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The Daily Free Press

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue XV

SAFETY FIRST Brookline PD holds meeting to address concerns, page 3.

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Monday, February 12, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

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Prototype workout eliminates time from exercising, page 5.

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Beanpot consolation loss lowers postseason chances, page 8.

Today: Mostly sunny/High 43 Tonight: Clear/Low 26 Tomorrow: 42/38 Data Courtesy of weather.com

Terriers fall to Harvard in Beanpot consolation SG announces final break bus dates to Logan By Annie Maroon Daily Free Press Staff

Sinking in the national rankings has not been enough to spur the No. 13 Boston University men’s hockey team out of its funk in the winter 2013 semester. Neither have the embarrassments of poor performances against inferior teams. On Monday, it was clear that even the memory of a crucial loss in an identical game two years ago was not enough to get the Terriers (13–12–1, 10–7–1 Hockey East) in the right frame of mind for their Beanpot consolation game against Harvard University, which they lost 7–4. Two years ago, when the Terriers fell to Harvard (6–15–2) in the consolation game, it effectively ended their season. They did not lose again until the last game of the regular season, but the Harvard loss hurt their PairWise ranking enough that it kept them from an at-large bid in the NCAA tournament. Barring a dominant run through their last nine games leading into a Hockey East tournament win, it will now be an uphill battle for BU to escape the same fate this year. “It had been said already, before this game, that [the game] is not important to Harvard,” said BU coach Jack Parker on Monday. “Harvard is not going to get into the national tournament by an at-large bid. Now we will drop well out of the PairWise.” BU had 47 shots on Harvard goalie Peter Traber, who made a rare start in relief of the

By Rachel Riley Daily Free Press Staff

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS

Terrier senior captain Wade Megan scored a goal in BU’s matchup against Harvard University in the Beanpot consolation game Monday night at TD Garden.

Crimson’s usual No. 1 Raphael Girard. But nothing the Terriers did on the offensive end could overcome the breakdowns on the defensive end — a refrain that has become common over the last month and a half. BU appeared to start strong as freshman forward Mike Moran opened the scoring just over three minutes into the game. Traber thought he had control of a soft shot, but the rebound trickled away from him and

into the slot, where Moran was ready to tap in his first career goal. Then, with BU shorthanded after an interference call on freshman forward Sam Kurker, senior captain Wade Megan chipped the puck out of the defensive zone, chased it down himself and executed a tapeto-tape give-and-go play with sophomore

Beanpot, see page 7

Harvard to expand science and engineering to Allston By Kyle Plantz Daily Free Press Staff

Harvard University President Drew Faust announced Tuesday that the college is planning to move its School of Engineering and Applied Science presence from the main campus in Cambridge to property in Allston, amid mixed reactions by students. Faust unveiled plans to relocate the majority of SEAS to the planned science facility in Allston, which is expected to be completed by 2017, according to Harvard officials. “We regard this [plan] as an extraordinary opportunity for SEAS,” Faust said in a community meeting Tuesday. “The school must grow.” Faust said she wants to establish SEAS as “a hub in the wheel of connectivity” that is meant to shape Allston. Work on the building was suspended in 2009 due to drops in Harvard’s endowment

as a result of the recession. Construction should continue in 2014. Harvard owns about 350 acres in Allston, and the sciences building is planned to take up between 500,000 and 600,000 square feet. It will include laboratories, research facilities and classrooms. SEAS includes about 575 undergraduate and 375 graduate students, 400 researchers and 70 full-time faculty member who use the space on Harvard’s main campus. SEAS became its own school in 2007 after being a division of the university since 1847, according to the SEAS website. Melina Schuler, spokeswoman for the Boston Redevelopment Authority, said the BRA approved the new building’s design in 2007 after a two-and-a-half-year public review process. “Harvard’s announcement last week is a positive step towards resuming construction at the stalled Allston science complex,

which is important to Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and the neighborhood,” she said. “If there are changes to the approved science complex plans they could trigger a new community process and require new BRA approval.” Some students said they do not mind the proposal to move some of SEAS to the Allston campus. “It seems mildly annoying but not a big deal,” said Xiaoyu He, an undecided freshman at Harvard. “I like Harvard’s current compactness, but continued expansions are fine as long as I don’t have classes there.” Manik Kuchroo, a freshman studying biology at Harvard, said the expansion to Allston is already prevalent, and moving more buildings to that location is not an issue. “We already have the Quad and the River houses over there, and it doesn’t create

Harvard, see page 2

Student Government officially announced dates and times for a Boston University holiday busing service to Logan International Airport and learned of possible changes in allocations at SG’s Senate meeting Monday night. Anjali Taneja, a representative from the Student Activities Office Allocations Board, spoke to SG Monday about plans that will require student groups that are fundraising for charities to return money allotted for organization — in other words, SAO will be loaning money as opposed to giving money. “[We] essentially want them to send representatives to a group table meeting where we discuss what this process will look like and start it,” Taneja, a Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences senior, said. “I came here tonight because Student Government is a part of that process.” Taneja said the Allocations Board plans to hold a town hall meeting for BU students to voice their concerns about the changes being considered to the fund allocation system.  “The idea is that only the profits from the event are going to that charity,” said Saurabh Mahajan, SG director of advocacy and spokesman. The spring break holiday buses will run on March 8 from 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. and will leave for Logan from Marsh Chapel, Mahajan, a College of Arts and Sciences freshman, said. Tickets will be available online at www.eventbrite.com for $5. Representatives from the Towers Planning Committee presented tentative housing developments for Towers, Myles Standish Hall and a Student Village III. “The Towers Planning Committee is trying to figure out what to do with that extra space in [the Towers dormitory],” Mahajan said. “From that they will also provide updates for what’s going to be happening with StuVi III or Danielsen [Hall] or Myles.” Sophia Woyda, a representative of the Towers Committee, said the administration will begin renovating laundry facilities in Towers during the summer 2013 break. She said the administration has not yet

SG, see page 2

Senate Special Election candidate field growing, many remain unknown By Kyle Plantz Daily Free Press Staff

Closely following one of the most talked-about and divisive U.S. Senate races in 2012, citizens of Massachusetts once again will witness a hard-fought battle to fill Secretary of State John Kerry’s vacant seat. U.S. President Barack Obama tapped Kerry Dec. 21 to replace Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State. Kerry was later confirmed Jan. 30 by a 94-3 vote and resigned from his senate seat Feb. 1. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick appointed William ‘Mo’ Cowan Jan. 30 as interim senator until a special election could be held to fill the seat. Speculation has been running wild with regards to who will run in the special election that will take place June 25, and a pool of candidates is beginning to form. The first candidate to declare candidacy for the Senate seat was U.S. Rep. Ed Markey. Markey, a Democrat, said he would run for Kerry’s open seat Dec. 27, before Kerry was confirmed as Secretary of State. Mar-

key made a formal announcement declaring his candidacy Feb. 2. U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch is the only other Democratic candidate that has announced he is running for the seat. Lynch kicked off his campaign Jan. 31 with a YouTube video detailing the issues he wanted to address if elected. The Democratic Party had many highprofile personalities that declined to run. When Kerry was tapped, Attorney Gen. Martha Coakley took her name off the list, stating that she wanted to focus on reelection for her position in 2014. Edward Kennedy Jr. announced Dec. 24 he would not run for the seat because he wanted to stay in Connecticut. However, he said he might run for a political office in the future. Mass. Sen. Benjamin Downing said he was not running due to financial reasons Jan. 11. U.S. Rep. Michael Capuano said Jan. 15

Senate Race, see page 2

The special election for John Kerry’s former senate seat will be held June 25.


