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The Daily Free Press

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue IX

GREAT DEBATERS BUSI and AWC debate sanctions on Iran, page 3.

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Thursday, January 31, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

TWINNING

Indie pair Tegan and Sara entertain with pop stylings, page 5.

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DOMINATED

Dom Morris helps BU before Hartford matchup, page 8.

WEATHER

Today: AM rain/wind/High 58 Tonight: Partly cloudy/Low 27 Tomorrow: 33/17 Data Courtesy of weather.com

Organizations push for cycle tracks to ensure bike safety Updated legislation would restrict harsh In light of the bike accidents that occurred in the City of Boston in 2012, grassroots orsentences for youth ganizations and city officials are considering By Katherine Lynn Daily Free Press Staff

implementing cycle tracks to further promote bike safety. Mike Tremblay, an engineer at Howard/ Stein-Hudson Associates, proposed the idea of installing a cycle track in South Boston on Broadway and L Street, to create a safer biking atmosphere in the area. The project was originally part of Tremblay’s capstone project at Northeastern University in 2010, but the idea of a cycle track is beginning to take hold in Boston, he said. “Rather than put simple bike lanes down, we wanted to put something a little bit better,” Tremblay said. “What we wanted to do was create an intermediate-level cycle track, which would be separated from the street level by about four inches or so.” The proposed raised bike track would be installed between the sidewalk and parking spaces for cars. This design would protect bikers from traffic on the street and prevent cars or pedestrians from using the cycle tacks created specifically for use by bikers, Tremblay said. “Broadly speaking, there is evidence that cycle tracks improve safety,” said Price Armstrong, the program director at MassBike, an organization that promotes bicycling and bike safety throughout the city. “Certainly bicyclists prefer cycle tracks because they are either grade-separated or there is a horizontal buffer

By Paola Salazar Daily Free Press Contributor

located a second apparent stab wound on the victim’s upper left shoulder. Both wounds were about one to one-and-ahalf inches wide. The victim reported not being aware he had been stabbed and did not see a weapon in either suspect’s hand. The victim was transported to Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center by ambulance with non-life-threatening injuries. Brookline Police, Boston University Police Department and Massachusetts State Police responded to the scene and are investigating, according to a BU Alert sent to students Tuesday night. No suspects have yet been identified. This incident is the eighth robbery or attempted robbery on or near the Charles River Campus during the 2012-13 academic year. Brown said he met Wednesday morning with BUPD Chief Thomas Robbins to establish steps to be taken based on ongoing inves-

Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick proposed new legislation Monday that would end life without parole sentencing for juveniles between the age of 14 and 18 convicted of murder in the first degree. Patrick’s proposal, An Act to Reform the Juvenile Justice System in the Commonwealth, gives juvenile murderers the chance to be tried without the immediate sentencing of life without parole, according to a Monday press release. “It is time for the Commonwealth’s laws to reflect the value, in accord with the Supreme Court, that young people deserve every opportunity to rehabilitation and reform,” Patrick said in the release. In the case of Miller v. Alabama, the U.S. Supreme Court declared in June that sentencing a juvenile offender to mandatory life without parole for murder in the first degree was unconstitutional. A number of the 26 states that had instated mandatory life without parole for juvenile murderers have altered their laws in accommodation to the Supreme Court’s decision. Massachusetts’s law states juveniles between the ages of 14 and 17 convicted of firstdegree murder are to receive a mandatory sentence of juvenile life without parole. Patrick’s proposal extends the juvenile age limit to 14 through 18. “Every violent felon should be held accountable for their actions, even youths,” Patrick said in the release. “But in sentencing, every felon’s circumstances should be considered, too, and youth itself is a special circumstance.” Gail Garinger, the Massachusetts child advocate, said brain research has demonstrated that the adolescent brain differs in significant ways from the adult brain. “The rationale in  Miller [v. Alabama] acknowledges that adolescents are different from adults,” Garinger said in an email. “This Miller rationale is likely to greatly influence how we deal with youth throughout our educational, mental/behavioral health, child welfare and juvenile justice systems.” According to studies used in Miller v. Alabama, the developmental characteristics of adolescents can lead to more impulsive behav-

Robbery, see page 2

Sentencing, see page 2

MAYA DEVEREAUX/DAILY FREE PRESS FILE

In light of recent bike accidents, legislators and advocates are pushing for updated bike lanes.

between the bicyclists’ track and the road.” In the fall 2012 semester there were two fatal bike accidents involving Boston University students. Chung-Wei Yang, a sophomore in the College of Arts and Sciences, was killed in a collision involving a Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority bus, and College of Communication graduate student Christopher Weigl was killed in an accident with a tractor-trailer. These biking accidents are not uncommon

occurrences on Commonwealth Avenue. According to the Mayor’s Office, Commonwealth Avenue and Massachusetts Avenue have the two highest rates of bike accidents in the city. Armstrong said action needs to be taken to curb the number of accidents. “Every time there is a fatal bike crash, or every time there is a bike crash fatal or not fatal, it reinforces the importance of what we do,” he bike safety, see page 2

Robbery details emerge, Pres. Brown to reconsider safety procedures By Chris Lisinski Daily Free Press Staff

A Boston University Medical Campus research assistant suffered two stab wounds in an armed robbery in Brookline Tuesday night, according to a Brookline Police Department incident report. At about 8:30 p.m. Tuesday night, the 38-year-old victim, whose name was omitted from the report, was walking near on Pleasant Street from Commonwealth Avenue to Beacon Street when two male suspects who were sitting on the steps in front of 94 Pleasant St. attacked him, the report stated. The suspects were described as two males, between 5-foot-10 and 6 feet tall, of average builds, wearing black hooded fleeces or sweatshirts with blue jeans and what appeared to be knit hats pulled over their faces. The victim was unable to tell what ethnicity the suspects were. BU President Robert Brown sent an email

to the community Wednesday afternoon acknowledging the number of robberies near West and South Campus. “This attack is especially troubling because it is the first instance in which assailants have actively used a weapon rather than the threat of violence,” Brown said. The victim reported being grabbed from behind and thrown to the ground. His black Patagonia backpack, which was carrying a MacBook Pro, a Verizon cellphone, an iPad and a brown leather wallet containing between $20 and $40 in cash, credit and ATM cards, was taken. The suspects punched the victim once or twice on the left side of his face after throwing him to the ground. They then fled down Browne Street toward St. Paul Street. A Brookline Police officer was the first to arrive on scene and the suspect reported he was bleeding. The officer located a stab wound on the victim’s upper right chest. Brookline Fire Department personnel later

Governor Patrick appoints Mo Cowan as interim Mass. Senator to replace Kerry By Kyle Plantz Daily Free Press Staff

COURTESY OF GOVERNOR’S OFFICE

William “Mo” Cowan was appointed today as U.S. Senator.

Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick has chosen William ‘Mo’ Cowan, his former chief of staff, as the interim senator to fill Secretary of State John Kerry’s vacant Senate seat until a special election is held June 25. “Today I have the great honor, privilege and personal pleasure to appoint Mo Cowan as United States senator in the interim until that special election,” Patrick said in a press conference on Wednesday. Cowan served the Patrick-Murray administration as both chief of staff and chief legal counsel. He is a native of North Carolina and graduated from Duke University in 1991. He came to Massachusetts to attend Northeastern Law School, from which he graduated with his law degree in 1994. Cowan was hired by Patrick as his legal counsel in 2009. In 2010, he was appointed to chief of staff. He left the position in November. “Mo is a highly respected public citizen,” Patrick said in the press conference. “His ser-

vice on the front lines, in our efforts to manage through the worst economy in 80 years and build a better and stronger Commonwealth for the next generation, has given him an intimate understanding of the issues we face.” Cowan succeeds Kerry, who formally resigned from his senator ial position Tuesday after 28 years of service. Cowan said he is honored and humbled by the appointment and promises to represent the people of Massachusetts. “I accept this temporary post confident in the knowledge and perspectives that I have acquired working closely with you [Gov. Patrick] and the Lieutenant Governor,” Cowan said at the press conference. “You in the Commonwealth should be assured that I now go to our nation’s capital, ever mindful of what matters to the people of Massachusetts.” He said Kerry’s work will not go unfinished and he is eager to work with his staff. “Secretary Kerry and his Senate staff have done extremely well by the people of Massachusetts and working with that staff, I aim

to continue that work during the next few months,” he said. Cowan is the first African-American to represent Massachusetts in the Senate since Edward Brooke held the position for two terms from 1966 to 1978. Cowan joins U.S. Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina in the Senate, making them the first two African-Americans tto serve in the Senate simultaneously. Mass. Lt. Gov. Timothy Murray said choosing the interim senator was a tough decision. Cowan said he was offered the position Tuesday, but knew he was on the long list of possible candidates for the position. He said he is not running for office and does not plan to in the future. Sen. Elizabeth Warren offered her congratulations to Cowan and said she looks forward to working with him, according to a press release Wednesday. “I am very pleased to welcome Mo Cowan to the Senate,” Warren said. “As former chief of staff to Governor Patrick, Mo brings a deep

Senator, see page 4


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Thursday , January 31, 2013

MA child advocate: Adolescent, adult brains differ Pres. Brown responds to robberies Sentencing: From Page 1

ior, an inability to understand consequences for actions and a blurred sense of self, Garinger said. Patrick’s proposed legislation would allow the juvenile court to sentence individuals to either life with parole eligibility after 15 to 25 years served or to life without parole after considering several factors. These factors include the person’s immaturity, the consequences of the person’s criminal misconduct, if the person acted alone, the person’s intellectual capacity and the likelihood that the offender is capable of change and would benefit from rehabilitation, according to the release. There are 62 JLWOP inmates in the state of Massachusetts. Patrick’s legislation would allow for

re-evaluations of cases that may be affected by the ruling, according to the release. Several inmates under the age of 18 at the time of the offense are working with counsel to determine how to approach the court for judicial reconsideration of their sentences, Garinger said. Some groups announced they believe the governor’s proposal is a good start, but needs to go further. The Massachusetts Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth said in a press release that the proposal does not guarantee a meaningful parole process for juveniles. “Unlike several legislative proposals, the Governor’s proposal does not ensure a meaningful parole process because it does not provide for the right to an attorney or establish

standards for the parole board to consider,” the release stated. “MAFSY is also disappointed that the Governor’s proposal does not eliminate the possibility for children and adolescents to be sentenced to die in prison.” Massachusetts has 59 individuals sentenced as juveniles to die in prison, according to the MAFSY website. MAFSY said it is seeking better alternatives than life in prison without parole for juveniles. “MAFSY looks forward to working with the Administration and the Legislature to address this and other issues to make this legislation a comprehensive solution that will serve Massachusetts and become a model for the nation,” according to the MAFSY press release.

Robbery: From Page 1

tigations. Robbins is working with Brookline Police, who have primary enforcement authority in the area. “Because of the prior series of robberies, we had added Boston University police patrols in the neighborhoods — significantly bolstering coverage,” Brown said. “But, clearly, recent experience suggests that we must — working with public officials — reevaluate current procedures and seek new approaches.” A number of BU students said they are concerned by the latest incident in a string of robberies during the academic year. Sarah Baiz, a second-year Graduate School of Arts and Sciences student, said she is alarmed by the escalation of violence in Tuesday’s robbery. “Knowing that there are actual injuries, that does [worry me], be-

cause it means that they’re getting more violent,” she said. “Before … there weren’t injuries, which means it was more of a scare tactic. This time, they [the robbers] are definitely going after somebody, and they’re willing to hurt.” CAS sophomore Monica Tanouye said she is skeptical of BU’s response. “I’m unsure about how confident I am in the university’s ability to handle a situation because — just as a really stupid small thing — the email that we got today from the police chief, Robbins, there’s a typo in it,” she said. “You can’t even send this email, do this part correctly. How am I supposed to expect you to actually be able to catch someone that’s robbing people and catching people on campus?” Margaret Waterman contributed to the reporting of this article.

Biking up 122 percent between ‘07, ‘09 Bike Safety: From Page 1

www.CollegeFinanceCenter.org The cost of attending college continues to skyrocket, and far too many students are graduating with debt that can cripple them financially for decades. As it becomes more difficult and confusing for consumers to negotiate the multitude of for-profit websites and other programs offering conflicting information about financial aid, the National College Finance Center is a free, first-stop, unbiased resource to help educate students, prospective students, graduates and families all across the country about their options for financing a college education and repaying student loans.

The Daily Free Press Crossword By Mirroreyes Internet Services Corporation ACROSS 1. Inside surfaces of hands 6. Exclamation of regret 10. Central African ethnic group 14. Concept of perfection 15. Synchronize (abbrev.) 16. Mild yellow Dutch cheese 17. Cassia 18. Phnom ____, Cambodia 19. Country in Central America, Costa ____ 20. 2 groups of Caribbean islands 22. Embankments 24. Metal money 25. Fabrics similar to velvet 26. Revenue 29. Bites or pinches 30. Open to question 31. In a seizing manner 37. Small areas of ground 39. Payment (abbrev.) 40. Strange 41. Health resort 44. Native of Finland 45. ____eseed (tastes like licorice) 46. Mini-blackboards

48. Scratching or tearing 52. Shakespearean king 53. End one’s career 54. Marked by tears 58. Attention (abbrev.) 59. Christmas 61. Light, sheer fabric 62. Long, matted fiber 63. Where the sun rises 64. Cars 65. Not his 66. Tiny round marks 67. Model rocket company DOWN 1. Leaning Tower 2. City in Yemen 3. Period of penitence 4. Italian pasta dish 5. Ski race 6. Colorado ski resort 7. Corrosive alkalines 8. Annual (abbrev.) 9. Yiddish for “Move slowly” 10. Mechanism-correcting device 11. Farewell 12. NASCAR or F1 driver 13. Gather 21. Place 23. American anthropologist _____ Clews Parsons 25. Taste for the fine arts 26. Mischievous elves 27. City near Naples Italy

said. “It reinforces the importance not only of better infrastructure, but better enforcement of traffic laws, and enforcement that fosters a culture of safe driving habits and safe bicycling habits.” With bike riding on the rise in the city — ridership increased 122 percent between 2007 and 2009, according to the Mayor’s office — government officials and grassroots groups are beginning to address bike safety. And with the installation of betterprotected biking areas like a raised cycle track, bicycling supporters hope to encourage even greater numbers of Bostonians to bike. Jon Ramos of Planet Southie, a South Boston-based organization that promotes healthy and green living in the area, said in an email commuting by bike is invaluable to the city and its residents. “For many people, myself included, bicycles are the ideal mode of transportation,” he said “Bicycle commuters can reach nearly any part of Boston in less than 30 minutes. The city’s investment in safe bike access would mean a more mobile city, and a healthier city. It’s good exercise and won’t pollute the air we all breathe.”

