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The Daily Free Press [

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue II

LAY DOWN THE LAW New LAW tower under construction, page 3.

Thursday, January 17, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

TUNE IN

MUSE suggests the concerts and movies not to miss, page 5.

]

www.dailyfreepress.com

HATS OFF

Lefort’s hat trick earns women’s hockey a win, page 8.

WEATHER Today: Partly cloudy/High 41 Tonight: Snow showers late/Low 15 Tomorrow: 26/20 Data Courtesy of weather.com

MBTA fare evasion citations increase by 40 percent BU Admissions By John Ambrosio Daily Free Press Staff

Although overall crime committed in the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority system has diminished, the MBTA reported a 40-percent increase in the number of citations given for fare evasions in 2012. MBTA transit police officers issued 4,753 citations in 2012, compared to 3,428 in 2011, MBTA officials said. Transit Police Superintendent-in-Chief Joseph O’Connor said the evasion fine has also increased. “On July 1, the fine for fare evasion was increased from $15 to $50 for a first offense,” he said. “And we felt that, at that time, it was a good time to put more resources into the issue, which resulted in a 40-percent increase in the number of citations.” The MBTA instituted “Operation Fare Game” in July 2012 to crack down on fare evaders. O’Connor said the MBTA Transit Police Department’s increased efforts were influenced by customer demands. He said customers complained about an inordinate number of fare evaders at a public meeting in November. “Last year during the fare increase hearings we heard loud and clear from customers that they had observed people fare evading and their displeasure with that,” O’Connor said. O’Connor said most Bostonians believe fares should be fairly enforced. “The vast majority of people realize the importance of public transportation and fares are

sees 20-percent increase in apps. By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

ports are available for people in need.” Mass. Sen. John Keenan said he is pleased with many of Patrick’s proposals, including the push to increase funding to mental health programs. “I also hope that this will be only the beginning of a serious conversation about the status of our mental health system,” Keenan said in a statement. “The Governor today takes an important step towards promoting public safety, but there is a need for broader conversation.” These legislative measures come after a wave of mass shootings accross the country. On Dec. 14 a shooting occurred at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. where 20 children and six adults were fatally shot. In July, a shooter in Aurora, Colo. took the lives of 20 people and injured 58 others at a movie theater. The National Rifle Association, issued a

Boston University received about 20 percent more applicants for the fall 2013 semester than it did the previous year, BU officials said. BU received a record-breaking 52,532 applications, of which 51,036 were regular decision and 1,496 were early decision, said BU spokesman Colin Riley in an email. There were 44,006 applicants for the fall 2012 semester, 8,526 fewer than this year. This reflects a 19.3 percent increase from application for fall 2012 admission, Riley Said. Despite the number of applicants, the incoming Class of 2017 will not be larger than previous years, Riley said. “Based on a projected incoming class of 3,800, we will be more selective,” he said. In 2012, BU accepted about 45 percent of applicants. 634 students were offered admission early decision for the Class of 2017. Riley said the majority of applications were to the College of Arts and Sciences as it is the largest school. While final statistics regarding where applicants are from have not been computed, the majority of applications came from New York, New Jersey, California and Massachusetts. Riley said more widespread knowledge of BU’s quality contributed to the spike in applications. “The quality of our programs, our international reputation and the global experience our students receive are factors,” he said. “Our outreach to high schools and our social media efforts contributed as well. Applications from international students increased significantly, and the diversity of our applicant pool grew with notable increases in applications from African American and Hispanic/Latino students.” Violet Walsh, an applicant from Kamiak High School in Mulkiteo, Wash., said she was attracted to the quality of education at BU. “When I visited, I met with people at the School of Education and I liked the facilities, such as the daycare and the area around SED,” she said. “I like the research going on there and the SED offers great programs.” Walsh said she learned about BU through relatives that attended the school and by visiting Boston. “I fell in love with the city so I started looking at east-coast schools and BU always came up,” she said. “If I get into the program and decide I do not want to be a teacher, there are a

Gun control, see page 2

Admissions, see page 2

SARAH FISHER/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

MBTA T fare evasion citations in 2012 are up 40 percent from 2011.

part of the funding source for the MBTA, and that anyone that truly cares about public transportation would not be involved in that type of campaign,” O’Connor said. A number of customers said they are happy the MBTA Transit Police Department is cracking down on fare hoppers. Aurora Case, a frequent rider of the T, said she was annoyed by the number of people who do not pay for public transportation.

“It never really seemed fair to me that some people would just circumvent the rules like that,” she said. “I am glad the MBTA Transit Police have started to go after fare hoppers more. It makes me feel like I’m finally being rewarded for following the rules.” Jennifer O’Neill, 37, a Boston resident that rides the T to work regularly, said she agrees with the increased penalty for evaders.

Fare evasion, see page 2

Gun control legislation offered on a state and national level By Regine Sarah Capungan Daily Free Press Staff

With the gun control debate eliciting reform in Washington, D.C. and Massachusetts, a number of individuals welcome the new restrictions and want to see more control on firearms, whereas others fear drastic alterations to their second amendment rights. On Wednesday, U.S. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden unveiled a series of 23 executive actions as well as a legislative plan to decrease gun violence. The provisions include a mandatory background check for all gun owners to ensure that criminals and mentally ill people do not have access to guns, a ban of high-capacity magazines and a ban of assault weapons. In a press conference Wednesday morning at the White House, Obama said the majority of the American people support his proposal. “I also believe most gun owners agree that we can respect the Second Amendment

while keeping an irresponsible, law-breaking few from inflicting harm on a massive scale,” Obama said. “I believe most of them agree that if America worked harder to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people, there would be fewer atrocities like the one that occurred in Newtown.” Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick also filed gun safety legislation for the Commonwealth on Wednesday, seeking to close loopholes and require gun purchasers to go through background checks at gun shows, reduce access to high-powered rounds of ammunition and give more funding to mental health programs. “Both proactively, and in the wake of too many tragedies, I have filed legislation to tackle the problem of gun violence and illegal firearm possession,” Patrick said in a statement. “Today, we do so again, along with an important investment in mental health programs. Mental illness is a disease that can be treated, and our communities are safer when the appropriate services and sup-

Mayor Menino to cut down on panhandling in Boston after many complaints By Clinton Nguyen Daily Free Press Staff

To the displeasure of local panhandlers, an ordinance restricting panhandling in potentially dangerous sections of Boston will be proposed next week in front of the city council, officials said. Sheila Dillon, director of the Department of Neighborhood Development, said City Council will hold public hearings for the proposed ordinance, and if it passes, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino will sign it. “The ordinance will limit aggressive panhandling and it will place some limitation on where panhandling will take place, based on safety concerns,” Dillon said. Jauvhon Price, a panhandler who opens doors for customers in front of the Kenmore Square 7-Eleven, said he hopes panhandling is not restricted in the city. “At least I’m doing something for someone,” Price said. “I’m not robbing or stealing. I’m only asking, and the person I’m asking can say yes or no. I’ve got no shame in my game.”