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Political science prof.: No ‘stand out’ candidate in special senate election Senate Race: From Page 1

that he was not going to run for the seat and that he wanted to focus on his work in the House. On the other side of the aisle, Republicans have been scrambling to find a candidate after Scott Brown shocked members of his party and decided Feb. 1 not to run. But Brown will not disappear entirely from the political stage, and is expected to announce a television deal with Fox News later this week. Brown also said he has

not ruled out a run for governor in 2014. Tim Buckley, spokesman of the Massachusetts Republican Party, said the GOP is optimistic about its future. “We have done pretty well in special elections. Whoever wins the primary will be a clear contrast to Markey and Lynch,” he said. “There are a lot of names floating out there and no matter who gets the nomination, they will be a fresh face to who is already there.”

Mass. Rep. Daniel Winslow became the first Republican candidate to declare his candidacy for the seat Feb. 8, and Gabriel Gomez, former NAVY SEAL and businessman, followed suit by declaring his candidacy Monday. Several Republican leaders said they did not want to run after Scott Brown made his decision. Former Mass. Gov. William Weld, who was believed to be the next possible candidate, said Feb. 8 that he was grateful for the sup-

port, but he was not interested in the position. Former Lt. Gov. Kerry Healey announced Feb. 4 that she was also not running in the special election. Tagg Romney, former Mass. Gov. Mitt Romney’s son, said Feb. 4 that, due to time commitments and his desire to spend time with his family, he would not run for the seat. Candidates of both parties must collect 10,000 voter signatures by Feb. 27 in order to appear in the

primary, which will be held April 30. Graham Wilson, professor of political science at Boston University, said there are no popular candidates emerging from either party. “I don’t see anyone of the popular standing of Scott Brown,” he said. “Someone said to me recently of the remaining candidates, ‘I think our [Democratic] nobody can beat their [Republican] nobody.’ That just about sums it up.”

Administration plans include StuVi III, KHC floors SG: From Page 1

decided whether the empty space in Towers will be used for a Fitness and Recreation satellite facility due to budget concerns. The administration also intends to establish a 24-hour study space in Myles Standish Hall and to move the residence’s laundry facilities during summer 2013, Woyda, a CAS senior, said. Woyda said the administration’s plans include the construction of a StuVi III, which will be 11 stories tall and house about 523 students. BU also plans to renovate Shelton Hall to reserve the first four floors for students of the Arvind and Chandan Nandlal Kilachand Honors College. Woyda said these developments require significant budget planning, so concrete dates have

not been set. “Creating even an architectural design or an infrastructural design for a satellite fitness and recreation facility requires an architect to be hired, requires approval for the upcoming school year,” she said. “Even commission and design costs money and has to be budgeted for, so that’s important to know.” Woyda said that serving on the committee was a valuable experience. “It really does create this amazing link between the students and the administration,” she said. “All the voices are equally heard at the table, and it really does set a great precedent for a working relationship between administration and students.” Luke Rebecchi, a member of

South Campus Residence Hall Association, spoke at the meeting about creating a Student Social Contract on behalf of South Campus’s RHA president. Rebecchi, a CAS junior, said a Student Social Contract is a mutual agreement about the rights and roles of students and administration in the BU community. He said he and other students from South Campus RHA are planning to brainstorm a contract with different student groups on campus. “We want to have that conversation about what our community will look like,” he said. “Ultimately, the really transformative process is sitting down together, disagreeing about certain things, coming to a certain agreement and writing it down.”

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Harvard freshman: SEAS not too far from campus Harvard: From Page 1

that much of a difference between the two campuses,” he said. A Harvard senior studying applied mathematics in SEAS, who wished to remain anonymous, said he could see many benefits to the move. “These new facilities would be better suited at meeting the demand for classroom space due to the increasing enrollments in SEAS areas,” he said. “I’m sure

that engineers and computer science students would benefit from new facilities that could provide a greater amount of resources to design and develop amazing things.” However, he said he was worried about how students would deal with the distance and getting to class on time. “The distance is always something I take into account and I have a difficult time imagining

how this would affect the way I scheduled my days if I would have to travel much further distances to get to class,” he said. “I think this same concern would apply across all undergraduates enrolled in SEAS courses.” Kuchroo said Harvard could provide services to assist with the travel to Allston. “All I hope is that they have a great bus system that will let us get back and forth easily,” he said.

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weapon 52. Travel on water by wind 53. Together for a common purpose 54. Haloes 58. Photocopy 59. Possessing the necessary skills 61. Steps used to cross fences 62. Docile 63. Sudden wind 64. Not those 65. Periods of history 66. Conceits 67. Donkeys DOWN 1. ____ and feathers 2. South west US state 3. French for “Black” 4. State of being unsatisfied 5. Oozed 6. Vaults 7. Tablet 8. “Much ___ About Nothing” 9. Enlist 10. Spectacular failure 11. Forms reefs 12. Farewell 13. Short-necked wild ducks 21. Tide 23. Lifeless or spiritless 25. Humanitarian Barton or actress Bow

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C ampus & City Pell Grants safe

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Police meet with community after robberies Mass. 3rd worst until 2015, new in training PD, report suggests study suggests By Nora Philbin Daily Free Press Staff

By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

While government agencies tighten their budgets as the U.S. economy recovers from recession, the Federal Pell Grant’s foreseen shortfall in 2014 is now unlikely, and students will still receive government-subsidized financial aid, according to a report by the Congressional Budget Office Wednesday. Officials had anticipated $5.7 billion dollars in Pell Grant shortfalls by 2014, but with $9.3 billion in extra money not used in 2013, the organization should be safe until 2015, said Libby Nelson of Inside Higher Ed, who analyzed the discrepancy between shortfall and surplus. “This was based on projection on how many students will be on the program receiving grants,” she said. “CBO’s latest analysis turns out this event significantly overestimated in the past and now there is money left over from this year’s appropriation.” The surplus may be a result of fewer students receiving Pell Grants than originally expected, Nelson said. “There have been quite a few eligibility changes that kick students out and create a drop-off in students applying,” Nelson said. However, despite the continuation of Pell Grants, it will be more difficult for students to meet the requirements needed to receive a grant in coming years due to changes put into effect in July 2012, she said. Restrictions on eligibility for applicants for Pell Grants have become more rigid, Nelson said. Students without a high school diploma or a GED were previously eligible for a grant, but that policy no longer stands. “Prospective students used to be able to take a test to prove they can benefit from college education, but people cant do that any more,” Nelson said. “Other policy changes are that the total semesters you could receive a grant was reduced from 18 to 12.” Prospective students and those enrolled in college can only receive a Pell Grant once per academic year instead of obtaining multiple to accelerate graduation, Nelson said. Daniele Paserman, a BU economics professor, said decreasing funding for student aid programs lowers chances for students to receive a grant. “That we are not going over the fiscal cliff opens good news to current students and prospective students worried about how to finance their higher education prospects,” Paserman said. “Much of the research on how financial scholarships affects attendance and enrollment shows that there is an effect if you decrease financial aid and how it affects probability to enroll.” Paserman said with a surplus, there is a chance more students can receive Pell Grants, but higher education costs have been rising at a pace faster than that of inflation during the past thirty years. “For the last couple of years the actual amount granted to students has been upgraded because there is an automatic index for inflation,” he said. A number of students said they believe the surplus should be put to use for the benefit of students.

