irving finished with 18 points apiece. The Terriers finished the game shooting 51.9 percent from the field. “We are playing well right now, so let’s just ride it,” Jones said. “Let’s not make any game bigger than the next. Let’s just try and finish strong. “They know what is ahead right now. They can smell it, and they are playing with a great sense of urgency and an unbelievable sense of confidence in themselves and each other.” The leading scorer for the Great Danes was

guard Mike Black with 21 points, while Rowley added 18 of his own. Wednesday night was also the Student Activities Office Student Group Night at Case Gym, and the BU students came out in throngs to provide a great atmosphere. “I really appreciate the fans coming and that really helps us,” Jones said. “We’ve had great crowds all year. Our guys play off the energy from the students, and it’s what college basketball is really supposed to be like. It’s a good night to be a Terrier.”

Sperry’s play key to maintaining sizeable lead over UNH Women’s hockey: From Page 8

you have. “I like the fact that she had plenty of jump tonight and then got rewarded with a goal. It wasn’t a pretty one that goes in the top corner, but it’s on the score sheet and you got to like it.” The Terriers had their most offensively potent period in the third when Kohanchuk, freshman forward Dakota Woodworth and junior defenseman Shannon Doyle each scored to give

the Terriers a substantive 6–0 victory. As successful as the team’s offense was during the game, the Terriers would have had more of a battle had it not been for a strong defensive corps and the work of Kerrin Sperry during the first period. As a team, BU blocked a total of 18 shots during the game, and Sperry, who picked up her third shutout of the season, stopped 22 shots. Twelve of those shots came during the first period. According to Kohanchuk, after losing two

straight games in the Beanpot Tournament, the Terriers are more focused on having fun and working as a team to win games. “After the Beanpot, our team was just a little down,” Kohanchuk said. “Those losses gave our team a lot of fire to win games and we just realized how it’s not fun at all to lose games. “We know that winning — just having more fun just allows us to win games. We’re going to just try to keep having fun on the bench and playing as a team and just working as a unit.”

BU’s defensemen contribute on offense in Wednesday’s victory Defense: From Page 8

per game, trailing only BC’s 2.06 average. Redshirt senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk said this prudent defense gives the forwards more confidence. “To have our defense playing together as a team and succeeding and just not letting many goals through our back end, that just gives confidence to the forwards that we can get the puck in the net and just keep moving forward to the offensive zone,” Kohanchuk said. But BU’s defensemen did more than just help the offense’s confidence during the game against UNH. At the 10:51 mark of the first period, sophomore defenseman Shannon Stoneburgh got her sixth assist of the season when

she took a wrist shot from the point that deflected off Kohanchuk’s stick and into the net to get BU on the board first. Junior defenseman Shannon Doyle then stepped up and contributed on offense in the third period. Midway through the final frame, she got her 12th assist of the season on freshman Dakota Woodworth’s goal. Fewer than four minutes later, Doyle got her fifth goal of the season to put the Terriers up by the final score of 6–0. Doyle leads all BU defensemen in goals, assists and points. But despite Doyle’s numbers, Durocher said he couldn’t single out one player as the key to BU’s defense. “[Defenseman] Kathryn Miller is a senior member and she’s a kid who hopefully sets a

Papale’s shooting key to success of guards Chemistry: From Page 8

driving lanes for me and D.J., just to be able to find him. I know that he’s going to knock the shot down. I just call it a sixth sense in the back of my head that when I drive he’s going to find an open spot.” Lost in all the shuffle of Irving’s 18 points, which leaves him three shy of reaching the 1,000-point plateau, were impressive performances from other Terriers. Junior forward Dom Morris put up 16 points, nine rebounds and a two-handed slam over Albany forward Sam Rowley. Freshman forward Nathan Dieudonne had a baseline dunk of his own. But the most notable was Papale’s 18 points on 7-of-11 shooting. On some nights, Papale is the fourth option on the offensive end, behind the talented trio of Morris, Watson Jr. and Irving, who accounted for 45 of the Terriers’ 79 points. Albany coach Will Brown said afterward that his game plan for defending Papale was to keep him guarded. “If you don’t get Irving or Watson Jr. in foul trouble, and those guys are both allowed to play 35 minutes, Papale, instead of being a good player, becomes awesome,” Brown said. “You’re either going to give up lay-ups to those two guys or they’re going to find him and he’s going to get jumper after jumper.” And that’s exactly what Papale accom-