Price said in his year-and-a-half of panhandling, he usually gets nominal amounts of money — typically a few cents or a dollar. One day before Christmas, Price said he got a $100 bill. The timetable for when this ordinance could go into effect is hazy, and the legislative process could mean passage will not occur for a few months, Dillon said. This proposal came after an influx of complaints about aggressive panhandlers during 2012. The mayor’s 24-hour constituent service line received 787 calls about panhandling between January and November of 2012, Dillon said. These numbers spurred Menino’s office to set up a task force several months ago to address the problem, she said. Through aggressive action by groups such as the American Civil Liberties Union, panhandling has been largely held up as a constitutional right. Dillon said Menino is not looking to impede rights, but simply looking to ensure

Panhandling, see page 2

JACKIE ROBERTSON/DAILY FREE PRESS FILE

Boston Mayor Thomas Menino plans to create zones for panhandling after complaints.


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Thursday, January 17, 2013

Councilor Ross targets roadway panhandling High school senior: Options, size Panhandling: From Page 1

safety for residents of Boston. “I really need to state that panhandling is a protected free speech activity under the Constitution,” Dillon said. “The mayor is a champion for the poor, and he’s not looking to limit people’s rights.” Councilor Michael Ross, of the Fens, said he agreed with Menino that action needed to be taken against aggressive panhandling. “The area that needs to be looked at is people walking on roadways,” he said. “There are areas where it’s really dangerous to be selling flowers or asking for money.” Ross also said the focus of the ordinance is not to restrict people’s rights to free speech, but rather to address safety concerns from citizens. “No one is trying to stop people from panhandling. That’s their right,” Ross said. “If we’re going forward, it’s to stop people from walking on dangerous roadways.” In his statement in the press release, Menino said the recent swing in panhandling can largely be attrib-

uted to the loss of substance abuse rehabilitation programs and mental health programs. Dr. Stephen Brady, director of the mental health and behavioral medicine program at Boston University, said one-third of the homeless population suffers from mental illness, and at least half have had a history with substance abuse. But Brady said he disagreed with the idea that the lack of rehabilitative programs and institutions are wholly to blame for the population of aggressive panhandlers. “This is a complex problem that relates to the availability of mental health and substance abuse treatment, and the migration of mentally ill people to bigger cities,” he said. “There’s never just one reason, and it’s naïve to think it’s just that simple.” Large cities with burgeoning homeless populations, such as San Francisco and New York, already have laws in place to restrict or constrain aggressive panhandling, Brady said. The city council of Colorado Springs instituted a panhandling ban

in 2012, but legal action has temporarily lifted the ban. The mayor’s office is not only putting together the ordinance, but it is also planning to work with nonprofits to increase community outreach and awareness, Dillon said. “We’re going to release a public education campaign about panhandling so that people panhandling won’t be vilified,” Dillon said. “But those who want to be generous will be able to give, but under safer conditions. We’re going to try to educate the public on better ways to help.” Lars Thorson, a sophomore at the Berklee School of Music, said he panhandles — busking is the term her prefers — by playing the violin on the street for cash. He said he understands a need to cut down on panhandling, but doesn’t want to see an ordinance that will cut down on spots to play. “I fully agree that people begging on the street for money is a pain,” he said. “But busking is different, its a way for us to get out and play and interact with people. I don’t think it’s hurting anybody.”

attract applicants to BU campus

biotechnology, biochemistry, biophysics and all aspects of biology,” Walton said. “It’s a really strong [biology] program so I can to be able to explore something that I want to do for the rest of my life.” Walton said he hopes to go to a larger university because he attends a small high school. Christine Tabora, of Miami, who is applying to transfer to BU after graduating from a 2-year program in the Honors College at Miami Dade College, said she is excited by the opportunities presented at BU. “I chose BU because of its location first of all, and its curriculum,” Tabora said. “Networking as well in Boston is amazing, and there are incredible research opportunities in psychology because there are so many schools in Boston.” Tabora said she applied to transfer to BU as an incoming junior in the fall. Acceptance decisions will be sent out April 1, Riley said.

Admissions: From Page 1

lot of options and it’s a great school for exploring many things” The size of BU is also a major factor in drawing in applicants, she said. “Some of the schools I applied to have smaller campuses, and some of the schools really push the idea of having very individual learning experiences which is funny for me,” Walsh said. “It’s a bigger school and I’ll have a chance to be in big lectures without constantly being in a small environment with the same people.” Russell Walton, a resident of Carlisle and a Concord-Carlisle Regional High School senior who applied to BU, said the size of BU will help him decide on a career. Walton said he is interested in biology, and BU offers a number of opportunities that can help him decide on a specialty. “With a school like BU they don’t just have biology; there is

NRA to focus on safety, repairing mental health system Gun control: From Page 1

statement Wednesday responding to Obama’s proposal. “The NRA will continue to focus on keeping our children safe and securing our schools, fixing our broken mental health system, and prosecuting violent criminals to the fullest extent of the law,” stated the response. A number of students agree with the gun control laws and believe

they are a step in the right direction. Megan McGoldrick, a Boston University College of COmmunication senior, said new measures are needed after the recent shootings. “It’s [the implementation of gun control legislation] a good idea,” she said. “The background check is definitely something that can, hopefully, decrease violence. With everything that’s been happening, some action needs to be taken.”

Michael Melkonian, a CAS senior, said legislators must be wary of violating Second Amendment rights, but some form of action must be taken to reduce the potential for violence. “They [gun control laws] should not violate Second Amendment rights,” he said. “But not letting people like [Adam Lanza] and [James Holmes] get thousands of rounds with no one knowing [is important].”

T riders happy to see Transit Police crack down Fare evasion: From Page 1

“It is a good thing that they raised the fine,” she said. “Especially since the fares went up. I don’t want to be paying more when someone else isn’t paying anything.”   Despite the increase in fare evasions, the MBTA reported a significant drop in crime in 2012. The crime statistics, released

Tuesday, showed an 11-percent decrease in serious crimes, which include homicide, rape, aggravated assaults, robbery, auto theft, burglary and arson. MBTA Transit Police Chief Paul MacMillan said the decrease was promising, but improvements still need to be made. “While we have had success in

decreasing overall theft, bicycle theft continues to be a concern for us,” MacMillan said in a press release. “We continue to conduct awareness campaigns and the MBTA continues to construct pedal and park areas to better secure bicycles. As more and more bicycles are used by our passengers, we will continue to focus on this issue.”

