Issuu on Google+

The Daily Free Press

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue XVII

DIRTY WATER Muddy Water Restoration faces opposition, page 3.

[

Thursday, February 14, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

MAY CAUSE TEARS Side Effects shows a different side to drama, page 5.

]

www.dailyfreepress.com

MO FO’ SHO’

WEATHER

Team effort slides BU women past Vermont, 56-47, page 8.

Today: Partly cloudy/High 42 Tonight: Mostly clear/Low 32 Tomorrow: 49/32 Data Courtesy of weather.com

Days after Nemo, Mass. reflects on cleanup efforts Bulger’s pre-trial By Kyle Plantz Daily Free Press Staff

The City of Boston continues to clean up the aftermath of Winter Storm Nemo even though the snow stopped days ago. “We are still in the cleanup process,” said Michael Verseckes, spokesman for Massachusetts Department of Transportation. “We got a lot of the snow melted, but overnight the temperatures dropped and froze the water again. We’re not out of it [the cleanup process] just yet.” Winter Storm Nemo hit Boston Friday and continued until Saturday, leaving behind about 24.9 inches of snow to the area, making Nemo the fifth largest snowstorm ever to hit Boston. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick called for utilities to look into the cost to put power lines underground on Monday after the snowstorm left more than 400,000 homes and businesses without electricity. The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority shut down services Friday at about 3:30 p.m. and resumed normal schedules Monday morning. Joe Pesaturo, MBTA spokesperson, said in an email the MBTA would not have been operational without the help from employees who worked around the clock. “Despite a blizzard that crippled the area this [past] weekend, America’s oldest subway came back fully operational [Monday] morning, providing safe and reliable service to tens of thousands of customers,” he

hearings continue, immunity debated By Nora Philbin Daily Free Press Staff

SARAH FISHER/DAILY FREE PRESS

Although the clean-up process has taken a while, Boston agencies are happy with the progress.

said. “While there were some minor delays, there were no significant service interruptions.” Pesaturo said the MBTA’s pre-storm strategy worked well, but exposing T cars to the weather had some negative effects. “Exposing the T’s aging subway cars and trolleys to heavy snow and ice for sustained periods of time has a detrimental effect, and makes it more difficult to get the vehicles

back into service in a timely manner,” he said. “In this case, however, the subway system performed very well, and protecting the aging fleet had a lot to do with that success.” Peter Judge, public information officer of the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, said the Commonwealth had time to prepare before the storm hit, which made the cleanup process easier.

Cleanup, see page 2

Foxwoods makes bid for Mass. gaming license amidst controversy By Alice Bazerghi Daily Free Press Contributor

Foxwoods Resort Casino is joining the Massachusetts casino sweepstakes as a full partner and stakeholder in the Milford venture for the most lucrative casino license in the state. The Massachusetts Gaming Commission plans to issue a license at the beginning of 2014 for the Crossroads casino, advancing the timeline by three months. Foxwoods representatives said they were excited about their new Massachusetts casino venture that would build a casino in Milford, according to a Sunday email statement from Foxwoods. “The pairing represents the foundation of a compelling case for a Bostonarea gaming license,” read the statement. “Crossroads brings the Milford site, an excellent location for a gaming-focused development, and Foxwoods brings unpar-

alleled regional gaming experience”. Foxwoods is in direct competition with Suffolk Downs, which proposed a casino in East Boston with Caesars Entertainment, and Wynn Resorts, which plans a casino resort on the Mystic River waterfront in Everett, according to information from the MGC website. Multiple casino companies are competing for the Western Massachusetts resort license, including a project backed by Mohegan Sun in Connecticut. In January, PPE Casino Resorts was the last to apply to the sweepstakes, without a specific location. The developer is looking at the town of Danvers for a possible slot parlor at the Liberty Tree Mall. The competition brings new attention to the debate over the comparative merits of urban and suburban casinos. Many groups said they oppose the gambling sweepstakes for a variety of reasons.

Carl Peirce, vice president of CasinoFacts.org, said he is strongly opposed to casino development in Massachusetts. “Casino gambling and slot parlors are at best a zero-sum gain for the economy, and experience has shown that there has been moderate-to-heavy burdens placed on these communities after the first five years of economic shine has worn off,“ he said. Peirce also said he has moral issues with spreading gambling across the Commonwealth. “Gambling is a waste of good time and money, and is greed driven,” he said. “The industry is by nature predatory. It feeds off of the greed of others to their own detriment, only to feed itself. The majority of the industry owners not only do not gamble themselves, but also do not live near their own establishments. That should tell you something about the industry.”

Foxwoods, see page 2

The saga of James “Whitey” Bulger continued Wednesday at a pre-trial hearing where the prosecution and the defense debated whether Bulger’s alleged immunity would be allowed as a defense in court. U.S. District Judge Richard Stearns did not hand out an immunity ruling Wednesday and said he would take the issue under advisement, giving the defense and prosecution 14 days to submit further filings. “The judge asked for more written submissions from both sides, so there was no ruling of any sort,” said Christina Sterling, public information officer for the U.S. Department of Justice District of Massachusetts. This hearing is the result of Bulger’s claim that a federal prosecutor granted him immunity for his crimes while he was providing the Federal Bureau of Investigation information on rival crime organizations. Bulger was the leader of the notorious Winter Hill Gang. He is charged with federal racketeering and 19 murders he allegedly committed during the 1970s and 1980s. After a prolonged manhunt, Bulger was arrested in June 2011 in California. Prosecutors claim that immunity from the FBI has no basis in legality, as it would not allow for murder. J. W. Carney Jr., Bulger’s attorney, declined to comment about the hearing. Richard Lehr, professor of journalism at Boston University and author of multiple books on Bulger, said there is a lot of debate surrounding the claim of immunity for Bulger because it was not based on anything legal. “Any lawyer I have talked to said that he doesn’t have a legal prayer,” Lehr said. “Legally, there is no such thing as a license to kill. I can see why he thinks he has a license to kill because of his experience on the street all those years where he indeed was able to kill without consequence because he had a band of corrupt FBI agents protecting him. It’s not as crazy as it seems.” Lehr said Bulger may not have had legal immunity, but he was safe from prosecution on the street.

Bulger, see page 2

CAP reports total student loan debt at $1 trillion, BU prof. calls for gov’t. efforts By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

As student loan debt totals $1 trillion, according to a recent report, the government must increase its efforts to decrease the cost of higher education nationwide to prevent students from opting out of college, said Boston University economics professor Kevin Lang. “There are a number of things that can be done and seem to be relatively low-cost,” he said. “The most promising of these is replacing private loans that are guaranteed by the federal government with direct loans from the federal government.” Wednesday, the Center for American Progress released a report finding student loan debt currently totaling $1 trillion. Of the 35 million student and ex-student borrowers, 13 percent defaulted on their loans in 2009, according to the report. “It is time for federal policymakers to take action,” the CAP report stated. “We should enact meaningful reforms that include an in-

terest rate reduction and that provide a way for private loan borrowers to consolidate their debt into the federal student loan program.” Lang said while college students and high school graduates continue to value obtaining a degree, some may believe taking on debt to attend college is too great a risk. “People are looking at the very high economic returns from graduating college despite the tough labor market for recent college graduates,” he said. “But weighing against that is the concern about the risk — ‘what if I don’t get a job, what if I don’t get a good job and I have all these student loans?’” While student loan debt continues to grow, governmental financial support for institutes of higher education has decreased, Lang said. “Higher education serves a fairly small segment of the population and you don’t have to stop offering higher education, you can just increase fees or tuition depending on the state,” he said. “It’s a fairly easy political place to cut [spending].”

Debt, see page 2

GRAPHIC BY MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS

Student loan debt is at an all-time high, reaching a total of $1 trillion this year, according to a study released Tuesday by the Center for American Progress.