The intermediate cycle tracks have been proposed to the City of Boston in legislation and may be implemented in the next two years, Armstrong said. MassBike has been involved in proposing two bills that would work to promote bike safety. The Act to Promote Vulnerable Road Users and the Act to Protect Bicyclists in Bike Lanes are awaiting approval at the state level. “We submitted two bills, one being the vulnerable road users bill, which strengthens protection of bicyclists and pedestrians and other vulnerable users of the road,” Armstrong said. “The other bill we filed would ban parking in bike lanes in the city.” These bills, along with the proposal of bike tracks and the improvement to existing bike lanes all are proposed with the goal of making Boston a more comfortable and safe place to ride bikes. “That may be one less car on the road, one less car pulling into and out of parking spaces, so maybe less people decide to buy a car,” Armstrong said. “When you’re in your car, you are shut off from the world. But when you’re on a bike you are observing a little more. You’re more involved with the community.”

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4 7 9 28. Raccoon (slang) 29. _____matics = study of coins and paper money 32. Small shoot or twig 33. Wicked 34. Indominable spirit (slang) 35. Note or verse 36. Cravings 38. Step 42. At-

tached or appended 43. Millisecond 47. Young of insects 48. Collide 49. River of forgetfulness (Greek mythology) 50. Fragrant floral oil 51. Found on birds 52. Persists 54. Final

55. Baseball catchers use this 56. Used in lotions 57. Not more 60. Chinese revolutionary

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Campus & City

Thursday, January 31, 2013

BU students debate SG stance on Iran sanctions By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

While members of Boston University Anti-War Coalition urged Student Government to take a stance against the sanctions in Iran during a debate Wednesday night, members of BU Students for Israel said they wanted to avoid SG making a decision on behalf of all students. “There’s often polarization that happens in politics and I don’t want that on this campus,” said Rachel DuShey, co-president of BU Students for Israel. “It’s not about being polarized — it’s about conversations, it’s about resolutions.” About 50 students went to the Photonics building to hear arguments made for and against SG taking a stand on the sanctions as a voice of the BU population. DuShey, a College of Communication junior, said she attended the debate not to convince any individual to support the sanctions, but rather to urge SG to remain neutral. “I’m just here to show that I don’t believe in someone coming to the table and saying ‘this is what I believe and the thousands of people at this university should agree with me and go in direct opposition to the U.S.,’” she said. “I believe in open discussion beforehand.” Members of the AWC debated to convince SG to take a stance against the U.S. sanctions on Iran. “Last October the United Nations noted that the sanctions were having significant effects on the civilian population [in Iran], includ-

ing an escalation in inflation, price of commodities and energy costs, an increase in the rate of unemployment and a shortage of necessary items, including medicine,” said AWC member Kristen Martin. Martin, a College of Arts and Sciences senior, said students should be concerned about the sanctions because some Iranian civilians directly rely on U.S. economic support for survival. She said one part of the sanctions target Iran’s importation of refined gasoline. Since the U.S. started to target gasoline imports, Iran has been forced to refine its gasoline without the technological ability to do so, which has led to an exacerbation of Iran’s emissions and pollution crisis. Iran’s pollution kills approximately 45,000 Iranians each year according to Tehran’s municipal government, Martin said. DuShey, however, said the sanctions target trade and imports, not the Iranian people. “The sanctions aren’t intended to have harsh effects on the population. I think everyone in this room can agree that negative effects on individuals and civilians is not something that anyone can support,” DuShey said. “However, my question is why the Iranian government doesn’t respond to their people’s suffering.” DuShey said if not for the sanctions, Iran might pose a serious threat to U.S. civilians, which should also be cause for concern.

By John Ambrosio Daily Free Press Staff

GRACE WILSON/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF College of Arts and Sciences senior Jorge Nassau delivers his opening statement on behalf of Boston University’s Students for Israel while College of Arts and Sciences senior Kristen Martin and third-year law student Tyler Willis from the BU Anti-War Coalition take notes.

“There is a serious nuclear threat that Iran poses to civilians,” DuShey said. “Which civilians? Civilians in the U.S., because of the anti-U.S. rhetoric.” Nikitasha Aggarwal, a Sargent College of Rehabilitation Sciences senior, said the debate went well and both sides prepared as best as they could. “The Anti-War Coalition did have a lot of facts and they brought a lot more facts, numbers, data and historical events to the table — to the discussion,” she said. “I wish I heard some more facts from the other BU Students for Israel.” Zach Schwartz, a College of Fine Arts senior and a SG senator, said he appreciated the amount of people who came out to voice their

opinions but had an issue with the idea that, in taking a stand to support wither perspective, SG would be speaking for all of BU. “We in senate have to keep in mind every time we’re here is that we are not only representing ourselves,” he said. “I represent the couple thousand people in the CFA.” He said he wished the event had been publicized earlier and that members of the audience and of SG were given more background information before the debate. “Yes, it was informative, yes they were presenting some empirical stuff,” Schwartz said. “But it would have been even better if we had had, generally, a little bit more context coming in.”

CFA alliance to increase abroad opportunities for artists By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

Members of Boston University’s College of Fine Arts will have more opportunities for overseas work and experiences after an alliance with TransCulture Exchange to be formally announced in February, according to a Tuesday CFA release. The release stated the alliance between BU and TransCulture Exchange will be formally announced Feb. 20 at a press conference and pre-release party titled “A Toast to the World.” TransCulture Exchange gives post-graduate artists like painters, musicians and writers the opportunity to go abroad and live with other artists to develop their skills in a new culture, said Mary Sherman, director of TransCulture Exchange. “TransCulture Exchange is

working with BU to help bridge the gap between academic experience and real world experience,” Sherman said. “We are helping students and faculty make connections with schools and artists around the world.” Sherman said post-graduate art students typically go within their first year after graduating from college, but emerging and seasoned artists can participate in a residency program at any point in their career. Diane Fargo, a full-time faculty member in CFA’s Theater Department, said the opportunities from the alliance will make studying abroad either during or after college more feasible for students who have not been abroad. “We pretty much travel all over the world in my [History of Architecture] class and pique their interest

Locals, developers debate green apt. complex in Allston

so they want to go abroad,” Fargo said. “[The alliance] is fantastic and most students would benefit from a programs like that — even if it is only a week.” If students are unsure about the path they wish to take with their CFA major, this program will help them figure out a plan, Fargo said. BU plans to host the 2013 Conference on International Opportunities in the Arts from Oct. 10 to Oct. 13, according to the release. TransCulture Exchange gathers hundreds of prospective traveling artists, professors and students every two years. “People come because this is the one place they can get this kind of information. There is no other conference like this in the world,” Sherman said. Hailey Markman, a CFA junior who is transferring into COM, said

the trips BU will offer with TransCulture Exchange will allow students to develop as individuals and as artists. “These trips would absolutely make me better because I would be studying alongside someone with the same passion,” she said. “It definitely helps you grow as you collaborate with someone.” Markman said because everything we see around us informs our art — whether writing or singing — having different experiences has helped her add more depth to her final products. “You can’t truly sing a song about having traveled the world with credibility if you haven’t been over the ocean,” Markman said. Laura Hwang, a CFA sophomore studying piano performance, said