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tense of “To have” (archaic) 52. Refund 54. Destroy utterly 55. Emperor 56. Poet ____ Pound 57. Coarse file 60. French for “Water” Solution is on Page 4

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Campus & City

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Free flu clinics Foundation work begins for Redstone law building in Boston serve more than 7,000 By Nora Philbin Daily Free Press Staff

The City of Boston opened 24 free flu clinics this past week and vaccinated over 7,000 people in response to Mayor Thomas Menino’s declaration of a public health emergency regarding the epidemic. The Boston Public Health Commission reported more than 950 cases of the flu among Boston residents since Oct. 1, and 25 percent of those sick with the flu have felt sick enough to undergo hospitalization, according to a press release from Menino’s office. “We took swift action to raise awareness about how severe this year’s flu season is, and we’re thrilled that so many people responded by going out and getting their flu shot this weekend,” Menino said in a statement. “The free public flu clinics were a great success, and I’m proud to have such strong partners in our community health centers.” Eighteen deaths have been reported in Massachusetts as a result of the flu this season, and eight of those fatalities were in Boston, according to Nick Martin, director of communications of the BPHC. Seven were senior citizens and one was a child under the age of six, he said. Both of these age groups carry the most risk during flu season. Walgreens has provided hundreds of vouchers to the Boston Public Health Commission, which vaccinated at least 7,000 people last weekend. Each voucher is good for one person over the age of 18 and can be used by those who do not have health insurance or cannot afford the flu shot, according to the press release. Martin said young children are at risk for the flu, but cannot be vaccinated in a pharmacy. “In any case there is still a lot of opportunity for people to get free or affordable flu shots so we really encourage people to get in touch with their local community health centers,” Martin said. Martin said although there were only 70 reported cases of the flu last season, the intensity this year comes from the different strain of the flu that has been circulating which causes more serious illness. “So that is what is called a type AH3N2 strain and that’s the one that seems to be circulating here,” Martin said. Anne Roach, media relations manager for Massachusetts Department of Public Health, said there is no way to predict how the flu will continue to affect the city. “The flu can be unpredictable, and it is too soon to tell if flu rates will continue to rise or have reached their peak,” she said. Allison Smith, a receptionist who lives in Boston, didn’t get the vaccine, but said she got the flu and it was worse than she expected. “I didn’t get a vaccine,” Smith said. “I just didn’t think I would need one. I don’t get sick that often and I haven’t had the flu in forever.” Though the vaccine is the best way to protect yourself against the flu, there are other safeguards you can take, Martin said. “The best way to help is if you are feeling sick at all stay home from work or school,” Martin said. “Because the flu is something that spreads — because the better we are at containing it and the more that we can help the city in general.”

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BUMC grants two donations to community By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

starting one in West Campus,” he said. “Our biggest thing is to see if there would be enough demand, because it would be a small investment for the administration if they were to pursue this.” A West Campus location would provide a study space for students who live past the western edge of campus and far from the current location in Shelton Hall, Mahajan said. Katie Burns, a College of Communication junior who lives in Allston, said while the 24-hour study spaces are beneficial, the current locations do not meet her needs. “If there is only one in Shelton

Boston University Medical Campus officials announced Thursday it will make two donations to local community groups in the South End area, which is a greater gift than standard practice. BUMC donated $2,500 grants to both Boston City Lights, a performance community group for children, and Mandela Resident Cooperative Association, a Roxbury-based group that fosters personal growth for inner-city teens, according to a press release Thursday. “This fall I had more money so [BUMC] had two grants to give instead of just one,” said Valeda Britton, executive director of community relations for the Medical Campus. “For me it was important to target a South-End-based organization that dealt with youth, and then another in Roxbury.” Britton said BUMC aims to become more involved in community outreach. “It is one of our top priorities to stay actively involved in local organizations devoted to strengthening the physical, social and economic conditions of neighboring communities such as Dorchester, Roxbury and South Boston,” Britton said. Twice a year, Britton must choose an organization based within proximity of the Medical Campus that helps inner city children or develops the area, she said. “BU and BCL are connecting because the university is building so much in our neighborhood,” said Duggan Hill, the founder of BCL. “The grant went right into the five teachers I have instructing the kids.” Hill said BCL was instrumental in organizing the yearly Fusion dance competition at BU and hopes to continue working with the university. “He gives these kids free training in arts, dance, singing, acting, video production, set design and sound engineering,” Britton said. “He really believes that the arts are a way to engage and empower youth.” Britton said she chose MCRA because of the organization’s devotion to fostering maturity and a sense of leadership in teenagers. “If you’re an inner city kid you don’t take opportunities like these for granted, but sadly you don’t have many exposures to programs for interview training and personal presentation,” Britton said. “I look at MCRA as wonderful opportunity for children in the area.” Although the next organization to receive a grant in the spring has not been chosen, Britton said she looks forward to determining the recipient. “We hear about the needs of the community and we try to find out if BU has an existing resource to help match that need,” she said. The Charles River Campus, which donates to the AllstonBrighton area, gave its 2012 grant to the Horace Mann School for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Allston. “We give out a yearly grant every spring so we are now in our

24/7, see page4

Grants, see page4

KEIRA BLESSING /DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The new five-story Sumner M. Redstone Building is scheduled to begin construction in May 2013 and be completed by fall 2014. The building, located next to the current LAW tower, is expected to open by the fall 2015 semester. By Taylor Burke and Katherine Lynn Daily Free Press Staff

Renovations to the Boston University School of Law begun over winter break will help modernize the school and its educational quality, BU officials said. “This opportunity to renovate the entire 18-story tower and add an additional wing, which will be where a lot of the classroom and library space will be, is important to meet the needs of contemporary methods of legal education,” said BU spokesman Colin Riley. Riley said work began during intercession on Jan. 1. “There is a much greater demand for technology to be part of the learning experience,” said Ann ComerWoods, LAW director of communications and marketing, in an email.