2

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Public info. officer: ‘After-action meeting’ to happen in next few weeks Cleanup: From Page 1

“We had the luxury of time to go through our preparation drills ahead of time,” he said. “We do all hazards training and although we haven’t been through this type of event in a while, we took our practices from previous disasters and put them to use here.” Judge said 90 percent of things MEMA did for the storm would be routine for other natural disasters, such as cleaning up debris, setting up shelters and getting generators for local communities. Judge said Deval’s road ban was

a significant help for the cleanup process. “Form our perspective, it [the ban] paid huge dividends,” he said. “It took people off the roads and made room for the cleanup crew to do their job. It allowed the plows to stay with the storm and get the major roads up and running. “ Overall, the emergency response to the storm went well, Judge said. “We will have a number of weeks to have an after-action meeting, where everyone will look at what we did and find ways to tweak it,” he said. “As of right now, there is nothing major that was a huge

problem.” Verseckes said MassDOT’s plan for cleaning up the storm worked well. “Having other vehicles for plowing was an enormous benefit. We called upon 4,000 contractors statewide to help with clearing the roads,” he said. Clearing most of the snow is a challenge and needs a lot of people power to get it done, Verseckes said. “Things worked really well. We will go back and look at our procedures and look at what can be done differently or changed for next

time,” he said. Some people said they were content with the quickness of the cleanup. “The city did a great job,” said Marcella Cuadra, 31, a resident of Newton Highlands. “Within 24 hours after the storm stopped, the roads were clean.” Other people said the city could have done a better job at getting the snow off the road. “The way they paved the road made it almost impossible to cross the road,” said Rosa Huang, a resident of Allston. Huang said many of the side-

walks had large snowbanks that prevented her from crossing the street. “You can’t jump over them [the snow banks],” she said. “There could have been a better way to move the snow.” Andrew Pinto, 21, a resident of Allston and student at Suffolk University, also said a lot of the sidewalks were not cleaned off in an efficient manner. “Commuting was a pain and I wish I could say nice things that the city did right, but I just can’t,” he said.

CAS junior: Student inability to invest hurts economy Journalism prof.: Bulger defense Debt: From Page 1

High rates of interest also cause recently graduated students financial stress, according to the report, with the average interest rate on unsubsidized federal student loans currently at 6.8 percent. “With relatively low cost, you could allow students with federally guaranteed loans to refinance into the federal student loan program,” Lang said. “For those who are paying high rates of interest, it could be a win-win situation.” Jesse Crane, a College of Arts and Sciences junior, said overwhelming student debt hurts not only recent graduates, but also the entire U.S. economy. “Having young people be able to come out of college and start businesses — or invest or save — is good for the economy,” Crane said. “It helps build the housing market

and generally encourages the flow of money.” He said the prospect of finding a job directly after graduation is his primary concern. “I’m actually desperately trying to get an internship so I can then get a job when I graduate and pay off my debt,” he said. “It’s definitely on my mind.” Danielle Elefritz, a College of Communication sophomore, said the government should attempt to help students with loans to decrease national debt. “It’s a lot of not being able to get good jobs right off the bat,” she said. “Tuition keeps going up and interest rates are high. We don’t have time to get it paid back — I’m going to be in debt for the rest of my life.” Elefritz said she plans to go to graduate school to increase her chances of finding employment af-

ter she graduates, even though doing so will likely add to her debt. “I want to go to graduate school so I can go to law school which is a more specific field because [I am] just doing environmental studies and journalism,” she said. “I don’t know if I’m going to be able to find anything in either of those fields, so I figured I should become more specialized.” Since the prospect of loans after graduation could discourage people from attending college, the government should prioritize making higher education more affordable, said Danielle Martinez, a CAS junior. “It [student loan debt] is definitely discouraging people from going to college,” she said. “Where I’m from, people worry about even going to local schools because they don’t want to take on the debt — they don’t want to risk it.”

Casinofacts.org Pres.: Gambling ‘greed driven’ Foxwoods: From Page 1

John Ribeiro, chairman of the Committee to Repeal The Casino Deal, said the new casinos could create economic trouble for visitors. “People will spend money at casinos that they were already spending,” he said. “Casinos are even permitted to lend money

directly to their patrons for the sole purpose of generating more losses.” Ribeiro, a resident of Winthrop, a neighboring town to Revere and East Boston where the Suffolk Downs and Wynn Resorts sites might be established, said he feared a negative community impact from the casino. “Casinos don’t help their host

communities. Almost every casino community has seen crime, decrease in home values, and a negative impact on small businesses,” he said. Despite the controversy, Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick’s 2014 fiscal budget relies upon $83 million in gaming revenues tied to the licensing of gaming facilities.

The Daily Free Press Crossword By Mirroreyes Internet Services Corporation ACROSS 1. Hidden supply 6. Spanish hors d’oeuvre 10. Back talk 14. Boat 15. Ailments 16. Cut with shears 17. Suitably 18. Baseball great Willie ____ 19. As well 20. Remainders 22. Commotion 24. Goblet (Scottish) 25. Show angry defiance 26. Academic compositions 29. Winding device 30. Indonesian island 31. Re-evaluates 37. Short publicity notice 39. Market (abbrev.) 40. Stiff hair or bristles 41. Most uneven in quality 44. Source of inspiration 45. Shortening 46. Beatified people 48. Persecute 52. Pulpy fruit residue 53. Capital of Saudi Arabia

54. Strangles with a wire 58. City in Switzerland 59. Muddy 61. Not dead 62. Frozen 63. Notion or concept 64. Pertaining to a cone 65. “____ of the d’Ubervilles” 66. Torn cloths 67. Down on one’s knees DOWN 1. Mark left by a wound 2. Adhesive strip 3. Picnic insects 4. Card game 5. Period of great prosperity 6. Instances 7. Exclamation of dismay 8. Layer 9. Inspires confidence 10. Mars or defaces 11. Assign or allocate 12. Cordage fiber 13. Dormant bacterium 21. Soviet Union 23. Heaps 25. Defeats 26. Lessens 27. Crystalline food additive 28. Aspersion 29. Gathered leaves and grass clippings

stems from ‘corrupt FBI agents’ Bulger: From Page 1

“On the streets he probably had what he calls immunity,” Lehr said. “But it’s based on the criminal actions of corrupt FBI agents, and I don’t think that’s going to stand up in court.” Although he does not support Bulger’s claim for immunity, Lehr said he does support the process of gaining more information for the public. “My hope is that they actually get to argue this to a jury because, as a journalist and as a citizen, I want the defense to put the government on trial,” he said. “I hope we will have a greater understanding of how this happened than we do today, because I don’t think we’ve ever gotten to the bottom — inside the government and the FBI.” Stan Fisher, a BU School of Law professor, said a pre-trial hearing for an advanced ruling is quite common. “It’s a lot more efficient,”

Fisher said. “Testimony can take hours, validating witnesses, and then it turns out that it has not strictly been admitted. The judge tells the jury to disregard it, which can be very difficult for people, psychologically, to disregard what they have heard.” Because of the high-profile nature of the case, many people already know about Bulger’s claim to immunity even if, as a defense, it is not allowed in court, but that is something that lawyers take into account when selecting a jury, Fisher said. “There is no jury selection until the trial is about to begin and in the process of jury selection, my guess is, they will have to fill out a questionnaire,” Fisher said. “There may be questions about exposure to pre-trial publicity, and even if there were not a questionnaire, part of the jury selection process would be questioning the jurors about things which could bias the jury.”