CFA, see page4

The Boston Redevelopment Authority held a town hall meeting on Wednesday concerning “The Icon” — the third and final new housing development in The Mount Vernon Company’s Green District in Allston — and faced mixed reactions from locals. The Icon, a five-story, 93,260 square-foot building with 108 parking spots to be constructed on the corner of Brainerd Road and Redford Street, is designed to be the most environmentally friendly housing unit in the city, said Bruce Percelay, chief executive office of the Mount Vernon Company, at the meeting. “We already owned properties in the area and, quite honestly, it was circumstance,” Percelay said. “We bought another one and realized that we were at a critical mass. We wanted to do something constructive with all these units so we decided to create a green culture.” Two buildings have already been built in the green district, and comprise over 215,000 square feet and almost 200 parking spaces. Percelay said other green designs would be added to the complex including electric car charging and Hubway stations. Some residents said they had concerns about the project. “They’re adding too many cars into the neighborhood with this extra parking,” said Matthew Danish, 30, a graduate student in Allston. “The streets are going to get more congested and the air pollution is going to get worse.” The Mount Vernon Company also wants to beautify the area by planting trees and flowers and investing $100,000 in public art for the Green District, Percelay said. Daniel Daly, 43, an electrician in Brighton, said he was concerned the developers were not doing enough to benefit the community with this project. “The owner and developer have a substantial footprint in the neighborhood and he seems to be not so concerned with hiring Boston, specifically Allston-Brighton, residents for his work or supporting community benefits,” Daly said.

BRA, see page4

More students working while enrolled in college full-time, study suggests By Zarah Kavarana Daily Free Press Staff

The results of a study finding an increase in the number of full-time students who are also employed can be attributed to a desire to minimize loans and debts, BU officials said. “If you’ve already invested in schooling, you may want to pay off the rest of the investments,” said Kevin Lang, an economics professor. “Students feel they need to limit their borrowing and therefore earn more of the tuition. And maybe since the labor market is not all that good, they’re getting less support from their parents.” More college students are working jobs while enrolled as full-times students in 2012 than in 2011, according to a study released by the U.S. Census Bureau Thursday. Of the 19.7 million college students in the U.S., 72 percent work at

least a part-time job, the study stated. Among these students, 20 percent worked full-time, year-round jobs. “A lot of people choose to stay in school to avoid the bad labor market,” Lang said. “It may now be becoming more feasible to get part-time employment.” Bethany Sheldon, Student Job Service manager at BU’s Student Employment Office, said students must finance a variety of expenses, including tuition and personal spending money. A number of students also want to gain work experience. “Because BU is located in a city, there are numerous businesses, alumni employers and private citizens who wish to hire students, and there are always new job opportunities available,” Sheldon said. In Massachusetts, fewer than 15 percent of undergraduates worked full-time, year-round, according to

the study. Half of the graduate students worked full-time, while 82 percent worked at least part time. “The Student Employment Job Service has a solid base of repeat employers and our reputation within the Boston community has new employers listing with us on a consistent basis,” Sheldon said. “Last year, employers posted 5,600 jobs with our service.” About 10,000 BU students per year — undergraduate and graduate — are employed in some capacity on campus, Sheldon said. This number has been steady for the past several years. “Along with this financial crisis, a lot of people have lost a lot of efforts, lost savings and at the same time, more people are going back to school, although they maybe weren’t planning on doing so,” said Johannes

Jobs, see page4

GRAPHIC BY MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Students with full-time jobs blame tuition and the poor economy for having to work while attending school.


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Thursday, January 31, 2013

CFA junior: Trips influence art CAS junior: Students work to pay debt early CFA: From Page 3

she likely will not have a chance to go abroad. She said learning that BU and TransCulture Exchange are collaborating makes her hopeful she can study overseas but the cost is holding her back. “I would pay money just to go abroad, but if there was opportunity for me to perform and be an actual musician here, that would be cool,” Hwang said. “... I would want to work as hard as possible to grow as a musician, so it’s appealing that I would be working with professionals.” Hwang said people go abroad to obtain a better understanding of what living in another culture is like, particularly in the musical community “Once students are starting to specialize, that’s a time to go across the pond,” said Caroline Olsen, a

CFA junior studying vocal performance. “It’s really important for musicians to get a global perspective because we’re always going to work with people all over, and we must understand other cultures and the music they create.” Olsen said TransCulture Exchange offers similar opportunities to other programs, but going abroad with this organization will offer a more complete experience for artists. “If you want to very literally learn how to play your instrument better, then I would tell you to not waste your money on a big plane ticket, especially if you’re going to an expensive European city,” Olsen said. “The truth is, music is more than just technique. Music is all about the cultural context and there is no comparison to the depth of understanding you can get from an abroad experience.”

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Guy Who Made the Beeping Stop

Jobs: From Page 3

Schmieder, an economics professor. Schmieder said the increase in students balancing jobs and a fulltime education can be attributed to the recession and failing job market. “If it is a trend, part of the reason might be that schooling is getting so much more expensive,” he said. “I know that trend has been there for a long time, and for a long time tuition has grown much faster than the general GDP has been increasing.” Emma Rosenfeld, a College of Arts and Sciences junior, said stu-

dents are working more to get head start on paying off student debt. “Another reason is for the connections later on,” Rosenfeld said. “And then, also, if your job correlates to your major or what you want to do later in life, it’s great to get that sort of practice.” Rosenfeld said the emphasis on the failing economy in the past ten years is forcing students to get a job sooner in case the job market crashes again. “Some people are trying to save up for loans already,” said Grace O’Connor, a College of General

Studies sophomore. “I go shopping a lot and that’s why I need to work.” O’Connor said she worked throughout last semester to finance her time at BU. Nosakhare Obaseki, a CAS sophomore, said the city environment prompts students to get a job because the lifestyle is more expensive than one provided by colleges in rural areas. “As a college student you want money in your pocket,” Obaseki said. “There are more areas you can go shopping in, so you end up spending more money.”

Cowan not planning to run for office in future Senator: From Page 1

knowledge of the issues facing the people of our Commonwealth to the Senate,” Rep. Ed Markey said in a press release he believes Cowan will continue the work of Kerry and represent the people of the Commonwealth. “I applaud Governor Patrick for his choice of William ‘Mo’ Cowan as interim U.S. Senator,” Markey said. “I know Mo personally and am

confident he will continue the great work of John Kerry and stand up for the values of Massachusetts voters.” David Palmer, professor emeritus of international relations and political science at Boston University, said he was not expecting Cowan to be chosen, and his appointment was a poor decision. “Patrick was probably miffed that [Barney] Frank actually lobbied for the appointment, not that he was go-

ing to choose him anyway,” Palmer said. Patrick said there were many capable candidates for the post. “There were other very capable candidates on the list including [former] Congressman Frank,” he said. “All of whom, because of how capable they were made it a difficult choice, but I am confident that this is the right and best choice for us.”