“We will be building right-sized classrooms that are equipped with state-of-the-art technology to best serve the modern-day needs of our school’s students and faculty.” Workers installed pressure-injected footing and laid foundation for the new Sumner M. Redstone Building between the existing LAW Tower and Mugar Memorial Library during winter break, she said. “Recognizing that the installation of the foundation footing would be noisy work, this aspect of the project was purposefully scheduled during intersession when students and most faculty were away from campus,” Comer-Woods said. “Every effort is being made to keep noise disruptions to a minimum during class hours.” In September, Redstone, a media executive, announced he was donating $18 million to BU for a new law

building. “We are pleased that Sumner Redstone, [an Honorary graduate in 1994] and a former BU Law faculty member, made a very generous gift of $18 million to support the construction of the law school’s new building,” Comer-Woods said. The Cambridge-based architectural firm Bruner/Cott completed the design of the Redstone Building while Skanska Construction and BU Facilities Planning & Management oversee the construction of the building, Comer-Woods said. Bruner/ Cott also oversaw construction of the Center for Student Services, located at 100 Bay State Road. Foundation work for the tower and new addition will end in the spring of 2013 then concrete work

LAW, see page4

Shelton Hall 24/7 space to remain open for spring By Katherine Lynn Daily Free Press Staff

While Shelton Hall’s 24-hour study space will not remain open for students permanently, it will be available for the remainder of the 2012-13 academic year, said Marc Robillard, Boston University’s executive director for housing and dining. BU plans to move the study space to Myles Standish Hall in the fall 2013 semester when Shelton Hall becomes home to the Arvind and Chandan Nandlal Kilachand Honors College, Robillard said. “We have rooms like the one in Shelton Hall that we keep open all night so that we can allow any student — on-campus, off-campus, graduate, undergraduate,” Robillard said. “As long as they are a student they can go in there and use that space.” Robillard said the Shelton study space is one of two all-night study spaces on campus open to all BU students. The other is located at 575 Commonwealth Ave. Student Government worked with BU officials to create more all-night study spaces on campus and opened Shelton’s 24-hour lounge at the start of the fall 2012 semester, said SG Director of Advocacy and spokesman Saurabh Mahajan. “As a result of that [last year’s work] we were able to start one in Shelton Hall,” Mahajan, a College of Arts and Sciences freshman, said.

GRACE WILSON/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The Shelton Hall study lounge, located on the ninth floor, will now be open 24 hours.

“From what I’ve heard, people are happy. It’s useful, serving its purpose.” When it was opened, SG officials said the Shelton lounge was a temporary 24/7 space and a permanent space would be opened in Myles Standish Hall’s former dining hall for the spring 2013 semester. However, the Myles Standish Hall lounge is now planned for the fall 2013 semester. The popularity and effectiveness of the 24-hour study space has prompted SG to consider opening more spaces, possibly in West Campus, Mahajan said. “We are going to be working on


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Thursday, January 17, 2013

LAW Tower foundation to be Charles River Campus gives 2012 grant constructed by spring of 2013 Allston school for deaf, hard of hearing LAW: From Page 3

for the LAW Tower façade will begin, according to the BU Facilities Management and Planning 2012 intercession report. “When the 93,000-square-foot Redstone Building opens in fall 2014, it will house most of the law school’s classrooms, expand the Pappas Law Library, increase study space and provide new facilities to support clinical, transactional and professional training programs,” Comer-Woods said. Along with the expansion of the Pappas Law Library, the addition will have student locker facilities, lounges and a dining facility, the Facilities Planning & Management report stated.

“We’ve begun the foundation footings so we’ll be ready to erect the steel for the new addition this summer,” Riley later said in an email. An official groundbreaking ceremony for the new building will take place April 19, Comer-Woods said. Comer-Woods said the existing Law Tower will undergo a complete renovation in 2014 and 2015. These newly refurbished facilities will be supported by funds from alumni of the Law School. “The building is nearly fifty years old, the systems were nearing the end of their life, as were the heating ventilation and electrical systems,” Riley said. “Of course they’ve been upgraded and renovated multiple times over the past decades, but this opportunity to renovate is important.”

Today’s crossword solution brought to you by...

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Grants: From Page 3

award season,” said Michelle Consalvo, executive director for government and community affairs at the Charles River Campus. “We are always looking for support in the community; that is why we run student programs to help clean up the Charles and FYSOP [First Year Student Outreach Project].” The Horace Mann School runs a basketball program funded by the volunteers, which gives young

boys the opportunity to meet children in similar situations while exercising, Consalvo said. “This teaches them team spirit, how to exercise and how to interact with other children, especially if they are in similar situations,” Consalvo said. “It was a $2,500 grant, which for a small organization goes a long way.” The Medical and Charles River campuses are also investing $1.25 million over five years to renovate a section of the Blackstone Com-

munity Center, which is set to open Feb. 1, Britton said. Residents in the South End will have access to fitness training, nutrition counseling and wellness programming. “We are also opening a fitness initiative connected with [Boston] Mayor [Thomas] Menino’s office to combat childhood obesity,” Consalvo said. “We are focusing on providing youth the opportunity to explore fitness in the facility and take wellness classes.”

Housing, dining exec. dir.: no plans for new late-night dining 24/7: From Page 3

Hall, since I am living so far down in Allston, I definitely won’t be using it,” Burns said. “It would be great if there was something in West Campus. A lot of kids living off campus would take advantage of it.” Ilana Langsam, a CAS sophomore, said she was unaware BU had opened 24-hour study spaces and does not see herself visiting the spaces since she lives in South Campus. However, Langsam said an option in West Campus would be good for the student population in the area. “That’s a better option, for people who live down there [in West Cam-

pus], than walking back from the library at 2 a.m,” she said. Robillard said BU officials do not have any plans to expand late-night dining options. “We can keep that [discussion topic] open later, but we are evaluating that as we go along,” Robillard said. A number of dining halls with late-night dining options, including The Towers and Myles Standish Hall, were closed when Marciano Commons was opened at 100 Bay State Road at the start of the fall 2012 semester. Mahajan said SG is not fighting

for increased late-night dining options on campus at this time. “If we find this ends up something that the students need or students feel their voice needs to be heard on this, sure we can look into it,” he said. Burns said late-night dining halls would be helpful for students studying at late hours. “I can’t get into any of the dining halls for late night,” she said. “It would be nice if there was something in the GSU [the George Sherman Union] or off campus that students could grab a snack or something that would keep them going in the library.”

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Tyler McCulloch Clinical Student


5

Muse Editor - Meg DeMouth

Music Editor - Lucien Flores

Film/TV Editor - Michela Smith

Lifestyle Editor - Justin Soto

Food Editor - Brooke Jackson-Glidden

From indie-rock to psychedelia to funk ... Lucien Flores Music Editor Music Editor Lucien Flores highlights the shows worth waiting in line for this spring semester. The Darkness @ Paradise Rock Club Saturday, January 19 Sad you missed out on the era of larger-thanlife hair metal bands? If so, The Darkness is your fix. Christopher Owens @ Paradise Rock Club Friday, January 25 The ex-Girls front man is taking his solo act to Paradise Rock Club. Don’t expect to hear any of his former band’s popular songs — such as “Vomit” and “Lust For Life” — as Owens is touring his solo debut, Lysandre. Built around the 40-second “Lysandre Theme,” the album promises to be a personal account of his touring days with Girls and past loves. The encore covers of Cat Stevens, Simon and Garfunkel, Bob Dylan and Donovan shows where Owens takes inspiration. Titus Andronicus @ The Sinclair Sunday, January 27 Titus Andronicus is a welcomed act in a musical landscape of irreverence. Chief songwriter Patrick Stickles pens deeply personal punk songs with a workman attitude that counters the wealth of artists that are too hip to show any semblance of emotion. Last year, they played an hour-and-a-half set at BU Central that has ranked among the best concerts at the University’s premiere venue. The Lumineers @ House of Blues Monday, February 4 These folk rockers have gotten a lot of good press since their eponymous debut album