Got Instragram? @Dailyfreepress CLASSIFIEDS JOBS -- $$ SPERM DONORS WANTED $$ Earn up to $1,200/month and give the gift of family through California Cryobank’s donor program. Convenient Cambridge location. Apply online: SPERMBANK.com

Sudoku 7 5

8 4

9 3

5

6

1

9 3

6 4

32. Chieftains 33. Punctuation mark 34. Render senseless 35. Where the sun rises 36. Perceives 38. Bundled 42. State in India 43. Emperor 47. Alcoholic drink from rice 48. Circle a planet

49. Portion 50. Funeral fires 51. Units of South African currency 52. Natives of the Yucatan 54. Golfer ____ Norman 55. Prong 56. Wicked 57. Religious splinter

group 60. Mountain in Crete

9

8 2 1 3

Solution is on Page 4

1

6

7

8

2 Sudoku-Puzzles.net

Difficulty: Medium

Solution is on Page 4


CCampus & City olumn girl, 20

Blondes prefer gentlemen

Feb. 14, or National Condom Awareness Day, is a day I’ll be spending alone with the cast of Downton Abbey and my metaphorical harem of cats, wistfully looking back at more actively romantic times in my life. In honor of those better days, I offer a condensed catalogue of relation- SYDNEY ships past. SHEA 1. At the tender age of four, I had a “boyfriend” in preschool that I married. Innocent, youthful bliss — how cute, one might think. He brought me conversation hearts and flowers on Valentine’s Day, so I guess my four-year-old self was doing a heck of a lot better than my current self. We had a playground marital ceremony, about which I remember little (God-willing and with enough liquor, this will be the case with my real future wedding as well). But one day when we were in the back seat of my mother’s Volvo, my mom looked back and had to cover her mouth to keep from screaming in horror: I was on top of this kid, doing things I shouldn’t have known how to do as a four-year-old (congrats, your daughter’s a slore!). 2. Nine years later, I was at a friend’s party and didn’t know everyone, so as an icebreaker, she decided we’d all play “Seven Minutes in Heaven,” a game in which two parties engage in activities that don’t normally save enough space for the Holy Spirit, what with the game’s perimeters being restricted to the dimensions of the average household closet. I whispered in my friend’s ear the person with whom I wanted to play the game and after some manipulation of the rules on her part, into the closet he and I went. Since I didn’t have any gum, I requested that we both chew a Starburst before commencing our seven minutes, but I didn’t anticipate the awkward 45 seconds of chewing that would occur in the meantime. After this short period of angsty awkwardness, all went accordingly and, needless to say, we won. In fact, during the course of the evening we would make several more trips into said closet, and we ended up dating for several months. 3. My first grown-up date was … with a professor. Oops. So maybe I lied about my age (I said I’m a 22-year-old grad student ... okay if you actually believe that, well, I wish you were the cashier at Wine Press). He taught at a university in Rhode Island and was from Turkey. I was only in it for the free food, so I had already composed my made-up plans pour après-date in my mind. At the end of the night, he asked me if I wanted to come back home with him — I’m assuming he wanted to play chess or discuss the latest read from Oprah’s Book Club — to which I replied I was “busy.” He lived in Cambridge, anyway, which we all know merits an automatic “no” to the private afterparty invitation. However forlorn I expect to be on Thursday, I gratefully look back upon more romantic occasions and then remember that, ah yes, I just figuratively killed five Owls with one stone at a Finals club last weekend. Come to think of it, I should probably be spending this holiday in confession. Sydney Shea is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences. She can be reached at slshea@bu.edu.

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Muddy River Restoration begins in Brookline ‘Condom Fairy’ delivers tools for safe sex via mail By Katherine Lynn Daily Free Press Staff

Construction on the Muddy River Restoration Project, a flood and erosion mitigation program, which aims to enhance aquatic habitats in the Muddy River and improve the water quality of the river, has officially begun, inciting anger in a number of locals. Early construction has involved tree removal, changes of traffic patterns in the area and the removal of a culvert in Brookline that is currently covering the Muddy River. The project is a collaboration between the Federal, Commonwealth, City of Boston and Brookline governments. As construction continues over the next few weeks, residents and people who drive in the area will begin to see changes in traffic patterns. Mike Keegan of the Army Corps of Engineers, project manager of the Muddy River Restoration, said progress is coming. “We are doing some work on some tree removal,” Keegan said. “We will also be doing work of the relocation of the landmark driveway. We will be starting work of the culvert under Brookline Avenue, between now and the end of March. It is starting slowly because of the winter, but we are glad to be making progress.” Keegan said the Army Corps of Engineers is working hard to keep the community informed of the

By Josh Molskness Daily Free Press Contributor

SARAH SIEGEL/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF Construction has begun on the Muddy River Restoration Project despite the disapproval of some activists.

changes the construction will be yield. “What we are trying to do is coordinate with people as much as possible,” Keegan said. “We do have on our webpage a 90-day look-ahead. People can get on there and see what construction is coming up in the next 90 days. We are building a mailing list so that, as we get information, we can send out an email blast to give people information about the project.” The project has been fairly well received, but there are several local groups against the construction plans of the Muddy River Restoration. Members of Save the Muddy River, a community group focused on protecting the current ecosystem

and habitat of the Muddy River, said they are strongly against the project. “We think the Muddy River Restoration Project is ill-advised, but agree that certain issues such as flooding and pollution of the river must be addressed,” said Save the Muddy River member Hilary Johansen, in an email statement. “We’d like to see taxpayer money used in a way that promotes and protects a healthy ecosystem.” The group has worked to spread information about the negative ecosystem impacts the construction project has, especially in regards to tree removal and herbicide use. “Unfortunately our protest of the tree cutting was not as successful as we had hoped, and we lost a

Muddy River, see page 4

Students pleased with SMG ambassadors program By Katia Rar Daily Free Press Contributor

Boston University’s School of Management sponsors the SMG Student Ambassadors program to acclimate exchange students to the U.S. and smooth their transition to a new learning environment, SMG officials said. Just over a month since the program’s inception, students involved said they are incredibly happy with the opportunities offered for meeting people and learning about Boston. “My predecessor had started by having events and bringing the exchange students in for pizza,” said Faith Nussbaum, assistant director of SMG’s Undergraduate Program. “Students were receptive to the idea.” Although Nussbaum started the program in December, she said she considers it a student-run

organization. “I will just be an advisor,” Nussbaum said. “[The] students can run the student clubs.” Nussbaum said the program’s goal is for the ambassadors to introduce their exchange students to the campus and the city, and to help them with anything they do not understand. The program is available only to exchange students taking at least one course in SMG or economics. Jeffrey Furnam, a strategy and innovation professor, said the program brings benefits to the ambassadors as well as the students because it helps ambassadors become familiar with a new culture that can help them excel in international business. “In general we’d like to improve our students’ understanding of global cultures,” Furman said. “It would be great to have more

exchange students in [SMG], and also to have them more deeply integrated into student social life in a way that’s facilitated by a program like the ambassador program.” Furnam said the ambassadors experience the U.S. through the eyes of an exchange student. “They get that in part by dealing with students who are not from the U.S. — who are in the fouryear curriculum — but they’re going to get additional perspective from those who are only in it for a brief time,” Furnam said. Jiaxin Lin, the SMG Ambassadors secretary, said ambassadors are required to meet with their students twice a month. Lin, an SMG freshman, said the goal of the program is to help exchange students become involved in the school and the local

Ambassadors, see page 4

To assist Boston University students in honoring the true spirit of Valentine’s Day, the Condom Fairy service will begin delivering free contraceptives to students’ mailboxes beginning the week of the holiday. Katharine Mooney, Wellness Coordinator at BU’s Wellness and Prevention Services who created the Condom Fairy, said she initiated the service in response to student demand. “Student Health Services offers free condoms to students, but we received feedback that students were not comfortable picking them up in public,” Mooney said. The launch of Condom Fairy marks the first ever condom-bymail service at any university, Mooney said. Students will be able to order up to three Trojan condoms, two FC2 female condoms and three lubricants to be delivered to their mailbox for free. With the new service, Mooney said she hopes students will practice safe sex because they will no longer feel intimidated by the social stigma of purchasing or picking up condoms in public. “Condom Fairy is discreet and promotes safe sex as well as sexual education,” Mooney said. She also said each Condom Fairy delivery comes with a card encouraging safe sex and includes information on testing for sexually transmitted infections. By promoting safe sex, Mooney said she also hopes to see a decline in STI rates. The Centers for Disease Control and Protection estimates 19,700,000 new STIs occur every year nationwide, with about half occurring among people between the ages of 15 and 24, according to data released Wednesday by the CDC. While Condom Fairy may be seen as controversial by some students, Mooney said those with access to contraceptives are not necessarily more sexually active. “Research shows that giving access to protection does not encourage sexual behavior,” she

Condoms see page 4

Students support more frequent BU Shuttle service in inclement weather By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Despite freezing temperatures, the Boston University Shuttle runs at the same schedule throughout the year.