Grants, see page4

In response to a recent string of robberies in the Brookline and Boston University area, Brookline Police Department officials hosted a community meeting Wednesday night to address residents’ concerns. While Brookline Police are concerned about recent Brookline-area crimes, including a string of armed robberies and attempted armed robberies in which BU students were victims, the overall crime rate has decreased, said Brookline Police Chief Daniel O’Leary. “It is difficult to drive crime to zero, but I would say that we have done a pretty good job of keeping it down,” O’Leary said at the meeting. “The last four years have been our lowest [crime rate] since 1994.” About 60 Brookline residents attended the meeting, held at The Edward Devotion School on Harvard Street. During the meeting, Brookline Police officials presented data on the area’s crime rates over the past 11 years. Though robberies have increased by 1.8 percent in the past year, violent crime has decreased, according

By Zoe Roos Daily Free Press Staff

KENSHIN OKUBO/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Brookline Police Department Chief Daniel O’Leary discusses recent robberies and assaults at a Brookline community meeting Monday night.

to the presentation. “Since Sept. 1, there have been six robberies in Brookline,” O’Leary said. “There have been more on the other side of Commonwealth Avenue, and we have worked with the BU Police Department on those and went to a community meeting at BU.” Seven victims in the six robberies were Brookline residents and two of the six robberies are still active cases, O’Leary said. Arrests have been

made for the four remaining robberies. BU students were among the victims in a string of eight robberies and attempted robberies and one stabbing in the area near West Campus and North Brookline during the 2012-13 academic year. BUPD Chief Tom Robbins said Brookline residents should be impressed with Brookline Police and how officers have handled the crimes.

Brookline PD, see page 4

Pope’s resignation could cause change, BU officials say By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

Pope Benedict XVI’s resignation, announced Monday, which came as a result of a lack of mental and physical strength, may result in the Catholic Church choosing a pope to better represent the current demographics of its membership, a number of Boston University professors said. “Most Catholics at this point in time are mostly in developing countries so they are non-white,” said Susan Eckstein, a professor of sociology and international relations. “At some point there will likely be a selection of a pope that isn’t from Europe, isn’t white and is more representative of the changing social base of the church itself.” At a small gathering of cardinals Monday morning, Pope Benedict, 85, announced in Latin he would be stepping down. He told cardinals he is no longer able to lead the world’s Roman Catholic population due to his advanced age. His resignation will be effective as of Feb. 28, making him the first pope to leave the position before death in six centuries. The last pope to resign from the

papacy was Pope Gregory XII, who resigned in 1415 amid internal struggles and the Western Schism. Pope Benedict, born Joseph Ratzinger, was appointed pope in 2005 after the passing of Pope John Paul II. Eckstein said the Catholic Church now has the opportunity to choose someone outside of Europe. Such a change might stem from similar changes in the electing body and could revitalize the church, but could also upset certain Catholics who would oppose an appointment of another race or ethnicity. Nancy Ammerman, a sociology of religion professor, said the Pope’s resignation will provide the Catholic Church with the opportunity to choose a non-european pope. “This does provide the Roman Catholic Church with an interesting opportunity,” she said in an email. “The Church is growing significantly outside Europe, and this would be an opportune moment for the cardinals to turn to the South for a new pope.” Ammerman said the incoming pope still must contend with the aftermath of the Catholic Church’s sexual abuse scandals and the disillusionment of lay Catholics in the U.S. and in Europe.

Ray Hart, a professor of theology, said the pope’s resignation was significant in its rarity and because of what Pope Benedict contributed to the church. “Ratzinger was the first eminent technical academic theologian to ascend to the papacy in many generations,” Hart said in an email. “He was the first pope to understand the rampant nihilism in the late-modern context that horizons all forms of Christianity.” Luke Walsh, a School of Education freshman who identifies as Catholic, said he hopes the new pope will continue Benedict’s attempt to modernize the church. “It’s going to be cool to see if the new pope follows his lead and tries to keep the church modern and applicable to our everyday life,” Walsh said. He said while Benedict’s resignation will not change the Catholic belief system, it could change the church in other ways. “I would hope that with a new pope, focus could turn towards transparency and a realignment with the principles that make the Catholic Church so important to so many people — a commitment to service, love,

Pope, see page 4

When it comes to funding police training programs, Massachusetts is the third worst state, and is underperforming particularly in the category of juvenile justice and sexual assault, according to a recent study. The study, released Tuesday and conducted by Strategies for Youth, a Cambridge-based legal research training organization, discovered very little funding was being allocated to new officers learning how to properly communicate with teens. Executive Director of Strategies for Youth and co-author of the study, Lisa Thurau, said teaching officers and juveniles how to better communicate can lower arrest rates. “We want young people to recognize what behaviors will set off a police officer so as not to escalate the situation and we are trying to train police to do the same,” she said. “We are trying to bring all the science of the teen brain to them so they can understand normative behavior and avoid criminalizing it.” Thurau said the program has been met with success, but finances have caused a hindrance in implementing the program to all Massachusetts police forces. “Mass. allocates $187 per officer and we are the third lowest in the country right now, so only the wealthy departments can afford to get their officers all the training that they should have,” she said. Terrel Harris, communications director for the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, which oversees the Commonwealth’s Municipal Police Training Committee, acknowledged that there is a significant financial issue. “The Patrick administration has worked to increase funding for police training,” he said. “We tried to implement a surcharge on auto insurance policies as a designated revenue stream for police training. The Legislature had no appetite for it.”  Harris said not until recently have police perceptions changed regarding juveniles. “The police professions have recognized that it was the initial interactions and perceptions between officers and teenagers that set the stage for the outcome,” he said.

Police, see page 4

Blogger documents the trials, tribulations of riding T with humor By John Ambrosio Daily Free Press Staff

Sit around any bus or train stop in Boston and you are sure to here the usual complaints about The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority — the trains are always late, the infrastructure outdated, the fare hikes too severe. Channeling this frustration creatively, Ali Wisch decided to begin poking fun at the MBTA and her fellow passengers with a Tumblr blog, TheMBTARuinedMyLife.com, which is closing in on 2,000 followers since its creation in late January. “Once I started taking the T every day, I noticed patterns of lateness and unhappy passengers, and I’m also grumpy in the morning so that doesn’t help,” Wisch said. “I would have seats stolen from me and I was delayed and got in trouble at work a few times. I was frustrated and had

nowhere to vent, so I created the blog.” Wisch, a 27-year-old Brighton resident who works on Newbury Street at a marketing firm, has been posting gifs and images that reflect the trials and tribulations she faces on her daily commute from Chiswick Road Station to Arlington Station on the Green Line. Wisch said her daily commute has been a constant source of inspiration and has given her no end of material to work with. “Pretty much every day something will happen to me on my way to or from work, and I’ll have a few ideas of gifs I want to look for,” she said. Wisch muses on her blog about topics including T delays, lack of room on buses and trains and the demeanor of MBTA employees.

MBTA, see page 4

PHOTO ILLUSTARTION BY MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Students are amused by a relatable blog called thembtaruinedmylife.