plished in his 36 minutes on the floor. He opened up his scoring with a 3-pointer at the 3:50 mark of the first half, and followed that up with another triple on the Terriers’ next possession — one that evened the score at 9–9. Papale contributed in more ways than one for the Terriers’ offense, finishing with three assists. One of those came on an Irving 3-point field goal that pushed BU’s lead to 21–16 with less than nine minutes remaining in the opening frame. After knocking down back-to-back jumpers on BU’s first two possessions coming out of the locker room at halftime, Papale added his second assist, and perhaps the one that changed the momentum in the Terriers’ favor for good. He found Morris wide open on the pick-and-roll and fed it to the burly forward, who had a thunderous finish over Rowley that brought the crowd to its feet at The Roof and stretched BU’s cushion to seven points. BU coach Joe Jones was asked to compare Papale with former Terrier Matt Griffin, whose trademark ability was to sink 3-pointers, and just so happened to wear jersey No. 2, the same that Papale wears. “John [Papale] is an underrated, tough kid,” Jones said. “He’s more than just a shooter. And that’s what Matt [Griffin] was. Matt was a tough, gritty kid who played hard. Both guys shoot it pretty well. John has more size so he can do a little bit more. There are some similarities there.”

Follow us on Twitter: @DFPSports @BOShockeyblog @DFPhoops

tempo,” Durocher said. “But certainly in your junior class with the Doyles and the [Kaleigh] Fratkins and the [Caroline] Campbells, they’ve done a great job. And Shannon Stoneburgh is probably our most improved player this year. “It would be hard for me to put a thumb on one person and say that’s the most consistent kid, but you like to lean on the upperclassmen.” With BU’s defense playing so well during the team’s three-game winning streak, Kohanchuk stressed the importance of defensive success toward the team reaching its ultimate objective. “When our defense is on game, I think that’s a big backbone for what takes teams to win games into national championships,” she said.

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Jenelle Kohanchuk scored two goals in BU’s 6–0 rout of UNH Wednesday night.

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Softball looking to progress from last year Defense: From Page 8

Despite frustration about not being allowed to participate in the America East tournament, Gleason believes the players will be able to use this setback to push themselves further in her first season as head coach. “I talk about it a lot with the team. They’ve been through changes, they’ve got a new coach,” Gleason said. “We’ve lost some players to injury, we’ve changed the lineup a little bit. They’re getting used to me as a new coach and me implementing my culture.” Although the coaching staff has changed this season, many of the staple players for the team’s success last year return to the team this season, including three of the four infielders, all three pitchers and junior catcher Amy Ekart. These players include two of last season’s strongest offensive producers, junior infielders Megan Volpano and Brittany Clendenny, as well as junior outfielder Jayme Mask, last year’s team leader in batting average and stolen bases. Also returning to the team is junior pitcher Holli Floetker, whose standout season last year played a significant role in the team’s 41–16 final record. She picked up 19 wins and finished the season with a conference-leading 1.54 ERA. “Sometimes when I ask them to communicate at practice they’re communicating in their own way because they already know each other,” Gleason said of the team chemistry. “It’s great just to look out and they can just turn to each other and know what they’re going to do and know what play they’re going to call.” Added to the team’s veteran lineup are three freshman players, pitcher and first baseman Lauren Hynes, outfielder Haley King and walk-on outfielder Lauren Underhill. Gleason emphasized that the team expects its freshmen to contribute, especially

with the team’s smaller roster this year. The veterans on the team, who have experienced success in previous seasons, will lead the team by example. During the fall off-season, Gleason and assistant coach Susie Rzegocki worked with the players one-on-one on fundamentals before the Terriers came back to practice in January. Despite some inclement weather, the team has been undeterred in its practice. “I don’t think we missed a beat the minute we started practicing in January,” Gleason said. Despite injuries and graduating seniors, Gleason believes the lineup will remain generally consistent with last season, especially once injuries incurred during the offseason begin to heal. These familiar faces may take comfort in last season’s successes. “They see it as a driving force,” Gleason said. “As we’ve been here before, we know what we need to do, and now we’re going to take that next step. They’ve had success, and once you’ve had success you don’t want to move backwards.” The first step in repeating last season’s success is this weekend’s Citrus Classic, starting Friday in Orlando, Fla. The Terriers will face the University of Wisconsin and Georgia Southern University. They will play Wisconsin three times and Georgia Southern twice over the course of the weekend. “If you don’t have those teams right away that drive you and challenge you, then you get a soft sense of where you are,” Gleason said. With this challenge, BU hopes to start off the season well and get an early push toward building its RPI ranking and improving its chances of making it to the NCAA tournament. This coming season looks to be one full of both the familiar and the new. “They’re ready to go,” Gleason said. “Ready to put on the uniform and represent BU.”