Although the Boston University Shuttle runs on a consistent schedule during the academic year, students said the service becomes unreliable and insufficient in poor weather, particularly in winter months. “I’m usually fine with walking, but because all my classes are so far from my dorm, when I try to rely on the BUS when the weather is not preferable, I end up waiting a really long time,” said Lauren O’Shaughnessy, a College of Communication freshman. O’Shaughnessy said the BUS should run more often when it is raining or if the temperature drops below freezing. “Often, when it is raining I can’t get on because there are so many people — I know a lot of

people run into that issue also,” O’Shaughnessy said. “It’s a hazard because if anything ever happens and there are 100 people crammed into the smaller bus, the risk of people getting hurt is way higher.” Having larger buses run more often would fix the crowding issue, O’Shaughnessy said. However, BU spokesman Colin Riley said the university does not increase bus service due to low temperatures or bleak conditions. “It is impractical and cost prohibitive to provide increased bus service during inclement weather, which is typical, seasonal weather for winter in New England,” Riley said in an email. “That would require scheduling drivers to stand-by and additional buses to be on-hand.”

BUS, see page 4


4

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Save the Muddy River member: Coordinator: WPS purchases condoms for delivery is not an expensive program, Hannah Klarner, a CAS senior, ‘Devastating’ loss of bur oak tree Mooney said said the service should be quicker Condoms: From Page 3

Muddy River: From Page 3

100-plus-year-old bur oak tree that was 43 inches in diameter,” Johansen said. “This is a devastating loss. With continued efforts of protest, we hope to influence a change in plans for phase two of the project, especially regarding the use of herbicides on the common reed, Phragmites.” Both the Maintenance and Management Oversight Committee and the Army Corps of Engineers said they have addressed the concerns of this group. “We have gotten some emails from them,” Keegan said. “We responded to the emails. We are taking approximately 200 trees out. We are putting approximately 200 trees

in their place. The trees we are putting in are going over a smaller area. We will have more trees on less space, as well as planning more than 11,000 small, medium and large shrubs.” The MMOC is still in full support of the planned ecosystem changes that will attempt to mitigate the risk of flooding in the area. “This is America and people have the right to express their opinions,” said Fran Gershwin, the chair of the Muddy River Restoration Project and Management Oversight Committee. “When the opinions are based on some misinformation we try to do the best we can to provide additional information. That’s not to say it will satisfy everyone of course.”

said. Placing an order with the Condom Fairy on the SHS website is simple, Mooney said. After selecting what he or she would like to receive, a student must simply supply his or her name, address and BU identification number. Students can expect a mailbox delivery within five business days, Mooney said. However, only on-campus students can utilize the service. Mooney said she would like to include dental dams or more than one type of condom alongside the other contraceptives offered. WPS purchases the male condoms delivered to students, but even with this cost, Condom Fairy

to accommodate students’ needs. “The idea is really good, but I am not sure I understand the five day waiting period,” Klarner said. Katie Boule, a CAS sophomore who used the Condom Fairy service, said she used the website Saturday after hearing about it around campus. “I used the service because it sounded efficient and more private than buying condoms or going into Health Services in front of everyone and reaching into the big fishbowl of condoms,” she said. Margaret Waterman contributed to the reporting of this article.

SAR soph.: BUS should run more frequently in winter BUS: From Page 3

Riley said six buses run during peak periods on campus, which are from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Three buses run every twenty minutes during offpeak hours. “The main function of the weekday BUS service is to facilitate transportation of faculty, staff and students between the Charles River Campus and [BU] Medical Campus, which are miles apart, not along a single walking campus,” Riley said. Riley said the BUS service is an option — just as the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority’s Green Line trolley and Route 57 bus are — for members of the

PUBLICATION SIZE C LIVE – 3.81 x 8 TRIM – BLEED – Sophian, The Archway, The Dartmouth, The Good 5 Cent Cigar, The Towers, Wesleyan Argus, Campus Lantern, Daily Free Press, Huntington News, The Mount Holyoke News, Mass Media, Informer

Will you be the applicant they can’t afford to bring on? Or the one they can’t afford not to?

She said she expects plenty of orders to be placed in the coming weeks as they begin to advertise the Condom Fairy on four Boston University Shuttles. WPS might use Condom Fairy appearances and a QR Code to further promote the service. Anna Treyzon, a College of Arts and Sciences freshman, said she hopes the Condom Fairy service promotes safe sex among students. “People are often unprepared and that is when bad things happen,” she said. “Hopefully this can lead to smarter decisions.” However, several students are more pessimistic about the new service.

BU community to travel up and down Commonwealth Avenue. Danielle Fusaro, a Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences sophomore, said she believes the bus runs more efficiently on sunnier, warmer days when fewer people are taking it. “The bus is useful when it’s there, but it does not always show up for the scheduled time,” Fusaro said. “The bus should run more frequently when it’s freezing because so many more people take it on cold days.” Fusaro said she does not take the BUS often, and would not support paying more for more buses to be added to the fleet. “There should be more buses running so they don’t get over-

crowded and so they can meet the schedule,” said Rebecca Long, a College of Fine Arts freshman. “It’s very hectic and the crowding can get dangerous.” Long said she worries about crowding on the buses on cold and rainy days because there is a greater chance of the bus having an accident. She said as more people ride the BUS on inclement days, the chance of injury is increased. “Everyone is trying to squeeze on the bus to avoid walking in the cold,” Long said. “It’s like the survival of the fittest because people will push, and whoever wants to get on the most will push the hardest to get on.”

Secretary: Ambassadors meet students bimonthly Ambassadors: From Page 3

culture. “Talking to different people and learning different cultures is basically what this is for,” Lin said. Lin’s exchange student, Safa Yerliyurt, an SMG junior from Turkey, said he was eager when he first learned about the club. He said he recently sent an email advising his school at home to incorporate a similar system to

The Emerging Leaders MBA at Bentley University is a full-time, two-year program designed specifically for recent or soon-to-be college graduates. It provides a comprehensive foundation in business management, offering students the chance to gain hands-on experience while specializing in one of eight business-focused concentrations. So when your opportunity arrives, you’ll be prepared to make the most of it. Visit www.bentley.edu/graduate/elmba to learn more.

> PREPARE

to stand out. Waltham, Massachusetts 02452

Today’s crossword solution brought to you by...

79183-12_BENGRD001 Campus Media Ad Cƒ.indd 1

10/12/12 10

K-Money’s V-Day Surprise 2

6

9

5

4

8

7

3

1

5

3

7

6

1

2

4

8

9

8

1

4

7

9

3

2

5

6

4

2

6

9

7

5

8

1

3

7

9

3

2

8

1

6

4

5

1

5

8

4

3

6

9

7

2

3

7

5

8

2

9

1

6

4

9

4

1

3

6

7

5

2

8

6

8

2

1

5

4

3

9

7

help its incoming exchange students adjust to the new setting. “When I was in Turkey I saw first Faith’s email, and she explained the program and she asked me if I wanted to join,” Yerliyurt said. “I had no idea about the campus life — I said I wanted to join immediately.” Constance Remy, one of the co-heads of SMG Ambassadors in the second year of her four-year

exchange program, said a couple of months passed before she found a café she liked. “If I had the opportunity to have somebody already here to [show me] how everything functions, it would have been awesome,” Remy, an SMG sophomore said. “[Being an ambassador] is not complicated, it’s just being there for someone.”