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Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Creator: MBTA blog receives ‘mostly positive’ feedback from readers MBTA: From Page 3

The feedback on the blog has been mostly positive, and people find it easy to identify with the problems that she faces as a T passenger, Wisch said. “I’ve been getting mixed responses, but generally more positive ones than negative ones,” she said. “Most people have said things like ‘thank you, this makes me laugh

on the T,’ and ‘now I can show my friends from out of town what we go through.’” The MBTA could not be reached for comment by press time. A number of T passengers identified with the idea behind the blog and said they have felt frustrated while riding the T. Seanna Cavanaugh, a Simmons College freshman, said she was pleased someone was pointing out

the flaws of the T. “I appreciate that the T is here, but I also get really annoyed with it, since I take it every day,” she said. “So in a joking way, it’s ok to make fun of it. I mean it’s not like it’s meant to be taken totally seriously.” Karen Loewy, a Boston University College of Communication sophomore, said she enjoyed the humor of the blog. “If you find it funny, then the site

is fine,” she said. “There definitely are problems with the MBTA, so it’s funny that someone is making fun of it.” Other passengers said that the blog failed to recognize how good the T was in comparison to other subway lines, and Wisch may have less to complain about than she thinks. Katie Bucaro, 25, a speech therapist and former New York resident,

said comparatively, the T is a good system. “I’m from New York City and to me, nothing is worse than the subway there,” she said. “People here don’t know crowding if they never lived in New York. Trains there come often, but in rush hour you have to wait two hours sometimes because of how crowded it is. So I’d say that they’re not totally justified in complaining about the T.”

Residents concerned about promptness, system of crime notifications Brookline PD: From Page 3

“First and foremost, you should be proudest of your police department,” Robbins said at the meeting. “The arrests of these individuals are due to the quality of your police department.” Robbins said a part of the hype surrounding recent crimes could be attributed to local news coverage and not necessarily to an unusual spike in criminal activity. “Most of the crime on campus and surrounding areas has been trending

down dramatically,” Robbins said. “Every so often we get high-profile crimes that attract a lot of media attention, so we are also dealing with the perception of crime.” Several residents said they were concerned about the lack of notification they had received in the aftermath of the string of robberies in their community. Receiving timely alerts is crucial for people in the area, said Martin Anderson, a 41-year-old Brookline resident. “I missed the first incident by

three minutes,” Anderson said. “Getting the information out as quickly as possible could be the difference.” Miriam Hoffman, a BU professor of family medicine who lives in Brookline, said having a communitywide mass mailing or central repository would be helpful for residents. “I think we definitely need to increase the two-way communication, but the people in this room are a very self-selective group — the people who knew about this meeting and have been paying attention,” she said.

Peter Ditto, the Brookline director of engineering and transportation, said Brookline has been working on a pilot program to change street lights in the area to increase nighttime visibility. The test areas were Kenwood Street, Verndale Street and Columbia Street. Christine Cromartie, a 41-yearold Brookline resident, said only using technology to spread the word about local crime might leave some residents in the dark. “Not all elderly people are computer literate,” she said. “Sometimes

paper works best.” In response to residents asking for a system similar to the BU Alert System, O’Leary said Brookline residents should refer to Brookline Police’s Twitter account and blog. “I am not a Twitter user and I don’t want to be, but to have some kind of system is incredibly important,” said Cassie Weiner, a 36-year-old from Brookline. “I have to say it’s really disturbing to find out the house next door to me was robbed and the neighbors were never notified.”

COM soph.: Papacy held until death Study co-author: Best improvement in MBTA TPD than it is today,” he said. Pope: From Page 3

forgiveness, hope and faith,” said Philip Herrera, a Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences freshman, in an email. Herrera said a newly appointed pope could tackle existing issues and take the correct course of action. “As long as the church remains resolved in its message and mission, it could come out on the other side even stronger

Kim O’Connell, a College of Communication sophomore who also identified as Catholic, said a pope, upon accepting the position, accepts it knowing that he must take on the responsibility until his death. “No matter what struggles you’re facing and any conflicts that come up,” she said, “you’re supposed to work that because it is your calling.” Brian Latimer contributed to the reporting of this article.

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Police: From Page 3

Thurau said the greatest improvement from the program was within the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Transit Police Department. “In the departments where we provided our intensive training and worked with leadership, we have seen arrest rates plummet,” she said. “We saw this most dramatically with the MBTA transit police where they went from 646 juvenile arrests in 1999 to 74 in 2009.”

Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, Carol Rose, said reducing the number of juvenile arrests could alleviate stress on the court system and protect young offenders. “Overuse of arrests in schools has effectively created a school-to-prison pipeline,” she said in a statement. “This report details kids getting arrested for offenses like swearing. This is not a good use of limited police and court resources, and minor misbehavior should not lead to a criminal record that could severely

affect a child’s future.” Thurau said the state does not do enough to fund juvenile justice and improve information about the current system. “Mass. does not collect data from all its police departments on a regular basis, ... ” she said. “The Executive Office of Public Safety is less than half of a mile from [Massachusetts Institute of Technology], so it is not for lack of resources or intelligence that we don’t know more. More needs to be done.”

Analyst: Students can receive only 1 Pell Grant a year

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Grants: From Page 3

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Amy Yun, a School of Management senior, said while a significant part of the surplus might be saved in case the economy begins to decline again, some should be used for student aid. “They should provide enough money for their current pool of candidates right now and dip into the surplus,” Yun said.

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Max Lim, a College of Arts and Sciences freshman, said he thinks as another recession or fiscal cliff is not immediately pressing, the U.S. government should allot the entire surplus to students. “Having too big of a surplus is not good because, although it is good to have as a backup plan, there is no real point keeping the extra money for something that may not happen,” Lim said. Thiagu Meyyappan, a College of

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Engineering senior, said the surplus will protect future Pell Grants from another recession, but the amount saved in 2013 should also be used for students. “When you are just coming out of an economic crisis, it’s necessary to tighten restrictions to save the whole program. But if they start to flourish, the Pell Grant should be available to more people again,” Meyyappan said.

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Don’t work out, “SIT” instead

E

veryone goes to the gym with hopes of getting fit fast. However, after attending a workout session, one might become deeply disappointed if he or she has not dropped weight overnight. If only losing weight was as easy as gaining it! However, a new study suggests that losing weight and getting fit might be easier than before. Scientists at Liverpool John Moores University and the University of Birmingham have developed two exercise routines they believe will give participants the same workout results in a fraction of the recommended time. Through these workouts, the suggested three to five hours of weekly exercise has decreased to a mere 90 minutes, according to the study published in the Feb. 1 issue of The Journal of Physiology. Even with the time cut, researchers claim participants will receive both the same health and weight-loss benefits. In the study, LJMU researchers Matthew Cocks and Sam Shepherd described two primary workout routines: the High intensity Interval Training program, and the Sprint Interval Training program, also known as “HIT” and “SIT.” Over the course of the six-week experiment, Cocks and Shepherd may have revolutionized the way

society will exercise. Why did they conduct the study? Shepherd said people’s busy schedules prompted research into exercises like HIT and SIT. “The number one reason people give for not engaging in regular activity is a lack of time,” Shepherd said.  “So there is a need to establish a way of exercising that increases engagement in regular exercise, and we believe HIT may be able to do this.” According to the Livestrong website, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends the average person to engage in more than 150 minutes of exercise per week with an additional two days of muscle-strengthening activity. That breaks down to roughly 30 minutes a day for five days. With about 47 percent of Americans holding full-time jobs, according to a Business Insider report, it seems that few people have 150 minutes to spare for this recommended amount of physical activity. However, Cocks and Shepherd said they have eliminated the issue of time. With their exercises, people can achieve the same results in just 90 minutes of cardio per week. Instead of exercising for 30 minutes over the course of five days, people can exercise for roughly 30 minutes over the

Stephanie Post Features Staff

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SARAH FISHER

Students can spend less time exercising and more time on their studies according to the report.

course of three days. Patricia Fortin, a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences said the SIT and HIT exercises could be helpful for time-consumed people. “[Exercises such as this] would catch on,” Fortin said. “I just think they would be good for people who don’t have a lot of time to go