It’s a good night to be a Terrier.

Quotable

-BU coach Joe Jones on his team’s win over University at Albany

Page 8

Sports

Defense

The Daily Free Press

wins championships

Redshirt senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk said when BU’s defense is playing well, the team plays at a championship level. P.8.

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Terriers defeat Albany 79–69 in last AE contest at Case Gym Solid two-way play gives BU 2nd win over Great Danes

Chemistry between Watson Jr., Papale demanding respect

By Michael Bagarella Daily Free Press Staff

By René Reyes Daily Free Press Staff

In its last America East game on the hardwood at Case Gymnasium, the Boston University men’s basketball team defeated the University at Albany 79–69 Wednesday night. “We played real well on both sides of the floor,” said BU coach Joe Jones. “Other than getting ourselves in foul trouble, we did a good job defensively. Our offense was terrific tonight. They shared the ball and we got a lot of contributions. Guys were efficient and it was fun to coach tonight.” It was the second meeting between the two teams, as the Terriers (16–11, 10–4 America East) deflated the Great Danes (19–9, 8–6 America East) in overtime by a score of 85–80 about a month ago. Junior guard D.J. Irving picked up right where he left off Jan. 23 in Albany, N.Y. Behind his 11 first-half points and a few big plays from sophomore forward James Kennedy, BU led Albany 32–30 at the end of the first half. After taking two offensive charges, Kennedy finished a layup 15:27 into the first half to give the Terriers a commanding 27–18 lead. Albany, however, came rearing back and, thanks to strong play from forward Sam Rowley and center John Puk, went on a 12–5 run to end the half and leave itself in a good position for the second half. Freshmen guards Maurice Watson Jr. and John Papale got the Terriers out to a quick start in

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Terrier junior forward Dom Morris came one rebound shy of a double-double, scoring 18 points and grabbing nine boards in BU’s 79–69 victory against Albany at Case Gymnasium.

the second half and helped put BU up 40–30 1:48 into the final frame. Momentum remained on BU’s side when junior forward Dom Morris threw down a dunk and added an extra point after an Albany foul.

“Its always good to dunk on someone and get the ‘and one,’” Morris said of the authoritative slam. “It was great.” Morris then built on the momentum and got

Boston University men’s basketball freshman guard Maurice Watson Jr. has a sixth sense when it comes to knowing where his roommate and fellow freshman guard John Papale is on the court. Watson Jr. handed out 10 assists in BU’s (16–11, 10–4 America East) 79–69 win over the University at Albany in the final America East game at Case Gymnasium Wednesday. Five of those assists were to the 6-foot-3 Papale, who finished with a team-high 18 points. Papale’s deadeye shooting from behind the 3-point line — he knocked down four treys against the Great Danes (19–9, 8–6 America East) — has commanded the respect of opposing defenses and provided the undersized but dynamic backcourt duo of Watson and junior guard D.J. Irving the ability to work its creativity in the lane. “Me and John are roommates. I consider him one of my best friends,” Watson Jr. said. “So when I’m driving, I always have a sixth sense of where he’s going to be. He’s a shooter. “You have to find the shooter to get the team hot. It opens up the floor so much that he makes some threes. It opens up some

Chemistry, see page 7

Men’s basketball, see page 7

Softball team prepared to reach lofty expectations with new obstacles, new coach By Sam Simmons Daily Free Press Staff

After winning the America East title for the third time in four years in the 2012 season, the Boston University softball team, under the leadership of new head coach Kathryn Gleason, looks to replicate last

season’s success. BU is predicted to finish atop the America East with the University at Albany, but will face a new set of challenges as its move to a new league in the 2014 season prevents the team from playing in the conference championship.

Last season the team’s place as America East champions guaranteed it a spot in the NCAA tournament, where it went 1–2 in the Regional round. This year, the team will have to fight harder and earn an at-large bid in order to make the tournament, but Gleason is determined to bring the team back

there this season. “We’re going to do everything we can, and we’ve set up the schedule to get us where we need to be ... and we just have to go do it on the field,” Gleason said.