Project mgr.: citizens concerned about parking issues

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BRA: From Page 3

Lance Campbell, BRA senior project manager, said he would try to mitigate any potentially negative situations. “Right now, for the most part, what we usually hear are parking and density issues,” Campbell said. “We’ve heard that and it’s going to be a case-by-case issue on how to deal with it.” Other residents said the new de-

velopment would have a positive effect on the community. “The BRA has to meet up to the community’s standard and make sure they’re taking care of people living in the immediate area, but as long as they’re being good to people, then I’m all for new development in the area,” said Brian Donoghue, 35, a carpenter in Brighton. Percelay said he would devise solutions to potential problems of The Icon and assured community mem-

bers that their concerns would be addressed. “We’ll be discussing with certain community groups to see if there are ways that we can promote or sponsor their activities,” Percelay said. “As far as the green aspect of the street, they [the community members] haven’t seen what we’re doing because it’s not done, but when they see what we’re doing they’ll feel a lot more comfortable.”

COME MEET ALUMNI AT OUR INFORMATION SEMINAR LILIAN SARFATI, MD ’12 Family Medicine Resident

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Speak with alumni and our admissions staff. Bring your family and friends who are helping you make this important decision; refreshments will be provided.

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For comprehensive consumer information visit www.RossU.edu/med-student-consumer-info 2013 Global Education International. All rights reserved.

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Muse Editor - Meg DeMouth

Music Editor - Lucien Flores

Film/TV Editor - Michela Smith

Lifestyle Editor - Justin Soto

Food Editor - Brooke Jackson-Glidden

REVIEW: Tegan and Sara celebrate at Brighton Music Hall Sydney Moyer MUSE Staff

PHOTO BY SYDNEY MOYER/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

T

Sara Quin of sister duo Tegan and Sarah at Brighton Music Hall.

egan and Sara Quin have been at it for about fifteen years now as steadfast veterans of the indie rock scene. Sunday night, the Canadian twins brough their beloved act to Brighton Music Hall in celebration of the upcoming record, Heartthrob. MTV made an appearance to film the intimate set as part of its “Artist to Watch” series– and the duo is an artistic act to watch indeed. You might call MTV behind the times in branding T&S as up-and-coming, but the band’s newest LP, released just this week via Sire/Warner Bros. Records, marks a significant turn of genre for a band seven albums into crafting its sound.

Tegan Quin recently told Spin that she had always thought of Tegan and Sara as a pop act, and with Heartthrob, there’s no mistaking it. Tracks like “I’m Not Your Hero,” “Drove Me Wild,” and “Closer” feature synth-heavy production, EDMesque backing beats and choruses bigger and bolder than the band’s previous work. Through working with producers like Greg Kurstin (P!nk, Kelly Clarkson) and Mike Elizondo (Dr. Dre, Eminem), the band has realized its pop potential and, it seems, may even make a crossover hit out of Heartthrob. I never thought I’d find myself wanting to dance at a Tegan and Sara show (I admit

PHOTO BY SYDNEY MOYER/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Tegan and Sara released their newest album, Heartthrob, earlier this week.

I may have shed a tear or ten the first time I heard The Con in high school), but the new material seemed to fill Brighton Music Hall on Sunday with an unparalleled energy. The band seemed excited to be with diehard fans, revisiting material as old as 2002’s “Living Room” and taking the time in between songs to answer questions submitted by Twitter followers. Unfortunately, the show had to be cut short because Sara had caught a nasty chest infection that prevented her from singing; because the sisters trade off on vocals, they only played the “Tegan” songs from the catalogue and had Sara sing back up when she could swing it. Even without the full Tegan and Sara

experience, it was undeniably cool to see veterans like T&S in such an intimate setting. Tegan’s famous rambling stage banter filled the gaps between songs with comic relief and, although I had a hard time lifting my elbow in such close quarters among the sold-out crowd, I felt like I had been invited into their living room. Although they’ve been around for a long time, it seems like it’s just the beginning for Tegan and Sara. All I can say is, I’d like to see the likes of Katy Perry or Robyn try to top Heartthrob as one of the best pop records of the year. I know it’s still January, but give it a listen, and I’m sure you’ll share my confidence.

REVIEW: European street art hits the MFA Hannah Landers

W

hen walking the Museum of Fine Art’s halls, the recently added “Art in the Street: European Posters” exhibit immediately sticks out among the oil paintings of stuffy Victorian royals and pristine marble statues of the female form. And with good reason – “Art in the Street” isn’t just trying to catch the eye of the viewer. This exhibit is art with a purpose. This art wants to sell you something. “Art in the Street” features a number of advertising posters from early 20th century Europe. Rooted in the 1890s, these posters appropriated the fine art that had only been accessible in elite museums and salons and brought it to the streets and store windows of France, Germany, Switzerland, Russia and the Netherlands. The exhibit incorporates well-known poster artists like Pierre Bonnard and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec with those from Northern Europe who may not be as familiar to the casual viewer. A far cry from the loud, flashy advertising plastered on MBTA buses or billboards over Kenmore Square, the posters displayed in “Art in the Street” are softer, quieter – yet no less alluring. Used to promote everything from operas (Maurice Dufréne’s “Poster for the Comic Opera, Rayon des Soieries, The Silk Counter,” 1930), art expositions to toothpaste (Niklaus Stoecklin’s Binaca [Toothpaste and Toothbrush], 1941) and alcohol, the posters display a level of finesse that has been all but lost in the modern advertising world so reliant on technology and

MUSE Staff

PHOTOGRAPH © MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON - HENRY S. HACKER EXCHANGE, MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH GIFTS FROM JOHN T. SPAULDING, J.N. STANLEY, HORATIO GREENOUGH CURTIS, MRS. E. VIETOR FROTHINGHAM, L.N. GEBHARD, JEAN GORIANY, DR. HENRY M. PUTNAM, WALTER ROWLANDS, R. CLIPSTON STURGIS, HORACE M. SWOPE, MISS FRANCES ELLIS TURNER, BEQUEST OF MAXIM KAROLIK, AND ANONYMOUS GIFT IN MEMORY OF JOHN G. PIERCE, SR.

Niklaus Stoecklin’s “Binaca” (1941)

computer-generated images. However, grouping the posters summarily into one broadly defined category presumes too much, as the exhibit, stretched along a first floor corridor, does boast a certain stylistic diversity.

PHOTOGRAPH © MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON - LEE M. FRIEDMAN FUND

Maurice Dufréne’s “Poster for the Comic Opera, Rayon des Soieries, The Silk Counter” (1930)

For example, Jules Chéret’s art nouveau poster for the French comedic opera “Les Brigands” employs curvy orange lettering and flowing lines to create a sword-wielding hero, while just a few feet away, Kurt Schwitters’ and Theo van Doesburg’s nonsensical Dadaist work marks a stark difference. Their

poster, made for a performance art piece, is only a hodgepodge of black-and-white letters and symbols. The exhibit even features several examples of photomontage, most notably in Anton Lavinsky’s movie poster for the Russian film “Battleship Potemkin,” which features a photo of a black and white soldier over two menacing battleship cannons on either side, all against a striking yellow background. “Art in the Street” also ventures into a more simplistic realm, featuring several Swiss “object posters.” Peaking in popularity during and after World War II, these posters dismiss text in favor of bold depictions of a product. Swiss artist Niklaus Stoecklin did this best in his 1941 poster featuring only a bright pink toothbrush and a yellow tube of Binaca toothpaste in a clear glass. The exhibit ultimately lives up to its name. Visiting “Art in the Street” feels more like strolling the streets of a turn-of-the-century European city than walking through a museum. Each poster, unique in its content and style, is not only promoting a brand or a ticket to a theater performance, but also promoting the idea of art’s universality ­— the idea that it should not be limited to those who can afford to access it. “Art in the Street: European Posters” will run at the MFA through July 21, 2013. The MFA is open Saturday – Tuesday from 10 am to 4:45 pm and Wednesday – Friday from 10 am to 9:45 pm, and admission to the museum is free to all BU students.