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to the gym.” The importance of exercising Why is working out even important? Many risk factors are associated with not exercising. According to Livestrong, the major consequences of not exercising include conditions such as diabetes, sleep apnea, asthma and types of cancer. Physical activity is linked with increased psychological health. According to Livestrong, exercise releases mood-enhancing chemicals called endorphins. These endorphins and regular physical activity relieve depression and anxiety while enhancing one’s ability to concentrate and focus. Individuals who are inactive are more likely to suffer from adverse psychological health effects than those who exercise regularly. This is another reason why Shepherd and Cocks said they developed the SIT and HIT programs. The components of the study Cocks and Shepherd’s study tested both males and females — of both lean and obese statures — between the ages of 20 and 60 years. Specifically in the SIT study, 16 young males who only exercised for about one hour per week were divided into two groups: the SIT group and the Endurance Training group. Once dispersed, they underwent preprogram physical tests. After six weeks, the results were calculated. In both groups, heart rates and blood pressures decreased. Additional data, according to Shepherd, proved just how effective these workouts were. “The results were as we expected, in so much as we expected HIT and SIT to have a positive effect on fat metabolism, vascular health and insulin sensitivity,” Shepherd said.  “What was most surprising was that HIT and SIT enhanced muscle fat metabolism similarly to more traditional endurance training, and that the effect on

some of the vascular adaptations were even greater with SIT and HIT.” What are the SIT and HIT workouts? Shepherd said the SIT workout consisted of a 30-second sprint on a laboratory bicycle, followed by 4.5 minutes of low-intensity cycling. Participants repeated this cycle between four and six times, concluding the single session of exercise. In total, participants only performed high intensity exercise for two-to-three minutes per session. Shepherd said almost anyone could engage in the SIT exercise: men or women, lean or obese and people between the ages of 20 and 60. Although the SIT program is easy and safe for anyone to do, Shepherd said people should not engage in the HIT program until researchers make it completely suitable for public use. “It is important to note that the form of HIT we used in this study is very extreme, and may not be suitable for the general population,” Shepherd said.  “We are currently investigating more practical forms of HIT and how these can be used in the real world.” Student reactions Casey Cirillo, a freshman in CAS, said exercises like HIT and SIT would fit conveniently into her schedule. “Though I like the classes that they offer [at Boston University], it would be nice to be able to get in a good workout in just an hour,” Cirillo said. Some students are more skeptical of this study. “I don’t think that [the results] necessarily aren’t true, but I don’t really think a quick fix will work,” said Brittany Comak, a freshman in the College of Communication. “It’s enticing to some people, but for me, I just want to build up an endurance. I don’t want to go to the gym for 90 minutes and feel like I’m done for the week.”


6T

uesday,

February 12, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 15

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan Online Editor Jasper Craven, City Editor Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Page Editor

Kaylee Hill, Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager

The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

Letter to the Editor: Guns on campus

After reading the recently published article concerning the legality of weapons on Boston University’s campus, I was worried when I saw that only the people that thought that guns should be outright banned on BU’s campus were interviewed and had their opinion published. Where was the differing opinion in this article?       BU Police Chief Thomas Robbins states that if you were to have a licensed, 21-or-older student or faculty member carry his or her legally obtained weapon into a classroom, “if there’s a physical struggle and someone disagrees with someone ... there’s now a weapon in that situation so anything can go wrong.” Does Chief Robbins really believe that if we allow these licensed individuals to carry their firearms into the classroom, normal academic debates can suddenly become intense gun battles? When in his “three decades as a police officer” can he cite something like this that has ever happened? He states his opinion that he believes licensed CCW holders should be banned from carrying weapons on campus, but doesn’t state any compelling evidence as to why.          The other opinion in this article is from a BU political science professor, Christine Rossel, who has probably never touched an actual gun in her life, much less shot one. She states a claim, once again not supported by evidence, that “… it ‘s very difficult for someone who hasn’t had decades of training to know exactly who they’re supposed to be shooting, that’s problem number one.”          Let’s look back on an example from reality: the Virginia Tech massacre from 2007, when a student shot and killed 32 people in the deadliest mass-shooting incident in United States history. When the campus police entered the building eight minutes after the shooting had started and 32 lay dead, the shooter had already committed suicide. Virginia Tech had a Campus firearms ban very similar to that of BU’s, which prohibited licensed students, faculty, or visitors from carrying their firearms on campus.          Now imagine being a student at Virginia Tech, trapped inside of a classroom hiding un-

der your desk with an active shooter outside of your classroom. To reference Sam Harris, Would you really be relieved to know that up until then, your university had been an impeccable gun-free environment and that no one, not even your professor who has been trained and held his concealed carry license for years, would be armed? If you found yourself trapped with others in a classroom, preparing to attack the shooter with pencils and chairs, can you imagine remembering BU political science professor Christine Rossel’s claim and thinking “I’m so glad no one else has a gun, because I wouldn’t want to get caught in any crossfire”?        To support my opinion, that licensed CCW permit holders should be allowed to carry their weapons on campus, to defend themselves as well as others, I provide the example of the Appalachian School of Law shooting in 2002. The story starts out the same as Virginia Tech, a mentally deranged student brings a weapon on campus, and shoots and kills three people point blank, then sets out to kill as many people as possible. However, what makes this story different is that Appalachian School of Law does not ban firearms on its campus. At the first sound of gunfire, two other students went to their vehicles to retrieve their personally owned firearms, and held the shooter at gunpoint until the police arrived, stopping any further killing from taking place. No shots were fired by the students, and no one was killed in the crossfire.      The fact is that in the United States we are around armed citizens every day, people who have legal concealed carry permits, and we don’t even know it. These random wild-westlike incidents that Professor Rossel and Chief Robbins state would occur if firearms were allowed on campus simply don’t happen in reality. I find it sad that an irrational fear of firearms can lead to such misinformation, and make people believe that BU students and faculty, some of the best and brightest in the world, are incapable of carrying firearms responsibly, while for every ‘average joe’ off campus it is perfectly legal. Tyler Butler CAS ‘14 tbutler@bu.edu

Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation Monday. He is the first Pope in 598 years to do so — the last Pope did so in the midst of a papal leadership crisis known as the Great Western Schism, according to The New York Times. Pope Benedict is doing so because he fears his ailing strength leaves him unsuitable to perform the job. “In today’s world,” Benedict said in his announcement, “subject to so many rapid changes and shaken by questions of deep relevance for the life of faith, in order to govern the bark of St. Peter and proclaim the gospel, both strength of mind and body are necessary, strength which in the last few months has deteriorated in me to the extent that I have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me,” reported the Times. The world, and the Catholic Church in particular, is left astonished by the news. Inasmuch as the Catholic Church has lost much modern public favor with its refusal to acknowledge gay rights or allow women into the

priesthood, the breach in tradition on behalf of Pope Benedict comes as a resounding shock. The Guardian noted Monday that the papacy was “foisted” upon Benedict, that he was at best an unlikely candidate for the position when he became Pope John Paul II’s successor in 2005. Aged 78 at the time of his appointment, he privately expressed fears about the burden of the role, according to the Guardian. Some have speculated that the “Vatileaks” scandal, in which the Pope’s former butler leaked confidential documents, left the Pope compromised, isolated and powerless, according to The Boston Metro. Even without regards to all of this, however, we must note the inherent modernity in the Pope’s decision to step down from his apparently divinely ordained position. If indeed he was chosen by God, it shows great individual governance in his refusal to carry on with it. It is perhaps the first of many changes that the Catholic Church will experience. Perhaps their new Pope will be ever more progressive.