Softball, see page 7

Terriers shutout UNH in 6–0 blowout BU defense playing well during streak By Meredith Perri Daily Free Press Staff

Halfway through the opening period of Wednesday night’s game, the No. 4 Boston University women’s hockey team experienced a momentum shift. After just over nine minutes of the University of New Hampshire controlling the game and the shot advantage, the Terriers (21–5–3, 16–2–1 Hockey East) found the back of the net, giving them a lead that they would not relinquish for the rest of the night. With that goal, one of two scored by senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk during the game, BU propelled itself to a 6–0 win over the Wildcats (13–15–3, 9–8–2 Hockey East) at Walter Brown Arena. The victory also served as the Terriers’ third straight win and their 16th Hockey East win this season — the most in the program’s history. “It was disappointing to watch [the first 10 minutes], because I thought we were going to come out and have the pedal to the floor and be ready to go, and for whatever reason that wasn’t the case,” said BU coach Brian Durocher. “And then we had two shifts back-to-back where we got a goal on a great forechecking job.” After the slow start, the Terriers gained a 1–0 lead when junior co-captain Marie-Philip Poulin sent a pass to sophomore defenseman

Shannon Stoneburgh, who was stationed at the point. Stoneburgh then took a shot that Kohanchuk deflected by UNH netminder Vilma Vaattovaara. BU came close to adding to its lead just over a minute later when senior co-captain Jill Cardella attempted to slip the puck by Vaattovaara. After the referees reviewed the play, however, it was determined that the puck never crossed the line. With the first 10 minutes of the game behind them, the Terriers began controlling the game, and increasingly showing off their offensive ability. Just over five minutes into the second frame, senior forward Isabel Menard earned her 13th goal of the season to give BU an insurance point just seconds after the Terriers came off of the power play. Four minutes later, freshman forward Rebecca Russo found her way onto the score sheet with her first collegiate goal, a redirection of a shot by Cardella. “She’s a kid who has plenty of ability and came here with a good reputation,” Durocher said of Russo. “We’ve seen a lot of things in practice, but it just hasn’t really translated to the ice, and I think a lot of it is freshman jitters that

Women’s hockey, see page 7

The Bottom Line

Thursday, Feb. 21

W. Basketball @ Albany, 7 p.m.

Friday, Feb. 22

M. Hockey v. UMass Lowell, 7:30 p.m. Softball @ Citrus Classic, 12:15 p.m. Track New England Championships @ TTC, All Day

By Gregory Davis Daily Free Press Staff

In its 6–0 shutout victory over the University of New Hampshire Wednesday night, the No. 4 Boston University women’s hockey team’s defense once again showed why it can be just as effective as its record-setting offense. After losing two games in a row en route to a last-place Beanpot finish, the Terriers (21–5– 3, 16–2–1 Hockey East) have gone on a threegame winning streak. In those three victories, BU surrendered three goals for an average of just one goal allowed per game. BU coach Brian Durocher attributed the defense’s success to limiting the number of risky pass attempts. “It starts with us moving the puck fast and really not making those turnovers that happen when you’re trying to thread the needle and make every pass tape-to-tape up the middle,” Durocher said after the game against UNH (13–15–3, 9–8–2 Hockey East). “You start just chipping them off the wall … which we did a lot of tonight.” The defense has actually been impressive all year, but it has been overshadowed by an offense that has six players with 10 or more goals in the same season for the first time in program history.

Saturday, Feb. 23

M. Hockey @ UMass Lowell, 7 p.m. Softball @ Citrus Classic, 12:15 p.m. W. Hockey v. Connecticu, 3 p.m. M. Basketball @ UMBC, 7 p.m.

During BU’s run of 14 games without a loss that spanned from Nov. 16 to Feb. 2, the team allowed more than two goals in a game just three times. One of the teams to accomplish the feat was No. 9 Northeastern University, which has the second-best scoring offense in Hockey East with 3.81 goals per game. However, the Terriers suffered stretches of poor defense over the course of the season, as well. The most notable struggle was during a three-game skid between Oct. 31 and Nov. 9, when they went 0–2–1 in two games against No. 2 Boston College and one game against UNH. BU allowed 16 goals in those three games, including a 7–1 routing at Walter Brown Arena. Durocher said BU is now playing much better in the defensive zone than it has at other points in the season. “We’re ... taking care of business on our end of the ice better than we have in certain stretches during the year,” Durocher said. “And that means people are guarding the front of the net and they’re picking up sticks and getting bodies when shots are coming.” Despite occasionally allowing more goals than they would like, the Terriers’ defense ranks second in Hockey East with 2.34 goals allowed

Sunday, Feb. 24 Softball @ Citrus Classic, 11:15 a.m. W. Hockey @ Connecticut, 2 p.m.

Defense, see page 7

Monday, Feb. 25

No Events Scheduled Daily Free Domination won its first game of the Broomball season Thursday with a 5-2 victory.


February 21st Daily Free Press