5

Muse Editor - Meg DeMouth

Music Editor - Lucien Flores

Film/TV Editor - Michela Smith

Lifestyle Editor - Justin Soto

Food Editor - Brooke Jackson-Glidden

Side Effects: Soderbergh’s dogged final dissertation David Karikomi

T

MUSE Staff

here may be no one person more responsible for the rise of the independent movie scene than Steven Soderbergh. His landmark feature Sex, Lies, and Videotape was an effective psychological thriller, because it constantly surprised with the “magic” possible in filmmaking. It redefined the playful, synthetic Hollywood ideal into more raw and intimidating filmmaking. His focus was on human transformation in front of the camera, a sort of King-Lear undressing without the physical hyperbole. For many of the women that stepped in front of the camera in SLV, any feelings of vulnerability dissolved into liberation and unfamiliar enlightenment. Soderbergh’s self-professed final feature, Side Effects, seems to be further evaluation of the relationship between intimacy and human emotion. How are we supposed to find happiness or love? If both require genuine emotional connection, what happens when those ends misfire? In the 21st century, are antidepressants the answer for those who find life “hopeless?” The drama of Side Effects surrounds the psychological path of Emily, played brilliantly by the appropriately enervated Rooney Mara. She is a sweet and seemingly loyal wife to Martin (Channing Tatum), who has just been released from prison for insider trading. We soon learn that federal agents arrested Martin at their very wedding reception and so, in many ways, Emily and Martin are

Rooney Mara and Channing Tatum in Side Effects.

still newlyweds learning to live together. Yet, the issues of trying to stabilize themselves financially and emotionally resemble struggles of a much older couple. Martin is determined to get back to where “they were before” — a lifestyle that seems to be of a previous life altogether. He and Emily are presumably wealthier, healthier, and more intimate with each other. Composer Thomas Newman’s (WALL-E, Skyfall) superb score perhaps most reveals the couple’s new life. The score is eerily pleasant and its lyric-less rhythm suggests much has been left

PHOTO COURTSY OF OPEN ROAD FILMS

unsaid about the nature of their relationship. Days after Martin is released, Emily survives a suicide attempt in a parking garage. She begins seeing Dr. Jonathan Banks (Jude Law), the psychiatrist who treats her at the hospital, for treatment of depression. He prescribes her a series of medication, but each seems to bring on many unappreciated and strange side effects. As the title of the film suggests, these repercussions extend beyond Emily’s fractured mental state. Unlike this year’s Silver Linings Playbook, Soderbergh sees the mental health industry as

a system that will invariably alienate patients and doctors, which occasionally results from personal vendettas between medical professionals. It is a bureaucratic and toxic environment that breeds manipulation instead of honesty, distrust in the place of comfort. At one point, Banks becomes involved in a highly lucrative consulting job with a new antidepressant, which allows him to entice patients with free prescriptions while he collects a sizeable paycheck. Though Soderbergh’s critique of such practices seemed educated — while also adding entertaining suspense — I found it too wise for its own good. The depressed patients may suffer from self-identified hopelessness, but there is no “silver lining,” no hope for the perpetually sick. For Soderbergh, we are a people who constantly manipulate and lie. There is nothing in the film that suggests we should behave differently, or even worse, that we are capable of behaving differently. Although this pessimistic attitude is wrapped around some entertaining plot twists and turns, there should have been contradiction in the film for Soderbergh’s sentiments to hold any value. We are never given the chance to opine on the medical industry, and more importantly, on the validity of our own relationships. I wish that Soderbergh had found some beauty in those naked human faces he first explored more than two decades ago to diversify Side Effects.

$5 in Chinatown: Why we should all eat Chinese pastries Noëmie Carrant MUSE Staff MUSE sent staffer Noëmie Carrant, a self-professed foodie, to Chinatown to find the most compelling food that $5 can buy in the area: February means one thing for me: Chinese New Year. Being half-Taiwanese, Asian culture has played a huge part in my life. As a child, I would devour my Ama’s (grandmother’s) dishes, made with obscure yet delicious ingredients. Steamed pork buns, Daikon rice cakes, fried pork won tons, pineapple cakes, cucumber chicken soup, bak chang, fish ball soup … I had them all. When Chinese New Year’s came, she would hand me a bright red envelope containing five one-dollar bills. When I was a kid, $5 meant that I was rich and could buy whatever I pleased. But at college, $5 means three laundry trips.

Here’s a far better idea: Grab $5 out of your wallet, take the T to Boylston, and leave your dirty laundry behind. Make your way towards the Theatre District and find the Eldo Cake House on Harrison Avenue. Yes, it looks like a shabby, run-down place, but do not let the neon lights fool you. Simply approach the counter, admire the pastries and let your stomach decide. Actually, the best thing to do is let your eyes choose. Try whatever looks delicious. The pastries are so cheap that even if you order seven of them, it will not cost you more than $10. That is the beauty of the Eldo Cake House, you get delicious things for a couple of dollars. A broke college student could not ask for more. I ordered a selection of pastries and buns, sat down at a nearby table and proceeded to eat,

as old Asian grandpas looked at me curiously. First off was the egg custard tart, the establishment’s most renowned item. It was gooey and flaky and absolutely perfect. The Lemon Swiss Roll came next — an airy sort of chiffon cake with a thick swirl of lemon curd. Sweet and tangy, this pastry will please those who haven’t yet grown accustomed to the egg tarts that are so characteristic of the beauty and complexity that are Asian dishes. The pork turnover had many layers to it, with sweet roasted pork nudged in between very greasy but very satisfying. The slice of mango sponge cake was so fluffy and light, it felt like eating a sweet cloud with little chunks of mango inside. The coconut tart was crisp on the outside and moist on the inside, with warm coconut flakes that melted in your mouth. I fin-

ished this Asian foodie extravaganza with the salty steamed pork buns. The white doughy bun hides the savory ground pork filling. Each bite was wonderful and made me want to cry, “Where have you been all my life, pork bun?” By far the best item on the menu, this simple little white bun immediately brought me back to my childhood, with my Ama. I had already paid for my previous items but I immediately returned to buy two more pork buns — which held up remarkably well after being reheated the next day. The pastries at Eldo Cake House are delicious, cheap and timeless. They should be shared with friends and family, and possibly with Asian grandpas suspiciously looking at you. Visit the Eldo Cake House to enjoy the beginning of the Year of the Snake!

NOËMIE CARRANT/ DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

A display case (left) and the counter at Eldo Cake House. The small shop at 36 Harrison Avenue is renowned for its “gooey and flaky and absolutely perfect” egg custard tarts.


6T

hursday,

February 14, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 17

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan, Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Page Editor

Kaylee Hill, Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

Letter to the Editor: The Middle East: An unstable region

In recent years the Middle East has gone through multiple transitions, revolutions and upheavals. As the dust begins to settle in some countries and storms begin to brew in others, it is vital that we grasp what is happening in the region. In Syria, a civil war rages on. 40,000 to 60,000 casualties have already been counted and more than 500,000 citizens have fled the country. Bashar Assad, the current “leader,” is unofficially backed by Iran and has a huge stockpile of weapons, including an arsenal of chemical weapons. The world watches with growing concern to see if Assad will use the weapons on his own people or if the rebel army (FSA), made up of religious extremists, will acquire them. The Syrian civil war has sent more than 200,000 refugees to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, in which 1.4 million Palestinians — now the majority demographic — live as citizens after fleeing Israel during the war of 1948 and 1967. With a Jordanian-born minority and a corrupt monarchy, Jordan is speculated to be the next country for the “Arab Spring.” Egypt recently went through the “Arab Spring,” overturning the dictatorship of President Hosni Mubarak and electing President Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood. The Muslim Brotherhood has used frightening rhetoric toward Israel, the United States’ most stable ally in the region. But though there have been intense protests in Egypt, it appears that they have begun to stabilize. Recently, they helped broker a cease-fire deal between Israel and Hamas. In addition, Egypt is starting to regain its control of the Sinai Desert (deemed the “Wild West” by many experts), a no man’s land which was returned by Israel to Egypt in the successful land for peace deal after the 1967 war and which has since been overrun by factions of many different dangerous groups, including Bedouin thieves, Islamic Jihadists, al-Qaeda and many other factions of religious extremists. The largest threat from this region to the world, however, is Iran. In 1979, the Iranian revolution brought Islamists to power. Currently held by the Supreme religious leader, Ayatollah Ali Hosseini and President Ahmadinejad, the regime oppresses its own people and is a