Pope resigns, raises questions

THE AMERICAN IDEA

Retired Pope, brighter future COLIN SMITH Pope Benedict XVI announced his retirement Monday, becoming the first Pope in nearly 600 years to take such a step. The announcement was met with widespread and wide-ranging emotions across the US, with virtually every news outlet providing a story on the event. As the news cyclone swirled Monday, facts forwarded and explanations grasped at, I couldn’t help but become utterly stuck to one simple question that seemed to sink like a stone amongst a sea of more complex and elaborate queries: Why? Why does this matter? Why does it matter that a Pope whose most notable steps have been the further alienation of an already alienated, archaic religion is stepping down? Indeed, when all is said and done, I do believe Pope Benedict’s most notable action in his eight year Papal tenure will be his termination of that tenure. That statement’s meant as a backhanded slap, to be sure, but also as a serious critique of a man who, among other things, ignored increasing cries to allow women into the priesthood, accept gay Catholics into the church, and unite more closely and harmoniously with other world religions. Given these actions, I believe Benedict XVI will go down as a weak Pope. However, this does not mean, unfortunately, that I hold any great hope for Benedict’s successor. The antiquated and immovable moral foundations of the Catholic Church — and all world religions for that matter — are increasingly at odds with the largely secular moral framework of our country. An example of this would be the great strides our country has taken in the areas of gay rights and gender equality, the biggest obstacles to which have come from organized religion, both in the Catholic Church and various fundamentalist Protestant sects. The heyday of Catholicism, and of Christian religion in America, is dwindling. Polls and statistics show that increasingly younger generations are abandoning the religions in which they were raised. If they are anything like me, they are doing this not as a matter of theological objection or a rejection of the sense of community the church provides, but from an awareness of the ever-widening gap between their own ideals and the Church’s. Catholicism’s failure to adapt and solve — or at the very least hear out — issues concerning gay rights, contraception and gender equality may be winning them points with the older, conservative generations. But these are not the people the Catholic Church must win over if it wishes to survive in the U.S. and globally. The church must win a young following, and to do this they will likely have to do something very difficult for an organization founded on the teachings of historical figures: They will have to look to uncharted territory. I write this column not as a militant atheist. I was raised Catholic and am no longer. I

have doubts, certainly, about the absolute guarantee of a greater power beyond that which I can see and hear myself, just as I have doubts about most things that are told to me in black and white and with absolute conviction. I am, however, open to the possibility of a God. Heck, I may even want one. If I am to become a religious adherent in my adult life, however, the Church is going to have to meet me half way. They are also going to have to admit, hard as it may be for them, that there are some things they are not sure about, theologically, morally and socially. As it stands now, the Church equates all uncertainty with weakness, and anything less than iron conviction with fallacy. This may have worked for our parents’ generation, serving a rock on which to lean, but we are the generation of uncertainty, and we do not mind if our leaders show themselves to be human. I mentioned before that I hold no great hope for the next Pope. Indeed, I am a cynic, and it may be hard to fully please me unless the next Pope is Barack Obama. I am aware, and not entirely pleased, that the next Pope will be someone who has spent his entire life in abbeys, churches and monasteries, doing work which though morally sound is hardly connected with most people or issues of today. But supposing I can accept this, may I ask in return for a religion that accepts — or at least acknowledges — the social values I have clearly chosen in my own personal life? Why must I choose between being a Catholic and being a Liberal? I shouldn’t have to, and nobody should have to choose between practicing their religion and practicing anything else they damn well want. Young people are on the verge of abandoning this God advertised as infinitely accepting and loving, all because his representatives on Earth are not infinitely accepting and loving enough. The Church is no longer needed as a moral framework on how to live our lives. For that we are doing just fine on our own. What it can provide is a sense of community, a sense of shelter and warmth for those who have otherwise been cast out, rather than a barrier against those same people. After all, Jesus’ earliest followers included prostitutes and street thugs, beggars and outlaws. Perhaps the Catholic Church needs to look no further than this for its lesson in diversity. The next Pope best understand all of this. He best understand the superfluous nature of God in our modern society, best know the thin ice that he walks on and the fog which surrounds him. Then, and only then, can he make his light shine through. Colin Smith is a freshman in the College of Arts and Sciences, and weekly columnist for the Daily Free Press. He can be reached at colin1@bu.edu

Navy SEAL suffers lack of benefits

The Navy SEAL who killed Osama bin Laden back in 2011 is reportedly struggling to reintegrate himself back into normal life. In a recent article in Esquire magazine, the shooter broke his silence about his life post-Osama, revealing that he has neither a job nor insurance, and is worried about the well-being of his family. The SEAL left the Navy last September after 16 years of service. He was four years short of receiving health insurance and his pension, according to Esquire. He has also been unlucky with the job search — many jobs require that his family abandon their current name and with it, their current lives. Why has the United States failed so in providing their military heroes with the benefits and post-service security they deserve? Osa-

ma’s shooter quit the Navy four years before he was guaranteed to receive benefits, which means benefits only come to those who serve in the military if they serve for the entire duration of twenty years. Indeed, it is important to secure the will to serve from those who sign up to protect the country. But 20 years of service is a long time, and military life can be particularly taxing. Any service to the country should guarantee an individual in the military post-service benefits. There ought to be community in which ex-soldiers can enjoy a system of benefits, like job searches, family relocation and health insurance. Hopefully, the controversial and eye-opening Esquire story will encourage military and government officials to take action on behalf of their forlorn hero.


Tuesday, February 12, 2013

7

Undisciplined play leads to insurmountable deficit for men’s hockey Beanpot: From Page 1

center Cason Hohmann for his 13th goal of the year. Harvard answered shortly afterward. BU freshman goalie Sean Maguire was against the left post after blocking a shot from the goal line. That rebound bounced off a few sticks and out into the slot, where Crimson defenseman Dan Ford slid it into the open net. With 14.2 seconds remaining in the first, Harvard senior defenseman Danny Biega tied the game 2–2. As he entered the zone, BU junior defenseman Patrick MacGregor sent him flying into the boards, but Biega got up, apparently unaffected, took a puck coming out of the corner and ripped a wrist shot over Maguire. As the period ended, Maguire took a stick to the head, but remained in the game and didn’t appear to see the puck as well

as he had before the collision. Parker said Maguire was examined in the intermission and was not injured in any way. Sophomore forward Evan Rodrigues put BU up 3–2 with a power-play goal from his new spot at the point early in the second. But Harvard came right back with a onetimer from left wing Marshall Everson that found its way over Maguire. Then Harvard took the lead for good seconds later, when senior center Luke Greiner flipped a puck from the slot over Maguire’s shoulder. With senior forward Ryan Santana in the box, Harvard increased its lead to 5–3 late in the second. A rebound came to Greiner in front of the net, and no BU player got to him in time to stop him from flipping it into the net. After the fifth Harvard goal, Crimson forward Alex Fallstrom rocked BU sophomore defenseman Alexx Privitera with a hit

to the head in the defensive zone. Privitera responded, sending Fallstrom flying with a leg check despite the fact that Fallstrom wasn’t involved in the play. Privitera received a five-minute major penalty and a game misconduct for the hit, the third time he’s been ejected from a game this year. Parker hinted that Privitera could sit out BU’s next game, but did not say for certain. “We have to just remove guys from ice time,” he said. “That’s the only thing you can do. If you can’t stop taking stupid penalties — if you don’t get on the ice, it’s hard to take a penalty.” BU killed off the ensuing Harvard power play, only to have Everson slam home a rebound just seconds later for a 6–3 Harvard lead. Hohmann brought BU within two with 8:36 left in the third, but late penalties — two from senior defenseman Sean Escobe-

do and one from junior defenseman Garrett Noonan, on top of the end of Privitera’s major — hurt their chances to come back. “We were undisciplined again tonight,” said senior defenseman and assistant captain Ryan Ruikka. “We took some stupid penalties. Guys get tired on the back end and we give up goals we shouldn’t be giving up.” Greiner finished off a hat trick with an empty-netter with eight seconds remaining to make the final score 7–4. This is the second time in the last three years BU has finished fourth in the Beanpot — something that only happened once before, when they did it in 1961 and 1963. “There wasn’t enough desperation,” Ruikka said. “Two years ago this team beat us, and we didn’t make the national tournament. Looks like we’re in the same boat again … we’re not playing the right way right now.”