dropped earlier last year. They are riding the wave of acoustic Americana that will take them to the House of Blues in early February. Jazz Composers Alliance Orchestra Plays Hendrix @ Berklee Performance Center Tuesday, February 5 The potential of seeing “Spanish Castle Magic,” “Fire,” or “Manic Depression” arranged by an orchestra should make any Hendrix fan curious. Can violins pack the same punch? Mumford & Sons @ TD Garden. Tuesday, February 5 Mumford and Sons has exploded with their earnest brand of folk-pop. Not as good as the pop crowd would make it seem, but not as bad as the indie kids would have you believe. Either way, good luck getting a ticket. George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic @ House of Blues Friday, February 8 The father of P-Funk (and personal friend of the Muppets) wants Boston to get funked up. Here’s hoping for an earth-shattering version of the ten-minute-long “Maggot Brain.” Passion Pit @ Agganis Arena Saturday, February 9 What started as a gift for lead singer Michael Angelakos’ girlfriend has transformed into a nationwide touring act that is coming to the home of Terriers hockey. WHY? @ Brighton Music Hall Tuesday, February 12 Similar to The Darkness, this will be a show to attend purely for the eccentricity of the experience. WHY? merges indie rock, folk,

PHOTO COURTESY OF VICTORIA JACOBS

Patrick Stickles, center, is the main singer and songwriter of Titus Andronicus.

atypical vocals, and quirky lyrics (“Even though I haven’t seen you in years, yours is a funeral I would fly to from anywhere,”) to create their unique brand of hip-hop. Listen to “The Vowels Pt. 2” to understand.

Yo La Tengo @ Paradise Rock Club Wednesday, February 13 Watching them open for The National, Yo La Tengo instantly became one of the best opening acts I have ever seen. Even though they have a sizeable music catalogue that I am largely unfamiliar with, I will still get

a ticket to see their brand of distorted, offkilter pleasure. Alt-J (∆) @ Paradise Rock Club Saturday, March 2 Named for the button combination to create the “∆” on a Mac keyboard, the fresh-faced English band will attract an arts-school crowd with an experimental blend of Joe Newman’s unusual vocals and peculiar song arrangements with hints of The xx.

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Film prospective: what to watch this semester

P

Michela Smith

er usual, Hollywood exploded with film excellence this holiday season. Debates abound on the superiority of Argo over Django Unchained and the relevance of Lincoln over Zero Dark Thirty — mincing that ultimately declares the brilliance of each. As such, it’s difficult to imagine that the upcoming film season could be an equally fruitful cornucopia, especially as the majority of film classics release at the end of the year. Still, the following films of early 2013 do hold promise.

Film/TV Editor 1970s to test the strength of friendship through Witch of the West under humdrum director Sam the ages. Al Pacino and Christopher Walken Raimi, this return to the world of Frank Baum’s star as life-long friends Val and Doc, who are Oz is still irresistible. Set before Dorothy falls reunited after Val’s release from a twenty-eight onto the Wicked Witch of the East, Oz: The year prison sentence. However, once the two Great & Powerful capitalizes on the success of have caught up on years of gossip, Doc must the bestseller Wicked to imagine how the Wizreturn to his current assignment: killing Val. If ard first came to rule over Oz. If not spoiled by Pacino brings half of the charisma he flourished its mammoth Disney budget, Oz has the potenin The Godfather and Glengarry Glen Ross, he tial to captivate audiences with the Technicolor and Walken will waltz beautifully through this landscapes and characters that have enchanted crime comedy. young and old for generations.

Stand Up Guys Friday, February 1: The first promising film of 2013 joins two of the coolest stars of the

Oz: The Great & Powerful Friday, March 8: Despite its questionable casting of the capricious Mila Kunis as the Wicked

Photo Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Tobey Maguire, Leonardo DiCaprio and Carrie Mulligan in a scene from The Great Gatsby.

Admission Friday, March 8: At long last, Admission pairs Tina Fey and Paul Rudd in the romantic web audiences have long awaited. Of all Hollywood comedians, Fey and Rudd can both uniquely blend insensitive hilarity with eloquent humanity in their performances. Armed with this duplicity, Fey and Rudd come to Admission to explore the complications of college admissions and the difficulties faced when objectivity becomes subjective. The Place Beyond the Pines Friday, March 29: With a title derived from an ancient Mohawk name, Blue Valentine director Derek Clanfrance promises much more than an imitative crime drama with The Place Beyond the Pines. The film follows stunt motorcyclist Luke (Ryan Gosling) as he uses his automotive agility to rob banks in a career change prompted by the birth of Luke’s infant son via his estranged ex, Romina (Eva Mendes). As

this film led to the coupling of Gosling and Mendes in real life, their on-screen interaction guarantees electricity. Critics lucky enough to screen the film at the Toronto Film Festival in September are already raving about Gosling’s performance. About Time Friday, May 10: While little is known about this upcoming film, the chemistry of its cast and crew promise devastating charm. Helmed by director Richard Curtis, (responsible for Blackadder, the Bridget Jones series, and Love Actually), About Time combines Rachel McAdams, Bill Nighy, and Tom Hollander in, astonishingly, a time-travel film. The Great Gatsby Friday, May 10: Aggravated by the forced delay of its release until this May, The Great Gatsby is one of the most anticipated releases of 2013, sparking a mob of speculative praise and criticism. Based on F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic novel, clips from this adaptation drip with the extravagance for which Gatsby and director Baz Luhrmann are both known. Yet, years after the Art Deco that first defined Gatsby tarnished, the truth of Fitzgerald’s characters and themes have endured and guaranteed its relevance. In the midst of the spectacle that has emerged in this adaptation, let’s pray that the story remains most essential.