6T

hursday, january

31, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 9

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Page Editor

Kaylee Hill Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

The rise of unpaid internships

It’s safe to say (and The New York Times said it Wednesday) that interning has become the norm. These days, college students typically graduate with an internship or two under their belt. Not just because work experience is a good thing to have — internships can act as a crucial segue into the workplace — but because it’s expected that job applicants already have it, or they won’t get hired in today’s increasingly competitive workplace. With that expectation, of course, has come a serious growth in the pool from which companies offering internships have to choose applicants. A larger pool means greater competition, as students are desperate to fill their resume — even if it means working for free. But after the Department of Labor declared, in 2010, that unpaid internships are illegal, according to the New York Times, companies have begun to take advantage of this high demand for work experience and avoided legal liabilities by offering work in return for college credit. Is this fair, though? Unpaid internships seem to equip students for success in obtaining employment in the future. But as much as they provide students with the chance to enhance their resume while also making networking connections, unpaid positions also hinder a student’s ability to stand on his or her own feet sooner rather than later. We’re forced to live at home, or hold other paying jobs on the side.

Moreover, only students with other sources of incomes or parents to support them can accept an unpaid offer. In some ways, the unpaid system only benefits the wealthy, furthering the divide between those with privilege or a leg-up and those without. The Times also critiqued the “academic internship,” in which colleges get tuition to not teach students but rather place them in an internship for which students will get credit. This is what the Boston University Internship Programs abroad do, which means that tuition for an Internship Program is essentially free money for the university. As The Times explained: it’s not just that students receive no wages, it’s that they’re actually receiving a “negative wage.” They are paying BU to receive credit, but they’re not going to class. They are going to work. This is almost exploitative. On the other hand, it’s almost necessary. As more and more soon-to-be-graduates seek job experience in the form of internships, it becomes a.) more crucial that students land a position and b.) more difficult for companies to hire so many applicants. There simply isn’t that much money to go around. Offering unpaid internships, therefore, benefits the student in that it allows them to get experience in offices where there would otherwise be no budget for them. Additionally, unpaid internships are perhaps slightly less competitive than those that offer a salary.

Oprah has publicly chosen The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, by debut novelist Ayana Mathis, as her latest book pick. We here at the Ol’ Free Press wondered what the schools of BU would declare as their favorite read… • • • • • • • •

COM: Bossypants by Tina Fey SMG: Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand CGS: Anything by Dr. Seuss ENG: Books ... what are books? Just kidding. Something by Isaac Newton. SHA: Rachael Ray’s cookbooks BU Athletics: doesn’t read anything but Sports Illustrated. STH: The Bible The FreeP: the works of Hunter S. Thomp-

son

Fat boy in a skinny world SANDOR MARK

There are two things you need to know about me. One: I’m fat — not husky, not bigboned, not stocky — fat. Two: I’m ambivalent about it. And I’ve embraced the ambivalence; I see the good and the bad, the bad being the health problems and the social constraints. The good is the humor and pointed observations that come from having a fat guy’s perspective on the world. Extra weight is really a kind of privilege. I can say stuff that others can’t and people will just say, “Oh, that’s just how he is. He’s just jolly.” Yes, jolly. Just like every “buddy” movie with a fat best friend, the guy who always makes the indecent remarks and does more damage than he’s worth. The Hangover, Animal House, Bachelor Party, Good Luck Chuck are all examples of movies with prominent fat guy characters who act like jerks and idiots, talk about things that shouldn’t be mentioned in front of children and make everyone laugh hysterically — all because they’re fat. For the most part, that’s the fat guy’s function in society: to be amusing, and to make neurotic though truthful insights, always as a kind of outsider looking in. If you’re a fat guy reading this and you don’t think this function applies to you, either reexamine your friendships or put a shirt on at the pool party. And stop telling people how much you benched at the gym yesterday — I know you’re lying and everyone else knows it too. It’s a fact that media has created an image that fat guys really haven’t strayed too far from in the last 30 years. It’s becoming increasingly difficult for fat guys to create a personality that isn’t comparable to some character from movie. For a while, people told me I was just like George Costanza from Seinfeld, which I guess is true. His neuroticism was perfect for the concurrent Jewish angst I experienced throughout my overweight adolescence, especially when it came to girls. (“Yes she wants me to like her, if she likes me! But she doesn’t like me!”) My friends look at me like: “I don’t know what you’re parents did to you.” There is something about being fat and being a man that gives one access to a platform of judgment that isn’t available to anybody else. We could insult the president to his face, so long as we did it with our outlandishly fat humor. No one would care, not even Joe Biden. And by the way, Uncle Joe’s political career could really benefit from gaining 40 or 50 pounds — anything that gets him closer to Chris Christie. We have this privilege because we’re creatures of ambiguity. On the one hand,

we are rarely taken seriously. But then, at the same time, our words carry weight. We’re modern day jesters. But it’s time for a confession. As much as I enjoy the high platform of pointed sarcasm upon which I sit, as much as I need a dose of eye-rolling to get through the day, these acts all come from a deep sense of insecurity. Shocker, I know. But I think too many people look at fat guys as these entities that rise above the jokes. The myth is that once guys get past a certain age, body image isn’t that big of a deal to us — like we’re laughing along with everyone else. Let me tell you: that’s just false. Ladies, you aren’t the only ones that stress and worry and self-destruct over weight issues. Yes, you can practically bounce coins off our bellies. But that doesn’t mean we’re impenetrable. Snarky jabs at our weight, even ones that aren’t meant to hurt our feelings, make us cringe and make us feel a sense of failure to live up to some ridiculous image of physical perfection. It’s a constant anxiety of my own and I’m sure that a lot of guys feel the same way. We loathe the way we look and we think that other people loathe our physical appearance as much as we do. Sometimes, unfortunately, our fears come true. Once when I was 11, my mom told me I was an embarrassment because of my weight — it kind of bummed me out; middle school was bad enough. Now I don’t want to make this issue sound overly dramatic, because it’s not. But there are day-to-day experiences that are terrifying for fat guys: too many people on an elevator or the BUS, or those desks in CAS that feel like they were designed for Kate Moss. When these situations arise we usually handle them in one specific way: humor. Because if we can turn an awkward situation into a laughable moment, we’ve taken the bite out of the beast. So this is my goal. I want to educate and elucidate what it’s like to be a fat boy in a skinny world — and I want to do it honestly. I want to talk about the emotional pain that comes with the hilarity of being overweight in a world that is obsessed with looking a certain way. Don’t worry, it’s not going to be as serious as it sounds. I’ll try my best to make my words induce sidesplitting laughter, and if that’s all I accomplish by the end of the semester, I’ll consider my time well spent. But hopefully by the end, I’ll have hit upon some truths. Sandor Mark is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences, and a guest columnist for the Daily Free Press. He can be reached at smark@bu.edu.