Terriers’ offense facing challenging defense Men’s basketball: From Page 8

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

D.J. Irving scored a game-high 20 points in BU’s last game against the University of Vermont.

with our athletic ability. They are bigger than us but we are quicker and we have the unit that has the advantage.” Aside from its defensive play, Jones was also pleased with his team’s energy and intensity considering the fact that this team has, at many points this season, looked sluggish and not mentally prepared. Junior forward Dom Morris registered a double-double in the last game against Vermont, while junior guard D.J. Irving recorded a game-high 20 points. The Terriers offense is on fire of late, as it leads the America East in field goal percentage (.449) as well as 3-point field goal percentage (.384). Additionally, freshman guard John Papale (.427) and junior guard Travis Robinson (.410) lead the individual 3-point field goal percentage category. Vermont does not have one player in the top ten in 3-point shooting percentage. Irving is fifth in the America East in scoring with 14.7 points per game, while Vermont’s leading scorer, forward Clancy Rugg, is 13th in the conference with 11.5 points per game. On the other hand, the Catamounts have

one of the strongest defenses in America East, holding opponents to a conference-best 57.3 points per game. They also allow teams to shoot just 39.7 percent from the field, second-best in America East. Therefore, according to Jones, the Terrier s’ offense will have to perform exceptionally well Tuesday night. “On the offensive end, we’re going to have to search out good shots,” Jones said. “We’re going to have to play through the shot clock a little better. They’re going to be all over us at times for the first 15 seconds or so. “We’re used to first option, first ball screen, first penetration. We’re just so used to being able to score that we’re going to have to be able to search out shots.” Tuesday night, their last in-league contest with Vermont, is an opportunity for the Terriers to show that they can play with the best in the America East. “You play 30 games, but you’re not going to play great every night,” Jones said. “You have to hope that this won’t be one of them and that we’ve prepared and that we’re ready to go. I have all the confidence in the world that we’ll be ready to go and we’ll go up there and do what we have to do.”

Morris: Coaches to blame for bad losses Morris: From Page 8

But that shouldn’t explain everything. That doesn’t explain Duke getting blown out of the building by the University of Miami. That doesn’t explain a No. 1 Indiana team getting beaten by an unranked Illinois team that’s just 4–7 in conference play. So while this stretch of schedule may explain some of the shaky play, it does not fully account for first and second-ranked teams going a combined 11–9. All right, then maybe it has to do with the opponent’s mindset. It is reasonable to assume that lesser teams are more amped up to play against a top-ranked program. But then why are third or fourth-ranked teams having more success than first or secondranked teams? I have a hard time believing that opponents are only getting pumped up for first or second-ranked teams. If I was playing, I wouldn’t be like, “Oh whatever, it’s just the third-ranked team in the nation,” but then be like, “Oh my god, it’s the number one team, this is our Super Bowl!” Maybe I’m wrong, but I think the intensity would be the same going against a number one team and going against a number three team. And on top of that, these are

supposed to be the best teams in the country. So the added intensity from the opponents should be offset by the fact that these are really good teams, right? So then why are all these really good teams being exposed? Well, I blame coaching. I think it is natural for any player to get caught up in the hype of being a numberone or number-two team. These are just college kids we are talking about. Heck, I would walk around like king of the campus if I were on a number-one team. I would make everyone bow down to me. So I believe it is the coach’s job to bring his players back down to earth. Teams always play better when they feel like the underdog. We see it literally every year in the NFL playoffs. It is the coach’s job to instill this “Us Against the World” mentality into the players. Otherwise, these teams that reach number one are going to continue this cycle of being told by the media how good they are, buying into it and then going out and laying an egg against a lesser opponent. Come on, coaches, I’m looking at you to end this. Indiana gets a do-over at number one this week, and we’ll see how they fare.

‘Like’ The Daily Free Press sports section On Facebook

Follow us on Twitter: @DFPsports @BOShockeyblog @dfphoops BU expecting hard-fought battle in next game Women’s hockey: From Page 8

struggled in last week’s game because of the flu. According to Durocher, while Poulin — who is now at 100 percent — felt well going into the game, she struggled as the contest progressed. “[She] definitely was weak when she was on the ice, just not really having the jump, the strength she’s accustomed to having,” Durocher said. The Terriers have never come in fourth in the Beanpot Tournament as a varsity

program. But, as Durocher said, the game is now less about the Beanpot and more about earning a spot in the national tournament. “With no disrespect to the Beanpot, I’m calling this a huge NCAA game and one that we’ve been focusing on for three days to be ready to go,” Durocher said. “This is going to be a battle of two teams that have remained pretty consistent all year and have only lost a few games each. It’ll probably be a one-goal game one way or the other.”


Quotable

With no disrespect to the Beanpot, I’m calling this a huge NCAA game.

-BU coach Brian Durocher on the upcoming Beanpot consolation game.

Page 8

Driving The Lane

Sports The Daily Free Press

Morris, see page 7

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Alex Privitera took a 5-minute major penalty for game misconduct after an agressive hit in the Beanpot consolation game. By Kevin Dillon Daily Free Press Staff

No. 13 Boston University men’s hockey sophomore defenseman Alexx Privitera was slow to get up after taking a big hit in his own defensive zone from Harvard University forward Alex Fallstrom. With the Terriers (13–12–1, 10–7–1 Hockey East) down 5–3 to the Crimson (6–15–2) late in the second period, the hit was enough to push Privitera’s temper over the edge. The sophomore flew down the ice and tried to lay a big hit on Fallstrom in retaliation for the previous check. When Fallstrom almost dodged the hit, Privitera stuck out his knee, creating knee-on-knee contact. Fallstrom fell to the ice writhing in pain, and Privitera was charged with a game misconduct and was told to hit the showers. The retaliation penalty was just one example of the Terriers showing signs of frustration in Monday night’s 7–4 loss to Harvard in the