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6T

hursday, january

17, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 2

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Page Editor

Kaylee Hill Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

On Gun Control

There appears to be progress on the gun control front. Amidst increasing amounts of mass shootings across the nation, Congress is tiptoeing around the Second Amendment, which guarantees American individuals the right to bear arms. Wednesday, U.S. President Barack Obama finally issued a bill of 23 executive orders that aim to keep guns out of the hands of criminals. “Reducing violent crime,” he said, “is a top priority of my administration.” His plan of action? Obama first called for Congress to require a universal background check for anyone trying to buy a gun. Secondly, he asked that Congress restore a ban on militarystyle assault weapons, as well as a 10-round bullet limit for magazines. (Such weapons, of course, are typically what allow for large-scale massacres, whereas the additional seconds that would be needed for bullet replenishment are vital.) These measures, of course, will not be easy to implement. In most instances, background checks are already required of individuals wishing to purchase firearms, and despite this, oversight errors and mass shootings, thusly, persist. Forty percent of all gun purchases are conducted without a background check. Moreover, acquiring a gun illegally may not

be as hard as we like to imagine. When people want something, they will get it. Consider marijuana. And consider how prior to last December, Sandy Hook shooter Adam Lanza was not a felon. He was autistic and unhappy, and used his mother’s guns to kill her and twenty-six innocent others. Bad people will still get the gun. True, background checks, waiting periods and bans on large weapons will aid the problem. But why are these measures being taken so late? Obama’s bill is hardly revolutionary. Gun control has been an issue for years — it took the death of 20 kindergartners for the federal government to take steps of action. The bill does address another looming Sandy Hook question: what do we do with our nation’s sick? Obama aims to make sure that students and young adults get treatment for mental health issues. It should be noted that our current mental health system may be failing in this respect — often times, a county jail is purportedly a disturbed individual’s only mental asylum, and jail time can only be achieved by committing a crime. This aspect of the bill is crucial — were Lanza provided with appropriate care, he may not have acted as he did.

Letter: On Piety

As the cinematic adaptation of Les Miserables gains popularity, more and more Americans are becoming familiar with Victor Hugo’s immortal tale of Jean Valjean, the ex-convict doer of moral good in face of all personal danger. As Americans watch this story unfold on the screen before them I wonder if, separated by nearly two centuries and the Atlantic Ocean, they can appreciate just how similar their own conflicts are to Valjean’s miserable conflict. Valjean and Javert — the police who pursues him — represent two dramatically different ideas of piety: Javert, upright and proper, lives strictly by the letter of the law, disdaining those who live in darkness (like Valjean) and seeing that darkness as sin not to be touched. Alternately Valjean, a man thrust into that darkness by his act of generous desperation, is redeemed by the love of God and the kindness of a man. Though Valjean himself is raised out of that darkness, he never sneers at those in the gutter. Though societal restrictions on his personal piety initially cause him to turn his back as the destitute Fantine is thrown into darkness, it is his genuine piety and love that incite him to rescue her child, Cosette, and live his life devoted to doing what is best for her. Such opposite poles of faith — that is, Javert’s disdain for the lowly, versus Valjean’s

embrace of Fantine’s poverty and destitution — are equally as present here and now as in 19th-century France. Faith and Family in America have come to emulate that same distaste for the poor and desolate, and the loss of all meaning of true charity. Those who achieve comfort here tend to remain within that comfort zone, instead of doing as Valjean does and helping those still trying to find their way. Do we not see that same attitude of Javert walking among us, upright and strict, faith without compassion? Do we not see him in our own reflection? As a country and as a people, it is time we look down without sneering, without judgment, greed or persecution, and help up all of humanity as our family. We can no longer mask selfishness and lust for power behind a façade of piety to the cause of wealth. Let us help our fellow man, recognizing his personal needs instead of blaming his failures on “personal irresponsibility.” Remember the truth that once was spoken: To love another person is to see the face of God. The only true piety is love. Morgan Chalue College of Fine Arts, 2016 mchalue@bu.edu

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This week, Lance Armstrong re-admitted to doping. We here at the ol’ Free Press are wondering what scandalous things the schools of BU would admit to... • COM students would admit that no one cares what they Tweet. • SMG students would admit that they have LIED about their net worth! Also, they invested in Enron. • CGS students would admit their SAT scores. • CFA students would admit that they do, in fact, buy their clothes from Urban Outfitters. • CAS students would admit that they like using the lockers. • BU Athletics would admit that there are other sports besides hockey. • SHA would admit that the only reason they attend college is for the wine tasting classes. • Dean Elmore would admit that he actually only owns one bowtie. • The FreeP would admit to already hating their jobs.


Thursday, January 17, 2013

7

Lefort’s line key to offensive Huskies’ comeback attempt futile in BU win production in win over NU Women’s hockey: From Page 8

Lefort: From Page 8

they share the puck, and I complimented them for that because they do a fantastic job of moving it around.” Furthermore, Durocher pointed out that each member of the line has served her own purpose during the game. “Marie-Philip is the kind of person who starts it, and Jenelle has great vision for the game and moves the puck,” Durocher said. “Sarah, tonight, picked up a backhand rebound on the first one and made a beautiful shot on the last one.” “When they’re sharing the puck … people are going to get opportunities and she took advantage of them tonight,” Durocher added. The line’s statistics prove Durocher’s point, as Lefort, Kohanchuk and Poulin lead the team in goals with 13, 12 and 11, respectively, and are in the top four for points scored. During Wednesday’s game against the Huskies, Kohanchuk and Poulin took part in Lefort’s careergame. With her team on the power play, Lefort gave the Terriers an early 1–0 lead at 5:59 in the first after Kohanchuk picked up the rebound from a shot taken by Poulin. Kohanchuk then shuffled the puck over to Lefort, who notched it by Northeastern’s Chloe Desjardins on the netminder’s

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glove side. During the third period, Kohanchuk assisted Lefort once again when Kohanchuk forced a turnover that allowed Lefort to score, giving the Terriers their fifth and final goal. With Northeastern having pulled the game to within one goal in the waning minutes of the contest, Lefort’s goal also became her teamleading fifth game-winning tally. “I think we felt like she was a kid who was a big power winger, who could shoot the puck extremely well,” Durocher said of his expectations for Lefort. “With some of the veteran players we had coming back, there was also an opportunity that she, or a couple of her teammates, were going to be on pretty significant lines.” “Nobody does it by themselves, and when you’re playing with top players, that’s really positive for her. She’s taken advantage of the opportunity,” Durocher added. Like Durocher, Lefort associated her early success with the opportunities she has received thus far. “I just came in [to BU] expecting to work hard, and obviously not expecting much as a freshman,” Lefort said. “But Coach gives people opportunities and you just have to grab them.”