LAST CHANCE!!! CALLING ALL COLUMNISTS! Apply for a weekly position in the FreeP by FRIDAY. Email three 800-word samples to letters@dailyfreepress.com


Thursday, january 31, 2013

7

BU consistently showing incredible shooting skills from beyond arc Notebook: From Page 8

nonconference schedule. “There could definitely be an America East team on our schedule next year or in the future,” Jones said. The Terriers’ final game as a member of America East will be Feb. 28 against Stony Brook University. From deep! A team that generally lacks size or a traditional “big man,” BU makes up for its physical shortcomings with strong 3-point shooting. BU currently leads America East in 3-point field goal percentage (.380) as well as 3-point field goals made (168). “Offensively, besides the Stony Brook

game, we have played very well,” Jones said. “We shoot the highest field goal percentage in the league and the highest field goal percentage from ‘3-point land’ in the league. I think we have gotten really comfortable with each other.” Uncharacteristically, BU went 0-for9 from behind the arc in its game against University of Maryland-Baltimore County, but Jones said he blames the fatigue after BU’s overtime game against University at Albany and a lack of preparation. Freshman guard John Papale leads the Terriers in 3-point field goals made with 43, while junior guard D.J. Irving and junior forward Travis Robinson are not far behind with 37 and 35 respectively.

‘Like’

Maturity The Terriers began their season on a five-game losing streak that has long been forgotten. Even with the slow start Jones remained calm, assuring everyone that he understood and even anticipated a slow start with such a young team. Now, however, the young Terrier team is beginning to find its confidence and was recently able to break the .500 mark for the first time this season. “Overall, guys have gotten more comfortable playing with each other,” Jones said. “Guys are really starting to play with a lot of confidence.” BU has no seniors on scholarship and is captained by three juniors — Irving, Rob-

inson and junior forward Dom Morris. Playoffs Restricted from playing in the America East Championship tournament this year, BU will have to find another outlet for postseason play, such as the NIT tournament. Even with a chance at a postseason birth, Jones said he wants his team to worry about the game at hand and take the season one day at a time. “We definitely want to play in the postseason, that’s the goal for us. But we can’t worry about which tournament we get to. We have eight games left and we just want to worry about being our best in those eight games.”

Six games left before playoffs Women’s hockey: From Page 8

The Daily Free Press Sports Section on Facebook

Moore, Nwakamma among players Terriers must cease Men’s basketball: From Page 8

Obviously, we don’t want a guy going for 20 against us. Nwakamma is a good player, so we don’t want to leave him open, but we don’t want their 3-point shooters getting wide open looks either.” Another potential threat for the Hawks is guard Yolonzo Moore II, who is the second leading scorer for Hartford. He is averaging 10.5 points per game in addition to leading the team in

3-point percentage (.432) and assists (51). But BU has the potential to counter Moore’s 3-point prowess with its own league-leading 3-point shooting. BU currently leads America East in 3-point percentage (.380) and 3-pointers made (168). Tipoff on Saturday is set for 7 p.m. at Chase Arena at Reich Family Pavilion.

BU matching up against best 3-point defense in conference Women’s basketball: From Page 8

offensive glass, grabbing 31 offensive rebounds. During the Jan. 5 game, Smith was the Hawks’ top performer, gathering 16 points while grabbing nine rebounds, falling just short of a double-double. “[Smith] has some tough post moves,” Greenberg said. “We will have to talk about it. But we can’t just talk about her. We have to focus on all of their key players.” Bepko has also been strong this season when she is in the lineup. The 5-foot-9 guard is tied with Smith at 10.8 points per game. Bepko battled an ankle injury for about a month and missed seven games for the Hawks, which included the matchup against the

Terriers. Since returning from the injury, Bepko has played as strong as she was before. Against the University of New Hampshire, she dropped 17 points, nine of which came from behind the 3-point arc. She also went 6-for-6 from the foul line. Along with a strong offensive unit, Hartford also shows strong numbers on defense. The Hawks hold opponents to an average of 55.3 points per game. Their most obvious threat to the Terriers is 3-point defense. While the Terriers have shot an America East-best 36.4 percent from behind the arc, the Hawks are one of the toughest teams to score the three on, allowing just 29.7 percent of 3-point attempts to go in.

we can get this win because this is one of those games that’s important,” Durocher said. “Northeastern’s a team that’s right at or right under the teams under consideration for the NCAA [tournament].” Six games away from the end of the regular season, the game against NU has implications for both hometown glory and national standing. “With national standing, when you’re in a nice location in the top five or 10 teams, every game you try to keep yourself there,” Durocher said. “With local pride, anytime we play Harvard [University], [Boston College] or Northeastern, the kids certainly get to know each other … There’s always that extra pride because of their relationships and knowledge with each other.” If anything, Durocher said he hopes Saturday will enhance BU’s place against rival No. 2 Boston College. “We need to keep putting together wins. We don’t get the automatic bid by winning Hockey East. We have a good body of work, and we want to earn our way in,” Durocher said. “And last but not least, we’re in a good race with Boston College right now. [If we] keep pace with them and keep pressuring them … we could come up in the regular season.”

JACKIE ROBERTSON/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Junior Louise Warren has stepped up her game a notch in the new year.

Follow us on Twitter: @DFPSports @ BOShockeyblog @BUbballBlog


Quotable

We’re in a good race with Boston College right now.

-BU coach Brian Durocher on his team’s position in the Hockey East standings

Page 8

Sports

Dominant

The Daily Free Press

Junior forward Dom Morris is playing excellent basketball down the stretch for the Terriers. P.8.

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

Thursday, January 31, 2013

Terriers prepare for another game vs Hartford By Michael Bagarella Daily Free Press Staff

The Boston University men’s basketball team will start its final tour of the America East Saturday afternoon in West Hartford, Conn., when it plays University of Hartford for the second time this season. In their first meeting of the 2012-13 season, Hartford (11–9, 4–3 America East) defeated BU (11–10, 5–3 America East) at Case Gymnasium, 77–74. The game was close for the first half and into the second half until BU started to pull away. After a 3-pointer from sophomore forward Malik Thomas at 11:37 in the second half, the Terriers had their largest lead of the game, ahead of Hartford by a score of 57–49. But it went downhill from there for BU. With five minutes to go in the game, the Hawks went on a run that ended the Terriers’ lead and eventually buried a BU squad that had been consistently playing poorly at the end of games. “We didn’t close the game out,” said BU coach Joe Jones of the matchup. “We turned them over, but we didn’t get stops when we needed, so overall we didn’t defend great.” Junior guard D.J. Irving led the Terriers with 17 points in the game, while freshman guard John Papale added 14. BU was heavily outrebounded and outplayed down the stretch. Junior forward Dom Morris, the second highest scorer on the season for BU, had only four rebounds and eight

points. This time around, The Terriers have momentum — in part thanks to Morris performing at the top of his game — and the Hawks are starting to stumble. “I think we are better now than a month ago when we played them,” Jones said. “We have definitely played much better since then, outside the Stony Brook game.” Since its last loss to Hartford, BU has gone 5–1 in America East play, only losing to Stony Brook University (16–7, 7–1 America East) Jan. 15. In the six-game span, BU defeated the University at Albany on the road in overtime while also making quick work of low-ranked teams such as Binghamton University, University of MarylandBaltimore County and the University of New Hampshire. Morris is coming off one of his strongest performances of the season. He led a sluggish BU team with 19 points in a victory over UMBC. On the other hand, Hartford has gone 2–3 since its last meeting against BU. The Hawks lost to both Albany (16–7, 5–4 America East) and UMBC (4–16, 2–5 America East). Hartford center Mark Nwakamma leads the Hawks in scoring and rebounding, averaging 14.4 points per game and 5.4 boards. In the last meeting, BU controlled Nwakamma and forced him into turning the ball over early in the game. In the Jan. 5 matchup, Hart-

Men’s basketball saying goodbye to America East By Michael Bagarella Daily Free Press Staff

13 points and four rebounds. “We changed them around a lot and those guys got open,” Jones said. “We just have to do a better job of keeping guys in front of us.