state sponsor of global terrorism. They have sponsored global terrorists like the group Hezbollah, located in southern Lebanon, supplying them with more than 60,000 rockets in order to “wipe the Zionist regime that occupies Jerusalem off of the pages of history.” They have used violent rhetoric targeted at America, Israel, and other western countries. In addition, they hold alliances with unstable countries like Syria and Venezuela, which has an oppressive, corrupt government and sits on one of the largest uranium deposits in the world. As Iran quests after a nuclear weapon they see not only a friend but a strategic ally. In the center of this region is Israel, the oldest democracy in the Middle East with a thriving parliamentary democracy and an agricultural and business miracle. They just had their 19th parliamentary elections. Their elections were projected to put a hard right-wing coalition in the parliament (known in Israel as the Knesset). Prime Minister Netanyahu was reelected in a vote that ended up being 51% conservative and 49% liberal. These moderately liberal results surprised many, but give hope for a peaceful resolution with Israel’s neighbors. Surrounded by conflict, Israel remains the best ally The United States has in the region. Personally, I feel that Israel, as the island of peaceful existence in the region, is a crucial ally for the United States. Whether you are a Democrat, Republican or Independent, Israel offers the United States a friend in a frightening region that grows more troubled by the day. Throughout the Middle East, countries are either finding their democratic legs, worried about uprisings or are in violent strife. Israel stands tall as a stable country. It develops technology and gathers intelligence that is used to save the lives of countless US soldiers. Israel is an economic partner in the Middle East with a stable government allowing America to communicate. I believe that to maintain the United States’ current place in the world it is important for America and Israel to maintain and strengthen the bonds these two countries have shared over the last 65 years. Jack Goldberg COM ‘13 goldj@bu.edu

The Catholic season of Lent started Wednesday. Seems the Olympics gave up the sport of wrestling (just kidding...) but we here at the ol’ Free Press wondered what vices the schools of BU would give up for forty days...

• • • • • •

COM : Social media. And they’d fail. SHA: Wine. CGS : Naptime and recess. CFA : Irony. SMG: Cigarettes. BU Hockey: Winning. But they got a headstart on that with the Beanpot... • Dean Elmore : Bowties. • The FreeP : Complaining.

EXITMENT

The limits of ‘Love’ DAVID FONTANA

Back in the good old days of 2003, the Black Eyed Peas, newly featuring the one and only Fergie, dropped some knowledge on our brains, along with a few beats, and made us all ask one, simple question: “Where is the Love?” So, I thought on it, prayed on it, and ten years later I’ve got a question of my own: “What kind of love?” [Insert Valentine’s Day column here, pursued by a bear (and not some Teddy Bear with a heart-shaped box of chocolates. Unless it’s milk chocolate. Chocolate just isn’t chocolate unless it’s got some milk in it, am I right?)] Love is without bounds, limitless. And yet all we do is spend our time wrapping it up with pretty bows and ribbons, squeezing it into the four walls of our hearts, or encrusting it with diamonds and placing it in a rather plain box. What happened to the days when “L” was for the way you looked at me? When Love was all that I could give to you? Love conquers all, but can it ever move past the four letters we’ve given it — not to mention all of those lovely clichés (pun intended)? Those three little words: “I Have Reese’s,” as the peanut-buttery commercial would like us to believe. But how about “I love you”? I’m in love with you, I love you, I’m falling in love, I love to read, I love, I love, I love! How can one word mean so many inconceivable things?! And how far is that from “I hate you”? Just the tip of a hat away? Yet they mean a world of difference that we as English speakers fit into a thimble on a daily basis. I blame the Germans, of course. That’s still allowed, right? Per my historical rearing, and the Germanic roots of our language, it just seems to fit. I blame them for giving us a language that just doesn’t cut it when it comes to describing love. Or rather, I should blame them for letting us use their language without telling us the proper rules! While the rules of the road may be mere suggestions to me, you don’t just give a kid a plane and tell him to go fly. Can I get an Icarus up in here? Bueller? Bueller? No? Let me put it this way: The Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary has nine definitions of Love, most of which break down into at least two differing definitions — if not more — so that puts us at somewhere around eighteen different kinds. Eighteen! If you gave each definition its own year, Love would officially be a legal adult, able to serve in the army, vote and got to jail. But, surprisingly, still unable to drink — I suppose booze and Love never really made a great couple anyway. The definitions have everything from copulation (the sexual embrace), to a warm attachment (love of koalas), to a

score of zero (as in tennis). Great. Wonderful. Why not just put Love in the dictionary and underneath have a mini exhibit of Jackson Pollock’s life works. Limitless, indeed! We English speakers, lacking the matured nuances of the rest of the world, rely heavily on such factors as poetry, everybody’s best friend — the one you ditched back in third grade when you started thinking catching cooties might not be such a bad thing, that is. I mean, Valentine’s Day wasn’t even associated with romantic love until the idea was introduced by Chaucer’s posse back in the High Middle Ages in defiant opposition to courtly love (Screweth thy chivalry!). But eventually we gave up on poetry too, and then it turned into Hallmark Cards ©, which eventually turned into “Roses are red, violets are blue, [screw] you [loose maiden of many beds’ sheets]!” Excuse my French, even if it is the language of love. So, a day for love becomes a day for hating the opposite sex, a holy day becomes moldy with capitalism, this little flicker in the midst of a freezing winter is snuffed out with Nemo’s icy fist. In laymen’s terms: A romantic proposal has become “If you like it then you better put a ring on it.” And while I am quite the connoisseur of women’s fingers, tossed in a nice fresh salad with some ranch dressing on the side, enough is enough people. And this is enough! But where does my man Saint Valentinus weigh in on all of this? Well for one thing I’m betting he wished he had died on June 14th instead. At least that way we would be celebrating his achievements during the summer, dressed in bikinis and sandals, instead of bundled up in jackets the size of a miniature vans with internal thermostats permanently broken on either “sweaty balls” or “icy death.” But when you’ve been dead for a gazillion and two years, how do you battle against events like the St. Valentine Day Massacre back in 1929 (also on a Thursday)? No, Al, I prefer to remain amongst the living, thank you very much. Maybe Ingrid Bergman got it right — “A kiss is a lovely trick designed by nature to stop speech when words become superfluous.” And perhaps, at this point, my words have done just that. So, instead, in the words of my home-boy, Cupid Valentino — the modern-day cupid — “Happy Valentine’s day, every day the 14th! If you know what love is, somebody tell me?” David Fontana is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences, and a weekly columnist for the Daily Free Press. He can be reached at fontad5@bu.edu.

College health insurance debates covering transgender surgery

An increasing number of universities, many of them elite private institutions, are offering their students health insurance plans with coverage for gender reassignment surgery, The New York Times reported Tuesday. Brown University has announced that it will begin to cover sex-change surgery this coming August, joining what has been a decade-long fight on behalf of activists to get colleges to recognize transgender needs on campus. About the controversial issue, there are those who argue that sex-change surgeries are cosmetic and therefore undeserving of university medical plan coverage. Many forward-thinking individuals, however, argue that sex-change surgeries are absolutely essential to the wellbeing of the transgender individual, and that to rob that individual of the benefits of gender reassignment surgery is ultimately to diminish that individual’s quality of life. But in considering covering sex-change surgeries, colleges must calculate costs. Gender reassignment surgeries are needed by a considerably small part of a student population — the fiscal threat looms, but it could be relatively

small. But should a university also be required to cover the costs of post-surgery and hormone therapy in addition to covering the surgery itself? Ostensibly yes — such things are often necessary. Many universities already offer the latter services. Still, a university should do its best to serve as a security network for transgender individuals, some of whom may find themselves alienated by families unwilling to cover the costs of gender reassignment procedures. According to the Times, universities are lagging behind the corporate world. The Human Rights Campaign reported that about one-quarter of Fortune 500 companies have health plans that cover sex changes in addition to hormone therapy. Inasmuch as one has the freedom to be what one feels, we would hope that a college campus would be able to support an individual in need of life-changing (and bettering) surgeries. This would constitute a jump towards further social acceptance and progress, but it still remains to be determined what sort of surgery a college is obligated to finance.