lines that can play college hockey at a really significant level,” Durocher said. “So it’s a hard matchup. It’s a nice problem for us to have as coaches, but a tricky one sometimes for opponents.” Sixteen minutes into the first period, NU scored the last goal of the opening frame. Sophomore Lucie Povova cut BU’s lead in half with a powerplay goal. BU entered the second period with 1:41 remaining on a power play from the previous period. Not even a minute in, Lefort scored her second power-play goal of the night, and her career, to increase BU’s lead to 3–1. Nine minutes later, senior forward Isabel Menard scored on assists from junior forward Louise Warren and freshman forward Dakota Woodworth. It was her ninth goal of the season. BU remained unchallenged until the last second of the period, when junior Brittany Esposito whipped the puck in with less than a second left on the clock, cutting BU’s lead in half yet again. At the end of two periods, BU led Northeastern, 4–2. Despite BU’s lead throughout the game, Durocher said the team lacked the control they had when they met Northeastern on the ice

in October. “The last game we played, we seemed to be in control. I think we were a little sharper moving the puck,” Durocher said. “I think we have a little bit more of an experienced team, but their kids are getting used to college hockey now.” Halfway through the third period, Lefort scored her third goal of the game to push the BU lead to 5–2, giving her the first hat trick of her career and BU its final goal of the night. Northeastern made a strong effort to overcome the deficit at the end of the game. NU cut BU’s lead down to two after a power-play goal by sophomore Kendall Coyne 17:53 into the third, after which Durocher immediately called a timeout. “I was maybe hoping it was a 58-minute game,” Durocher said. “But truth be told, we didn’t quite close out either period — the second or the third. We gave them a big goal, and it gave them a little bit of light in the second. “We answered that by getting the fifth goal and having ourselves in a nice position, but we ended up giving up another goal, and it was 5–3,” Durocher added. Ten seconds after Coyne’s goal, NU freshman Paige Savage slipped a goal right past

goalkeeper Kerrin Sperry, which represented NU’s last goal of the night. “Then obviously a crazy goal that made it 5–4,” Durocher said. “It was a great chance for them to pull a goalie and tie the game … We’ve got to make sure we close the deal here, and play a real good game like that, and to let three in four minutes really put us behind the eight ball.” Regardless of the shaky third period, Durocher said the team has been playing well, and he’s proud of their 11-game unbeaten streak. “I think we’ve been playing pretty darn well here,” Durocher said. “We’ve got multiple people putting pucks in the net. The defense is back to keeping the play a lot simpler. But we’re still playing some tight hockey games.” Durocher also said the game separated the team from the rest of the league. “It puts us right on BC’s tail,” Durocher said. “I think we can make this thing a two-team race right now, and look at the biggest picture, which is the NCAA tournament. We want to try to earn our way in there, and this is another step in the right direction.” BU heads to Burlington, Vt., next weekend to play the University of Vermont on Jan. 25.

Alford’s impressive 2nd half leads to BU defeat of Maine Women’s basketball: From Page 8

Alford picked it up in the second, finishing the game with 21 points, 15 of them coming from 3-point range. Turner continued her strong play, ending the game with 13 points and grabbing seven rebounds. Maine’s second-half effort was better than the first, at least on the offensive side of the ball. Wood ended up scoring 14 points for the Bearcats, only one of two players on the team to score double-digit points. Although Maine improved to a 37.1 percent from the field, the Terriers were too much to handle. With the game well in hand, Greenberg put in a group of players that have not seen much action yet this season.

Freshman guard Clodagh Scannell scored nine off the bench while her fellow freshman guard Dana Theobald saw some action and scored her first point as a Terrier. BU cruised to an 85–54 win, but the game did not come without a little drama, as sophomore forward Mollie McKendrick came off the court icing her arm after diving for a ball at midcourt. “I like the hustle, but you have to be smart,” Greenberg said. “I told her to not put herself in danger because we only have three forwards.” The Terriers will look to tie last year’s longest streak by winning their 13th straight game as they travel to Durham, N.H., to take on the University of New Hampshire Saturday.

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Chantell Alford scored 21 points in BU’s 12th straight victory.

Combination of youth and experience heeds anticipation of upcoming campaign Track and field: From Page 8

cord with a time of 3:59.24 at the America East Championships, and broke his own school record with a time of 3:57.83. On the women’s side, graduate student Katie Matthews will also play a key role in the Terriers’ success. Last season, she set a new school record in the 5000 meters with a time of 15:52.8 and was an AllAmerican in 2011. Other top returning distance runners include seniors Matt Paulson, Elliot Lehane, Robert Gibson and juniors Monica Adler

and Rosa Moriello. Johnson said the continued success of the distance runners is largely due to the efforts of their coach. “Bruce Lehane coaches our distance kids, and he’s done a fabulous job per usual,” Johnson said. “Over the years, he’s gotten our kids prepared, getting ready to really step it up to that next level, and the kids have responded.” Johnson said she also anticipates a strong effort from the athletes competing in shorter distances. The sprinters will be led by

senior RJ Page, whom Johnson described as a “a very intense person [and] a very hard worker.” Last season, Page placed first at the America East Championships in the 60-meter dash with a time of 6.84 and also set school and conference records in the 200 meters (21.29). Senior Shelby Walton will likely continue her success, as well. Last year, Walton had an excellent showing at the America East championship, winning the 200-meter dash (23.99) and placing second in the 60-meter dash (7.61).

Johnson noted freshman Sophie Jacsurak, senior Julia Mirochnick and graduate student Zachary Ray as potential threats in the sprints and hurdles. According to Johnson, senior Tewado Latty, a 400 runner, could have a breakout season, as well. “He’s ready to show us what he’s got,” Johnson said of Latty. “We’re ready to see that. He’ll run very well.” The Terriers will host their first competition of the season, the Multi-Team Meet, on Jan. 17 at the Track and Tennis Center. Johnson said she is excited to see

how her team stacks up against the competition after months of training. “It’s hard [to prepare] in track and field because you wait for a long time. We start training in October,” Johnson said. “It’ll be nice to get them out there on the track, and see what they’re doing … I think we’ll be happy with what we see. “We have a lot of good people … they’ve been putting in a lot of work this first semester. We’re anxious and excited to see how they’ve progressed this year.”

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Quotable

She’s the one who goes a little unnoticed. -BU coach Kelly Greenberg on Whitney Turner’s defensive efforts.

Page 8

Sports

Lefortitude

The Daily Free Press

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

BU freshman forward Sarah Lefort scored three goals against Northeastern to get the first hat trick of her collegiate career. P.8.