Farewell Tour When the Boston University men’s basketball team travels to Hartford, CT. Saturday, it will officially begin its final go-around as a member of the America East Conference. After this season, all BU sports — with the exception of men’s and women’s ice hockey, which will remain in the prestigious Hockey East — will move from the America East to the Patriot League. Since joining the America East in 1979, BU (11–10, 5–3 America East) has made the NIT four times (2002-2005) and the NCAA tournament once as a 16-seed in 2011 when it lost to then-No. 1 University of Kansas in the first round. At one point, current University of Louisville head coach and former Boston Celtics head coach Rick Pitino, coached the Terriers. “A lot of the coaches in this league are guys that I have been friends with a long time,” said BU coach Joe Jones. “Situations happen. I don’t know if any of the coaches were involved, but people made decisions.” Even though the team will no longer be part of the in-conference schedule, there is a high likelihood that Terrier fans will see America East teams on the BU

Men’s basketball, see page 7

Notebook, see page 7

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Junior forward Dom Morris put up 19 points in BU’s game against UMBC.

ford’s scoring came from unlikely sources in sophomores Wes Cole and Nate Sikma. Cole, averaging 6.6 points per game, put up 22 points against BU. Sikma, averaging 6.7 points per game, scored 19. Nwakamma recorded

BU expects high level of play from Huskies Women’s basketball trying to start new streak By Kira Cole Daily Free Press Staff

The No. 4 Boston University women’s hockey team meets Northeastern University at Walter Brown Arena this Saturday before taking on the Huskies yet again in the Beanpot semifinal. Having not suffered a loss in its last 13 games, BU (17–3–3, 12–2–1 Hockey East) coach Brian Durocher said the team needs to be careful to not become overconfident. “Sometimes when you get on a good streak, you always worry that someday the stars aren’t going to line up,” Durocher said. “The fact we’ve got a couple wins over Northeastern (14–9–2, 8–6–1 Hockey East) — sometimes instincts don’t let you get as jazzed up or you take something for granted.” Durocher said Northeastern is a team to be reckoned with, and forwards Kendall Coyne, Casey Pickett, Rachel Llanes and Brittany Esposito lead a solid team with great chemistry on the ice. “When you can rattle off three or four names of all-star players, you know they have some depth and can score goals,” Durocher said. Despite their wining streak, Durocher said the Terriers have to be cognizant of their performance on the ice last Saturday. “I feel like we’ve had a number of games where we’ve been looking to run

and break out of the zone,” Durocher said. “We still should have been thinking about defending the front of our net.” On Oct. 16, BU beat NU 4–1, but when the teams met on Jan. 16, BU barely snuck by with a 5–4 win. “Early in the year, we caught them by surprise. But they were here in the second game,” Durocher said. “It was right down to the wire, and it ended up being a one-goal game. They came back late in the game with a couple of goals and got a pretty darn good look to tie the game.” Beyond BU’s all-stars, Durocher said junior Louise Warren, freshman Jordan Juron and freshman Lillian RibeirinhaBraga have been playing well, and he hopes their performance continues to improve as the season draws to a close. “Louise Warren has really stepped up her game. Jordan had a nice weekend and is hopefully continuing with that same confidence. Ribeirinha-Braga played a very good game on Sunday,” Durocher said. “There are plenty of others, but those are a few who’ve done a real nice job recently” Independent of the upcoming Beanpot tournament, Durocher said the game against the Huskies Saturday has its own importance. “What you try to do in this game is not worry about Tuesday … but let’s see if Women’s hockey, see page 7

The Bottom Line

Thursday, Jan. 31

No Events Scheduled On Antawn Jamison’s website, he has a bio written by his mother, who spells his name as “Antwan” several times....

Friday, Feb. 1

M. Hockey @ UMass, 7 p.m. Track @ Collegiate Invitational, All Day

By Andrew Battifarano Daily Free Press Staff

While the Boston University women’s basketball team could not overcome the University at Albany and win its 14th straight game, the Terriers (17–4, 7–1 America East) resumed their winning ways by defeating the University of Maryland-Baltimore County Saturday and have regained a bit of momentum to ride as they face the University of Hartford. Junior forward Rashidat Agboola and senior guard Chantell Alford combined for 39 points to stick the dagger in the Retrievers (6–14, 2–5 America East). The win gave BU coach Kelly Greenberg a milestone 250th career win as a head coach. After a week off, the Terriers seek to win their second straight game against another America East foe, this time taking on the Hawks (13–7, 4–3 America East). “I think the timing is perfect for us,” Greenberg said. “It gave us three days off. Good time for us preparing against our conference, and especially a game against one of our rivals.” Hartford is a familiar adversary for the Terriers, as the two met earlier this season on Jan. 5. In that game, BU defeated the Hawks in a low-scoring affair, taking the victory by a score of 45–39. Although most of the Terriers had trouble scoring, Agboola did not have a problem. She posted a career-high 26 points in

Saturday, Feb. 2

W. Basketball v. Hartford, 12 p.m. W. Hockey v. Northeastern, 3 p.m. M. Basketball @ Hartford, 7 p.m. Track @ Collegiate Invitational, All Day

Sunday, Feb. 3

the contest while shooting 52 percent from the field. As a team, the Terriers shot 35.4 percent. The BU defense held strong, however, only allowing 15 field goals. It held the Hawks to a mere 30.6 percent shooting. “The first game really doesn’t mean much,” Greenberg said. “ Both teams battled and played tough.” Although Hartford dropped that game against the Terriers, the team won four out of its last five, staying in the upper ranks of the America East Conference. The Hawks are currently in third place behind Albany (16–3, 8–0 America East) and BU. “They’re a great team,” Greenberg said. “They’re extremely competitive and wellcoached.” Having shown especially strong play at points in the season, Hartford might pose a threat to BU’s chances of taking the America East regular season title. The Hawks’ offense has been one of the best in the conference, scoring 56.3 points per game while shooting at 39.3 percent — third best in the conference in both categories. This offense is led in large part by forward Nikkia Smith and guard Amber Bepko. Smith is tied for the team-best with 10.8 points per game on 47.5 percent shooting from the field. She is one of the best at the charity stripe as well, sinking 82.5 percent of her free throws. Smith has also been impressive on the

No Events Scheduled ...Observers expressed their shock at Mrs. Jamison’s inability to spell such a common name.

Women’s basketball, see page 7

Monday, Feb. 4 M. Hockey Beanpot v. Northeastern, 6 p.m.


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