Thursday, February 14, 2013

7

Parker’s line changes lead to more efficiency from power-play unit Men’s hockey: From Page 8

Parker is looking for answers now that his team has only won one of its last seven contests. “We haven’t played anywhere near up to our capabilities,” Parker said. “[Former NFL coach Bill Parcells] used to say, ‘You are who you are. You are who your record is.’ Well this is who we are right now. One game over .500. That’s a long way from where we were in December.” Power-play changes prove effective With his power play struggling to get shots on goal, Parker decided to switch up a few tactics with the man-advantage entering Monday night’s game. One of the things BU did was shoot the puck more often instead of waiting for the perfect shot. That way, the power play unit had a better chance of capitalizing on a deflected shot or a rebound in front of the goal. Parker also moved sophomore forward Evan Rodrigues back to the point on the second power-play unit and slotted senior forward Ryan Santana as the right winger. Parker said he thought Santana would bring a missing element to that group. “When I played him against Providence on that line, when Rodrigues wasn’t playing, he played the power play and was pretty sharp, so I kept that in the back of my mind,” Parker said. “He was determined to get in front of the goalie’s eyes and he was

determined to get to loose pucks, so that’s a good thing on a power play.” The moves were effective, as BU scored twice on the power play. Rodrigues scored the first tally on a wrist shot from the point with Santana screening Harvard goalie Peter Traber. Sophomore forward Cason Hohmann added a second goal to make the Terriers 2-for-7 (.286) on the game. Parker has made the power play a focus area in practice, and will look to continue improving it as the team prepares for the final stretch of the season. Ruikka remains up front, Ronan could see ice time Senior assistant captain Ryan Ruikka spent the last two games playing right wing on the fourth line despite being a natural defenseman, and will likely remain in that spot in part due to a lack of depth. With Yasin Cissé and Wes Myron gone from the team, senior forward Jake Moscatel and junior forward/defenseman Matt Ronan are the only remaining skaters on the roster besides Ruikka. However, Moscatel recently separated his shoulder in practice and was unavailable for Monday’s game. Parker hinted that sophomore defenseman Alexx Privitera could be facing another team suspension after receiving a game misconduct in Monday’s game. Should Privitera be benched for Friday’s game at the University of Maine, Ronan would likely see his first playing time of the season.

Moran, Turner lead BU offense to win W. basketball: From Page 8

“It came down to us being very active with our feet and with our hands,” Greenberg said. “We had a lot of steals, a lot of deflections and I really felt like we got to them a little bit in the half-court and the full-court as well.” BU had three players in double figures with senior guard Mo Moran leading the team with 12 points on 4-of-10 shooting. Moran also added five assists and four rebounds. Junior forward Whitney Turner was 4-for-7 with 10 points and four rebounds. Callahan contributed 10 points off the bench. McKendrick reached season highs with eight points and eight rebounds. Overall, the BU bench outscored that of the Catamounts 18–11.

Alford, who is leading the Terriers in scoring this season, had an uncharacteristically quiet night, only putting up six points on 2-for-9 shooting. Agboola also had a quiet night on the offensive end with eight points on 3-of-13 shooting, but showed effort on the boards by grabbing 10. For the Catamounts, Buschmann led with 17 points on a 3-for-7 shooting night. She went 11-for-14 from the charity stripe, while also grabbing seven rebounds. Their only other player in double figures was Shumpert, who had 12. The win extends the Terriers’ win streak to five games as they sit in second place in America East behind the University at Albany.

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Moving senior forward Ryan Santana to right wing on the second power-play unit proved helpful.

‘Like’ The Daily Free Press Sports Section On Facebook

Terriers’ top-ranked 3-point offense meeting top-ranked 3-point defense Men’s basketball: From Page 8

ing big games all season and the last time he went against UNH’s slew of big men, he put up 18. “We hope he plays well, he’s been pretty consistent,” Jones said. “What I really like about Dom is he’s locked in. He has really bought into our philosophy.” One of the other aspects of the Terriers’ game that will be spotlighted during and after Sunday’s game is the play of Irving. Going into this season, Irving was expected to

be the team’s best producer, yet he has been rather quiet recently, suffering from slight inconsistencies in his scoring. In Tuesday’s game, Irving finished with just seven points, all of which came in the second half. However, he finished with seven rebounds and six assists. “D.J. has done a great job,” Jones said. “We’ve asked him to rebound and lead by example. He’s done exactly that, just as the rest of the captains.” Meanwhile, New Hampshire, which was on a seven-game skid the last time it faced

Follow us on Twitter:

@DFPSports @ BOShockeyblog @BUbballBlog

BU, continues to struggle, going 2–4 since the teams’ last match. It ranks second-to-last in America East in points per game (59.8) and field goal percentage (.383). However, the Wildcats rank first in 3-point defense, only allowing opponents to shoot 25.6 percent from 3-point range. This could pose a challenge to the Terriers, who shoot 38.2 percent from beyond the arc, good for first place in America East on the season. Forward Ferg Myrick currently leads all UNH scorers, averaging 13.8 points per

game — eighth best in the conference. His classmate, guard Chandler Rhoads, chips in 11.2 points per game, while forward Patrick Konan adds an average of 11.1 points. Jones said he is confident that someone will step up and have a good game for the Terriers against UNH’s impressive 3-point defense. “I don’t go into games looking for specific players to step up. It’s got to be about us playing well as a team,” Jones said. “The big thing that we’ve shown is that every single night someone steps up.

BU throwers and vaulters finding success Track and field: From Page 8

thews’ performance, but she was not necessarily surprised. “Katie has been running phenomenally all year, and this is just another highlight of her doing what she does best,” Johnson said. Field events consistently shine While many Terriers have been excelling on the track, several throwers and vaulters have also been continually producing points for BU during the season. Two vaulters, freshman Fritz Howser and senior Adam Weaver, most recently placed in the top 10 at the Tufts Stampede Feb. 2, both with marks of 4.15m. “They have been doing a great job, those guys,” Johnson said of Howser and Weaver. “It’s a tough event, because you’re just running down that runway, and you’ve got to literally vault yourself over a bar. They’ve

been doing well. They get better each week ... point scorers, for sure.” Freshman Reuben Horace is one of the top athletes in America East in the weight throw, recently placing fourth (19.00m) in the event at the Collegiate Invitational on Feb. 2. On the same day, juniors Sarah Dillard and Chelsea Curry placed second (12.53m) and third (12.29m) respectively in the shot put at the Tufts Stampede. Senior Susan Ottey placed fifth in the weight throw, with a distance of 15.40m. Johnson said she is delighted with the consistent improvement of her throwers. “I’m extremely pleased with them,” Johnson said. “They worked hard all fall, and they’re getting better every week.” “Sometimes track is a team sport in some ways, but very individual. Particularly in the throwing events, I you have to get it done, and they’ve been able to do that.”


Quotable

The big thing that we’ve shown is that every single night someone steps up.

-BU coach Joe Jones on his team’s threegame winning streak

Page 8

Sports

I

The Daily Free Press

want

Mo

Senior guard Mo Moran contributed on the scoreboard and the glass in BU women’s basketball’s victory over UVM. P.8.