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Terriers extend unbeaten streak to 11 with victory over NU Lefort’s performance leads to first hat trick

Terriers’ power play strong in 5–4 victory

By Meredith Perri Daily Free Press Staff

By Kira Cole Daily Free Press Staff

On multiple occasions during her first year as a member of the No. 5 Boston University women’s hockey team, freshman forward Sarah Lefort has played an integral part for her team. Lefort has scored multiple game-winning goals, is a leading point scorer and has made herself known on a line laced with some of BU’s (15– 3–3, 10–2–1 Hockey East) best and most prominent players. During Wednesday night’s game against No. 10 Northeastern University, however, Lefort had one of her best performances as she tallied her first collegiate hat trick during BU’s 5–4 win over the Huskies (11–9–2, 5–6–1 Hockey East) at Walter Brown Arena. “It was pretty much a team effort,” Lefort said of her achievement. “The two first [goals] were power-play goals, and I think we just moved the puck well, and I happened to tip it in off of some shots, so it was pretty good. And the last one was just a good shot.” By the end of the game, Lefort had not only tallied a goal in each period, but she had also become the leading goal scorer for the Terriers with 13 and notched her first collegiate powerplay goals. According to Durocher, much of Lefort’s success has come from the Ormstown, Quebec native working on the same line as junior cocaptain Marie-Philip Poulin and senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk. “I complimented [her line] after the game,” Durocher said. “I talked about how unselfishly

Lefort, see page 7

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The No. 5 Boston University women’s hockey team met No. 10 Northeastern University on the ice Wednesday night, beating the Huskies (11–9–2, 5–6–4 Hockey East) 5–4 to extend BU’s unbeaten streak to 11 games. The Terriers (15–3–3, 10–2–1 Hockey East) last met the Huskies on the ice Oct. 16, where the Terriers came away victorious, 4–1. Four different players registered goals for BU. On Wednesday, BU was led by freshman Sarah Lefort, who scored her first career hat trick and her first two power-play goals of the season. Six minutes into the first period during a power play, Lefort picked up a rebound and sent the puck to the back of the net to put the Terriers up, 1–0. Senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk and junior co-captain MariePhilip Poulin assisted on the play. Five minutes later, while on yet another power play — NU junior Sonia St. Martin was sent to the box for holding — junior Louise Warren scored her one goal for the night, giving the Terriers a 2–0 lead. BU coach Brian Durocher attributed BU’s scoring to its strong offensive lines, which have more experience than some of the NU players. “People can key on the line, but with us I think it’s hard because you have two ‘A’ lines, and certainly you have two other

Sarah Lefort got her first career hat trick including 2 power-play goals in BU’s 11th consecutive game without a loss.

Women’s hockey, see page 7

Women’s basketball extends winning Terriers look to improve upon successful streak to 12 with victory over Maine 2011-12 campaign in upcoming season By Andrew Battifarano Daily Free Press Staff

Riding an 11-game winning streak, the red-hot Boston University women’s basketball team continued its victorious ways Wednesday night, dismantling the University of Maine by a score of 85–54. Despite senior guard Chantell Alford’s poor half, during which she only shot 2-of8 from the field, the rest of the Terriers (15–3, 5–0 America East) picked up the slack. Fellow senior guard Mo Moran led the Terriers in the first half with 11 points. Junior guard Danielle Callahan provided a spark off the bench, as she has done many times this season, contributing seven points in her 10 minutes of play for the Terriers in the opening frame. Although the Bearcats (1–16, 0–4 America East) attempted to play BU with a zone defense, the Terriers were able to pick it apart and score 37 points in the first half. “I was happy they played zone,” said BU coach Kelly Greenberg. “We were able to penetrate the gaps and set it up outside. We made a lot happen in the first half, which made the second half much easier.” While the Terrier offense clicked in the first half, the team also put together a strong frame defensively. BU’s potent defensive unit was able to contain Maine, which only shot 25 percent from the field and hit nothing from 3-point land.

The poor shooting performance translated into a measly 18 points for the Bearcats. Maine’s top scorers in the first half were guard Liz Wood and forward Danielle Walczak, who each netted four points. The BU defense applied plenty of pressure on the Bearcat shooters, which forced a lot of poor shot selections. Although BU recorded only one block for the first half, its constant pressure allowed it to control the game. The defensive effort was in large part led by junior forward Whitney Turner. In addition to four defensive rebounds and a steal in the first half, Turner also had fierce control of the paint. Greenberg said she was impressed by the effort by Turner. “She’s the one who goes a little unnoticed,” Greenberg said. “[She] comes in with a lot of energy. She did a little bit of everything tonight. She brings a lot to the table for us.” Taking a 37–18 lead into the second half, the Terriers went right in for the jugular. The offense went on a quick 7–0 run, with all seven points coming from junior forward Rashidat Agboola. This Terrier run was a preview of what was to come for the rest of the half. BU shot a lights-out 58.1 percent from the field in the game’s final frame. Despite her struggles in the first half,

Women’s basketball, see page 7

By Sarah Kirkpatrick Daily Free Press Staff

The 2012 indoor season for the Boston University track and field team featured multiple new school records, several America East individual titles and two All-Americans. With several key athletes returning and a few fresh faces, the 2013 team looks to continue this dominant performance. BU is ineligible to compete in the America East Championship Tournament this season, which Robyne Johnson, BU’s director of track and field, said was disappointing, as BU has had recent success in the tournament, including a team victory for the women in 2012. “Usually that’s one of our big goals, to win the conference,” Johnson said. For the time being, however, Johnson said it was important to focus on other competitions. “We are really just focused on getting our kids better, and trying to qualify for some of the major championships.” There are several Terriers who could qualify to compete at the national level, including senior jumper Allison Barwise, who will look to carry her success from 2012 into this season. Last season, Barwise was named a U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association First Team All-American after placing fifth in the NCAA Championships. This year, Johnson says she has high

expectations for Barwise, who also qualified for the 2012 U.S. Olympic Trials in the high jump, where she placed 11th. “[We want her to] just continue on that general path she’s been on of competing at a very high level,” Johnson said. As for the rest of the field events, Johnson said the team has a lot to anticipate. “Everybody’s looking pretty good,” Johnson said. “We’ve always been a pretty strong field event team. We’ve recruited towards that end as well.” One of the top recruits this year is freshman thrower Reuben Horace, who was one of the top hammer throwers in the nation. In high school, Horace threw over 212 feet. “I look forward to seeing all of my freshmen compete,” Johnson said. “We have a great class that has come in this year, and we look forward to seeing everyone reap the fruits of working all first semester.” Distance has historically been a strong event for the Terriers, and this year is expected to be no different. Several top runners from last season will be lacing up their spikes again in 2013. Junior Rich Peters had considerablesuccess last season as one of the nation’s top milers. He was named a USTFCCCA First Team All-American as the national runnerup in the mile (4:01.78). He also broke his own conference re-

Track and field, see page 7

The Bottom Line Thursday, Jan. 17 Track and Field Multi-Team Meet, 5 p.m.

Friday, Jan. 18 M. Hockey vs. Northeastern, 7 p.m. Track @ Harvard Multi-Meet, 10 a.m.

Saturday, Jan. 19

M. Hockey vs. UMass Lowell, 7 p.m. W. Basketball @ UNH, 2 p.m. M. Basketball @ UNH, 4 p.m. Track @ Harvard Multi-Meet, 10 a.m.

Sunday, Jan. 20

No Events Scheduled University of Oregon football head coach Chip Kelly recently became the head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles...

Monday, Jan. 21

No Events Scheduled ...He just couldn’t resist the opportunity to face Monte Kiffin’s defense twice in one season.


1-17DFP