W. Hockey Beanpot v. Harvard, 5 p.m. M. Basketball @ Vermont, 7 p.m.

Beanpot consolation game. BU has won just one of its last seven contests. “I’d say the team’s definitely a little frustrated,” said senior assistant captain Ryan Ruikka. “You want to win, but when you keep losing it just kills the morale of the team.” While there have been a number of things that have gone wrong in the Terriers’ recent cold streak, one of the most notable problems Monday was the team’s discipline. BU took nine penalties in the game, including six penalties after it fell behind. “We don’t have anywhere near the discipline and the focus and the attention to detail — especially on defense — that we need,” said BU coach Jack Parker. “We had all those things first semester. But it’s almost like we threw a switch when we came back second semester.” Privitera in particular has been one of the least disciplined players for BU since the beginning of the

second semester. Privitera earned a game disqualification and an automatic one-game suspension for kicking a player at the University of Denver and then was benched for an additional game by Parker. The benching did not seem to have an effect though, as Privitera earned his second game misconduct of the season Monday night. Privitera will earn another suspension if he gets another game misconduct this season, but Parker hinted the sophomore may find himself watching a game from the stands yet again regardless. “We have to just remove guys from ice time,” Parker said. “That is the only thing you can do … If you don’t get on the ice, it is hard to take a penalty.” It would be difficult to bench Privitera considering he is not an issue for the Terriers in terms of his defense. Privitera and senior defenseman Sean Escobedo, who combine to make up BU’s top defensive pairing, were the only two Terriers to finish Monday’s game as a plus in the plus-minus category. However, the duo also combined for 19 minutes worth of penalties in the loss. The penalties did not appear to hurt the Terriers much according to the score sheet, as Harvard only scored once on its seven powerplay attempts. However, two of the Crimson’s goals came within seconds after BU penalties. Now, with only nine games remaining in the season, the Terriers do not have time to make frustrated mistakes like they did Monday night. The loss to Harvard will bump BU down in the PairWise rankings, and put it at risk of missing out on the NCAA tournament. For now, Parker said he is just looking for a way to get his team out of its recent “grand funk.” “The major problem is the lack of compete and the lack of coming to the game and putting it on the line,” Parker said. “They are almost waiting for something bad to happen.”

BU to take on surging UVM Tuesday night By Michael Bagarella Daily Free Press Staff

The Boston University men’s basketball team will look to win its third straight game when it visits the America East-leading University of Vermont Tuesday night. Coming off a 67–55 win against the University of Maryland-Baltimore County Saturday afternoon, Vermont (16–7, 9–2 America East) will be seeking its fifth straight victory. During the winning streak, the Catamounts took down the slumping University at Albany, University of New Hampshire and University of Hartford. Since its last matchup with BU (13–11, 7–4 America East) Jan. 8, Vermont has gone 7–1, only losing a three-point game to the University of Maine on Jan. 22. Vermont’s primary strength lies in its defense, while its offense is run through its forwards. “They’re very big,” said BU coach Joe Jones. “We cannot allow the game to be played strictly in the paint. We have to do a good job of pressuring them and try to keep them out of the lane. Their strength is in their ability to get the ball in the paint by penetration or the pass.” In the first matchup, the BU defense stepped up to the plate. The Terriers held the Vermont offense to 27.3 percent from the field while forcing the Catamounts into 14 turnovers. Additionally, the Terriers were able to counter the size of Vermont by playing strong in the paint and outscoring the Catamounts down low, 26–18. Jones is looking for the defense to step up again Tuesday night. “We need to get our hands on the ball,” Jones said. “We really need to try to keep them out of rhythm

Men’s basketball, see page 7

Women’s hockey views upcoming game vs. Harvard as crucial NCAA bout By Meredith Perri Daily Free Press Staff

A week ago, the No. 3 Boston University women’s hockey team had a hope of winning its first Beanpot trophy since 1981 and its first as a varsity program. In a matter of 60 minutes, however, Northeastern University dashed that dream as it defeated the Terriers (18–4–3, 13–2–1 Hockey East) in the first round of the tournament. With its chances of winning the title gone, BU has decided not to look at Tuesday’s consolation game against No. 5 Harvard University as a part of the Beanpot. “Fortunately and unfortunately, I’ve taken ‘Beanpot’ and ‘consolation’ out of my vocabulary this week because it’s a huge NCAA game that we’re looking at

The Bottom Line

Tuesday, Feb. 12

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Terriers show frustration in Beanpot

John Morris

they did it again

The BU men’s hockey team placed fourth in the Beanpot tournament for the second time in three years. P.7.

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Top Seed Issues

“Down goes number one!” It’s the headline that you’re probably getting sick of hearing on SportsCenter. For the fifth straight week, the nation’s number one team in college basketball has lost. The latest number one to fall was Indiana University against Big Ten rival University of Illinois Thursday. I’m here to ask one question. Why? Why are all these great basketball teams stumbling once they reach number one? Why do the basketball gods all of a sudden hate whichever team sits in that top spot? First off, you might just think it’s a fluke. Maybe there’s nothing to it. Well, here are a few stats that might convince you otherwise. Now keep in mind, I do not work for the Elias Sports Bureau. This is just a dude counting numbers on ESPN.com. But if my calculations are correct, the teams at the top spot are just 5–5 the past five weeks. This includes Duke University (for two weeks), University of Louisville, University of Michigan and Indiana. Overall, these teams are a combined 82–13. These are very, very good teams we are talking about. So why are they all of a sudden vulnerable once being named number one? Well maybe it’s not just a number one thing. Maybe just being ranked near the top causes teams to fall. Second-ranked teams have also struggled during this fiveweek stretch, going just 6–4. So, to be fair to number one, they’re not the only ones having a hard time staying atop the rankings. Interestingly enough though, third-ranked teams have fared very well, going a near perfect 8–1. Fourth-ranked teams have also had success, going 8–2. So why do these teams start struggling once becoming number one or number two? For starters, these teams are now right in the thick of their inter-conference schedule. That means tough road games against hard-nosed conference rivals. Teams that maybe don’t look all that great on paper all of a sudden become tougher opponents because of rivalries.

Oops,

Wednesday, Feb. 13 W. Basketball @ Vermont, 7 p.m.

against Harvard,” said BU coach Brian Durocher. Both BU and the Crimson (17–3–2) have compiled successful seasons so far with the teams having just four and three losses on the season, respectively. With both teams in the top five of the PairWise and USCHO rankings, a win for either program could help a team as the playoffs draw near. “I think that getting a win here in this game could solidify us in a pretty nice position relative to the PairWise and the ultimate NCAA Tournament,” Durocher said. “That’s our goal.” Back on Nov. 18, in the teams’ other meeting this season, the Terriers served the Crimson their first loss of the season, as the Terriers defeated Harvard 2–1 at Walter Brown Arena. At the time,

Harvard was ranked higher than the Terriers. Senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk and junior forward Louise Warren led the way for BU, as they each scored in the close contest. Both of BU’s goals occurred in the first half of the game, and Harvard came close to staging a comeback as forward Mary Parker scored her second goal of the season 2:18 into the third frame of the game. Forwards Jillian Dempsey and Lyndsey Fry, who are first and second, respectively, on the team in scoring, earned assists on Parker’s goal. “They might be even a little more confident bunch than they were earlier in the year,” Durocher said. “They’ve played well throughout the year. They’re obviously a well-coached team.

They’ve got a real super player that leads them in Jillian Dempsey. They’ve had good goaltending all year.” Like the Terriers, Harvard will come into the game having not played since the first round of the Beanpot. Both teams had their weekend games canceled due to the snowstorm that rocked the Northeast. “We’ll both go into it in kind of the same situation,” Durocher said. “Everybody has got four to five months [of hockey] under their belts. They’ll be ready for a hockey game.” The Terriers will also have one of their team leaders, junior cocaptain Marie-Philip Poulin, back to full strength after the forward

Thursday, Feb. 14

Friday, Feb. 15

Saturday, Feb. 16

No Events Scheduled Tony Romo played in a golf tournament, but blew his lead late and placed 3rd. At least he’s consistent from sport to sport.

M. Hockey @ Maine, 7:30 p.m.

Women’s hockey, see page 7

W. Basketball v. UNH, 1 p.m. W. Hockey v. Vermont, 3 p.m. M. Hockey @ Maine, 7 p.m.


February 12th Daily Free Press