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Terriers defeat Vermont with strong opening half BU’s defense not

getting job done in season’s 2nd half

By Matthew Fils-Aime Daily Free Press Staff

Thanks to a high-scoring first half, the Boston University women’s basketball team defeated the University of Vermont by a score of 56–47 Wednesday night. The Terriers’ (21–4, 11–1 America East) offense in the first half was solid, as it shot 40 percent from the floor. It was a back-andforth affair for the first eight minutes, but with 12:18 left in the half and the Terriers trailing 12–10, junior guard Danielle Callahan made a 3-pointer to push BU ahead 13–12. After her three, Callahan scored another triple and a layup with no response from the Catamounts (7–17, 4–7 America East). Callahan’s individual 8–0 run was extended by a layup from junior forward Rashidat Agboola and a jumper from sophomore forward Mollie McKendrick. At 10:56 of the first, the Terriers led Vermont by a score of 22–12. “In the first half we could really get any shot we wanted,” said BU coach Kelly Greenberg. “We didn’t knock them all down, but we were getting very good looks inside and out, and we were feeling pretty good going into the half.” Vermont forward Lauren Buschmann made a free throw 11:27 into the half, cutting Vermont’s deficit to single digits, but the Catamounts did not make a field goal for the remainder of the opening frame. BU went into halftime with a 33–15 lead. To start off the second half, senior guard Chantell Alford made a jumper and junior forward Whitney Turner secured a layup to push the Terrier lead to 22 points. But Vermont guard Tierra Shumpert made a jumper 1:51 into the half — the Catamounts’ first field goal since they were ahead 12–10 7:26 into the game. This kicked off a 7–0 run to bring Vermont within 15 points four minutes into the final frame. “In the second half there was a change,” Greenberg said. “The game got more physi-

By Kevin Dillon Daily Free Press Staff

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Terrier senior guard Mo Moran led BU’s offense with a team-high 12 points to go along with five assists and four rebounds in a winning effort against the University of Vermont.

cal and everything was much more difficult to get an open shot.” However, Vermont could not gain enough momentum to overcome the hole it dug for itself in the first half. A 3-pointer from Shumpert with 22 seconds left brought the Catamounts within single digits for the first time in the second, but it was too little, too late, as

BU held on for the victory. Going up against the No. 7 offense in the America East Conference, the Terriers held the Catamounts to 27 percent shooting from the field, and were able to force 18 turnovers, which they converted into 21 points.

W. basketball, see page 7

The No. 13 Boston University men’s hockey team extended its seemingly endless slump Monday night, when it allowed seven goals in a Beanpot consolation game loss to Harvard University at TD Garden. The Terriers (13–12–1, 10–7–1 Hockey East) have now allowed 13 goals in their last two games against Harvard — a team that averages 1.76 goals per game in contests against teams besides BU. BU’s defense has struggled since coming back from winter break. Before the beginning of the second semester, the Terriers only allowed 2.33 goals per game despite facing the top two offenses in Hockey East three times apiece. However, in the 11 games since then, they have allowed 4.09 goals per game and generally faced statistically weaker offenses. While freshmen goaltenders Matt O’Connor and Sean Maguire have struggled in part due to poor defense in front of them, it is clear that neither goaltender is in rhythm right now. O’Connor, who held a 1.75 goals-against average and a .945 save percentage through his first four collegiate starts, has a 4.31 goals-against average and an .862 save percentage in his five starts since the beginning of the second half of the season. Maguire, who started the second semester well by only allowing three goals in his first two starts of 2013, has a 4.75 goalsagainst average and an .854 save percentage in his last four starts. The goalies have not been the only problem for the Terriers, but BU coach Jack

Men’s hockey, see page 7

Men’s basketball looking to extend win Track and field team cancels annual streak to 4 in upcoming contest vs. UNH Valentine Invitational due to blizzard By Chris Dela Rosa Daily Free Press Staff

The red-hot Boston University men’s basketball team returns to Case Gymnasium Sunday afternoon to close out its season series against the University of New Hampshire. The Terriers (14–11, 8–4 America East) are on a three-game winning streak that has them sitting in third place, 1.5 games behind Stony Brook University, who sits atop the America East. Their most recent victory came in a tough game against second-place University of Vermont Tuesday night. Despite some early troubles, BU was able to battle throughout the game and ultimately outlasted the Catamounts (16–8, 9–3 America East), 64–59. Sunday’s game against the Wildcats (6–16, 2–8 America East) can go either way. BU was only able to make it out of Durham, N.H., last month with a five-point victory. When the two went head-to-head Jan. 19, poor defense allowed UNH to make several comeback attempts. Fortunately for BU, its collection of shooters was able to contribute by bailing the team out with 3–pointers. “When you play New Hampshire you really got to defend, and we need to be ready to defend all the way on Sunday,” said BU coach Joe Jones.

Something Joe Jones touched on after the previous win against New Hampshire was having an “x-factor” on the court, putting BU over the top against its opponent. In that game, the “x-factor” was sophomore guard Malik Thomas, who recorded 11 points, four rebounds, three steals and an assist. The question going into Sunday remains the same. Who is going to be the Terriers’ x-factor? Tuesday night, freshman guard John Papale played that role as he led the team in scoring with 19 points. Papale’s shining moment against the Catamounts came with about three minutes remaining, when a series of passes around the arc put the ball in his hands. He promptly put it in the net to give his team a nice four-point cushion. That margin was all the Terriers needed, as they held on to the lead for another victory. “It’s been [junior captain] Travis [Robinson], it’s been [junior captain] D.J. [Irving], and it’s been [junior captain] Dom [Morris],” Jones said. “I think different guys on different nights can step up.” Morris will be looking to have another big game on Sunday as well. Last week, when BU took on the University of Maine, Morris set a career high in points (20) as the team went on to win big. He has been hav-

Men’s basketball, see page 7

The Bottom Line

Thursday, Feb. 14

No Events Scheduled Topps recently released the world’s largest baseball card, of Tigers first baseman Prince Fielder...

Friday, Feb. 15 M. Hockey @ Maine, 7:30 p.m.

By Sarah Kirkpatrick Daily Free Press Staff

Due to unsafe travel conditions resulting from the recent snowstorm, the Boston University track and field team had to cancel its annual Valentine Invitational, which was scheduled to take place last Friday and Saturday. BU Director of Track and Field Robyne Johnson said more than 3,000 athletes were scheduled to compete at the meet. “It’s just a big letdown to our team,” Johnson said of the cancellation. “There were a ton of people coming, and it’s always an exciting time.” Johnson also said that the canceled meet gave one less opportunity for BU athletes to qualify for upcoming championship meets. “It’s disappointing by not having the other competition,” Johnson said. “The indoor season is pretty short as it is ... [there are] a lot of championship meets you have to qualify for.” According to Johnson, BU will be hosting an abridged meet Thursday in an attempt to post more qualification times. Northeastern University, Boston College, Harvard University, Brown University and Dartmouth College are expected to attend. While Johnson said it was disappointing to the runners to have one less home meet,

Saturday, Feb. 16 M. Hockey @ Maine, 7 p.m. W. Basketball v. UNH, 1 p.m. W. Hockey v. Vermont, 3 p.m.

Sunday, Feb. 17

they will be hosting several other meets at the Track and Tennis Center in the coming weeks, including the New England Championships scheduled for Feb. 22 and 23. “We’ve got a few more opportunities to run here, provided nature doesn’t take its course again,” Johnson said. Matthews breaks school record at Husky Classic Unable to participate in the Valentine Invitational, graduate student Katie Matthews traveled to Seattle to compete in the 3,000m run at the Husky Classic at the University of Washington Dempsey Indoor Track. “We had a great field scheduled for the Valentine for the 3K, but since it was cancelled, we made the executive decision to take her out to the University of Washington,” Johnson said. “We knew there would be great competition, and luckily because we canceled in time, we were able to get her into that race.” Matthews placed sixth overall in the race with a time of 9:05.73, breaking the BU school record in the event. She also broke the school record in the 5,000m with a time of 15:46.13 at the Terrier Invitational earlier this season. Johnson said she was impressed by Mat-

M. Basketball v. UNH, 1 p.m. W. Hockey v. Vermont, 3 p.m. Track @ N.E. Open Championships, All Day

Track and field, see page 7

Monday, Feb. 18 No Events Scheduled ...the 90 feet x 60 feet card of Fielder is a life-sized representation.


February 14th Daily Free Press